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  • 1. Alfstad, K Å
    et al.
    Lossius, M I
    Røste, G K
    Mowinckel, P
    Scheie, D
    Casar Borota, Olivera
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Dept. of Laboratory medicine/Pathology, Umeå University, Umeå Sweden.
    Larsson, P G
    Nakken, K O
    Acute postoperative seizures after epilepsy surgery: a long-term outcome predictor?2011In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 123, no 1, p. 48-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The prognostic value of acute postoperative seizures (APS) after epilepsy surgery is much debated. This study evaluated APS, defined as seizures in the first week post-surgery, as a predictor of long-term seizure outcome, and investigated the utility of other potential outcome predictors.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Medical records of 48 patients with temporal and extra-temporal epilepsy surgery were studied. Forty patients had lesional surgery. All had at least 2 year postoperative follow-up.

    RESULTS: At 2 year follow-up, 25 patients (53%) were seizure free. Univariate analysis showed that APS (P = 0.048), using ≥ six AEDs prior to surgery (P = 0.03), pathological postoperative EEG (P = 0.043) and female gender (P = 0.012) were associated with seizure recurrence.

    CONCLUSIONS: Univariate analysis indicate that APS, a high number of AEDs used prior to surgery, and pathological postoperative EEG are possible predictors of seizure recurrence after epilepsy surgery. Only gender retained significance in the multivariate analysis.

  • 2.
    Almkvist, Ove
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Bosnes, Ole
    Bosnes, Ingunn
    Stordal, Eystein
    Subjective working and declarative memory in dementia and normal aging2019In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 140, no 2, p. 140-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Subjective memory complaints are common in both elderly individuals and patients with dementia. This study investigated the power of subjective memory, divided into declarative and working memory, to differentiate between patients with dementia and normal elderly individuals.

    Method: Two groups of participants, patients with dementia (n = 117) and normal elderly individuals (n = 117), individually matched with regard to age, gender, and education. All subjects had participated in the third wave of the HUNT population health survey in Nord-Trondelag County in Norway and completed the Meta-Memory Questionnaire (MMQ) in the HUNT study. The MMQ was subdivided into two components, one associated with declarative memory (episodic and semantic) and the other with working memory.

    Results: Patients with dementia reported significantly more subjective memory concerns than normal elderly individuals. The difference between working and declarative memory components was significantly greater in patients with dementia than in normal elderly individuals. This finding made it possible to differentiate patients with dementia from the normal elderly individuals. Mental and somatic health conditions did not significantly add power to differentiating the two groups.

    Conclusion: In clinical and research applications, subjective memory components could contribute to differentiation of patients with dementia and normal elderly individuals by using self-reported impairment in working memory, rather than declarative memory.

  • 3. Anckarsäter, R.
    et al.
    Vasic, N.
    Jidéus, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Thoracic Surgery.
    Kristiansson, M.
    Zetterberg, H.
    Blennow, K.
    Anckarsäter, H.
    Cerebrospinal fluid protein reactions during non-neurological surgery2007In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 115, no 4, p. 254-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective - To study changes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein markers of blood-CSF barrier integrity and immunological reactions during surgical stress. Subjects and methods - Thirty-five patients without neurological or psychiatric disorders undergoing knee replacements had CSF and serum samples drawn from spinal and arterial catheters before, 3 h after and the morning after surgery. Results - Serum albumin decreased during surgery and CSF albumin decreased during and after surgery, and, as a consequence, the CSF/serum albumin ratio decreased significantly during the study period, especially after the intervention. In contrast, CSF concentrations of beta-2-microglobuline (β2M) increased significantly during surgery and remained high. The CSF general marker beta-trace protein (βTP) remained unchanged. Conclusions - Central nervous system protein reactions to a non-neurological surgical intervention include sharply decreased permeability of albumin into the CSF and signs of intrathecal inflammatory activity.

  • 4.
    Andersson Hagiwara, Magnus
    et al.
    University of Borås, PreHospen - Centre for Prehospital Research, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, Borås, Sweden.
    Wireklint Sundström, B.
    University of Borås, PreHospen - Centre for Prehospital Research, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, Borås, Sweden.
    Brink, Peter
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Herlitz, J.
    University of Borås, PreHospen - Centre for Prehospital Research, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, Borås, Sweden.
    Hansson, P. -O
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A shorter system delay for haemorrhagic stroke than ischaemic stroke among patients who use emergency medical service2018In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 137, no 5, p. 523-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives We compare various aspects in the early chain of care among patients with haemorrhagic stroke and ischaemic stroke. Materials & methods The Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and nine emergency hospitals, each with a stroke unit, were included. All patients hospitalised with a first and a final diagnosis of stroke between 15 December 2010 and 15 April 2011 were included. The primary endpoint was the system delay (from call to the EMS until diagnosis). Secondary endpoints were: (i) use of the EMS, (ii) delay from symptom onset until call to the EMS; (iii) priority at the dispatch centre; (iv) priority by the EMS; and (v) suspicion of stroke by the EMS nurse and physician on admission to hospital. Results Of 1336 patients, 172 (13%) had a haemorrhagic stroke. The delay from call to the EMS until diagnosis was significantly shorter in haemorrhagic stroke. The patient’s decision time was significantly shorter in haemorrhagic stroke. The priority level at the dispatch centre did not differ between the two groups, whereas the EMS nurse gave a significantly higher priority to patients with haemorrhage. There was no significant difference between groups with regard to the suspicion of stroke either by the EMS nurse or by the physician on admission to hospital. Conclusions Patients with a haemorrhagic stroke differed from other stroke patients with a more frequent and rapid activation of EMS.

  • 5.
    Andersson Hagiwara, Magnus
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Wireklint Sundström, Birgitta
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Brink, P
    Högskolan väst.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Hansson, P-O
    University of Gothenburg.
    A shorter system delay for haemorrhagic stroke than ischaemic stroke among patients who use emergency medical service.2018In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: We compare various aspects in the early chain of care among patients with haemorrhagic stroke and ischaemic stroke.

    MATERIALS & METHODS: The Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and nine emergency hospitals, each with a stroke unit, were included. All patients hospitalised with a first and a final diagnosis of stroke between 15 December 2010 and 15 April 2011 were included. The primary endpoint was the system delay (from call to the EMS until diagnosis). Secondary endpoints were: (i) use of the EMS, (ii) delay from symptom onset until call to the EMS; (iii) priority at the dispatch centre; (iv) priority by the EMS; and (v) suspicion of stroke by the EMS nurse and physician on admission to hospital.

    RESULTS: Of 1336 patients, 172 (13%) had a haemorrhagic stroke. The delay from call to the EMS until diagnosis was significantly shorter in haemorrhagic stroke. The patient's decision time was significantly shorter in haemorrhagic stroke. The priority level at the dispatch centre did not differ between the two groups, whereas the EMS nurse gave a significantly higher priority to patients with haemorrhage. There was no significant difference between groups with regard to the suspicion of stroke either by the EMS nurse or by the physician on admission to hospital.

    CONCLUSIONS: Patients with a haemorrhagic stroke differed from other stroke patients with a more frequent and rapid activation of EMS.

  • 6. Andersson, K.
    et al.
    Manchester, I. R.
    Laurell, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Cesarini, Kristina Giuliana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Malm, J.
    Eklund, A.
    Measurement of CSF dynamics with oscillating pressure infusion2013In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 128, no 1, p. 17-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Infusion tests are used to diagnose and select patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH) for shunt surgery. The test characterizes cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and estimates parameters of the cerebrospinal fluid system, the pressure-volume index (PVI) and the outflow conductance (Cout). The Oscillating Pressure Infusion (OPI) method was developed to improve the test and reduce the investigation time. The aim of this study was to evaluate the new OPI method by comparing it with an established reference method. Methods Forty-seven patients (age 71.2 +/- 8.9years) with communicating hydrocephalus underwent a preoperative lumbar infusion investigation with two consecutive infusion protocols, reference (42min) and new (20min), that is, 94 infusion tests in total. The OPI method estimated Cout and PVI simultaneously. A real-time analysis of reliability was applied to investigate the possibility of infusion time reduction. Results The difference in Cout between the methods was 1.2 +/- 1.8l/s/kPa (Rout=-0.8 +/- 3.5mmHg/ml/min), P<0.05, n=47. With the reliability analysis, the preset 20min of active infusion could have been even further reduced for 19 patients to between 10 and 19min. PVI was estimated to 16.1 +/- 6.9ml, n=47. Conclusions The novel Oscillating Pressure Infusion method produced real-time estimates of Cout including estimates of reliability that was in good agreement with the reference method and allows for a reduced and individualized investigation time.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Kennet
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Manchester, I. R.
    Laurell, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Cesarini, K. Giuliana
    Malm, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Measurement of CSF dynamics with oscillating pressure infusion2013In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 128, no 1, p. 17-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Infusion tests are used to diagnose and select patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH) for shunt surgery. The test characterizes cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and estimates parameters of the cerebrospinal fluid system, the pressure-volume index (PVI) and the outflow conductance (Cout). The Oscillating Pressure Infusion (OPI) method was developed to improve the test and reduce the investigation time. The aim of this study was to evaluate the new OPI method by comparing it with an established reference method. Methods Forty-seven patients (age 71.2 +/- 8.9years) with communicating hydrocephalus underwent a preoperative lumbar infusion investigation with two consecutive infusion protocols, reference (42min) and new (20min), that is, 94 infusion tests in total. The OPI method estimated Cout and PVI simultaneously. A real-time analysis of reliability was applied to investigate the possibility of infusion time reduction. Results The difference in Cout between the methods was 1.2 +/- 1.8l/s/kPa (Rout=-0.8 +/- 3.5mmHg/ml/min), P<0.05, n=47. With the reliability analysis, the preset 20min of active infusion could have been even further reduced for 19 patients to between 10 and 19min. PVI was estimated to 16.1 +/- 6.9ml, n=47. Conclusions The novel Oscillating Pressure Infusion method produced real-time estimates of Cout including estimates of reliability that was in good agreement with the reference method and allows for a reduced and individualized investigation time.

  • 8. Appelros, P.
    et al.
    Gunnarsson, K. E.
    Terént, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ten-year risk for myocardial infarction in patients with first-ever stroke: a community-based study2011In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 124, no 6, p. 383-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Stroke and coronary heart disease (CHD) share common risk factors. The risk for stroke patients to have a myocardial infarction (MI) has not been fully explored.

    Methods: Three hundred and seventy-seven first-ever stroke patients were ascertained prospectively. The 10-year incidence of MI was examined by register searches. The results were compared to the general Swedish population. Predictors for MI were identified using univariate and multivariate analysis.

    Results: The cumulative incidence of MI over 10 years was 25.0/100 (95% confidence interval (CI), 19.5-31.5), 26.5 for men, (95% CI, 18.9-45.8) and 23.4 for women (95% CI, 16.0-32.9). Compared to the general population, the relative risk for stroke patients having a MI was 1.6 for men (95% CI, 1.12-2.37) and 1.9 for women (95% CI, 1.27-2.90). In multivariate analysis, CHD before the stroke (MI, angina pectoris, coronary artery bypass grafting, or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty) and peripheral artery disease were significant predictors for MI.

    Conclusions: The risk for MI is significantly higher, for both male and female stroke patients, compared to the general population. Stroke patients with previous CHD and peripheral artery disease are at highest risk. Stroke patients should receive adequate secondary prevention, and cardiac complaints must be taken seriously.

  • 9. Appelros, P.
    et al.
    Terént, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Validation of the Swedish inpatient and cause-of-death registers in the context of stroke2011In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 123, no 4, p. 289-293Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background - Quality follow-up within stroke care is important in times when stroke prevalence is increasing and health care funds are limited. Administrative data, such as data from the inpatient register (IPR) and the cause-of-death register (CDR) are often used for this purpose, but the validity of such data has not been ascertained. Methods - During the year 1999-2000, a community-based stroke register was established in a Swedish municipality. Data from that register was compared with two administrative registers, the IPR and the CDR. Results - Using multiple overlapping data sources, 377 patients with first-ever stroke were found in the community-based register. Forty-four of these (12%) were missing in the IPR/CDR. Non-hospitalized patients were less likely to be registered in the IPR/CDR, as were patients who were not initially treated in a stroke unit. Stroke severity was lower among non-registered patients. Thirty patients (8%) in the IPR/CDR were misclassified as stroke patients. Conclusions - Quality follow-up within stroke care could be biased or have low comparability, when administrative data are used. Great caution should be taken when data derived from the inpatient and cause-of-death registers, and more validation work needs to be carried out in the context of stroke.

  • 10. Appelros, Peter
    et al.
    Stegmayr, B.
    Terént, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Internal Medicine.
    A review on sex differences in stroke treatment and outcome2010In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 121, no 6, p. 359-369Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background - Beyond epidemiological differences, it has been controversial whether any important sex differences exist in the treatment of stroke. In this review paper, the following areas are covered: thrombolysis, stroke unit care, secondary prevention, surgical treatment, and rehabilitation. Additionally, symptoms at stroke onset, as well as outcome measures, such as death, dependency, stroke recurrence, quality of life, and depression are reviewed. Methods - Search in PubMed, tables-of-contents, review articles, and reference lists after studies that include information about sex differences in stroke care. Results - Ninety papers are included in this review. Women suffer more from cortical and non-traditional symptoms. Men and women benefit equally from thrombolysis and stroke unit care. Women with cardioembolic strokes may benefit more from anticoagulant therapy. Most studies have not found any tendency towards sexism in the choice of treatment. Post-stroke depression and low quality-of-life seem to be more common among women. Mortality rates are higher among men in some studies, while long-term ADL-dependency seems to be more common among women. Conclusions - Sex differences in stroke treatment and outcome are small, with no unequivocal proof of sex discrimination. Women have less favourable functional outcome because of higher age at stroke onset and more severe strokes.

  • 11. Archer, T.
    et al.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Ulleråker, University Hospital.
    Johansson, B.
    Exercise alleviates Parkinsonism: clinical and laboratory evidence2011In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 123, no 2, p. 73-84Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present review examines the putative benefits for individuals afflicted with Parkinsonism, whether in the clinical setting or in the animal laboratory, accruing from different exercise regimes. The tendency for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) to express either normal or reduced exercise capacity appears regulated by factors such as fatigue, quality-of-life and disorder severity. The associations between physical exercise and risk for PD, the effects of exercise on idiopathic Parkinsonism and quality-of-life, the effects of exercise on animal laboratory models of Parkinsonism and dopamine (DA) loss following neurotoxic insults, and the effects of exercise on the DA precursor, L-Dopa, efficacy are examined. It would appear to be case that in view of the particular responsiveness of the dopaminergic neurons to exercise, the principle of 'use it or lose' may be of special applicability among PD patients.

  • 12.
    Archer, T.
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson, K
    School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Alricsson, Marie
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Physical exercise ameliorates deficits induced by traumatic brain injury2012In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 125, no 5, p. 293-302Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extent and depth of traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a major determining factor together with the type of structural insult and its location, whether mild, moderate or severe, as well as the distribution and magnitude of inflammation and loss of cerebrovascular integrity, and the eventual efficacy of intervention. The influence of exercise intervention in TBI is multiple, ranging from anti-apoptotic effects to the augmentation of neuroplasticity. Physical exercise diminishes cerebral inflammation by elevating factors and agents involved in immunomodulatory function, and buttresses glial cell, cerebrovascular, and blood-brain barrier intactness. It provides unique non-pharmacologic intervention that incorporate different physical activity regimes, whether dynamic or static, endurance or resistance. Physical training regimes ought necessarily to be adapted to the specific demands of diagnosis, type and degree of injury and prognosis for individuals who have suffered TBI. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  • 13.
    Archer, Trevor
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science. University of Gothenburg.
    Svensson, Kjell
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Alricsson, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science. Mittuniversitetet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap.
    Physical exercise ameliorates deficits induced by traumatic brain injury2012In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 125, no 5, p. 293-302Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extent and depth of traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a major determining factor together with the type of structural insult and its location, whether mild, moderate or severe, as well as the distribution and magnitude of inflammation and loss of cerebrovascular integrity, and the eventual efficacy of intervention. The influence of exercise intervention in TBI is multiple, ranging from anti-apoptotic effects to the augmentation of neuroplasticity. Physical exercise diminishes cerebral inflammation by elevating factors and agents involved in immunomodulatory function, and buttresses glial cell, cerebrovascular, and blood-brain barrier intactness. It provides unique non-pharmacologic intervention that incorporate different physical activity regimes, whether dynamic or static, endurance or resistance. Physical training regimes ought necessarily to be adapted to the specific demands of diagnosis, type and degree of injury and prognosis for individuals who have suffered TBI. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  • 14. Arnardottir, S
    et al.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurophysiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Borg, K
    Inclusion body myositis - Sensory dysfunction revealed with quantitative determination of somatosensory thresholds2003In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 108, no 1, p. 22-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to evaluate sensory function in inclusion body myositis (IBM), nine patients were subjected to sensibility screening and quantitative determination of somatosensory thresholds. Data were compared with results from electrophysiological examination and muscle biopsy. On sensibility screening all but one of the IBM patients had abnormal findings in hands and/or feet mostly affecting thermal sensibility. Vibratory thresholds were abnormal in five and thermal thresholds in four of the patients. Mean vibratory thresholds were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the IBM patients when compared with the controls. Significantly increased heat pain thresholds were found in hands and feet when compared with the controls while thermal thresholds were normal. Nerve conduction velocities were decreased in three patients, EMG showed both myopathic and neuropathic abnormalities in six patients. Eight patients had neuropathic abnormalities on muscle biopsy. The sensory dysfunction found suggests an affection of peripheral nerves in IBM mainly affecting large diameter myelinated nerve fibres corroborating earlier findings of a peripheral neuropathy in IBM.

