Change search
Refine search result
12345 1 - 50 of 224
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Aanaes, K
    et al.
    Rigshosp, Denmark .
    Rasmussen, N
    Rigshosp, Denmark Statens Serum Institute, Denmark .
    Pressler, T
    Rigshosp, Denmark Rigshosp, Denmark .
    Segelmark, Mårten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Nephrology UHL.
    Johansen, H K
    Rigshosp, Denmark .
    Lindberg, U
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Hoiby, N
    Rigshosp, Denmark .
    Carlsson, M
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Wieslander, J
    EuroDiagnostica AB, Sweden .
    Buchwald, C
    Rigshosp, Denmark .
    Extensive Endoscopic Image-Guided Sinus Surgery Decreases BPI-ANCA in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 76, no 6, p. 573-579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antineutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA) directed against bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) are common in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), and serum levels are correlated with lung colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the severity of lung damage. The production of BPI-ANCA may be due to the costimulation of BPI when mounting an immune response against P. aeruginosa. The effect of surgery aiming to eradicate bacteria and infected tissue on BPI-ANCA levels is sparsely described. A cohort of patients with CF were included: 53 patients having extensive image-guided sinus surgery (EIGSS) with topical postoperative antibiotic treatment, 131 non-operated controls and 36 who had double lung transplantation (LTX). In all 219 patients, serum samples before and after surgery or at similar intervals were analysed for IgG and IgA BPI-ANCA. The EIGSS group showed a highly significant decrease in both IgA and IgG BPI-ANCA levels compared with their own preoperative values and control group values (P andlt; 0.0010.02). The LTX patients also showed a highly significant decrease in both IgA and IgG BPI-ANCA levels (P andlt; 0.001). EIGSS and LTX decrease IgA and IgG BPI-ANCA levels in patients with CF, indicating that extensive removal of infected tissue influences the pathogenic process of autoantibody production. The results shown herein are in favour of applying EIGSS in selected patients with CF and for using BPI-ANCA as a surrogate marker for guiding further therapeutic interventions.

  • 2.
    Almroth, G.
    et al.
    Department of Nephrology, Institution of medicine and health sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lönn, Johanna
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Uhlin, F.
    Department of Nephrology, Institution of medicine and health sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Brudin, L.
    Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Physiology, County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Andersson, B.
    Department of Clinical Immunology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hahn-Zoric, M.
    Department of Clinical Immunology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Sclerostin, TNF-alpha and Interleukin-18 Correlate and are Together with Klotho Related to Other Growth Factors and Cytokines in Haemodialysis Patients2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 58-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with chronic renal failure are known to have renal osteodystrophy (bone disease) and increased calcification of vessels. A new marker of bone disease, sclerostin, the two pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-18 (IL-18), and the fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) receptor-associated marker Klotho were tested in 84 haemodialysis (HD) patients and in healthy controls. The patients had significantly higher levels of the three former markers than of the controls while Klotho was significantly higher in the controls. Low level, but significant, correlations were observed in the patient group when the levels of these four markers were compared to each other and to those of 5 cytokines and growth factors tested earlier; high-sensitive CRP (hsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator (suPAR). Ln sclerostin correlated positively to Ln hsTNF-alpha, Ln HGF and Ln suPAR. Ln hsTNF-alpha correlated positively to Ln sclerostin, Ln hsCRP, Ln IL-6, Ln FGF-23, Ln suPAR and Ln IL-18. Ln IL-18 correlated positively to Ln suPAR and Ln TNF-alpha. Ln Klotho correlated negatively to Ln hsCRP but did not correlate to Ln FGF-23. The markers studied here may be involved in the calcification of vessels seen in HD patients due to a combination of inflammation and bone disease. The mechanisms are still not fully known but may be of importance for future therapeutic possibilities in this group of patients.

  • 3. Almroth, G.
    et al.
    Lönn, Johanna
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Uhlin, F.
    Nayeri, F.
    Brudin, L.
    Andersson, B.
    Hahn-Zoric, M.
    Fibroblast growth factor 23, hepatocyte growth factor, interleukin-6, high-sensitivity c-reactive protein and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor. Inflammation markers in chronic haemodialysis patients?2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 78, no 3, p. 285-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sera from 84 haemodialysis (HD) patients and 68 healthy blood donors were analysed with commercially available ELISA techniques for fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), interleukin-6 (Il-6), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), to find a possible correlation of FGF-23 and HGF with the earlier recognized inflammatory markers Il-6 and hs-CRP or suPAR. All patients studied had significantly elevated levels of FGF-23, HGF, hs-CRP and suPAR as compared to the controls. Il-6 and hs-CRP correlated for patients (R=0.6) as well as for patients and controls altogether. Ln (natural logarithm) of HGF correlated weakly with Ln Il-6 and Ln CRP (R 0.28-0.37). Ln FGF-23 correlated only with Ln HGF (r=-0.25) in controls. Ln HGF correlated with ln suPAR (r=0.6) in both patients and controls. Although elevated as compared to controls, we found no correlation of FGF-23 with the recognized inflammatory markers Il-6, hs-CRP, nor HGF or the new marker suPAR in HD patients. Ln HGF correlated with Ln Il-6, Ln CRP and Ln suPAR. Although probably involved in vessel disease, FGF-23 and HGF may play other roles than acting in inflammatory vessel disease in HD patients. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the role of these immunological markers in chronic haemodialysis patients with atherosclerosis.

  • 4.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nephrology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Lonn, J
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Uhlin, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Nayeri, Fariba
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, B
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Hahn-Zoric, M
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Fibroblast Growth Factor 23, Hepatocyte Growth Factor, Interleukin-6, High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor. Inflammation Markers in Chronic Haemodialysis Patients?2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 78, no 3, p. 285-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sera from 84 haemodialysis (HD) patients and 68 healthy blood donors were analysed with commercially available ELISA techniques for fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), interleukin-6 (Il-6), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), to find a possible correlation of FGF-23 and HGF with the earlier recognized inflammatory markers Il-6 and hs-CRP or suPAR. All patients studied had significantly elevated levels of FGF-23, HGF, hs-CRP and suPAR as compared to the controls. Il-6 and hs-CRP correlated for patients (R=0.6) as well as for patients and controls altogether. Ln (natural logarithm) of HGF correlated weakly with Ln Il-6 and Ln CRP (R 0.28-0.37). Ln FGF-23 correlated only with Ln HGF (r=-0.25) in controls. Ln HGF correlated with ln suPAR (r=0.6) in both patients and controls. Although elevated as compared to controls, we found no correlation of FGF-23 with the recognized inflammatory markers Il-6, hs-CRP, nor HGF or the new marker suPAR in HD patients. Ln HGF correlated with Ln Il-6, Ln CRP and Ln suPAR. Although probably involved in vessel disease, FGF-23 and HGF may play other roles than acting in inflammatory vessel disease in HD patients. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the role of these immunological markers in chronic haemodialysis patients with atherosclerosis.

  • 5.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Lönn, Johanna
    Örebro Universitet, Sweden.
    Uhlin, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Physiology, County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Andersson, Bengt Andersson
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hahn-Zoric, Mirjana
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Sclerostin, TNF-alpha and Interleukin-18 Correlate and are Together with Klotho Related to Other Growth Factors and Cytokines in Haemodialysis Patients2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 58-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with chronic renal failure are known to have renal osteodystrophy (bone disease) and increased calcification of vessels. A new marker of bone disease, sclerostin, the two pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-18 (IL-18), and the fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) receptor-associated marker Klotho were tested in 84 haemodialysis (HD) patients and in healthy controls. The patients had significantly higher levels of the three former markers than of the controls while Klotho was significantly higher in the controls. Low level, but significant, correlations were observed in the patient group when the levels of these four markers were compared to each other and to those of 5 cytokines and growth factors tested earlier; high-sensitive CRP (hsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator (suPAR). Ln sclerostin correlated positively to Ln hsTNF-alpha, Ln HGF and Ln suPAR. Ln hsTNF-alpha correlated positively to Ln sclerostin, Ln hsCRP, Ln IL-6, Ln FGF-23, Ln suPAR and Ln IL-18. Ln IL-18 correlated positively to Ln suPAR and Ln TNF-alpha. Ln Klotho correlated negatively to Ln hsCRP but did not correlate to Ln FGF-23. The markers studied here may be involved in the calcification of vessels seen in HD patients due to a combination of inflammation and bone disease. The mechanisms are still not fully known but may be of importance for future therapeutic possibilities in this group of patients.

  • 6. Ambrosi, Aurelie
    et al.
    Salomonsson, Stina
    Eliasson, Håkan
    Zeffer, Elisabeth
    Dzikaite, Vijole
    Bergman, Gunnar
    Fernlund, Eva
    Theander, Elke
    Rydberg, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Öhman, Annika
    Skogh, Thomas
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Fored, Michael
    Blomqvist, Paul
    Ekbom, Anders
    Lindström, Ulla
    Melander, Mats
    Winqvist, Ola
    Gadler, Fredrik
    Jonzon, Anders
    Sonesson, Sven-Erik
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    Influence of season of birth and maternal age in the development of congenital heart block in anti-Ro-SSA/La-SSB positive pregnancies2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 72, no 3, p. 265-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Amin, Kawa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology. Clin Chem & Asthma Res Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden.;Univ Hosp, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Janson, C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Byström, J.
    Queen Mary Univ London, Barts & London, Harvey Res Inst, Expt Med & Rheumatol William, London, England..
    Role of Eosinophil Granulocytes in Allergic Airway Inflammation Endotypes2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 84, no 2, p. 75-85Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eosinophil granulocytes are intriguing members of the innate immunity system that have been considered important defenders during parasitic diseases as well as culprits during allergy-associated inflammatory diseases. Novel studies have, however, found new homoeostasis-maintaining roles for the cell. Recent clinical trials blocking different Th2 cytokines have uncovered that asthma is heterogeneous entity and forms different characteristic endotypes. Although eosinophils are present in allergic asthma with early onset, the cells may not be essential for the pathology. The cells are, however, likely disease causing in asthma with a late onset, which is often associated with chronic rhinosinusitis. Assessment of eosinophilia, fraction exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and periostin are markers that have emerged useful in assessing and monitoring asthma severity and endotype. Current scientific knowledge suggests that eosinophils are recruited by the inflammatory environment, activated by the innate interleukin (IL)-33 and prevented from apoptosis by both lymphocytes and innate immune cells such as type two innate immune cells. Eosinophils contain four specific granule proteins that exhibit an array of toxic and immune-modulatory activates. The granule proteins can be released by different mechanisms. Additionally, eosinophils contain a number of inflammatory cytokines and lipid mediators as well as radical oxygen species that might contribute to the disease both by the recruitment of other cells and the direct damage to supporting cells, leading to exacerbations and tissue fibrosis. This review aimed to outline current knowledge how eosinophils are recruited, activated and mediate damage to tissues and therapies used to control the cells.

  • 8.
    Andersen, G N
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Hägglund, M
    Nagaeva, O
    Frängsmyr, L
    Petrovska, R
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Pharmaceutical Pharmacology.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, L
    Wikberg, J E S
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Pharmaceutical Pharmacology.
    Quantitative measurement of the levels of melanocortin receptor subtype 1, 2, 3 and 5 and pro-opio-melanocortin peptide gene expression in subsets of human peripheral blood leucocytes2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 279-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Levels of the melanocortin receptor (MCR) 1, 2, 3 and 5 subtypes and pro-opio-melanocortin (POMC) protein mRNA were measured by the real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction method in CD4+ T helper (Th) cells, CD8+ T cytotoxic cells, CD19+ B cells, CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells, CD14+ monocytes and CD15+ granulocytes from healthy donors. We found high levels of all of the MC1, 2, 3 and 5R subtype mRNA in Th cells and moderate levels in NK cells, monocytes and granulocytes. POMC peptide mRNA was found in all examined leucocyte subsets, but only low levels were present in granulocytes. Our findings suggest a co-ordinating role for MCR subtypes and their naturally occurring ligands in the co-operation between innate and adaptive immunity. Moreover, our findings are compatible with earlier finding of MCR-mediated tolerance induction in Th cells.

  • 9. Andersen, G. Neumann
    et al.
    Andersen, M.
    Nagaeva, Olga
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Wikberg, J. E. S.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Dermal Melanocortin Receptor Rebound in Diffuse Systemic Sclerosis after Anti-TGF ss 1 Antibody Therapy2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 76, no 5, p. 478-482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disturbed transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) signalling leads to enhanced synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM), which is manifested as systemic sclerosis (SSc), but this may be attenuated by the melanocortin system. Here, we report of rebound reaction in the gene expression of melanocortin receptor (MCR) subtypes and of the precursor of these receptors ligands, the pro-opio-melanocortin protein (POMC), in the acute skin lesion of diffuse systemic sclerosis (dSSc) after treatment with a recombinant human anti-TGF beta 1 antibody. Biopsies, taken from the leading edge of the skin lesion, before and after treatment of a patient with recent onset dSSc, were examined. Before treatment, increased levels of TGF beta mRNA and suppressed levels of POMC mRNA and MCR subtypes MC1-3, 5R mRNAs were seen in the lesion, compared with healthy controls. After treatment, there was a rebound expression of POMC, MC2, 3, 5R mRNAs. As the melanocortin system regulates collagen and melanin production, our findings add a new understanding to the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in the acute skin lesion of dSSc, which is characterized by enhanced ECM formation and changes in skin pigmentation.

  • 10.
    Andersen, Grethe
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Hägglund, M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nagaeva, Olga
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Frängsmyr, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Petrovska, R
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Wikberg, J E S
    Quantitative measurement of the levels of melanocortin receptor subtype 1, 2, 3 and 5 and pro-opio-melanocortin peptide gene expression in subsets of human peripheral blood leucocytes2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 279-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Levels of the melanocortin receptor (MCR) 1, 2, 3 and 5 subtypes and pro-opio-melanocortin (POMC) protein mRNA were measured by the real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction method in CD4+ T helper (Th) cells, CD8+ T cytotoxic cells, CD19+ B cells, CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells, CD14+ monocytes and CD15+ granulocytes from healthy donors. We found high levels of all of the MC1, 2, 3 and 5R subtype mRNA in Th cells and moderate levels in NK cells, monocytes and granulocytes. POMC peptide mRNA was found in all examined leucocyte subsets, but only low levels were present in granulocytes. Our findings suggest a co-ordinating role for MCR subtypes and their naturally occurring ligands in the co-operation between innate and adaptive immunity. Moreover, our findings are compatible with earlier finding of MCR-mediated tolerance induction in Th cells.

  • 11.
    Andersen, Grethe N.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Nilsson, Kenneth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Nagaeva, O
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Cytokine mRNA profile of alveolar T lymphocytes and macrophages in patients with systemic sclerosis suggests a local Tr1 response2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 74, no 3, p. 272-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of an autoimmune disease like systemic sclerosis (SSc) is suspected to be driven by an activated T lymphocyte subset, expressing a cytokine profile specific to the disease. To further characterize the type of immune reaction in SSc, we searched for a broad panel of cytokine messenger ribonucleic acids (mRNAs) in T lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages from paired samples of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and peripheral blood in 18 patients and 16 age- and sex-matched controls. RNA from CD3(+) T lymphocytes and CD14(+) monocytes/macrophages was examined by means of the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. SSc alveolar T lymphocytes expressed a cytokine profile suggestive of a mixed Th1/Th2 reaction, showing an increased frequency of mRNA for interleukin (IL)-10, IL-6 and interferon (IFN)γ, while IL-1β, IFNγ and tumour necrosis factor β were expressed in blood T lymphocytes in a higher percentage of patients with SSc than controls. SSc alveolar T cells expressed IL-10 mRNA more often than peripheral T cells, a phenomenon not found in controls and which may point at local IL-10 activation/response in SSc lung. Transforming growth factor β mRNA was present in all alveolar as well as peripheral blood T cell samples in patients and controls. The cytokine mRNA profile in SSc with interstitial lung disease (ILD) was similar to the profile found in SSc without ILD. Our findings point at a mixed Th1/Th2 reaction in SSc and may indicate regulatory T 1 cell activation/response in the lungs of patients with SSc.

  • 12.
    Andersen, M.
    et al.
    North Denmark Reg Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Bispensgade 37, DK-9800 Hjorring, Denmark.;Aalborg Univ, Dept Hlth Sci & Technol, Aalborg, Denmark..
    Nagaev, I.
    Umea Univ, Dept Clin Microbiol, Div Clin Immunol, Umea, Sweden..
    Meyer, M. K.
    Aalborg Univ, Dept Hlth Sci & Technol, Aalborg, Denmark.;North Denmark Reg Hosp, Ctr Clin Sci, Hjorring, Denmark..
    Nagaeva, O.
    Umea Univ, Dept Clin Microbiol, Div Clin Immunol, Umea, Sweden..
    Wikberg, Jarl E. S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, L.
    Umea Univ, Dept Clin Microbiol, Div Clin Immunol, Umea, Sweden..
    Andersen, G. N.
    North Denmark Reg Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Bispensgade 37, DK-9800 Hjorring, Denmark.;Aalborg Univ, Dept Clin Med, Aalborg, Denmark..
    Melanocortin 2, 3 and 4 Receptor Gene Expressions are Downregulated in CD8(+) T Cytotoxic Lymphocytes and CD19(+) B Lymphocytes in Rheumatoid Arthritis Responding to TNF-alfa Inhibition2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 1, p. 31-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Melanocortin signalling in leucocyte subsets elicits anti-inflammatory and immune tolerance inducing effects in animal experimental inflammation. In man, however, the effects of melanocortin signalling in inflammatory conditions have scarcely been examined. We explored the differential reactions of melanocortin 1-5 receptors (MC1-5R) gene expressions in pathogenetic leucocyte subsets in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to treatment with TNF- inhibitor adalimumab. Seven patients with active RA donated blood at start and at 3-month treatment. CD4(+) T helper (h) lymphocytes (ly), CD8(+) T cytotoxic (c) ly, CD19(+) B ly and CD14(+) monocytes were isolated, using immunomagnetic beads, total RNA extracted and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) performed. Fold changes in MC1-5R, Th1-, inflammatory- and regulatory cytokine gene expressions were assessed for correlation. Six patients responded to adalimumab treatment, while one patient was non-responder. In all lymphocyte subtypes, MC1-5R gene expressions decreased in responders and increased in the non-responder. In responders, decrease in MC2R, MC3R and MC4R gene expressions in CD8(+) Tc and CD19(+) B ly was significant. Fold change in MC1-5R and IFN gene expressions correlated significantly in CD8(+) Tc ly, while fold change in MC1R, MC3R and MC5R and IL-1 gene expressions correlated significantly in CD4(+) Th ly. Our results show regulation of MC2R, MC3R and MC4R gene expressions in CD8(+) Tc ly and CD19(+) B ly. The correlations between fold change in different MCRs and disease driving cytokine gene expressions in CD8(+) Tc ly and CD4(+) Th ly point at a central immune modulating function of the melanocortin system in RA.

  • 13. Andersen, M.
    et al.
    Nagaev, Ivan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Meyer, M. K.
    Nagaeva, Olga
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Wikberg, J.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Andersen, G. N.
    Melanocortin 2, 3 and 4 Receptor Gene Expressions are Downregulated in CD8(+) T Cytotoxic Lymphocytes and CD19(+) B Lymphocytes in Rheumatoid Arthritis Responding to TNF- Inhibition2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 1, p. 31-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Melanocortin signalling in leucocyte subsets elicits anti-inflammatory and immune tolerance inducing effects in animal experimental inflammation. In man, however, the effects of melanocortin signalling in inflammatory conditions have scarcely been examined. We explored the differential reactions of melanocortin 1-5 receptors (MC1-5R) gene expressions in pathogenetic leucocyte subsets in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to treatment with TNF- inhibitor adalimumab. Seven patients with active RA donated blood at start and at 3-month treatment. CD4(+) T helper (h) lymphocytes (ly), CD8(+) T cytotoxic (c) ly, CD19(+) B ly and CD14(+) monocytes were isolated, using immunomagnetic beads, total RNA extracted and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) performed. Fold changes in MC1-5R, Th1-, inflammatory- and regulatory cytokine gene expressions were assessed for correlation. Six patients responded to adalimumab treatment, while one patient was non-responder. In all lymphocyte subtypes, MC1-5R gene expressions decreased in responders and increased in the non-responder. In responders, decrease in MC2R, MC3R and MC4R gene expressions in CD8(+) Tc and CD19(+) B ly was significant. Fold change in MC1-5R and IFN gene expressions correlated significantly in CD8(+) Tc ly, while fold change in MC1R, MC3R and MC5R and IL-1 gene expressions correlated significantly in CD4(+) Th ly. Our results show regulation of MC2R, MC3R and MC4R gene expressions in CD8(+) Tc ly and CD19(+) B ly. The correlations between fold change in different MCRs and disease driving cytokine gene expressions in CD8(+) Tc ly and CD4(+) Th ly point at a central immune modulating function of the melanocortin system in RA.

  • 14. Andersson, P
    et al.
    Bratt, J
    Heimburger, M
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Palmblad, J
    Inhibition of neutrophil dependent cytotoxicity for human endothelial cells by ACE inhibitors2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 80, no 5, p. 339-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) have immunomodulating properties and have been suggested to protect against endothelial injury, for example myocardial infarction and reperfusion injury. We tested whether two ACEi (captopril and enalapril), differing in a thiol group, protected human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) from cytotoxicity induced by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in vitro, when cells were activated by tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα) or the arachidonate derivative lipoxin-A4 (LXA4), using separate cytotoxicity pathways. When 51Cr labelled HUVEC were treated with captopril (0–500 μm) or enalapril (0–100 μm) for 2 h and then activated by TNFα (100 ng/ml) for 24 h, a significant, dose-dependent reduction of 51Cr release was observed. Similarly, captopril reduced 51Cr release when LXA4 (0.1 μm) was used to stimulate PMN for 4 h. Among previously defined mechanisms of significance for the cytotoxic reaction, expression of ICAM-1, but not intracellular Ca2+ changes in PMN or PMN adherence to HUVEC, were reduced by ACEi treatment. Moreover, both ACEi inhibited HUVEC surface expression of TNFα receptor I (but not II). Thus, these ACEi, particularly captopril, interfere with PMN-induced cytotoxicity for endothelial cells by modulating pro-inflammatory surface receptors, which is a novel effect that might be explored for further therapeutic approaches.

  • 15. Arkestal, Kurt
    et al.
    Mints, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Enocson, Anders
    Linton, Ludvig
    Marits, Per
    Glise, Hans
    Andersson, John
    Winqvist, Ola
    CCR2 upregulated on peripheral T cells in osteoarthritis but not in bone marrow2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 88, no 6, article id UNSP e12722Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a condition affecting millions of patients around the world, causing pain and disability and often resulting in joint replacement surgery. The aetiology of OA has long been attributed to mechanical wear mainly due to the increased prevalence of OA in load bearing joints among older patients. However, recent studies reveal a complex molecular disease causality in which inflammation, nutritional deficit and angiogenesis lead to the destruction of the joint structure. The aim of this study was to examine chemokine receptor expression in peripheral blood and bone marrow in OA patients. We devised a protocol for extracting healthy bone marrow from patients undergoing hip arthroplasty due to coxarthrosis. Flow cytometry was used to determine the expression of 18 chemokine receptors on CD4 and CD8 T cells from bone marrow and blood from 7 osteoarthritis patients and peripheral blood from 9 healthy controls. We found a significantly increased fraction of CCR2 expressing CD4 and CD8 T cell in peripheral blood compared to healthy controls. Also, there was a significant decrease in CXCR3 (Th1) (P < 0.01) expressing T cells in peripheral blood from OA patients. Finally, multivariate analysis was used to separate T cell profiles from healthy controls and OA patients and demonstrate that the divergence of chemokine receptor expression occurs in the mature T cell subsets. In conclusion, we find increased CCR2 expression in peripheral blood from OA patients that possibly may be targeted in future clinical studies.

  • 16.
    Aveskogh, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Immunology and Microbiology.
    Hellman, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Immunology and Microbiology.
    A single major transcript encodes the membrane-bound form of rat immunoglobulin E1995In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 535-539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary structure of the membrane-bound form of rat immunoglobulin E was determined by PCR amplification and nucleotide sequence analysis of its mRNA. The sequence was found to correspond to the previously identified membrane exons of the rat epsilon chain gene. The donor splice site in the C4 exon was mapped to a position 35 nt upstream of the stop codon for the secreted form of rat IgE. Therefore, the membrane-bound IgE lacks the 12 C-terminal amino acids present in the secreted form of the protein. Recently, five novel epsilon chain transcripts were isolated from human IgE producing B-cells or B-cell lines. Four of these transcripts encode proteins which differ in their C-terminal ends from the classical membrane or secreted forms of human IgE. To investigate if these transcripts were likely to represent functional mRNAs, their evolutionary conservation was studied by screening a rat IgE producing B-cell line for the expression of similar transcripts. By PCR amplification and cloning of transcripts, containing both the C3 and the M2 exons, approximately 10,000 independent cDNA clones were obtained. These clones were screened with probes directed against regions specific for each of the five novel human epsilon chain mRNAs. However, no evidence was found for the presence of transcripts with a similar structure, indicating that no specific function associated with these transcripts and their corresponding proteins has been conserved between human and rat. The lack of additional M2-containing transcripts in the rat suggest that the novel human IgE transcripts are byproducts of differential splicing and that they most likely encode proteins with no evolutionarily important function.

  • 17.
    Banday, Viqar Showkat
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Thyagarajan, Radha
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Lejon, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Contribution of both B cell intrinsic alterations as well as non-hematopoietic derived factors in the enhanced immune response of the NOD mouse2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 252-252Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18. Bas, A
    et al.
    Forsberg, G
    Hammarström, S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Hammarström, M-L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Utility of the housekeeping genes 18S rRNA, beta-actin and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase for normalization in real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis of gene expression in human T lymphocytes.2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 59, no 6, p. 566-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The accuracy of 18S rRNA, beta-actin mRNA and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) mRNA as indicators of cell number when used for normalization in gene expression analysis of T lymphocytes at different activation stages was investigated. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the expression level of 18S rRNA, beta-actin mRNA, GAPDH mRNA and mRNA for six cytokines in carefully counted samples of resting human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), intestinal lymphocytes and PBMCs subjected to polyclonal T-cell activation. The 18S rRNA level in activated and resting PBMCs and intestinal lymphocytes was essentially the same, while the levels of beta-actin and GAPDH mRNAs fluctuated markedly upon activation. When isolated gammadeltaTCR(+), CD4(+) and CD8(+) subpopulations were studied, 18S rRNA levels remained unchanged after 21 h of activation but increased slightly after 96 h. In contrast, there was a 30-70-fold increase of GAPDH mRNA/cell in these cell populations upon activation. Cytokine analysis revealed that only normalization to 18S rRNA gave a result that satisfactorily reflected their mRNA expression levels per cell. In conclusion, 18S rRNA was the most stable housekeeping gene and hence superior for normalization in comparative analyses of mRNA expression levels in human T lymphocytes.

  • 19.
    Bas, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Forsberg, Göte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Hammarström, Sten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Hammarström, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Utility of the housekeeping genes 18S rRNA, β-actin, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH) for normalisation in real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis of gene expression in human T lymphocytes2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 59, no 6, p. 566-573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The accuracy of 18S rRNA, β-actin mRNA and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) mRNA as indicators of cell number when used for normalization in gene expression analysis of T lymphocytes at different activation stages was investigated. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the expression level of 18S rRNA, β-actin mRNA, GAPDH mRNA and mRNA for six cytokines in carefully counted samples of resting human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), intestinal lymphocytes and PBMCs subjected to polyclonal T-cell activation. The 18S rRNA level in activated and resting PBMCs and intestinal lymphocytes was essentially the same, while the levels of β-actin and GAPDH mRNAs fluctuated markedly upon activation. When isolated γδTCR+, CD4+ and CD8+ subpopulations were studied, 18S rRNA levels remained unchanged after 21 h of activation but increased slightly after 96 h. In contrast, there was a 30–70-fold increase of GAPDH mRNA/cell in these cell populations upon activation. Cytokine analysis revealed that only normalization to 18S rRNA gave a result that satisfactorily reflected their mRNA expression levels per cell. In conclusion, 18S rRNA was the most stable housekeeping gene and hence superior for normalization in comparative analyses of mRNA expression levels in human T lymphocytes.

  • 20.
    Bengtson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zetterberg, H.
    Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Mellberg, T.
    Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Påhlsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larson, G.
    Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Characterization of EBV-transformed B-cells established from an individual homozygously mutated (G329A) in the FUT7α1,3-fucosyltransferase gene2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 251-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The α1,3-fucosyltransferase VII (Fuc-TVII) is involved in the biosynthesis of E- and P-selectin ligands such as sialyl Lewis x (SLex) on human leukocytes. Recently, individuals were characterized carrying a missense mutation (G329A; Arg110-Gln) in the FUT7 gene encoding this enzyme. The mutated FUT7 construct produced a Fuc-TVII enzyme with impaired activity compared with the wildtype enzyme. Polymorphonuclear granulocytes from an individual carrying this mutation homozygously also showed a reduced expression of SLex. In the present study, we have established Epstein–Barr virus-transformed B-cell lines from this individual (SIGN) and from an individual not carrying the mutation (IWO). The cell lines were confirmed to be of B-cell origin by flow cytometry analysis. IWO cells interacted with E-selectin in an in vitro flow chamber analysis whereas SIGN cell did not. However, when SIGN cell was transiently transfected with wildtype FUT7 cDNA, interaction with E-selectin could be restored. Cell surface expression of the SLex-related epitopes recognized by antibodies CSLEX-1, KM-93 and HECA-452 was elevated on IWO cells compared with that on SIGN cells, consistent with a role of these antigens in E-selectin recognition. These cell lines will be useful in further characterization of E-selectin ligands and encourage further studies on the consequences of the FUT7-G329A mutation in vivo.

  • 21.
    Berglund, Martin
    et al.
    Inst. för Biomedicin, göteborgs Universitet.
    Thomas, J. A.
    Department of Pediatrics and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA .
    Hultgren-Hörnquist, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Hultgren, Olof H.
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Orebro University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden .
    Toll-like receptor cross-hyporesponsiveness is functional in interleukin-1-receptor-associated kinase-1 (IRAK-1)-deficient macrophages: differential role played by IRAK-1 in regulation of tumour necrosis factor and interleukin-10 production2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 67, no 5, p. 473-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Signalling downstream Toll-like receptors (TLR) is regulated at several levels in order to activate the immune response and prevent excessive inflammation. Altered intracellular signalling may be one reason that repeated stimulation of various TLRs results in hyporesponsiveness and cross-tolerance. We report that TLR cross-tolerance is inducible in the absence of interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 (IRAK-1) in peritoneal macrophages. Similar to wild-type macrophages, IRAK-1-deficient macrophages respond with decreased tumour necrosis factor (TNF) production to a secondary TLR stimulation, but in opposite to IRAK-1(+/+), IRAK-1(-/-) macrophages display increased interleukin (IL)-10 production at TLR restimulation. IRAK-1-deficient peritoneal macrophages have a defective TNF and IL-10 production in response to lipoteichoic acid stimulation as well as a defective IL-10-but a normal TNF production in response to high concentration of lipopolysaccharide. Our results demonstrate that IRAK-1 is not necessary for induction of TLR cross-tolerance as judged by TNF production.

  • 22.
    Berglund, Mattias
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Oncology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Oncology.
    Turesson, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Oncology.
    Edman, V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Oncology.
    Thunberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Oncology.
    Folate-metabolizing genes in lymphoma patients from Sweden2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 70, no 4, p. 408-410Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Berglund, Mattias
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Zainuddin, N.
    Thunberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Is a TNF Alpha Polymorphism Responsible for Mutations in the TP53 Gene?2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 73, no 2, p. 154-155Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Bergman, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Ding, Zhoujie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Heyman, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Antigen-Specific IgM Causes Deposition of C3 on Sheep Red Blood Cells Within Seconds After Immunization2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 79, no 6, p. 442-442Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25. Bergman, Emma Ahlen
    et al.
    Hartana, Ciputra Adijaya
    Linton, Ludvig
    Winerdal, Malin E.
    Krantz, David
    Rosenblatt, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Lundgren, Christian
    Marits, Per
    Sherif, Amir
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Winqvist, Ola
    Epigenetic methylation profiles of CD4 T cell signature loci from patients with urinary bladder cancer2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 264-264Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Bergström, Joakim J. E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Westin, Annika Grahn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Heyman, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    IgG-Mediated Suppression of Primary IgG Anti-SRBC Responses is not Dependent on Fc gamma R or Complement2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 79, no 6, p. 443-443Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Bergström, Joakim J. E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Xu, Hui
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Heyman, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    IgG-mediated Immune Suppression: Discrepancy between Suppression of Antibody and Germinal Center Responses?2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 80, no 3, p. 210-210Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Bergström, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Joly, A. -L
    Seiron, P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Isringhausen, S.
    Modig, E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Renal Medicine.
    Andersson, J.
    Berglund, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Immunological Profiling of Haemodialysis Patients and Young Healthy Individuals with Implications for Clinical Regulatory T Cell Sorting2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 81, no 5, p. 318-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the increasing interest in clinical trials with regulatory T cells (Tregs), immunological profiling of prospective target groups and standardized procedures for Treg isolation are needed. In this study, flow cytometry was used to assess peripheral blood lymphocyte profiles of young healthy individuals and patients undergoing haemodialysis treatment. Tregs obtained from the former may be used in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and Tregs from the latter in the prevention of kidney transplant rejection. FOXP3 mRNA expression with accompanying isoform distribution was also assessed by the quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Flow-cytometric gating strategies were systematically analysed to optimize the isolation of Tregs. Our findings showed an overall similar immunological profile of both cohorts in spite of great differences in both age and health. Analysis of flow-cytometric gating techniques highlighted the importance of gating for both CD25high and CD127low expression in the isolation of FOXP3-positive cells. This study provides additional insight into the immunological profile of young healthy individuals and uraemic patients as well as in-depth analysis of flow-cytometric gating strategies for Treg isolation, supporting the development of Treg therapy using cells from healthy donors and uraemic patients.

  • 29. Bjornsdottir, Halla
    et al.
    Christenson, Karin
    Forsman, Huamei
    Stylianou, Marios
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Urban, Constantin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Dahlgren, Claes
    Karlsson, Anna
    Bylund, Johan
    Cytotoxic Peptides from S. aureus Cause Neutrophil Cell Death with NET-like Features2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 79, no 6, p. 432-432Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Björkander, Sofia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Heidari-Hamedani, Ghazal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Bremme, K.
    Gunnarsson, I.
    Holmlund, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Peripheral Monocyte Expression of the Chemokine Receptors CCR2, CCR5 and CXCR3 is Altered at Parturition in Healthy Women and in Women with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 77, no 3, p. 200-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Monocytes are precursors of macrophages and recruited to the uterus throughout pregnancy to perform important immunological functions. In this study, we hypothesized that pregnant women have reduced peripheral monocyte expression of chemokine receptors and alterations in PBMC responses to microbial stimuli as an adaption to pregnancy and that these changes are less pronounced in women with autoimmunity. We therefore investigated the chemokine receptor expression, migratory behaviour and responses to microbial stimulation of peripheral monocytes from pregnant women at parturition (n=13) and from non-pregnant women (n=9). In addition, we compared healthy pregnant women with women suffering from SLE (n=5), a condition with pronounced systemic inflammation increasing the risk for pregnancy complications. We demonstrate that peripheral monocytes are affected by pregnancy with reduced percentages of CCR2+, CCR5+ and CXCR3+ monocytes of both classical (CD16) and inflammatory (CD16+) subsets and that the trophoblast-secreted chemokine CCL2/MCP-1 recruited monocytes of both subsets in vitro. Further, PBMCs from pregnant women had a divergent response to microbial stimulation with lower CCL5/RANTES and higher CCL2/MCP-1 secretion compared with non-pregnant women. In addition, pregnant women had lower basal PBMC-secretion of CCL5/RANTES and higher basal secretion of IL-10 and CCL2/MCP-1. Interestingly, the women with SLE responded similar to pregnancy as did healthy women with lower percentages of CCR2+, CCR5+ and CXCR3+ monocytes. However, they had increased expression of CCR5 on CD16+ monocytes and heightened PBMC-secretion of CCL5/RANTES. In conclusion, our data indicate that monocyte chemokine receptor expression and the chemokine milieu during pregnancy are tightly regulated to support pregnancy.

  • 31.
    Blomberg, Stina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Wallgren, A. C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Karlsson-Parra, A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Anti-SSA/Ro antibody determination by enzyme-linked immunosorbent a supplement to standard immunofluorescence in antinuclear antibody screening2000In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 51, no 6, p. 612-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and possible clinical relevance of SSA/Ro antibodies, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), in patient sera not exhibiting a concomitant positive reaction by the standard immunofluorescence (IF) test using HEP-2 cells as substrate. SSA/Ro reactivity, as shown by ELISA, was found in 285 (7%) of 4025 serum samples consecutively remitted for antinuclear antibody (ANA) screening. Seventy-five of these serum samples (26%), derived from 64 patients, were negative by the IF-ANA screening test. Serum samples from all 64 patients exhibiting SSA/Ro reactivity by ELISA without concomitant positivity by IF-ANA were further investigated by IF using transfected HEP-2 cells hyperexpressing the 60,000 MW SSA/Ro antigen (HEP-2000(R)) and by immunodiffusion (ID) and Western blot. In 55 of these 64 patients, SSA/Ro reactivity could be verified by one or more of the other techniques investigated. Twelve of these patients fulfilled four or more American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and another five patients exhibited a histologically confirmed cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE). In four of the 12 IF-ANA-negative patients with a diagnosis of SLE, the SSA/Ro reactivity was only detectable by ELISA and Western blot. In conclusion, the use of a sensitive ELISA assay could provide a clinically important supplement to the routine ANA screening by IF, which does not detect certain anti-SSA/Ro-containing sera among patients with relevant autoimmune diagnoses. Detection of anti-SSA/Ro antibodies, however, does not alone signify cutaneous LE or SLE but adds weight to these diagnoses that should rely heavily on other clinical information.

  • 32. Bohmova, K
    et al.
    Cerny, M
    Hladikova, Z
    Vrabelova, Z
    Stadlerova, G
    Kverka, M
    Spalova, I
    Chudoba, D
    Pithova, P
    Zacharovova, K
    Brabec, R
    Faresjö, Maria
    Hälsouniversitetet i Linköping.
    Stechova, K
    Cord blood cytokine profile detection in neonates with T1D parents: monitoring of cellular auto-reactivity using protein microarray2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 66, no 5, p. 563-571Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33. Bohmova, K
    et al.
    Hladikova, Z
    Cerny, M
    Flajsmanova, K
    Vrabelova, Z
    Skramlikova, T
    Spalova, I
    Cerna, M
    Chudoba, D
    Pithova, P
    Stadlerova, G
    Bartaskova, D
    Faresjö, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Stechova, K
    Cord blood cytokine profile detection in neonates with T1D parents - Monitoring of cellular auto-reactivity using protein microarray2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 66, no 5, p. 563-571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a great medical challenge and its incidence rises rapidly. T lymphocytes and their cytokine production are supposed to play a major role in T1D development. So far, there is no potent tool to recognize the early signs of cellular auto-reactivity which leads to β-cell damage. The naïve immune system of the newborn (not yet influenced by external factors) can be used as an important model for T1D pathogenesis studies. Cord blood samples of 22 healthy neonates born at term to a diabetic parent (T1DR) and 15 newborns with no family history of any autoimmune disease (controls) were collected. Determination of 23 cytokines was performed before and after the stimulation with diabetogenic autoantigens using protein microarray. We observed lower basal production of all detected cytokines in the T1DR group - granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (P = 0.025), growth regulated protein (GRO) (P = 0.002), GRO-α (P = 0.027), interleukin (IL)-1-α (P = 0.051), IL-3 (P = 0.008), IL-7 (P = 0.027), IL-8 (P = 0.042), monocyte chemoattractant proteins (MCP)-3 (P = 0.022), monokine-induced by IFN-γ (MIG) (P = 0.034) and regulated upon activation normal T-cell express sequence (RANTES) (P = 0.004). Exclusively lower post-stimulative levels of G-CSF (P = 0.030) and GRO-α (P = 0.04) were observed in controls in comparison with the basal levels. A significant post-stimulative decrease in G-CSF (P = 0.030) and MCP-2 (P = 0.009) levels was observed in controls in comparison with T1DR neonates. We also observed the interesting impact of the risky genotype on the protein microarray results. Protein microarray seems to be a useful tool to characterize a risk pattern of the immune response for T1D also in newborns. © 2007 The Authors.

  • 34.
    Bokarewa, M
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; .
    Tarkowski, A.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; .
    Magnusson, Mattias
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; .
    Pathological survivin expression links viral infections with pathogenesis of erosive rheumatoid arthritis2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 66, no 2-3, p. 192-198Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory joint disease leading to cartilage and bone destruction. Insufficient apoptosis in the inflamed RA synovium along with accumulation of highly differentiated B- and T-lymphocytes as well as invasive growth of macrophages and fibroblasts is among the major mechanisms supporting joint destruction. We have recently shown that circulating survivin, an apoptotis inhibitor tightly bound to tumorigenesis, is an independent predictor of development and progression of joint destruction in RA. In this review we discuss the possible connectivity between viral infection, leading to interferon (IFN)-alpha production, survivin expression, and subsequent joint inflammation. The role of IFN-a and the involvement of IFN transcription factors and phosphoinositide-3-kinase signalling as essential modulators of arthritogenic process are discussed in the context of survivin.

  • 35. Bolad, Ahmed
    et al.
    Farouk, Salah E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Israelsson, Elisabeth
    Dolo, Amagana
    Doumbo, Ogobara K.
    Nebié, Issa
    Maiga, Boubacar
    Kouriba, Bourema
    Luoni, Gaia
    Sirima, Bienveu S.
    Distinct interethnic differences in IgG class/subclass and IgM antibody responses to malaria antigens but not in IgG responses to non-malarial antigens in sympatric tribes living in West Africa2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 61, no 4, p. 380-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The well-established relative resistance to malaria observed in the Fulani as compared with other sympatric tribes in West Africa has been attributed to their higher levels of serum immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibodies to malarial antigens. In this study, we confirm and extend the previous findings by analyses of the levels of IgM, IgG and IgG subclasses of anti-malarial antibodies in asymptomatic individuals of different sympatric tribes in Burkina Faso (Fulani/Mossi) and Mali (Fulani/Dogon). The Fulani showed significantly higher median concentrations of anti-malarial IgG and IgM antibodies than the sympatric tribes at both locations. Although the overall subclass pattern of antibodies did not differ between the tribes, with IgG1 and IgG3 as dominant, the Fulani showed consistently significantly higher levels of these subclasses as compared with those of the non-Fulani individuals. No significant differences were seen in the levels of total IgG between the tribes, but the Fulani showed significantly higher levels of total IgM than their neighbours in both countries. While the antibody levels to some nonmalarial antigens showed the same pattern of differences seen for antibody levels to malaria antigens, no significant such differences were seen with antibodies to other nonmalarial antigens. In conclusion, our results show that the Fulani in two different countries show higher levels of anti-malarial antibodies than sympatric tribes, and this appears not to be a reflection of a general hyper-reactivity in the Fulani.

  • 36. Bolad, Ahmed
    et al.
    Farouk, Salah E.
    Modiano, David
    Berzins, Klavs
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Troye-Blomberg, Marita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Israelsson, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Dolo, Amagana
    Doumbo, Ogobara K.
    Nebié, Issa
    Maiga, Boubacar
    Kouriba, Bourema
    Luoni, Gaia
    Sirima, Bienveu Sodiomon
    Distinct interethnic differences in IgG class/subclass and IgM antibody responses to malaria antigens but not in IgG responses to non-malarial antigens in sympatric tribes living in West Africa2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 61, no 4, p. 380-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The well-established relative resistance to malaria observed in the Fulani ascompared with other sympatric tribes in West Africa has been attributed totheir higher levels of serum immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibodies to malarialantigens. In this study, we confirm and extend the previous findings by analysesof the levels of IgM, IgG and IgG subclasses of anti-malarial antibodies inasymptomatic individuals of different sympatric tribes in Burkina Faso(Fulani/Mossi) and Mali (Fulani/Dogon). The Fulani showed significantlyhigher median concentrations of anti-malarial IgG and IgM antibodies thanthe sympatric tribes at both locations. Although the overall subclass pattern ofantibodies did not differ between the tribes, with IgG1 and IgG3 as dominant,the Fulani showed consistently significantly higher levels of these subclasses ascompared with those of the non-Fulani individuals. No significant differenceswere seen in the levels of total IgG between the tribes, but the Fulani showedsignificantly higher levels of total IgM than their neighbours in both countries.While the antibody levels to some nonmalarial antigens showed the same patternof differences seen for antibody levels to malaria antigens, no significant suchdifferences were seen with antibodies to other nonmalarial antigens. In conclusion,our results show that the Fulani in two different countries show higherlevels of anti-malarial antibodies than sympatric tribes, and this appears not tobe a reflection of a general hyper-reactivity in the Fulani.

  • 37.
    Bolin, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gunnarsson, I.
    Sjowall, C.
    Eriksson, P.
    Forsblad-d'Elia, H.
    Jonsen, A.
    Theander, E.
    Omdal, R.
    Jonsson, R.
    Sivils, K.
    Wahren-Herlenius, M.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Early B Cell Factor 1 is Associated to Clinical Manifestations in Primary Sjogren's Syndrome and SLE2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 81, no 5, p. 416-416Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Boström, E A
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Sjöwall, Christoffer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Bokarewa, M I
    University of Gothenburg.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Resistin is Associated with Breach of Tolerance and Anti-nuclear Antibodies in Patients with Hepatobiliary Inflammation2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 74, no 5, p. 463-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resistin is a cysteine-rich protein, which is abundantly expressed at the site of inflammation, and acts as a regulator of the NF-kB-dependent cytokine cascade. The aim of this study was to evaluate resistin levels in relation to inflammatory mediators, disease phenotype and autoantibody status in a spectrum of pathological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. Resistin levels were measured with an ELISA in sera originated from 227 patients and 40 healthy controls (HC). Fifty patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), 53 ulcerative colitis (UC), 51 Crohns disease (CD), 46 autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and 27 primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) were included. The sera were analysed with respect to biochemical parameters of systemic inflammation and liver function and to the presence of antibodies to nuclear antigens (ANA), mitochondria (AMA) and smooth muscle (SMA). Compared with HC, resistin levels were raised in AIH (P = 0.017) and PSC (P = 0.03); compared with NAFLD, levels were elevated in CD (P = 0.041), AIH (P andlt; 0.001) and PSC (P andlt; 0.001). Patients with elevated levels of resistin were more often treated with corticosteroids, but no difference was found between active disease and clinical remission. Resistin levels were significantly higher in ANA-positive individuals compared with ANA-negative (P = 0.025). Resistin levels were directly correlated with IL-6 (r = 0.30, P = 0.02) and IL-8 (r = 0.51, P andlt; 0.001). Elevated levels of resistin were prominent in patients with hepatobiliary inflammation and were associated with breach of self-tolerance, i.e. ANA positivity. Thus, we propose that resistin may be an important marker of disease severity in autoantibody-mediated gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases.

  • 39.
    Brandt, Ludwig
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Pfefferle, Aline
    Goodridge, Jodie
    Malmberg, Karl-Johan
    Önfelt, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Cytotoxicity and killing kinetics of KIR educated NK cells2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 301-301Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 40. Brauner, Susanna
    et al.
    Kvarnstom, Marika
    Gorgen, Sabrina
    Franzen-Malmros, Michaela
    Brokstad, Karl A.
    Folkersen, Lasse
    Klareskog, Christina Trollmo Lars
    Jonsson, Roland
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Malmstrom, Vivianne
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    Hyperreactive B Cells Upon Endosomal TLR Triggering Underlying Primary Sjogren's Syndrome2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 76, no 2, p. 199-200Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Brink, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Ärlestig, Lisbeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Lejon, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    B Regulatory Cells are Functionally Impaired in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and in Their First-Degree Relatives Compared with Controls2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 79, no 6, p. 450-450Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Calla-Magariños, Jacqueline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Gimenez, A.
    Troye-Blomberg, Marita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Fernandez, Carmen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    An alkaloid extract of Evanta, traditionally used as anti-Leishmania agent in Bolivia, inhibits cellular proliferation and interferon-g production in polyclonally activated cells2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 69, no 3, p. 251-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional medicine and scientific studies have shown that the raw extract ofEvanta [Galipea longiflora, Angostura longiflora (Krause) Kallunki] exhibits antileishmanialactivity. We hypothesized that the healing observed when usingthis plant might not only be due to the direct action on the parasite, but possiblyto a parallel effect on the host immune response to the parasite involvedin the healing process. We show here that an alkaloid extract of Evanta (AEE)directly killed the parasite already at a dose of 10 lg ⁄ ml, but at this low concentration,AEE did not have a major effect on viability and proliferation ofeukaryotic cells. The whole extract was also found to be stronger than 2-phenylquinoline,the most prominent alkaloid in AEE. AEE was not directlystimulating B or T cells or J774 macrophages. However, it interfered with theactivation of both mouse and human T cells, as revealed by a reduction of invitro cellular proliferation and interferon-gamma (IFN-c) production. The effectwas more evident when the cells were pretreated with AEE and subsequentlystimulated with the polyclonal T-cell activators Concanavalin A and anti-CD3.Taken together, our results suggest that Evanta have a direct leishmanicidaleffect and due to the effect on IFN-c production it might contribute to controlthe chronic inflammatory reaction that characterize Leishmania infectionpathology, but in vivo studies are necessary to corroborate this finding.

  • 43.
    Calla-Magariños, Jacqueline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Quispe, T.
    Giménez, A.
    Freysdottir, J.
    Troye-Blomberg, Marita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Fernández, Carmen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Quinolinic Alkaloids from Galipea longiflora Krause Suppress Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines in vitro and Control Inflammation in vivo upon Leishmania Infection in Mice2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 77, no 1, p. 30-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An antileishmanial activity of quinolinic alkaloids from Galipea longiflora Krause, known as Evanta, has been demonstrated. We have previously shown that, apart from its leishmanicidal effect, in vitro pretreatment of spleen cells with an alkaloid extract of Evanta (AEE) interfered with the proliferation and interferon-γ production in lymphocytes polyclonally activated either with concanavalin A or anti-CD3. In the present study, we investigated if AEE could interfere with antigen-specific lymphocyte activation. We found that in vitro and in vivo treatment reduced recall lymphocyte responses, as measured by IFN-γ production (55% and 63% reduction compared to untreated cells, respectively). Apart from IFN-γ, the production of IL-12 and TNF was also suppressed. No effects were observed for meglumine antimoniate (SbV), the conventional drug used to treat leishmaniasis. When mice infected with Leishmania braziliensis promastigotes in the hind footpad were treated with AEE, the dynamics of the infection changed and the footpath thickness was efficiently controlled. The parasite load was also reduced but to a lesser extent than upon treatment with SbV. Combined treatment efficiently controlled both the thickness and parasite load as smaller lesions during the entire course of the infection were seen in the mice treated with AEE plus SbV compared with AEE or SbV alone. We discuss the benefits of combined administration of AEE plus SbV.

  • 44.
    Calla-Magariños, Jacqueline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Quispe, Teddy
    Giménez, Alberto
    Freysdottir, Jona
    Troye-Blomberg, Marita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Fernández, Carmen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Quinolinic alkaloids from Galipea longiflora suppress inflammatory cytokine production in vitro and control inflammatory reaction in vivo upon Leishmania infectionIn: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An antileishmanial activity of quinolinic alkaloids from Galipea longiflora Krause, known as Evanta, has been demonstrated. We have previously shown that, apart from its leishmanicidal effect, in vitro pretreatment of spleen cells with an alkaloid extract of Evanta (AEE) interfered with the proliferation and interferon-g production in lymphocytes polyclonally activated either with concanavalin A or anti-CD3. In the present study, we investigated if AEE could interfere with antigen-specific lymphocyte activation. We found that in vitro and in vivo treatment reduced recall lymphocyte responses, as measured by IFN-g production (55 % and 63 % reduction compared to untreated cells, respectively). Apart from IFN-g, the production of IL-12 and TNF were also suppressed. No effects were observed for meglumine antimoniate (SbV), the conventional drug used to treat leishmaniasis. When mice infected with Leishmania braziliensis promastigotes in the hind footpad were treated with AEE, the dynamics of the infection changed and the footpath thickness was efficiently controlled. The parasite load was also reduced but to a lesser extent than upon treatment with SbV. Combined treatment efficiently controlled both the thickness and parasite load since smaller lesions during the entire course of the infection were seen in the mice treated with AEE plus SbV compared with AEE or SbV alone. We discuss the benefits of combined administration of AEE plus SbV.

  • 45.
    Canedo, P.
    et al.
    University of Porto, Portugal.
    Thorselius, M.
    Uppsala University.
    Thunberg, U.
    Uppsala University.
    Sällström, J.
    Uppsala University.
    Sundström, C.
    Uppsala University.
    Rosén, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderberg, O.
    University of Porto, Portugal.
    A Follicular Dendritic Cell Line Promotes Somatic Hypermutations in Ramos cells In Vitro2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 70-71Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 46. Canedo, P.
    et al.
    Thorsélius, M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Thunberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Oncology.
    Sällström, J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Rosén, A.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    A follicular dendritic cell line promotes somatic hypermutations in Ramos cells in vitro2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 70-71Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47. Carannante, Valentina
    et al.
    Olofsson, Karl
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Van Oojen, Hanna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Edwards, Steven
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Brismar, Hjalmar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Lundqvist, Andreas
    Wiklund, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Önfelt, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Novel platform for studying infiltration, migration and cytotoxicity of human Natural Killer cells in solid tumors2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 315-315Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Carlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Getahun, Andrew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Rutemark, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Heyman, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Impaired antibody responses but normal proliferation of CD4+ T cells in mice lacking complement receptors 1 and 22009In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 70, no 2, p. 77-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Severely impaired Ab responses are seen in animals lacking C   (complement) factors C2, C3 or C4 as well as CR1/2 (C receptors 1 and   2). The molecular mechanism behind this phenomenon is not understood.   One possibility is that C-containing immune complexes are endocytosed   via CR2 on B cells and presented to specific CD4(+) T cells, which   would then proliferate and provide efficient help to specific B cells.   In vitro, B cells can endocytose immune complexes via CR1/2 and present   the Ag to T cells. Whether absence of this Ag presenting function in   Cr2(-/-) mice (mice lacking CR1/2) explains their low Ab response is   unclear. To address this question, Cr2(-/-) and wild type mice were   transferred with OVA-specific T cells, obtained from the DO11.10 strain   which has a transgenic TCR recognizing an OVA peptide. The animals were   subsequently immunized with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) conjugated to   OVA. Interestingly, proliferation of the OVA-specific T cells was   normal in Cr2(-/-) mice, although their Ab response to both SRBC and   OVA was severely impaired. These observations suggest that the impaired   Ab response in Cr2(-/-) mice cannot be explained by a lack of  appropriate induction of T cell help.

  • 49.
    Carlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Hjelm, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Conrad, Daniel H.
    Heyman, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    IgE enhances specific antibody and T cell responses in mice overexpressing CD232007In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 66, no 2-3, p. 261-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IgE administered with its specific antigen in vivo induces enhanced proliferation of specific T cells as well as enhanced production of specific antibodies. Both effects are dependent on the low-affinity receptor for IgE (CD23) and the underlying mechanism is thought to be increased antigen presentation following uptake of IgE/antigen complexes via CD23+ B cells. By contrast, CD23 negatively regulates antibody responses to antigens administered with alum, i.e. without IgE. This effect has been observed as low IgG1 and IgE responses in transgenic mice overexpressing CD23 (CD23Tg). The present study was designed to test whether IgE could enhance antibody and T-cell responses in CD23Tg animals or whether CD23's downregulatory effect precludes IgE-mediated enhancement. IgE-anti-TNP administered with OVA-TNP enhances the OVA-specific antibody responses in wild-type (wt) and CD23Tg mice equally well. Interestingly, the total magnitude of antibody responses to IgE + OVA-TNP and to uncomplexed OVA-TNP, as well as to sheep erythrocytes and keyhole limpet haemocyanine, were lower in the CD23Tg mice. IgE induced proliferation of OVA-specific CD4+ T cells to the same degree in wt and CD23Tg mice. The effect on T cells was dependent on CD23+ B cells as demonstrated in in vitro proliferation assays. In conclusion, CD23 does indeed have dual immunoregulatory effects in the same animal. The receptor mediates enhancement of antibody and T-cell responses to IgE-complexed antigen, most likely via increased presentation of complexed antigen, while it negatively regulates the total antibody response to a variety of antigens.

  • 50. Carvalho, Ricardo F S
    et al.
    Mahshid, Yilmaz
    Claesson, Hans-Erik
    Glimelius, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Oncology.
    Fischer, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson, Gunnar
    Expression of mast cell tryptases in Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 53-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tryptase is the most abundant protease in human mast cells, and is often used as a marker for the enumeration of mast cells in tissue. Here we report that tumour cells from Hodgkin lymphoma, the so called Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells, can express tryptase. Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines expressed mRNA for both alpha- and beta-tryptase and also produced the protein, although at much lower concentrations than mast cells. However, the frequency of tryptase positive HRS-cells in situ was very low. This report demonstrates that tumour cells of lymphoid origin can express tryptase in vitro and in situ.

12345 1 - 50 of 224
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf