Change search
Refine search result
1 - 31 of 31
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Abbass, Allan
    et al.
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Town, Joel
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Ogrodniczuk, John
    University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Joffres, Michel
    Simon Fraser University, Canada.
    Lilliengren, Peter
    Stockholms universitet.
    Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy Trial Therapy: Effectiveness and Role of Unlocking the Unconscious2017In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 205, no 6, p. 453-457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the effects of trial therapy interviews using intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy with 500 mixed sample, tertiary center patients. Furthermore, we investigated whether the effect of trial therapy was larger for patients who had a major unlocking of the unconscious during the interview compared with those who did not. Outcome measures were the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) and the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP), measured at baseline and at 1-month follow-up. Significant outcome effects were observed for both the BSI and the IIP with small to moderate preeffect/posteffect sizes, Cohen's d = 0.52 and 0.23, respectively. Treatment effects were greater in patientswho had a major unlocking of the unconscious comparedwith thosewho did not. The trial therapy interview appears to be beneficial, and its effects may relate to certain therapeutic processes. Further controlled research is warranted.

  • 2. Abbass, Allan
    et al.
    Town, Joel
    Ogrodniczuk, John
    Joffres, Michel
    Lilliengren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy Trial Therapy Effectiveness and Role of Unlocking the Unconscious2017In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 205, no 6, p. 453-457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the effects of trial therapy interviews using intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy with 500 mixed sample, tertiary center patients. Furthermore, we investigated whether the effect of trial therapy was larger for patients who had a major unlocking of the unconscious during the interview compared with those who did not. Outcome measures were the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) and the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP), measured at baseline and at 1-month follow-up. Significant outcome effects were observed for both the BSI and the IIP with small to moderate preeffect/posteffect sizes, Cohen's d = 0.52 and 0.23, respectively. Treatment effects were greater in patientswho had a major unlocking of the unconscious comparedwith thosewho did not. The trial therapy interview appears to be beneficial, and its effects may relate to certain therapeutic processes. Further controlled research is warranted.

  • 3.
    Armelius, Bengt-Åke
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Kullgren, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Borderline diagnosis from hospital records:  reliability and validity of Gunderson's diagnostic interview for Borderlines (DIB)1985In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 173, no 1, p. 32-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two trained and experienced clinical psychologists and two nontrained students rated the sections in Gunderson's Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines (DIB) on the basis of hospital records for 16 patients (DIB-R). The results showed that both reliability and validity, i.e., correlations with an actual interview, were unexpectedly high, around .80 for the trained judges and around .55 for the nontrained judges. The conclusion is that the DIB may be used for retrospective diagnosis of borderline patients from hospital records.

  • 4.
    Arnetz, Judith
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Rofa, Yoasif
    Arnetz, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Ventimiglia, Matthew
    Jamil, Hikmet
    Resilience as a Protective Factor Against the Development of Psychopathology Among Refugees2013In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 201, no 3, p. 167-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Refugee research, to date, has predominantly focused on factors that make refugees more vulnerable for developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and/or psychological distress. Few articles have studied potential protective factors such as resilience. A targeted nonrandom sample of Iraqi refugees (n = 75) and a control group of non-Iraqi Arab immigrants (n = 53) were recruited from a number of Iraqi/Arab community institutions in Michigan to complete a questionnaire that included measures for psychological distress, PTSD symptoms, exposure to trauma, and resilience. The refugees reported significantly more PTSD symptoms (t-test, p < 0.01) and psychological distress (p < 0.05) compared with the immigrants. There was no difference in resilience between the two groups. In linear regression, premigration exposure to violence was a significant predictor of psychological distress (p < 0.01) and PTSD symptoms (p < 0.01). After controlling for migrant status and violence exposure, resilience was a significant inverse predictor of psychological distress (p < 0.001) but not of PTSD. Resilience is associated with less trauma-related psychological distress and should be considered in assessing risk and protective factors among victims of war-related violence.

