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  • 1.
    Ah-King, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Gowaty, Patricia A.
    A reaction norm perspective on sex and mate choice2013In: Integrative and Comparative Biology, ISSN 1540-7063, E-ISSN 1557-7023, Vol. 53, no S1, p. E2-E2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2. Hamidi, H. M.
    et al.
    Cardenas, Paco
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Thacker, R. W.
    Diversification and Correlated Trait Evolution in Astrophorid Sponges (Porifera: Demospongiae)2015In: Integrative and Comparative Biology, ISSN 1540-7063, E-ISSN 1557-7023, Vol. 55, no S1, p. E269-E269Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3. Hart, M. W.
    et al.
    Stover, D.
    Mozaffari, S. , V
    Ober, C.
    Mugal, Carina Farah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Kaj, Ingemar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Mathematics, Analysis and Probability Theory.
    Selection on coevolving human gamete recognition genes2016In: Integrative and Comparative Biology, ISSN 1540-7063, E-ISSN 1557-7023, Vol. 56, p. E84-E84Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4. Hill, G. E.
    et al.
    Lopes, R. J.
    Johnson, J. D.
    Toomey, M. B.
    Ferreira, M.
    Melo-Ferreira, J.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Corbo, J. C.
    Carneiro, M.
    Hill, Geoffr
    Genetic Basis for Red Coloration in Birds2017In: Integrative and Comparative Biology, ISSN 1540-7063, E-ISSN 1557-7023, Vol. 57, p. E292-E292Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5. Jones, Adam G.
    et al.
    Rosenqvist, Gunilla
    Berglund, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology.
    Avise, John C.
    The measurement of sexual selection using Bateman's principles: An experimental test in the sex-role-reversed pipefish Syngnathus typhle2005In: Integrative and Comparative Biology, ISSN 1540-7063, E-ISSN 1557-7023, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 874-884Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Angus J. Bateman's classic study of sexual selection in Drosophila melanogaster has had a major influence on the development of sexual selection theory. In some ways, Bateman's study has served a catalytic role by stimulating debate on sex roles, sexual conflict and other topics in sexual selection. However, there is still considerable disagreement regarding whether or not "Bateman's principles" are helpful in the study of sexual selection. Here, we test the idea that Bateman's principles provide the basis for a useful method to quantify and compare mating systems. In this study, we focus on the sex-role-reversed pipefish Syngnathus typhle as a model system to study the measurement of sexual selection. We set up artificial breeding assemblages of pipefish in the laboratory and used microsatellite markers to resolve parentage. Three different sex-ratio treatments (female-biased, even and male-biased) were used to manipulate the expected intensity of sexual selection. Measures of the mating system based on Bateman's principles were calculated and compared to the expected changes in the intensity of sexual selection. We also compare the results of this study to the results of a similar study of Bateman's principles in the rough-skinned newt, a species with conventional sex roles. The results of this experiment show that measures of the mating system based on Bateman's principles do accurately capture the relative intensities of sexual selection in the different treatments and species. Thus, widespread use of Bateman's principles to quantify mating systems in nature would facilitate comparative studies of sexual selection and mating system evolution.

  • 6. Jutfelt, F.
    et al.
    Sundin, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Raby, G. D.
    Krang, A. S.
    Clark, T. D.
    Two-Current Choice Flumes for Testing Avoidance and Preference in Aquatic Animals2017In: Integrative and Comparative Biology, ISSN 1540-7063, E-ISSN 1557-7023, Vol. 57, p. E82-E82Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Lund University.
    The evolution of life histories in holo-anhydrobiotic animals: a first approach2005In: Integrative and Comparative Biology, ISSN 1540-7063, E-ISSN 1557-7023, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 764-770Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The life histories of holo-anhydrobiotic animals differ from those of all other organisms by a regular or irregular entrance into an ametabolic state induced by desiccation. Such ametabolic periods will arrest growth and reproduction completely and thus affect primary life history parameters dramatically. The selective forces and the genetic and physiological trade-offs acting on anhydrobiotic animals are to a large extent unknown. Assuming low growth rates and low juvenile to adult survival, general theoretical models on life history responses to stress predict that anhydrobiotic animals will be selected for a high degree of iteroparity, with low fecundity, large egg size, and low total reproductive investment. A high degree of variability in growth and reproduction should create a selective force in the same direction. Although basic empirical data on life history parameters are very scarce, available observations seem to be consistent with this prediction.

  • 8.
    Marras, Stefano
    et al.
    CNR, IAMC, I-09170 Torregrande, Oristano, Italy..
    Noda, Takuji
    Kyoto Univ, Grad Sch Informat, Dept Social Informat, Kyoto 6068501, Japan..
    Steffensen, John F.
    Univ Copenhagen, Marine Biol Sect, DK-3000 Helsingor, Denmark..
    Svendsen, Morten B. S.
    Univ Copenhagen, Marine Biol Sect, DK-3000 Helsingor, Denmark..
    Krause, Jens
    Leibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries, D-12587 Berlin, Germany.;Humboldt Univ, Fac Life Sci, D-10115 Berlin, Germany..
    Wilson, Alexander D. M.
    Carleton Univ, Dept Biol, Fish Ecol & Conservat Physiol Lab, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada..
    Kurvers, Ralf H. J. M.
    Leibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries, D-12587 Berlin, Germany..
    Herbert-Read, James
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Mathematics, Applied Mathematics and Statistics.
    Boswell, Kevin M.
    Florida Int Univ, Marine Sci Program, Dept Biol Sci, North Miami, FL 33181 USA..
    Domenici, Paolo
    CNR, IAMC, I-09170 Torregrande, Oristano, Italy..
    Not So Fast: Swimming Behavior of Sailfish during Predator-Prey Interactions using High-Speed Video and Accelerometry2015In: Integrative and Comparative Biology, ISSN 1540-7063, E-ISSN 1557-7023, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 719-727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synopsis Billfishes are considered among the fastest swimmers in the oceans. Despite early estimates of extremely high speeds, more recent work showed that these predators (e.g., blue marlin) spend most of their time swimming slowly, rarely exceeding 2 m s(-1). Predator-prey interactions provide a context within which one may expect maximal speeds both by predators and prey. Beyond speed, however, an important component determining the outcome of predator-prey encounters is unsteady swimming (i.e., turning and accelerating). Although large predators are faster than their small prey, the latter show higher performance in unsteady swimming. To contrast the evading behaviors of their highly maneuverable prey, sailfish and other large aquatic predators possess morphological adaptations, such as elongated bills, which can be moved more rapidly than the whole body itself, facilitating capture of the prey. Therefore, it is an open question whether such supposedly very fast swimmers do use high-speed bursts when feeding on evasive prey, in addition to using their bill for slashing prey. Here, we measured the swimming behavior of sailfish by using high-frequency accelerometry and high-speed video observations during predator-prey interactions. These measurements allowed analyses of tail beat frequencies to estimate swimming speeds. Our results suggest that sailfish burst at speeds of about 7 m s(-1) and do not exceed swimming speeds of 10 m s(-1) during predator-prey interactions. These speeds are much lower than previous estimates. In addition, the oscillations of the bill during swimming with, and without, extension of the dorsal fin (i.e., the sail) were measured. We suggest that extension of the dorsal fin may allow sailfish to improve the control of the bill and minimize its yaw, hence preventing disturbance of the prey. Therefore, sailfish, like other large predators, may rely mainly on accuracy of movement and the use of the extensions of their bodies, rather than resorting to top speeds when hunting evasive prey.

  • 9. Natesan, D.
    et al.
    Saxena, N.
    Ekeberg, Örjan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Sane, S. P.
    Airflow mediated antennal positioning in flying hawkmoths2016In: Integrative and Comparative Biology, ISSN 1540-7063, E-ISSN 1557-7023, Vol. 56, p. E159-E159Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10. Orr, Teri J.
    et al.
    Lindenfors, Patrick
    Dalen, Love
    Angerbjorn, Anders
    Garland, Theodore, Jr.
    Delayed implantation in carnivores, causes and consequences and reproductive effort.2009In: Integrative and Comparative Biology, ISSN 1540-7063, E-ISSN 1557-7023, Vol. 49, p. E127-E127Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11. Ortega-Hernandez, J.
    et al.
    Janssen, Ralf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Budd, Graham
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Origin and Evolution of the Panarthropod Head - a Deep Time Perspective2017In: Integrative and Comparative Biology, ISSN 1540-7063, E-ISSN 1557-7023, Vol. 57, p. E369-E369Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12. Redmond, N. E.
    et al.
    Morrow, C. C.
    Thacker, R. W.
    Diaz, M. C.
    Boury-Esnault, N.
    Cardenas, Paco
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Hajdu, E.
    Lobo-Hajdu, G.
    Picton, B. E.
    Pomponi, S. A.
    Kayal, E.
    Collins, A. G.
    Phylogeny and Systematics of Demospongiae in Light of New Small-Subunit Ribosomal DNA (18S) Sequences2013In: Integrative and Comparative Biology, ISSN 1540-7063, E-ISSN 1557-7023, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 388-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most diverse and species-rich class of the phylum Porifera is Demospongiae. In recent years, the systematics of this clade, which contains more than 7000 species, has developed rapidly in light of new studies combining molecular and morphological observations. We add more than 500 new, nearly complete 18S sequences (an increase of more than 200%) in an attempt to further enhance understanding of the phylogeny of Demospongiae. Our study specifically targets representation of type species and genera that have never been sampled for any molecular data in an effort to accelerate progress in classifying this diverse lineage. Our analyses recover four highly supported subclasses of Demospongiae: Keratosa, Myxospongiae, Haploscleromorpha, and Heteroscleromorpha. Within Keratosa, neither Dendroceratida, nor its two families, Darwinellidae and Dictyodendrillidae, are monophyletic and Dictyoceratida is divided into two lineages, one predominantly composed of Dysideidae and the second containing the remaining families (Irciniidae, Spongiidae, Thorectidae, and Verticillitidae). Within Myxospongiae, we find Chondrosida to be paraphyletic with respect to the Verongida. We amend the latter to include species of the genus Chondrosia and erect a new order Chondrillida to contain remaining taxa from Chondrosida, which we now discard. Even with increased taxon sampling of Haploscleromorpha, our analyses are consistent with previous studies; however, Haliclona species are interspersed in even more clades. Haploscleromorpha contains five highly supported clades, each more diverse than previously recognized, and current families are mostly polyphyletic. In addition, we reassign Janulum spinispiculum to Haploscleromorpha and resurrect Reniera filholi as Janulum filholi comb. nov. Within the large clade Heteroscleromorpha, we confirmed 12 recently identified clades based on alternative data, as well as a sister-group relationship between the freshwater Spongillida and the family Vetulinidae. We transfer Stylissa flabelliformis to the genus Scopalina within the family Scopalinidae, which is of uncertain position. Our analyses uncover a large, strongly supported clade containing all heteroscleromorphs other than Spongillida, Vetulinidae, and Scopalinidae. Within this clade, there is a major division separating Axinellidae, Biemnida, Tetractinellida, Bubaridae, Stelligeridae, Raspailiidae, and some species of Petromica, Topsentia, and Axinyssa from Agelasida, Polymastiidae, Placospongiidae, Clionaidae, Spirastrellidae, Tethyidae, Poecilosclerida, Halichondriidae, Suberitidae, and Trachycladus. Among numerous results: (1) Spirophorina and its family Tetillidae are paraphyletic with respect to a strongly supported Astrophorina within Tetractinellida; (2) Agelasida is the earliest diverging lineage within the second clade listed above; and (3) Merlia and Desmacella appear to be the earliest diverging lineages of Poecilosclerida.

  • 13. Redmond, N. E.
    et al.
    Morrow, C. C.
    Thacker, R. W.
    Diaz, M. C.
    Boury-Esnualt, N.
    Cardenas, Paco
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Hajdu, E.
    Lobo-Hajdu, G.
    Picton, B. E.
    Collins, A. G.
    New 18S rDNA Sequence Data Suggest Exciting New Hypotheses for Internal Relationships of Demospongiae (Phylum Porifera)2013In: Integrative and Comparative Biology, ISSN 1540-7063, E-ISSN 1557-7023, Vol. 53, no S1, p. E176-E176Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Sanders, Kate L.
    et al.
    School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.
    Rasmussen, Arne R.
    The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Architecture, Design and Conservation, Copenhagen.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Independent innovation in the evolution of paddle-shaped tails in viviparous sea snakes (Elapidae Hydrophiinae)2012In: Integrative and Comparative Biology, ISSN 1540-7063, E-ISSN 1557-7023, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 311-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The viviparous sea snakes (Hydrophiinae) comprise ∼90% of living marine reptiles and display many physical and behavioral adaptations for breathing, diving, and achieving osmotic balance in marine habitats. Among the most important innovations found in marine snakes are their paddle-shaped (dorsoventrally expanded) tails, which provide propulsive thrust in the dense aquatic medium. Here, we reconstruct the evolution of caudal paddles in viviparous sea snakes using a dated molecular phylogeny for all major lineages and computed tomography of internal osteological structures. Bayesian ancestral state reconstructions show that extremely large caudal paddles supported by elongated vertebral processes are unlikely to have been present in the most recent common ancestor of extant sea snakes. Instead, these characters appear to have been acquired independently in two highly marine lineages of relatively recent origin. Both the Aipysurus and Hydrophis lineages have elongated neural spines that support the dorsal edge of their large paddles. However, whereas in the Aipysurus lineage the ventral edge of the paddle is supported by elongated haemapophyses, this support is provided by elongated and ventrally directed pleurapophyses in the Hydrophis lineage. Three semi-marine lineages (Hydrelaps, Ephalophis, and Parahydrophis) form the sister group to the Hydrophis clade and have small paddles with poorly developed dorsal and ventral supports, consistent with their amphibious lifestyle. Overall, our results suggest that not only are the viviparous hydrophiines the only lineage of marine snakes to have acquired extremely large, skeletally supported caudal paddles but also that this innovation has occurred twice in the group in the past ∼2–6 million years.

  • 15.
    Sundin, Josefin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Clark, T. D.
    Amcoff, M.
    Mateos-Gonzalez, F.
    Raby, G. D.
    Binning, S. A.
    Roche, D. G.
    Speers-Roesch, B.
    Jutfelt, F.
    Temperate and Coral Reef Fishes Show Negligible Physiological and Behavioral Responses to Elevated CO22017In: Integrative and Comparative Biology, ISSN 1540-7063, E-ISSN 1557-7023, Vol. 57, no suppl. 1, p. E423-E423Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 15 of 15
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