  • 15. Asztely, F.
    et al.
    Kumlien, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    The diagnosis and treatment of limbic encephalitis2012In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 126, no 6, p. 365-375Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term limbic encephalitis (LE) was first introduced in 1968. While this disease was initially considered rare and is often fatal with very few treatment options, several reports published in the last decade provide a better description of this condition as well as possible causes and some cases of successful treatment. The clinical manifestation of LE is primarily defined by the subacute onset of short-term memory loss, seizures, confusion and psychiatric symptoms suggesting the involvement of the limbic system. In addition, EEG often shows focal or generalized slow wave or epileptiform activity, and MRI findings reveal hyperintense signals of the medial temporal lobes in T2-weighted or FLAIR images. The current literature suggests that LE is not a single disorder but is comprised of a group of autoimmune disorders predominantly affecting the limbic system. Before the diagnosis of LE can be determined, other causes of subacute encephalopathy must be excluded, especially those resulting from infectious aetiologies. LE has previously been regarded as a paraneoplastic phenomenon associated with the classical onconeuronal antibodies that are primarily directed against intracellular antigens. However, recent literature suggests that LE is also associated with antibodies that are directed against cell surface antigens, and these cases of LE display a much weaker association to the neoplasm. The treatment options for LE largely depend on the aetiology of the disease and involve the removal of the primary neoplasm. Therefore, a search for the underlying tumour is mandatory. In addition, immunotherapy has been successful in a significant number of patients where LE is not associated with cancer.

  • 16.
    Axelson, Hans W.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Öberg, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Askmark, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    No benefit of treatment with cyclophosphamide and autologous blood stem cell transplantation in multifocal motor neuropathy2008In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 117, no 6, p. 432-434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction - Patients with multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) usually respond to intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), but because of the short-lasting effect the treatment must be given repeatedly. Remission after treatment with high-dose cyclophosphamide has recently been reported in one patient refractory to IVIG. Case report - Here we report on a patient who responded to IVIG, but temporarily deteriorated dramatically after treatment with high-dose cyclophosphamide and autologous blood stem cell transplantation. Today the situation is the same as before the treatment with cyclophosphamide and blood stem cell transplantation, i.e. IVIG is given every 4 weeks. Conclusion - Our patient did not benefit from the treatment with high-dose cyclophosphamide and autologous blood stem cell transplantation. The effect of treatment with high-dose cyclophosphamide in MMN seems to be difficult to predict and that should be paid attention to if this type of treatment is considered.

  • 17.
    Behrens, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Lenfeldt, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Qvarlander, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Koskinen, Lars-Owe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Malm, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Are intracranial pressure wave amplitudes measurable through lumbar puncture?2013In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 127, no 4, p. 233-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Objective The aim of this study was to investigate whether pulsations measured in the brain correspond to those measured in lumbar space, and subsequently whether lumbar punctures could replace invasive recordings. Methods In ten patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus, simultaneous recordings of the intracranial pressure (ICP; intraparenchymal) and lumbar pressure (LP; cerebrospinal fluid pressure) were performed. During registration, pressure was altered between resting pressure and 45mmHg using an infusion test. Data were analyzed regarding pulsations (i.e., amplitudes). Also, the pressure sensors were compared in a bench test. Results The correlation between intracranial and lumbar amplitudes was 0.98. At resting pressure, and moderately elevated ICP, intracranial pulse amplitudes exceeded that of lumbar space with about 0.9mmHg. At the highest ICP, the difference changed to 0.2mmHg. The bench test showed that the agreement of sensor readings was good at resting pressure, but reduced at higher amplitudes. Conclusions Compared to intracranial registrations, amplitudes measured through lumbar puncture were slightly attenuated. The bench test showed that differences were not attributable to dissimilarities of the sensor systems. A lumbar pressure amplitude measurement is an alternative to ICP recording, but the thresholds for what should be interpreted as elevated amplitudes need to be adjusted.

  • 18.
    Bengtsson, D
    et al.
    Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Brudin, L
    Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Wanby, Pär
    Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Martin
    Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Previously unknown thyroid dysfunction in patients with acute ischemic stroke.2012In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 126, no 2, p. 98-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Opinions differ regarding the clinical significance of subclinical thyroid disorders. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence and influence of previously unknown overt or subclinical thyroid dysfunction in patients with acute ischemic stroke and to look for differences between cardio-embolic and non-embolic ischemic stroke.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 153 Swedish patients diagnosed with first-time acute ischemic stroke were included in the study and categorized for suspected cardio-embolic (n = 30) or non-embolic (n = 123) ischemic stroke depending on the presence of atrial fibrillation (AF). Blood samples were taken 48 h or earlier after onset of stroke symptoms.

    RESULTS: Previously, unknown overt or subclinical thyroid dysfunction was found in 12%. Previously, unknown overt or subclinical hyperthyroidism was more common in the AF group (13%) compared to the non-AF group (3%), P = 0.048. Patients with AF had slightly higher concentrations of free T4 (15 vs 14 pm; P < 0.001), but there was no significant difference in concentrations of S-TSH or prevalence of thyroperoxidase (TPO) antibodies between the groups.

    CONCLUSIONS: In patients with first-time acute ischemic stroke, unknown thyroid dysfunction is common, and unknown overt or subclinical hyperthyroidism is associated with cardio-embolic stroke.

  • 19. Bergendal, G.
    et al.
    Martola, J.
    Stawiarz, L.
    Kristoffersen-Wiberg, M.
    Fredrikson, S.
    Almkvist, Ove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Callosal atrophy in multiple sclerosis is related to cognitive speed2013In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 127, no 4, p. 281-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bergendal G, Martola J, Stawiarz L, Kristoffersen-Wiberg M, Fredrikson S, Almkvist O. Callosal atrophy in multiple sclerosis is related to cognitive speed. Acta Neurol Scand: 2013: 127: 281-289. (C) 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Background Long-term changes regarding corpus callosum area (CCA) and information processing speed in cognitive and sensory-motor tasks have rarely been studied in multiple sclerosis (MS). Objective and methods Information processing speed in cognitive (Symbol Digit Modalities Test, SDMT), sensory (visual and auditory reaction time) and motor (finger-tapping speed, FT; right and left hand) tasks as well as auditory inter-hemispheric transfer (verbal dichotic listening, VDL) was related to CCA, measured by MRI at baseline and at follow-up after nine years in 22 patients with MS. Possible confounding by demographic (age, gender and education), clinical (symptom onset, duration, severity of disease) and relative brain volume (RBV) as well as T2 lesion load was taken into account. Results The smaller the CCA at baseline, the slower was SDMT performance at baseline. In a similar way, CCA at follow-up was associated with poor SDMT result at follow-up. Furthermore, the higher the annual rate of change in CCA, the poorer was performance in VDL on the left ear and the more pronounced was the right ear advantage. A positive relationship between performance in VDL right ear and annual rate of change in RBV was also seen. Sensory-motor tests were not significantly associated with CCA. T2 lesion load at baseline was associated with FT performance at baseline. Demographic, clinical and radiological (RBV and T2 lesion load) characteristics did not confound the significant relation between CCA and SDMT. Conclusions CCA unlike RBV and T2 lesion load was associated with SDMT, which indicated a marked cognitive rather than perceptual-motor component.

  • 20.
    Bergman, Eva-Mathilda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Henriksson, Karin M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Åsberg, Signild
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Farahmand, B.
    Terént, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    National registry-based case-control study: comorbidity and stroke in young adults2015In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 131, no 6, p. 394-399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesStroke is overrepresented in cohorts of young adults with chronic diseases. The prevalence and impact of comorbidity among young stroke patients have not been compared with individuals without stroke. Our aim was to investigate the association between comorbidity and stroke in young adults. Materials and methodsA nationwide cohort of patients (aged 15-44years), registered in the Swedish Stroke Register, (Riksstroke) 2001-2009, was identified. Age- and sex-matched controls were randomly selected from the Population Register of Sweden. Discharge diagnoses were retrieved from the National Patient Register and grouped by chapter in the International Classification of Diseases 10th revision. Associations between ICD-10 chapters and stroke were stratified (age, sex, and stroke type) and analyzed by multivariable logistic regression. ResultsIn 2599 stroke patients analyzed, the prevalence of vascular risk factors (hypertension 25.3%, dyslipidemia 13.0%, diabetes 9.7%, heart failure 3.2%, and atrial fibrillation 2.8%), all ICD-10 chapters (except pregnancy) and prestroke hospitalizations were more frequent among cases than controls. Independent associations were found between stroke and eight ICD-10 chapters: neoplasms (odds ratios (OR) 1.53, 95% CI 1.15-2.05), blood (OR 1.61, 1.11-2.34), endocrine (OR 2.28, 1.77-2.93), psychiatric (OR 1.50, 1.24-1.81), nervous (OR 1.91, 1.46-2.50), eye (OR 1.67, 1.05-2.64), circulatory (OR 3.05, 2.45-3.80), and symptoms (OR 1.31, 1.13-1.52). The risk of stroke increased by 26% per ICD-10 chapter diagnosed. ConclusionsIn addition to vascular risk factors, comorbidity (represented by ICD-10 chapters) was associated with increased risk of stroke in young individuals. The risk of stroke was further increased with the number of diagnosed ICD-10 chapters.

  • 21.
    Berntsson, S. G.
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Kristoffersson, A.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Motala Gen Hosp, Sweden.
    Boström, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Feresiadou, A.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Burman, J.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Motala Gen Hosp, Sweden.
    Rapidly increasing off-label use of rituximab in multiple sclerosis in Sweden Outlier or predecessor?2018In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 138, no 4, p. 327-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesOff-label use of rituximab to treat MS patients in Sweden is high, and the need for long-term safety data may not be met. Our objectives were to assess the rate of rituximab prescription in patients with multiple sclerosis in Sweden and, in addition, to evaluate the safety of rituximab in a single centre for patients with multiple sclerosis. Material and MethodsReview of the Swedish MS register was performed to study the number of MS patients treated with rituximab during the last 6years. Investigation also included a retrospective review of medical files in search for possible side effects/adverse events in all adult patients with MS treated with rituximab at Uppsala University Hospital. ResultsPresently, in Sweden the rate of rituximab prescriptions in relation to other annually started of disease- modifying drugs in MS is 53.5%. ConclusionsThe share of MS patients in Sweden who are treated with rituximab is very high, and also rapidly increasing. Taken into account the off-label use, cases with adverse medical conditions that could possibly be related to rituximab use should be reported thoroughly.

  • 22.
    Berntsson, Shala G.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Kristoffersson, A
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology. Neurology Policlinic, Department of Medical Specialist, Motala General Hospital, Motala, Sweden.
    Boström, I
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology, Medical Faculty, University of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Feresiadou, Amalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Burman, Joachim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology. Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology, Medical Faculty, University of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden; Neurology Policlinic, Department of Medical Specialist, Motala General Hospital, Motala, Sweden.
    Rapidly increasing off-label use of rituximab in multiple sclerosis in Sweden: Outlier or predecessor?2018In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 138, no 4, p. 327-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Off-label use of rituximab to treat MS patients in Sweden is high, and the need for long-term safety data may not be met. Our objectives were to assess the rate of rituximab prescription in patients with multiple sclerosis in Sweden and, in addition, to evaluate the safety of rituximab in a single centre for patients with multiple sclerosis.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Review of the Swedish MS register was performed to study the number of MS patients treated with rituximab during the last 6 years. Investigation also included a retrospective review of medical files in search for possible side effects/adverse events in all adult patients with MS treated with rituximab at Uppsala University Hospital.

    RESULTS: Presently, in Sweden the rate of rituximab prescriptions in relation to other annually started of disease- modifying drugs in MS is 53.5%.

    CONCLUSIONS: The share of MS patients in Sweden who are treated with rituximab is very high, and also rapidly increasing. Taken into account the off-label use, cases with adverse medical conditions that could possibly be related to rituximab use should be reported thoroughly.

  • 23.
    Blomberg, Hans
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Lundström, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Toss, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Johansson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Agreement between ambulance nurses and physicians in assessing stroke patients2013In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 129, no 1, p. 49-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: If an ambulance nurse could bypass the emergency department (ED) and bring suspected stroke patients directly to a CT scanner, time to thrombolysis could be shortened. This study evaluates the level of agreement between ambulance nurses and emergency physicians in assessing the need for a CT scan, and interventions and monitoring beforehand, in patients with suspected stroke and/or a lowered level of consciousness.

    Materials and Methods: From October 2008 to June 2009 we compared the ambulance nurses’ and ED physicians’ judgement of 200 patients with stroke symptoms . Both groups answered identical questions on patients’ need for a CT scan, and interventions and monitoring beforehand.  

    Results: There was a poor agreement between ambulance nurses and ED physicians in judging the need for a CT scan: κ = 0.22 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.06–0.37). The nurses’ ability to select the same patients as the physician for a CT scan had a sensitivity of 84% (95% CI: 77–89) and a specificity of 37% (95% CI: 23–53). Agreement concerning the need for interventions and monitoring was also low: κ = 0.32 (95% CI: 0.18–0.47). In 18% of cases, the nurses considered interventions before a CT scan unnecessary when the physicians’ deemed them necessary.

    Conclusions: Additional tools to support ambulance nurses decisions appear to be required before suspected stroke patients can be taken directly to a CT scanner.

     

     

  • 24. Bolin, K
    et al.
    Berggren, F
    Berling, P
    Morberg, S
    Gauffin, H
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Patterns of antiepileptic drug prescription in Sweden: A register-based approach2017In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 136, no 5, p. 521-527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To determine drug utilization pathways from the incident healthcare visit due to epilepsy and three years onward.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Anti-epileptic drug utilization was calculated using individual information on inpatient- and outpatient care utilization and drug sales. Throughout, we used national register information pertaining to pharmaceutical sales linked to diagnosis-related healthcare utilization. Information on pharmaceutical sales was collected for the 2007-2013 period.

    RESULTS: For the entire studied period, a majority of new patients with epilepsy were initiated on anti-epileptic drug treatment with a monotherapy (98%); most of these patients remained on that first treatment (64%). The three most frequently prescribed drugs accounted for 72% of the initiated AED treatments. Patients with epilepsy (ICD-10: G40/41) were most commonly prescribed carbamazepine, lamotrigine and valproate. The most common second-line monotherapy was levetiracetam. About 12% of new patients with epilepsy who were initiated on AED treatment during the period eventually switched to an add-on therapy. The proportion of patients who were initiated on treatment with carbamazepine or valproate decreased, and the proportion of patients who remained on their initial monotherapy increased between 2007 and 2013.

    CONCLUSIONS: A limited number of anti-epileptic drugs accounted for the treatment of a majority of new patients with epilepsy (carbamazepine, lamotrigine and valproate accounted for more than 70%). Add-on therapies showed the same pattern, as the most frequently prescribed add-on regimens were the same ones that accounted for most of the monotherapies. There was a tendency towards fewer patients being initiated on AED treatment with either carbamazepine or valproate.

  • 25.
    Bolin, K.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berggren, F.
    UCB Pharma, Denmark.
    Berling, P.
    UCB Pharma, Denmark.
    Morberg, S.
    UCB Pharma, Denmark.
    Gauffin, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Patterns of antiepileptic drug prescription in Sweden: A register-based approach2017In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 136, no 5, p. 521-527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To determine drug utilization pathways from the incident healthcare visit due to epilepsy and three years onward. Material and methods: Anti-epileptic drug utilization was calculated using individual information on inpatient- and outpatient care utilization and drug sales. Throughout, we used national register information pertaining to pharmaceutical sales linked to diagnosis-related healthcare utilization. Information on pharmaceutical sales was collected for the 2007-2013 period. Results: For the entire studied period, a majority of new patients with epilepsy were initiated on anti-epileptic drug treatment with a monotherapy (98%); most of these patients remained on that first treatment (64%). The three most frequently prescribed drugs accounted for 72% of the initiated AED treatments. Patients with epilepsy (ICD-10: G40/41) were most commonly prescribed carbamazepine, lamotrigine and valproate. The most common second-line monotherapy was levetiracetam. About 12% of new patients with epilepsy who were initiated on AED treatment during the period eventually switched to an add-on therapy. The proportion of patients who were initiated on treatment with carbamazepine or valproate decreased, and the proportion of patients who remained on their initial monotherapy increased between 2007 and 2013. Conclusions: A limited number of anti-epileptic drugs accounted for the treatment of a majority of new patients with epilepsy (carbamazepine, lamotrigine and valproate accounted for more than 70%). Add-on therapies showed the same pattern, as the most frequently prescribed add-on regimens were the same ones that accounted for most of the monotherapies. There was a tendency towards fewer patients being initiated on AED treatment with either carbamazepine or valproate.

  • 26.
    Bolin, K.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berggren, F.
    UCB Pharma, Denmark.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Prevalence and cost of epilepsy in Sweden - a register-based approach2015In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 131, no 1, p. 37-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesTo estimate the prevalence of epilepsy, costs associated with in- and outpatient care, drug utilization and productivity losses due to epilepsy in Sweden for the years 2005 and 2011. MethodsCost components were calculated using registry data on inpatient- and outpatient-care utilization, drug sales and early pensions granted due to permanent disability and mortality. Moreover, by cross-identification of information in healthcare and pharmaceutical registries, we were able to distinguish between pharmaceuticals prescribed for epilepsy and non-epilepsy indications. ResultsThe prevalence of epilepsy was estimated at 0.62% in 2005 and 0.88% in 2011. The total cost of epilepsy increased during the same period, while the per-patient cost decreased from Euro2929 to Euro1729. Direct medical costs accounted for about 36% of the estimated total cost in 2005 and 60% in 2011. The estimated healthcare cost due to epilepsy as a share of total healthcare costs for all illnesses was about the same in 2005 as in 2011 (0.2%), while the corresponding pharmaceutical cost increased from about 0.5% in 2005 to almost 1% in 2011. ConclusionsThe per-patient cost of epilepsy is substantial, implying a significant aggregated cost incurred on society (despite a prevalenceless than1%). Our results suggest that the per-patient pharmaceutical utilization increased, while the per-patient physician visits and hospitalizations decreased, between 2005 and 2011. Moreover, we demonstrate that the 2005 prevalence measure was underestimated the true prevalence in 2005.

  • 27. Bolin, K
    et al.
    Berggren, F
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine/Neurology, University of Linköping, UHL, County Council, Linköping, Sweden.
    Prevalence and cost of epilepsy in Sweden -: a register-based approach2015In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 131, no 1, p. 37-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the prevalence of epilepsy, costs associated with in- and outpatient care, drug utilization and productivity losses due to epilepsy in Sweden for the years 2005 and 2011.

    METHODS: Cost components were calculated using registry data on inpatient- and outpatient-care utilization, drug sales and early pensions granted due to permanent disability and mortality. Moreover, by cross-identification of information in healthcare and pharmaceutical registries, we were able to distinguish between pharmaceuticals prescribed for epilepsy and non-epilepsy indications.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of epilepsy was estimated at 0.62% in 2005 and 0.88% in 2011. The total cost of epilepsy increased during the same period, while the per-patient cost decreased from €2929 to €1729. Direct medical costs accounted for about 36% of the estimated total cost in 2005 and 60% in 2011. The estimated healthcare cost due to epilepsy as a share of total healthcare costs for all illnesses was about the same in 2005 as in 2011 (0.2%), while the corresponding pharmaceutical cost increased from about 0.5% in 2005 to almost 1% in 2011.

    CONCLUSIONS: The per-patient cost of epilepsy is substantial, implying a significant aggregated cost incurred on society (despite a prevalence < 1%). Our results suggest that the per-patient pharmaceutical utilization increased, while the per-patient physician visits and hospitalizations decreased, between 2005 and 2011. Moreover, we demonstrate that the 2005 prevalence measure was underestimated the true prevalence in 2005.

  • 28.
    Bolin, K.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berggren, F.
    UCB Pharma, Denmark.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Regional variation in prevalence and healthcare utilization due to epilepsy in Sweden2014In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 130, no 6, p. 354-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveTo estimate the regional differences in the prevalence of epilepsy and the associated costs due to inpatient and outpatient care and anti-epileptic drug (AED) utilization for the years 2005 and 2011 in Sweden. MethodsRegion-specific estimates of the prevalence of epilepsy were obtained using a method based on a linkage of the healthcare and pharmaceutical registries and the cause of death registry. Regional cost components were estimated using registry data by region on inpatient and outpatient care utilization, AED sales, and mortality. Per-patient utilization and monetary costs were calculated. ResultsEstimated prevalence of epilepsy varied substantially across the regions in 2011, from 0.76% in Jamtland to 1.08% in Gotland. The national prevalence was 0.88%. The average number of hospitalizations per patient and year decreased at the national level between 2005 and 2011. At the national level, the per-patient specialized care (outpatient) utilization also decreased between 2005 and 2011. However, at the regional level, the decrease was not uniform, and in some counties, the per-patient utilization increased during the period studied. The per-patient utilization of AEDs increased in all counties, except Kronoberg, between 2005 and 2011. Moreover, between-region differences in healthcare and AED utilization, and significant differences between regions and national averages were revealed. Similarly, regional per-patient costs were shown to deviate from the national average in 13 of 21 regions. ConclusionsThere is significant variation in the prevalence of epilepsy and the provision of health care for patients with epilepsy across the different regions of Sweden.

  • 29. Bolin, K
    et al.
    Berggren, F
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine/Neurology, University of Linköping, UHL County Council, Linköping, Sweden.
    Regional variation in prevalence and healthcare utilization due to epilepsy in Sweden2014In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 130, no 6, p. 354-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the regional differences in the prevalence of epilepsy and the associated costs due to inpatient and outpatient care and anti-epileptic drug (AED) utilization for the years 2005 and 2011 in Sweden.

    METHODS: Region-specific estimates of the prevalence of epilepsy were obtained using a method based on a linkage of the healthcare and pharmaceutical registries and the cause of death registry. Regional cost components were estimated using registry data by region on inpatient and outpatient care utilization, AED sales, and mortality. Per-patient utilization and monetary costs were calculated.

    RESULTS: Estimated prevalence of epilepsy varied substantially across the regions in 2011, from 0.76% in Jämtland to 1.08% in Gotland. The national prevalence was 0.88%. The average number of hospitalizations per patient and year decreased at the national level between 2005 and 2011. At the national level, the per-patient specialized care (outpatient) utilization also decreased between 2005 and 2011. However, at the regional level, the decrease was not uniform, and in some counties, the per-patient utilization increased during the period studied. The per-patient utilization of AEDs increased in all counties, except Kronoberg, between 2005 and 2011. Moreover, between-region differences in healthcare and AED utilization, and significant differences between regions and national averages were revealed. Similarly, regional per-patient costs were shown to deviate from the national average in 13 of 21 regions.

    CONCLUSIONS: There is significant variation in the prevalence of epilepsy and the provision of health care for patients with epilepsy across the different regions of Sweden.

  • 30. Bolin, Kristian
    et al.
    Berggren, F
    Forsgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Lacosamide as treatment of epileptic seizures: cost utility results for Sweden2010In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 121, no 6, p. 406-412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The estimated cost per QALY gained falls within the range of reported estimates of the willingness-to-pay for an additional QALY. The results imply that lacosamide is cost-effective in the treatment of uncontrolled partial-onset seizures (1 euro approximately 9.6 SEK).

  • 31. Bosnes, O.
    et al.
    Dahl, O. -P.
    Almkvist, Ove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Including a subject-paced trial may make the PASAT more acceptable for MS patients2015In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 132, no 4, p. 219-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT) is regularly used in the evaluation of cognition in multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the test may impose frustration, distress, and anxiety in patients, which may result in refusal to participate by many patients. ObjectivesIn this study, a subject- and experimenter-paced PASAT was compared and analyzed, with regard to independent measures of cognitive functions, as well as disability, fatigue, depression, and anxiety. MethodsA population-based sample of patients with MS (n=34; mean age 47.28.6) was examined with the PASAT, including a subject-paced condition, in addition to the standard experimenter-paced conditions using three levels of interstimuli intervals (ISI: 3.0, 2.5, and 2.0s). A comprehensive set of neuropsychological tests, measures of disease severity, fatigue, anxiety, and depression were studied as potentially associated factors. ResultsSubject- and experimenter-paced PASAT performance correlated significantly and the subject-paced administration correlated even higher with measures of information processing speed, executive function, attention, and working memory than standard experimenter-paced administration of PASAT. DiscussionThe associations between PASAT performance and measures of fatigue, anxiety, and depression were not significant. ConclusionThe results indicate that the altered PASAT procedure measures the same cognitive functions in MS as the standard procedure. At the same time, the altered procedure may make the PASAT more user-friendly for patients with MS.

  • 32.
    Boström, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Does the changing sex ratio of multiple sclerosis give opportunities for intervention?2015In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 132, p. 42-45Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In several international studies, an increasing women-to-men (w/m) ratio in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) has been reported. Such sex ratios have been analysed by year of onset or by year of birth. In a Swedish study, data from the Swedish MS register (SMSreg) were used to analyse the w/m ratio in Sweden. The sex ratio was analysed both by year of birth (8834 patients) and by year of onset (9098 patients). No increased w/m ratio was seen in this study. The age-specific sex ratio did not demonstrate any significant changes. However, a new investigation of the sex ratio in Sweden, based on data from all available data sources (19,510 patients), showed a significantly increased w/m ratio of MS in Sweden from 1.70 to 2.67. Environmental factors such as cigarette smoking, hormonal factors and nutrition are of interest in this context, but the cause of the increasing w/m ratio in MS is yet not possible to explain.

  • 33.
    Brown, C.
    et al.
    Griffith Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Meadowbrook, Qld 4131, Australia.
    Hasson, H.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Learning Informat Management & Eth, Med Management Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thyselius, V.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Almborg, A. -H
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Post-stroke depression and functional independence: a conundrum2012In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 126, no 1, p. 45-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brown C, Hasson H, Thyselius V, Almborg A-H. Post-stroke depression and functional independence: a conundrum.?Acta Neurol Scand: 2012: 126: 4551.?(c) 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Objectives People who suffer a stroke are at risk of developing post-stroke depression (PSD). Not only does this lower their quality of life but it also increases their risk of another stroke or death. This study aimed to investigate the factors associated with PSD in order to better direct rehabilitation efforts aimed at cutting the incidence of PSD. Material and methods This study was based on all patients admitted to the stroke unit of a hospital in southern Sweden from 1 October 2003 to 30 November 2005. The total number of patients involved was 181. Measures were collected at 2 +/- 1 weeks after discharge from hospital, 3 +/- 0.5 months after the occurrence of the stroke and 12 +/- 1 months after the occurrence of the stroke. Information collected was results from the Center of Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the Barthel Index together with demographic data including age, sex, time since stroke and relationship status. Results Those patients involved in the study were mainly men (5859%) and generally those either married or cohabiting (5357%). The age of respondents ranged from 32 to 92 years with a mean age of 74.0 (95%CI 72.3775.63) at 2 +/- 1 weeks after discharge. The Barthel Index scores ranged from 15 to 100 with means of between 88.7 and 91.7. Between 15% and 19% of the group were clinically depressed during the time frame of the study. The Barthel Index, measuring functional independence in terms of need for assistance with personal activities of daily living (P-ADL), was consistently associated with PSD. Conclusions The differences found in levels of depression between those with lower functional independence after a stroke compared to those more independent in P-ADL, raise the possibility that attention should be paid to therapeutic rehabilitation for stroke patients to help them recover as much functional independence as possible in order to improve their quality of life and lower their chances of developing PSD.

  • 34. Brown, C.
    et al.
    Hasson, H.
    Thyselius, Vanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Almborg, A. -H
    Post-stroke depression and functional independence: a conundrum2012In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 126, no 1, p. 45-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives People who suffer a stroke are at risk of developing post-stroke depression (PSD). Not only does this lower their quality of life but it also increases their risk of another stroke or death. This study aimed to investigate the factors associated with PSD in order to better direct rehabilitation efforts aimed at cutting the incidence of PSD.

    Material and methods This study was based on all patients admitted to the stroke unit of a hospital in southern Sweden from 1 October 2003 to 30 November 2005. The total number of patients involved was 181. Measures were collected at 2 +/- 1 weeks after discharge from hospital, 3 +/- 0.5 months after the occurrence of the stroke and 12 +/- 1 months after the occurrence of the stroke. Information collected was results from the Center of Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the Barthel Index together with demographic data including age, sex, time since stroke and relationship status.

    Results Those patients involved in the study were mainly men (5859%) and generally those either married or cohabiting (5357%). The age of respondents ranged from 32 to 92 years with a mean age of 74.0 (95%CI 72.3775.63) at 2 +/- 1 weeks after discharge. The Barthel Index scores ranged from 15 to 100 with means of between 88.7 and 91.7. Between 15% and 19% of the group were clinically depressed during the time frame of the study. The Barthel Index, measuring functional independence in terms of need for assistance with personal activities of daily living (P-ADL), was consistently associated with PSD.

    Conclusions The differences found in levels of depression between those with lower functional independence after a stroke compared to those more independent in P-ADL, raise the possibility that attention should be paid to therapeutic rehabilitation for stroke patients to help them recover as much functional independence as possible in order to improve their quality of life and lower their chances of developing PSD.

  • 35.
    Bruhn, H.
    et al.
    Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Strandeus, M.
    Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Milos, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Lind, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Improved survival of Swedish glioblastoma patients treated according to Stupp2018In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 138, no 4, p. 332-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesThe median survival in glioblastoma (GBM) patients used to be less than 1year. Surgical removal of the tumor with subsequent concomitant radiation/temozolomide (the Stupp regimen) has been shown to prolong survival. The Stupp protocol was implemented in the county of Jonkoping in 2006. The purpose of this study was to examine if the Stupp treatment has prolonged overall survival, in an unselected patient cohort with histologically verified GBM. Material and MethodThis study includes all patients from the county of Jonkoping, with a diagnosis of GBM from January 2001 to December 2012. Patients were divided into 2 cohorts, 2001-2005 and 2006-2012, that is before and after implementation of the Stupp regimen. By reviewing the medical case notes, the dates of the histological diagnosis and of death were identified. The median and mean overall survival and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis were calculated and compared between the 2 cohorts. ResultsThe mean survival was 110days longer in the cohort treated according to the Stupp regimen. Four patients in the 2006-2012 cohort and 1 patient in the 2001-2005 cohort are still alive. When comparing survival in patients with radical surgery vs biopsy, those that underwent radical surgery survived longer. The significance was slightly greater in the 2001-2005 cohort (mean 163 vs 344days, Pamp;lt;.001) than in the 2006-2012 cohort (mean 220 vs 397days, P=.02). ConclusionSurvival significantly improved after the implementation of the Stupp regimen in the study region of Sweden.

  • 36.
    Burman, Joachim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Fagius, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Bilateral and recurrent optic neuritis in multiple sclerosis2011In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 123, no 3, p. 207-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective - To assess the frequency of bilateral and recurrent optic neuritis (ON) in multiple sclerosis (MS) and to compare these results with epidemiological data of ON in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and recurrent ON without other signs of disease. Methods - We identified 472 patients with diagnosis of MS from the Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Register. These patients were evaluated for the presence of ON and whether the ON was the presenting symptom of MS; unilateral or bilateral; monophasic or recurrent. Results - Twenty-one percent presented with ON as their first manifestation of MS. The proportion of patients developing a second attack of ON before demonstration of other manifestations of MS was 5.5% and the frequency of recurrent bilateral ON as the presenting symptom was 3.8%. Only two patients presented with simultaneously appearing bilateral ON corresponding to 0.42%. Conclusion - Recurrent ON, whether unilateral or bilateral, is a common presentation of MS. As MS is a much more common disease than NMO, care must be taken when evaluating the work-up of patients with recurrent ON. In some cases repeated MRI and lumbar punctures are warranted to improve diagnostic accuracy, even in the presence of the serological marker NMO-IgG.

  • 37.
    Burman, Joachim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Zetterberg, H
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Fransson, Moa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Loskog, Angelica SI.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Fagius, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Assessing tissue damage in multiple sclerosis: a biomarker approach2014In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 130, no 2, p. 81-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain and spinal cord is the gold standard for assessing disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS). MRI is an excellent instrument for determination of accumulated damage to the brain and spinal cord, but tells us little about ongoing tissue damage. In this study, biomarkers of oligodendrocyte, axonal and astrocyte injury were related to MRI and clinical findings and used to assess tissue damage in MS.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS:

    Cerebrospinal fluid from 44 patients with relapsing-remitting MS, 20 with secondary progressive MS and 15 controls were investigated with ELISA to determine levels of myelin basic protein (MBP), neurofilament light (NFL) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAp). Patients underwent MRI of the brain and spinal cord, and gadolinium enhancing lesions, T1 lesions and T2 lesions were counted.

    RESULTS:

    Patients in clinical relapse and patients with nonsymptomatic gadolinium enhancing lesions had high levels of MBP and NFL, indicating ongoing damage to oligodendrocytes and axons. The level of MBP dropped quickly within a week from the onset of a relapse, whereas NFL remained elevated for several weeks and GFAp slowly rose during the course of a relapse. Relapsing-remitting MS patients without gadolinium enhancing lesions had values of MBP, NFL and GFAp similar to controls, while patients with secondary progressive disease had moderately increased values of all biomarkers.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Analysis of MBP, NFL and GFAp provides direct means to measure tissue damage and is a useful addition to our methods for evaluation of MS.

  • 38.
    Bäckström, David
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Eriksson Domellöf, Magdalena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Granåsen, Gabriel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Linder, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Mayans, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Elgh, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Zetterberg, H.
    Blennow, K.
    Forsgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Polymorphisms in dopamine-associated genes and cognitive decline in Parkinson's disease2018In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 137, no 1, p. 91-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Cognitive decline is common in Parkinson's disease (PD), but the underlying mechanisms for this complication are incompletely understood. Genotypes affecting dopamine transmission may be of importance. This study investigates whether genotypes associated with reduced prefrontal dopaminergic tone and/or reduced dopamine D2-receptor availability (Catechol-O-methyltransferase [COMT] Val(158)Met genotype and DRD2 (CT)-T-957 genotype) affect the development of cognitive deficits in PD.

    Materials and methods: One hundred and 34 patients with idiopathic PD, participating in a regional, population-based study of incident parkinsonism, underwent genotyping. After extensive baseline investigations (including imaging and biomarker analyses), the patients were followed prospectively during 6-10 years with neuropsychological evaluations, covering six cognitive domains. Cognitive decline (defined as the incidence of either Parkinson's disease mild cognitive impairment [PD-MCI] or dementia [PDD], diagnosed according to published criteria and blinded to genotype) was studied as the primary outcome.

    Results: Both genotypes affected cognition, as shown by Cox proportional hazards models. While the COMT(158)Val/Val genotype conferred an increased risk of mild cognitive impairment in patients with normal cognition at baseline (hazard ratio: 2.13, P=.023), the DRD2(957)T/T genotype conferred an overall increased risk of PD dementia (hazard ratio: 3.22, P<.001). The poorer cognitive performance in DRD2(957)T/T carriers with PD occurred mainly in episodic memory and attention.

    Conclusions: The results favor the hypothesis that dopamine deficiency in PD not only relate to mild cognitive deficits in frontostriatal functions, but also to a decline in memory and attention. This could indicate that dopamine deficiency impairs a wide network of brain areas.

  • 39.
    Caceres, R.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Richter, J.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Säfström, Kåge
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Editorial: Application of a vagal nerve stimulator in an epilepsy patient with cardiac pacemaker after post-ictal cardiac arrest2009In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 120, no 2, p. 139-142Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this case report we present a patient with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) showing partial complex seizures and secondary generalization, and treated with several antiepileptic drugs. After two consecutive seizures she had an episode of cardiac arrest followed by AV-block III which led to the implantation of a cardiac pacemaker. She subsequently received a vagal nerve stimulator because of poor response to epilepsy treatment. Combined treatment with two different electromagnetic stimulators raises the question of safety during surgery which is discussed.

  • 40.
    Caceres, R
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Richter, J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Säfström, Kåge
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Letter: Increased need for combinated nervus vagus-stimulators and electronic cardiac devices: aspects on methods and safety2010In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 121, no 4, p. 287-288Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 41.
    Callander, Margarita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A cluster of multiple sclerosis cases in Lysvik in the Swedish county of Värmland2004In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 110, no 1, p. 14-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives – When surveying the county of Värmland in Sweden in order to determine the prevalence of multiple sclerosis (MS), we observed an aggregation of MS cases originating from the parish of Lysvik in the local region called Fryksdalen. Our intention was to analyse this cluster thoroughly, confirming the MS diagnosis and seeing if a hereditary or environmental background was plausible.

    Methods – The medical files were studied and the cases were classified by a neurologist according to Poser's criteria. Hereditary factors were analysed.

    Results – Sixteen living cases of MS were found, either living in the parish (n = 6) or born or raised there and had later moved to another place (n = 10). All patients had clinically definite MS. Eleven patients had relatives with MS, all of these being descendants of the Suhoinen family. Another two cases were Suhoinen descendants who did not have relatives with MS. Other common ancestors were also identified. Two cases were adopted. Eleven deceased MS patients from Lysvik were found, 10 of them had Suhoinen ancestry.

    Conclusion – We report a cluster of MS cases with a common ancestry indicating heredity for MS in 85% of the cases. Lysvik is a parish where Finnish immigration was pronounced in the 17th century and there has been inbreeding to a certain extent through marriage between cousins. Thus, we interpret this aggregation as possibly being genetically based, and neurogenetic studies are now being performed. However, as two of the cases were adopted environmental factors must also be considered.

  • 42. Cheng, Q
    et al.
    Jiang, GX
    Fredrikson, S
    Link, H
    de Pedro-Cuesta, J
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Epidemiological surveillance of Guillain-Barré syndrome in Sweden, 1996-1997.2000In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 101, p. 104-111Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Corell, Alba
    et al.
    Department of Neurosurgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Carstam, L
    Department of Neurosurgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Smits, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Henriksson, R
    Regional Cancer Centre Stockholm, Gotland, Sweden; Department of Radiation Science and Oncology, University hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Jakola, A S
    Department of Neurosurgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Neurosurgery, St. Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
    Age and surgical outcome of low-grade glioma in Sweden2018In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 138, no 4, p. 359-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Low-grade gliomas (LGG) are slow-growing primary brain tumors that typically affect young adults. Advanced age is widely recognized as a poor prognostic factor in LGG. The impact of age on postoperative outcome in this patient group has not been systemically studied.

    METHODS: We performed a nationwide register-based study with data from the Swedish Brain Tumor Registry (SBTR) for all adults diagnosed with a supratentorial LGG (WHO grade II astrocytoma, oligoastrocytoma, or oligodendroglioma) during 2005-2015. Patient- and tumor-related characteristics, postoperative complications, and survival were compared between three different age groups (18-39 years, 40-59 years, and ≥60 years).

    RESULTS: We identified 548 patients; 204 patients (37.2%) aged 18-39 years, 227 patients (41.4%) aged 40-59 years, and 117 patients (21.4%) ≥60 years of age. Unfavorable preoperative prognostic factors (eg, functional status and neurological deficit) were more common with increased age (P < .001). In addition, overall survival was significantly impaired in those 60 years and above (P < .001). We observed a clear dose-response for age with separation of survival curves at 50 years. Biopsy was more common in patients ≥60 years (P < .001). Subgroup analysis of patients with resection revealed a higher amount of postoperative neurological deficits in older patients (P = .029).

    CONCLUSION: In general, older patients with LGG have several unfavorable prognostic factors compared with younger patients but seem to tolerate surgery in a comparable fashion. However, more neurological deficits were observed following resections in elderly. Our data further support a cutoff at 50 years rather than 40 years for selection of high-risk patients.

  • 44.
    Darehed, David
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Blom, Mathias
    Glader, Eva-Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Niklasson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Norrving, Bo
    Bray, Benjamin D.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Diurnal variations in the quality of stroke care in Sweden2019In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 140, no 2, p. 123-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: A recent study of acute stroke patients in England and Wales revealed several patterns of temporal variation in quality of care. We hypothesized that similar patterns would be present in Sweden and aimed to describe these patterns. Additionally, we aimed to investigate whether hospital type conferred resilience against temporal variation.

    MATERIALS & METHODS: We conducted this nationwide registry-based study using data from the Swedish Stroke Register (Riksstroke) including all adult patients registered with acute stroke between 2011 and 2015. Outcomes included process measures and survival. We modeled time of presentation as on/off hours, shifts, day of week, 4h and 12 h time blocks. We studied hospital resilience by comparing outcomes across hospital types.

    RESULTS: 113862 stroke events in 72 hospitals were included. The process indicators and survival all showed significant temporal variation. Door-to-needle (DTN) time within 30 minutes was less likely during nighttime than daytime (OR 0.50; 95% CI 0.41-0.60). Patients admitted during off-hours had lower odds of direct stroke unit (SU) admission (OR 0.72; 95% CI 0.70-0.75). 30-day survival was lower in nighttime versus daytime presentations (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.84-0.96). The effects of temporal variation differed significantly between hospital types for DTN time within 30 minutes and direct SU admission where university hospitals were more resilient than specialized non-university hospitals.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that variation in quality of care and survival is present throughout the whole week. We also found that university hospitals were more resilient to temporal variation than specialized non-university hospitals.

  • 45.
    de Flon, Pierre
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Laurell, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Sundström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Söderström, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Gunnarsson, Martin
    Svenningsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience. Department of Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institute Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Comparison of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid neurofilament light in a multiple sclerosis trial2019In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 139, no 5, p. 462-468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The main objective of this study was to evaluate the axonal component neurofilament light protein (NFL) in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as an outcome measure in a clinical trial on disease-modifying treatments in multiple sclerosis.

    Materials and methods: Seventy-five patients with clinically stable relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) participating in the clinical trial "Switch-To RItuXimab in MS" (STRIX-MS) were switched to rituximab from first-line injectable therapy and then followed up for 2 years. Thirty patients from the extension trial (STRIX-MS extension), accepting repeated lumbar punctures, were followed up for an additional 3 years. Plasma and CSF samples were collected yearly during the follow-up. NFL concentration in plasma was measured by an in-house NF-light assay on the Simoa platform with a Homebrew kit. NFL concentration in CSF was measured by sandwich ELISA.

    Results: The mean levels of NFL, in both CSF and plasma, were low. The reduction of CSF-NFL was 25% during the first year of follow-up (from a mean of 471 [SD 393] to 354 [SD 174] pg/mL; P = 0.006) and was statistically significant. The corresponding reduction in plasma NFL was 18% (from 9.73 [SD 7.04] to 7.94 [SD 3.10] pg/mL; P = 0.055) and did not reach statistical significance.

    Conclusion: This study indicates that NFL in plasma is less sensitive as an endpoint in group comparisons than NFL in CSF. Given that plasma NFL is far easier to access, it is a promising and awaited method but further studies are needed to optimize the use in clinical trials.

  • 46.
    de Flon, Pierre
    et al.
    Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Laurell, Katarina
    Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sundström, Peter
    Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Söderström, Lars
    Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden; Department of Molecular Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, UK; UK Dementia Research Institute at UCL, London, UK.
    Gunnarsson, Martin
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Neurology.
    Svenningsson, Anders
    Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institute Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Comparison of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid neurofilament light in a multiple sclerosis trial2019In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 139, no 5, p. 462-468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The main objective of this study was to evaluate the axonal component neurofilament light protein (NFL) in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as an outcome measure in a clinical trial on disease-modifying treatments in multiple sclerosis.

    MATERIALS & METHODS: Seventy-five patients with clinically stable relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) participating in the clinical trial "Switch-To RItuXimab in MS" (STRIX-MS) were switched to rituximab from first-line injectable therapy and then followed for two years. Thirty patients from the extension trial (STRIX-MS extension), accepting repeated lumbar punctures, were followed for an additional three years. Plasma and CSF samples were collected yearly during the follow-up. NFL concentration in plasma was measured by an in-house NF-light assay on the Simoa platform with a Homebrew kit. NFL concentration in CSF was measured by sandwich ELISA.

    RESULTS: The mean levels of NFL, in both CSF and plasma, were low. The reduction of CSF-NFL was 25% during the first year of follow-up (from a mean of 471 (SD 393) to 354 (SD 174) pg/mL; p=0.006) and was statistically significant. The corresponding reduction in plasma-NFL was 18% (from 9.73 (SD 7.04) to 7.94 (SD 3.10) pg/mL; p=0.055) and did not reach statistical significance.

    CONCLUSION: This study indicates that NFL in plasma is less sensitive as an endpoint in group comparisons than NFL in CSF. Given that plasma NFL is far easier to access, it is a promising and awaited method but further studies are needed to optimise the use in clinical trials.

  • 47.
    Domellöf, Magdalena E
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Ekman, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Forsgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Elgh, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Cognitive function in the early phase of Parkinson's disease, a five-year follow-up2015In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 132, no 2, p. 79-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Presence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) as a predictor for Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) has been discussed from a clinical perspective. Recently, a Movement Disorder Society (MDS) commissioned Task Force published guidelines for PD-MCI. However, long-term follow-ups of the PD-MCI guidelines for the prediction of PDD have been sparse.

    METHOD: In a community-based cohort of PD, the MDS guidelines for PD-MCI and consensus criteria for PDD were applied on 147 subjects. The predictive ability of PD-MCI for PDD was investigated. Additionally, baseline comparisons were conducted between MCI that converted to PDD and those who did not, and evolvement of motor function was investigated.

    RESULTS: One fourth of the population developed PDD. MCI and age at baseline predicted later occurrence of PDD, and baseline results of tests measuring episodic memory, visuospatial function, semantic fluency, and mental flexibility differed between MCI converters and non-converters. Postural instability/gait (PIGD) phenotype and education did not predict later occurrence of PDD, but increased postural/gait disturbances were shown across time in those developing dementia.

    CONCLUSION: The new PD-MCI guidelines are useful to detect patients at risk for developing PDD. The PIGD phenotype at diagnosis was not a predictor of PDD within 5 years, but the study supports a temporal association between postural/gait disturbances and PDD. Older patients with PD-MCI at baseline with decline in episodic memory, semantic fluency, and mental flexibility need to be carefully monitored regarding cognition and likely also for fall risk.

  • 48.
    Ekegren, Titti
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Grundström, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Lindholm, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Aquilonius, Sten-Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Upregulation of Bax protein and increased DNA degradation in ALS spinal cord motor neurons1999In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 100, no 5, p. 317-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    To investigate if degeneration of motor neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is related to altered levels of the apoptosis regulating proteins Bcl-2 and Bax. In addition, immunoreactivity of the cysteine protease ICH-1L and detection of motor neurons with DNA fragmentation, indicative of apoptosis, was also studied.

    Material and methods

    The immunoreactivity of Bcl-2, Bax and ICH-1L were compared in ALS and control spinal cord motor neurons by immunohistochemical analysis and motor neurons with DNA fragmentation were identified by the TUNEL-method.

    Results

    The results demonstrate an increased expression of Bax in the ALS material as compared to controls but no change in Bcl-2 and ICH-1L expressions. Moreover, a larger proportion of motor neurons stained positive for TUNEL in ALS spinal cords.

    Conclusion

    Present study suggest an upregulation of the cell death promoting protein Bax and increased DNA degradation, indicative of apoptosis, in spinal motor neurons of ALS patients.

  • 49.
    Ekman, Urban
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fordell, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Eriksson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Lenfeldt, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Wåhlin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Malm, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Increase of frontal neuronal activity in chronic neglect after training in virtual reality2018In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 138, no 4, p. 284-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: A third of patients with stroke acquire spatial neglect associated with poor rehabilitation outcome. New effective rehabilitation interventions are needed. Scanning training combined with multisensory stimulation to enhance the rehabilitation effect is suggested. In accordance, we have designed a virtual-reality based scanning training that combines visual, audio and sensori-motor stimulation called RehAtt((R)). Effects were shown in behavioural tests and activity of daily living. Here, we use fMRI to evaluate the change in brain activity during Posners Cuing Task (attention task) after RehAtt((R)) intervention, in patients with chronic neglect.

    Methods: Twelve patients (mean age=72.7years, SD=6.1) with chronic neglect (persistent symptoms >6months) performed the interventions 3 times/wk during 5weeks, in total 15hours. Training effects on brain activity were evaluated using fMRI task-evoked responses during the Posners cuing task before and after the intervention.

    Results: Patients improved their performance in the Posner fMRI task. In addition, patients increased their task-evoked brain activity after the VR interventions in an extended network including pre-frontal and temporal cortex during attentional cueing, but showed no training effects during target presentations.

    Conclusions: The current pilot study demonstrates that a novel multisensory VR intervention has the potential to benefit patients with chronic neglect in respect of behaviour and brain changes. Specifically, the fMRI results show that strategic processes (top-down control during attentional cuing) were enhanced by the intervention. The findings increase knowledge of the plasticity processes underlying positive rehabilitation effects from RehAtt((R)) in chronic neglect.

  • 50. Emanuelson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Holmqvist Andersson, Elisabeth
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björklund, Ragnhild
    Stålhammar, Daniel A
    Quality of life and post-concussion symptoms in adults after mild traumatic brain injury: a population-based study in western Sweden.2003In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 108, no 5, p. 332-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To study quality of life and subjective post-concussion symptoms in adults (16-60 years) with a mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) 3 months and 1 year after injury.

    METHODS: Of a total of 489 patients 173 responded to questionnaires at 3 months and at 1 year, including the SF-36 health-related quality of life survey, which is a standardized measure validated for Swedish conditions. Post-concussion symptoms were rated as either existing or non-existing in a 21-item checklist [a modified version of Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale (CPRS)].

    RESULTS: SF-36 showed impaired scores in all dimensions. Existing post-concussion symptoms were reported by 1545%. Significantly, more symptoms were present at 3 months than at 3 weeks after injury. Furthermore, a significant correlation between higher rates of post-concussion symptoms and lower SF-36 scores was found.

    CONCLUSIONS: The SF-36 results were significantly impaired compared with an age- and gender-matched normative control group and the rate of post-concussion symptoms was significantly higher at 3 months than at 3 weeks after injury. As a significant correlation between higher rates of symptoms and low SF-36 scores was also found we assume SF-36 to be a sensitive enough measure of MTBI-related effects.

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