  • 5.
    Bergh Johannesson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Lundin, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Fröjd, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Hultman, Christina M
    Michel, Per-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Tsunami-exposed tourist survivors: Signs of recovery in an 3-year perspective2011In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 199, no 3, p. 162-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Long-term follow-up after disaster exposure indicates increased rates of psychological distress. However, trajectories and rates of recovery in large samples of disaster-exposed survivors are largely lacking. A group of 3457 Swedish survivors temporarily on vacation in Southeast Asia during the 2004 tsunami were assessed by postal questionnaire at 14 months and 3 years after the tsunami regarding post-traumatic stress reactions (IES-R) and general mental health (GHQ-12). There was a general pattern of resilience and recovery 3 years postdisaster. Severe exposure and traumatic bereavement were associated with increased post-traumatic stress reactions and heightened risk for impaired mental health. The rate of recovery was lower among respondents exposed to life threat and among bereaved. Severe trauma exposure and bereavement seem to have considerable long-term impact on psychological distress and appear to slow down the recovery process. Readiness among health agencies for identification of symptoms and provision of interventions might facilitate optimal recovery.

  • 6.
    Bergh Johannesson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Ulleråker, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Michel, Per-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Ulleråker, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Hultman, Christina M
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet.
    Lindam, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Arnberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Ulleråker, University Hospital.
    Lundin, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Ulleråker, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Impact of Exposure to Trauma on Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptomatology in Swedish Tourist Tsunami Survivors2009In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 197, no 5, p. 316-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to examine long-term mental health and posttraumatic stress symptomatology in a Swedish tourist population after exposure to the 2004 Southeast Asian tsunami. Data from 4822 returned questionnaires 14 months after the disaster were analyzed. Respondents were categorized into 3 subgroups: (1) danger-to-life exposure group (having been caught or chased by the waves), (2) nondanger-to-life exposure group (exposed to other disaster-related stressors), and (3) low exposure group. Main outcome measures were General Health Questionnaire-12 and Impact of Event Scale-22-Revised. Danger-to-life exposure was an important factor in causing more severe posttraumatic stress symptoms and in affecting mental health. Female gender, single status, and former trauma experiences were associated with greater distress. Other factors related to more severe symptoms were loss of relatives, physical injuries, viewing many dead bodies, experiencing life threat, and showing signs of cognitive confusion. Disaster exposure has a substantial impact on survivors, which stresses the need for long-lasting support.

  • 7.
    Bjärtå, Anna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Leiler, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ekdahl, Johanna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Wasteson, Elisabet
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Assessing Severity of Psychological Distress Among Refugees With the Refugee Health Screener, 13-Item Version2018In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 206, no 11, p. 834-839Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent inflow of refugees to Sweden has put pressure on health care as well as revealing a need for methods regarding assessment of refugees' mental health status. The present study investigated the use of the Refugee Health Screener (RHS; Hollifield et al., 2013) to distinguish among severity levels of symptoms of psychological distress in refugees. Refugees residing in asylum accommodations (n = 510) were screened with RHS-13, together with screeners for depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Risk for mild, moderate, or severe levels of depression, anxiety, or/and PTSD was used as screening proxy. Receiver operating characteristic analysis rendered cutoff scores of 11, 18, and 25, for mild, moderate, and severe symptoms, respectively. Evaluated against each symptom scale separately, cutoffs performed well. Cutoff 11, previously identified by Hollifield et al. (2016), was also confirmed. However, utilization of additional cutoffs could improve refugee mental health by guiding clinical decision making.

  • 8.
    Buchanan, A.
    et al.
    Department of Psychiatry, Division of Law and Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, 34 Park St, New Haven, CT 06519, United States .
    Nich, C.
    Department of Psychiatry, Division of Law and Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, 34 Park St, New Haven, CT 06519, United States .
    Douglas, Kevin S.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences. Department of Psychology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada.
    Babuscio, T.
    Department of Psychiatry, Division of Law and Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, 34 Park St, New Haven, CT 06519, United States .
    Easton, C. J.
    Department of Psychiatry, Division of Law and Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, 34 Park St, New Haven, CT 06519, United States .
    Risk factors of violence during a 4-week period in a psychiatric outpatient population2013In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 201, no 12, p. 1021-1026Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The clinical impact of structured risk assessment instruments has been limited by a lack of information regarding a) their short-term accuracy and b) the relationship between change as measured by the instrument and a change in the risk for harm. Data were collected every 4 weeks on a) variables designed to resemble the items of a structured risk assessment instrument, b) substance use, c) social circumstances and mental state, and d) violent behavior. Scores on the variables designed to resemble the items of a risk assessment instrument were associated with violence during the ensuing 4 weeks. However, an increase in a subject's score on these variables was not associated with violence. Instead, increasing cocaine use and increasing social conflict as described by the subject at interview were associated with violence during those weeks. Copyright © 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  • 9.
    Colins, Olivier F
    et al.
    Curium/Leiden University Medical Center, Oegstgeest/Leiden, Netherlands .
    Vermeiren, Robert R J
    Curium/Leiden University Medical Center, Oegstgeest/Leiden, Netherlands .
    The usefulness of DSM-IV and DSM-5 conduct disorder subtyping in detained adolescents2013In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 201, no 9, p. 736-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to test whether the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), and DSM-5 conduct disorder (CD) subtyping approaches identify adolescents with concurrent psychiatric morbidity and an increased risk to reoffend. A diagnostic interview was used to assess childhood-onset CD (CoCD), adolescent-onset CD (AoCD), and concurrent psychiatric morbidity in 223 detained male adolescents. The callous-unemotional (CU) specifier was established through a self-report questionnaire. Two to four years later, information on official criminal recidivism was collected. The CoCD and AoCD youths were different in concurrent psychiatric morbidity but not in their risk to reoffend. The youths with CD and CU (CD+CU) and the CD-only youths did not differ with regard to concurrent psychiatric morbidity. In addition, the CD+CU youths were at risk to reoffend but merely when compared with their counterparts without CD/CU. Although CD subtyping approaches may identify youths with concurrent psychiatric morbidity, the usefulness to predict recidivism in already delinquent youths is limited.

  • 10.
    Colins, Olivier F
    et al.
    Curium-LUMC/Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands .
    Vermeiren, Robert R
    Curium-LUMC/Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands; VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Noom, Marc
    Curium-LUMC/Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands .
    Broekaert, Eric
    Department of Special Education, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Psychotic-like symptoms as a risk factor of violent recidivism in detained male adolescents2013In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 201, no 6, p. 478-483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to prospectively examine whether psychotic-like symptoms (PLSs) are positively associated with violent recidivism and whether this relation is stronger when PLSs co-occur with substance use disorders (SUDs). Participants were 224 detained male adolescents from all youth detention centers in Flanders. The Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children was used to assess PLSs and the number of SUDs. Two to 4 years later, information on official recidivism was obtained. Although hallucinations were unrelated to violent recidivism, paranoid delusions (PDs) and threat/control override delusions (TCODs) were negatively related to violent recidivism. The relation between PLSs and violent recidivism did not become stronger in the presence of SUDs. Detained youths with PLSs do not have a higher risk for violent recidivism than detained youths without PLSs. In contrast, by identifying detained youths with PDs or TCODs, clinicians are likely to identify youths with a low risk for future violent crimes.

  • 11.
    Fekadu, Abebaw
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    O'Donovan, Michael C
    Department of Psychological Medicine, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Alem, Atalay
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Kebede, Derege
    Department of Community Health, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Church, Steve
    Maudsley Hospital, South London and Maudsley NHS Trust, London, UK.
    Johns, Louise
    Section of Epidemiology, Health Services Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, UK.
    Medhin, Girmay
    Department of Pathobiology, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Prince, Martin
    Section of Epidemiology, Health Services Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, UK.
    Shibre, Teshome
    Department of Psychiatry, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Validity of the concept of minor depression in a developing country setting2008In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 196, no 1, p. 22-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence for validity of the diagnostic construct of minor depressive disorder comes primarily from reports on subthreshold depressive states rather than minor depressive disorder per se. We report on the prevalence, impact, and sociodemographic correlates of minor depressive disorder in a developing country setting as further validation of this diagnostic construct. Diagnostic assessment of 1714 adults of an island population in Ethiopia was carried out using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. The lifetime prevalence of minor depressive disorder was 20.5% (95% confidence interval 18.6, 22.5%). One-third of cases had sought help and expressed suicidal ideation. Being divorced/widowed, middle-aged, and having somatic pain were independently associated with having minor depressive disorder. Only being divorced/widowed was a shared risk factor for both minor depressive disorder and bereavement. Minor depressive disorder seems to be a useful and valid diagnostic construct with particular clinical significance in this and, possibly, similar developing country settings.

  • 12.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Scott, Berit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Coping in dieting and eating disorders: A population-based study2000In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 188, no 5, p. 273-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of different coping strategies, measured by the Ways of Coping Questionnaire was investigated among 1157 women (18 to 30 years), randomly selected from the general population of Sweden as part of a longitudinal study. Subjects were clustered into five groups: subjects with past or current eating disorders (ED), and subjects with no ED but with past, current, or no history of dieting. Subjects with past or current ED reported significantly higher levels of escape avoidance and lower levels of seeking social support and purposeful problem solving compared with subjects with neither ED nor dieting. These group comparisons were then reanalyzed with sum of depressive symptoms as a covariate in covariate analyses. The only significant difference between the groups concerned the use of escape avoidance. The significant differences in the use of escape-avoidance strategies may motivate more extensive training in coping in the context of prevention and treatment of ED and maladaptive dieting.

  • 13.
    Hermansson, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, FHVC - Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum, Socialmed FHVC.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, FHVC - Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum, Socialmed FHVC.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    The Mental Health of War-wounded Refugees: An 8-year Follow-up2002In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 190, p. 374-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complex nature of recent wars and armed conflicts has forced many war-injured persons into exile. To investigate their long-term mental health, three instruments for assessing mental health (HSCL-25, PTSS-10, and a Well-Being scale) were presented to 44 war-wounded refugees from nine different countries 8 years after arrival in Sweden. The prevalence of psychiatric symptoms was high and corresponds to findings in previous studies of refugee patient populations. A lower level of mental health was associated with higher education, unemployment, and poor physical health. The findings suggest a high psychiatric morbidity and a need for psychiatric interventions in this refugee group. Methodological issues to be considered in research on sequels of war traumas are discussed.

  • 14.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Associations between staff feelings toward patients and treatment outcome at psychiatric treatment homes2000In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 188, no 6, p. 366-371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents, as part of a national Swedish research project, a study of associations between staff feelings toward patients and treatment outcome at 23 small psychiatric inpatient units. The outcome was measured with a composite scale based on structured interviews. Staff feelings were reported on a feeling checklist. Few and scattered correlations were found between staff feelings and treatment outcome when the whole group of patients was analyzed together. More meaningful patterns were found when data for psychotic and borderline patients were analyzed separately. For psychotic patients, positive outcome was associated with low levels of negative feelings throughout treatment. For borderline patients, positive outcome was associated with negative feelings at the beginning of treatment, followed by strong positive feelings in the later part. Staff feelings were more strongly associated with outcome for borderline patients than for psychotic patients. Patients with different structural diagnoses need different kinds of staff 'feeling milieus'.

  • 15.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    The influence of patient diagnosis and self-image on clinicians' feelings1998In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 186, p. 455-461Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Armelius, B-Å.
    The patient's contribution to the therapist's countertransference feelings1996In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 184, p. 660-666Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Koposov, Roman A
    et al.
    Ruchkin, Vladislav V
    Yale Child Study Center.
    Eisemann, Martin
    Sense of coherence: a mediator between violence exposure and psychopathology in Russian juvenile delinquents.2003In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 191, no 10, p. 638-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has demonstrated that exposure to community violence tends to have a hazardous impact on the health and well being of youth. In this context, sense of coherence is related to indicators of well being and mental health and is considered crucial for human information processing in resolving conflicts and coping with enduring stress. The aim of the present study was to explore the role of sense of coherence as a potential mediator in the relationships between community violence exposure and psychopathology, controlling for involvement in severe problem behavior. The study was conducted with a group of Russian juvenile delinquents (N = 159; a highly traumatized population with a history of frequent exposure to violence), who completed a set of questionnaires assessing their exposure to community violence, psychopathology, involvement in severe problem behaviors, and sense of coherence. The relationships among the variables of interest were explored using a structural equation modeling approach. Sense of coherence partially mediated the link between victimization and psychopathology. The direct relationships between victimization and psychopathology decreased in size, suggesting that higher levels of sense of coherence can potentially reduce the levels of psychopathology. These results have an important theoretical value and are meaningful for clinical work, suggesting that preventive and therapeutic interventions should aim at increasing sense of coherence, which might be especially valuable in populations at risk.

  • 18.
    Kullgren, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Factors associated with completed suicide in borderline personality disorder.1988In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 176, no 1, p. 40-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fifteen patients with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder (BPD) who had committed suicide while under inpatient care or within a month after discharge were compared with a group of 13 inpatients with a diagnosis of BPD who did not kill themselves. Suicides occurred in all ages from 20 to 49 years. Age, sex, and age when first in contact with psychiatry did not differ between groups. DIB profiles differed only with respect to slightly higher scores on the affect section among patients who committed suicide. Axis I affective disorders were equally frequent. The patients who committed suicide had been more often hospitalized and they had made more suicide attempts in their lifetime. Male patients who killed themselves showed a more extensive suicidal behavior at admission than did their matched control subjects. Earlier suicide attempts during inpatient treatment were only identified among the patients who committed suicide. An imminent mandatory discharge preceded the inpatient suicides in five of 11 cases.

  • 19.
    Kullgren, Gunnar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Jacobsson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    An empirical study of borderline personality disorder and psychiatric suicides.1986In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 174, no 6, p. 328-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is closely related to suicidal behavior, and suicide attempts per se are considered a diagnostic criterion. However, there has been no previous study of completed suicides and BPD. The present study is based on a population of 134 consecutive psychiatric suicides from 1961 to 1980 in a catchment area of 250,000 inhabitants. Clinical records were retrospectively diagnosed according to the Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines and DSM-III. There was a progressive increase in proportion of borderline suicides during the time period. The overall proportion of BPD, however, was only 12%, indicating that borderline patients are not seriously overrepresented among patients committing psychiatric suicides. Demographic variables, earlier psychiatric care, and suicidal behavior in the borderline group are described and analyzed.

  • 20.
    Leichsenring, Falk
    et al.
    Justus Liebig Univ Giessen, Germany.
    Liliengren, Peter
    Ersta Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Karin
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Mechler, Jakob
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Falkenström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Philips, Bjorn
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Steinert, Christiane
    MSB Med Sch, Germany.
    Abbass, Allan
    Dalhousie Univ, Canada.
    Inadequate Reporting of a Randomized Trial Comparing Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Psychodynamic Therapy for Depression2019In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 207, no 6, p. 421-422Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 21.
    Leichsenring, Falk
    et al.
    Tyskland.
    Liliengren, Peter
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, St Lukas Educational Institute.
    Lindqvist, Karin
    Stockholms universitet.
    Mechler, Jakob
    Stockholms universitet.
    Falkenstöm, Fredrik
    Linköpings universitet.
    Philips, Björn
    Stockholms universitet.
    Steinert, Christiane
    Tyskland.
    Abbass, Allan
    Kanada.
    Inadequate Reporting of a Randomized Trial Comparing Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Psychodynamic Therapy for Depression.2019In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 207, no 6, p. 421-422Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Nasseh Lotf Abadi, Mozhdeh
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Ghazinour, Seyedmehdi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Nygren, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Nojomi, Marzieh
    Richter, Jörg
    Birth weight, domestic violence, coping, social support and mental health of young Iranian mothers in Tehran2013In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 201, no 7, p. 602-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate associations of birth weight with sociodemographic variables, domestic violence, ways of coping, social support, and general mental health of Iranian mothers. Six hundred mothers aged 15 to 29 years participated between June 2009 and November 2010. t-Test, analysis of variance, Spearman's correlation, and multiple regression were used. The results showed that there was no significant association between birth weight and general mental health of the mothers. Prenatal care visits, the mothers' history of having children with low birth weight (LBW), and weight gain during pregnancy were significantly associated with birth weight. The women who reported physical abuse during pregnancy had infants with lower birth weight. Satisfaction with social support and use of positive reappraisal were significantly associated with higher birth weight. In conclusion, a high quality of prenatal care and screening of pregnant women are recommended. Social environments good enough during pregnancy have protective effects against LBW.

  • 23. Nilsson, D
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Per E
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Larsson, JL
    Svedin, CG
    Evaluation of the Linköping youth life experience scale2010In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 198, no 10, p. 768-774Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of a newly developed instrument for potentially traumatic life events, the Linköping Youth Life Experience Scale (LYLES), and determine the benefits of including adverse childhood circumstances (ACCs) as factors in the evaluation. In addition, we wanted to investigate the difference between interpersonal and noninterpersonal traumatic events, the impact of ACCs, and the cumulative effects of these events on self-reported symptoms of dissociation, depression, and anxiety. Adolescents from the normative population (n = 188) answered the questionnaire LYLES and also the Dissociation-Questionnaire-Sweden and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The results showed that LYLES was stable, with test-retest r = 0.79 and kappa item per item ranging between k = 0.44 and 1.0. ACCs contributed independently to the explanation of symptoms explaining them better than potentially traumatic events alone, particularly for boys where the impact of ACCs exceeded the impact of events. The conclusions are that LYLES displayed satisfactory psychometric properties and that ACCs seem to be a valuable addition to an instrument to evaluate potentially traumatic events.

  • 24.
    Nilsson, Doris
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Gustafsson, Per. E
    Hälsa och familje medicin Umeå.
    Larsson, Jessica
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Habilitation.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evaluation of the Linköping Youth Life experience Scale2010In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 198, no 10, p. 768-774Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of a newly developed instrument for potentially traumatic life events, the Linköping Youth Life Experience Scale (LYLES), and determine the benefits of including adverse childhood circumstances (ACCs) as factors in the evaluation. In addition, we wanted to investigate the difference between interpersonal and noninterpersonal traumatic events, the impact of ACCs, and the cumulative effects of these events on self-reported symptoms of dissociation, depression, and anxiety. Adolescents from the normative population (n = 188) answered the questionnaire LYLES and also the Dissociation-Questionnaire-Sweden and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The results showed that LYLES was stable, with test-retest r = 0.79 and kappa item per item ranging between k = 0.44 and 1.0. ACCs contributed independently to the explanation of symptoms explaining them better than potentially traumatic events alone, particularly for boys where the impact of ACCs exceeded the impact of events. The conclusions are that LYLES displayed satisfactory psychometric properties and that ACCs seem to be a valuable addition to an instrument to evaluate potentially traumatic events.

  • 25.
    Nilsson, Doris
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Gustafsson, Per E
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lifetime Polytraumatization in Adolescence and Being a Victim of Bullying2012In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 200, no 11, p. 954-961Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purposes of this study were to examine the mental health consequences of having been a victim of bullying and to investigate whether the impact of bullying was dependent on the co-occurrence of other potentially traumatic events, noninterpersonal traumas, interpersonal traumas, as well as adverse childhood circumstances. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanA community sample of participants (n = 462; 216 males and 246 females) aged 15 to 20 years completed the self-administered Linkopings Youth Life Experience Scale about lifetime exposure to a range of traumatic and other adverse events and circumstances and the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children (TSCC). The results showed that those who reported being a victim of bullying reported significantly higher scores on all TSCC clinical scales as well as significantly more other traumatic and adverse family exposures. Multiple linear regression analyses indicated that the impact of bullying on mental health was explained, to a considerable degree, by the accumulation of other adverse and traumatic exposures, particularly in the females.

  • 26. Nilsson, Doris Kristina
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Per E
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Lifetime polytraumatization in adolescence and being a victim of bullying2012In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 200, no 11, p. 954-961Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purposes of this study were to examine the mental health consequences of having been a victim of bullying and to investigate whether the impact of bullying was dependent on the co-occurrence of other potentially traumatic events, noninterpersonal traumas, interpersonal traumas, as well as adverse childhood circumstances. A community sample of participants (n = 462; 216 males and 246 females) aged 15 to 20 years completed the self-administered Linkoping's Youth Life Experience Scale about lifetime exposure to a range of traumatic and other adverse events and circumstances and the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children (TSCC). The results showed that those who reported being a victim of bullying reported significantly higher scores on all TSCC clinical scales as well as significantly more other traumatic and adverse family exposures. Multiple linear regression analyses indicated that the impact of bullying on mental health was explained, to a considerable degree, by the accumulation of other adverse and traumatic exposures, particularly in the females.

  • 27.
    Ruchkin, Vladislav
    et al.
    Yale University.
    Sukhodolsky, Denis G
    Vermeiren, Robert
    Koposov, Roman A
    Schwab-Stone, Mary
    Depressive symptoms and associated psychopathology in urban adolescents: a cross-cultural study of three countries.2006In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 194, no 2, p. 106-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aimed to compare cross-cultural trends of comorbid internalizing and externalizing psychopathology, prosocial beliefs, and perceptions of risk in adolescents with and without clinical levels of self-reported depressive symptoms. The Social and Health Assessment, a self-report survey, was conducted in a representative sample of 3309 adolescents 14 to 17 years old from urban communities in the United States (N = 1343), Belgium (N = 946), and Russia (N = 1009). In all three countries, girls reported higher levels of depressive symptoms than boys. The findings also demonstrate that in both genders, depressive symptoms were associated with increased levels of internalizing and externalizing problems, as well as lower levels of prosocial beliefs and low perceptions of harm from risk-taking behavior. Depressed boys had relatively higher levels of externalizing problems than depressed girls. Greater levels of internalizing problems observed in depressed youth, as compared with their nondepressed counterparts, were not gender-specific. Current findings suggest that the relationships between depression and comorbid psychopathology are not culture-specific and have similar patterns in different populations.

  • 28.
    Sveen, Josefin
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Dyster-Aas, Johan
    Uppsala universitet.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala universitet.
    Attentional bias and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder one year after burn injury2009In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 197, no 11, p. 850-855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trauma-related attentional bias is suggested to play a role in maintaining posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Although being burn injured is a traumatic event for many patients, there are no prospective studies investigating attentional bias. The aims were to assess burn-specific attentional bias 1 year after burn, and its associations with risk factors for PTSD and symptoms of PTSD. A total of 38 adult patients with burns were assessed with a structured clinical interview and a Swedish version of the Impact of Event Scale-Revised up to 1-year after burn. The Emotional Stroop Task was used to assess attentional bias 1 year after burn. In total 29 participants displayed burn-specific attentional bias. This group had more previous life events, perceived life threat, larger burns, and higher PTSD symptom severity. In conclusion, the majority of the patients had burn-specific attentional bias 1 year after burn and this was related to symptoms of PTSD.

  • 29.
    Sveen, Josefin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Dyster-Aas, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Attentional bias and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder one year after burn injury2009In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 197, no 11, p. 850-855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trauma-related attentional bias is suggested to play a role in maintaining posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Although being burn injured is a traumatic event for many patients, there are no prospective studies investigating attentional bias. The aims were to assess burn-specific attentional bias 1 year after burn, and its associations with risk factors for PTSD and symptoms of PTSD. A total of 38 adult patients with burns were assessed with a structured clinical interview and a Swedish version of the Impact of Event Scale-Revised up to 1-year after burn. The Emotional Stroop Task was used to assess attentional bias 1 year after burn. In total 29 participants displayed burn-specific attentional bias. This group had more previous life events, perceived life threat, larger burns, and higher PTSD symptom severity. In conclusion, the majority of the patients had burn-specific attentional bias 1 year after burn and this was related to symptoms of PTSD.

  • 30.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Kildal, Morten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Long-term assessment of personality after burn trauma in adults2002In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 190, no 1, p. 53-56Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Wikehult, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Social desirability, psychological symptoms and perceived health in burn injured patients2005In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 193, no 12, p. 820-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social desirability was previously seen as a nuisance in assessment, but today it is regarded as a personality trait with an influence on health. The aim was to explore relations between social desirability and health in former burn patients. Eighty-four burn patients injured on average 3.8 years ago responded to a questionnaire booklet. Social desirability was assessed with the social desirability subscale of the Swedish universities Scales of Personality, which is standardized in a normative sample. The results showed that a subgroup with high degree of social desirability displayed significantly poorer perceived health on the burn-specific health subscales heat sensitivity, work, and body image than normal responders did. There were no differences regarding age, education, injury-related variables, sick leave, or symptoms of anxiety and depression. In conclusion, participants with high social desirability were characterized by postburn problems in outdoor and work-related situations, and more self-consciousness about appearance.

1 - 31 of 31
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf