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  • 1.
    Abdillahi, Suado M.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Div Infect Med, Dept Clin Sci, Tornavagen 10, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Maass, Tobias
    Univ Cologne, Fac Med, Ctr Biochem, Ctr Mol Med Cologne, D-50931 Cologne, Germany.
    Kasetty, Gopinath
    Lund Univ, Div Resp Med & Allergol, Dept Clin Sci, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Strömstedt, Adam A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi.
    Baumgarten, Maria
    Lund Univ, Div Infect Med, Dept Clin Sci, Tornavagen 10, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Tati, Ramesh
    Lund Univ, Div Infect Med, Dept Clin Sci, Tornavagen 10, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Nordin, Sara L.
    Lund Univ, Div Infect Med, Dept Clin Sci, Tornavagen 10, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Walse, Björn
    Sarom Biostruct AB, S-22363 Lund, Sweden.
    Wagener, Raimund
    Univ Cologne, Fac Med, Ctr Biochem, Ctr Mol Med Cologne, D-50931 Cologne, Germany.
    Schmidtchen, Artur
    Lund Univ, Div Dermatol & Venereol, Dept Clin Sci, S-22184 Lund, Sweden;Univ Copenhagen, Bispebjerg Hosp, Dept Biomed Sci, Copenhagen Wound Healing Ctr, DK-2400 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Mörgelin, Matthias
    Lund Univ, Div Infect Med, Dept Clin Sci, Tornavagen 10, S-22184 Lund, Sweden;Colzyx AB, S-22381 Lund, Sweden.
    Collagen VI Contains Multiple Host Defense Peptides with Potent In Vivo Activity2018In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 201, no 3, p. 1007-1020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collagen VI is a ubiquitous extracellular matrix component that forms extensive microfibrillar networks in most connective tissues. In this study, we describe for the first time, to our knowledge, that the collagen VI von Willebrand factor type A like domains exhibit a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in human skin infections in vivo. In silico sequence and structural analysis of VWA domains revealed that they contain cationic and amphipathic peptide sequence motifs, which might explain the antimicrobial nature of collagen VI. In vitro and in vivo studies show that these peptides exhibited significant antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa through membrane disruption. Our findings shed new light on the role of collagen VI derived peptides in innate host defense and provide templates for development of peptide-based antibacterial therapies.

  • 2.
    Ahmed, Aisha S.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Nobel Vag 9, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gedin, Per
    Lowenstromska Hosp, Ortho Ctr Stockholm, S-19489 Upplands Vasby, Sweden.
    Hugo, Anders
    Lowenstromska Hosp, Ortho Ctr Stockholm, S-19489 Upplands Vasby, Sweden.
    Bakalkin, Georgy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Kanar, Alkass
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden;Swedish Natl Board Forens Med, S-17165 Solna, Sweden.
    Hart, David A.
    Univ Calgary, McCaig Inst Bone & Joint Hlth, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada.
    Druid, Henrik
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden;Swedish Natl Board Forens Med, S-17165 Solna, Sweden.
    Svensson, Camilla
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kosek, Eva
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Nobel Vag 9, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Spine Ctr, Lowenstromska Hosp, S-19489 Upplands Vasby, Sweden.
    Activation of NF-kappa B in Synovium versus Cartilage from Patients with Advanced Knee Osteoarthritis: A Potential Contributor to Inflammatory Aspects of Disease Progression2018In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 201, no 7, p. 1918-1927Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to assess the activation and association of the NF-kappa B system across synovial membrane (SM) and articular cartilage (AC) in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and ascertain its potential effects on catabolic mediator expression in advanced OA. SM and AC were obtained from 40 OA patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty and from 19 postmortem control subjects. NF-kappa B subunit RelA in nuclear and cytosolic fractions and NF-kappa B1-DNA binding in nuclear extracts was assessed by ELISA, whereas NFKB1, RELA, IL-8, IL-6, and MMP3 gene expression were analyzed by reverse transcriptase-quantitative PCR in tissues. We observed higher SM nuclear RelA protein levels and upregulated NF-kappa B1-DNA binding in OA patients compared with postmortem controls. However, in AC, lower nuclear RelA levels were observed compared with cytosolic extracts in patients. Nuclear RelA levels correlated positively with NF-kappa B1-DNA binding in SM and AC in patients. SM RELA and MMP3 mRNA levels were upregulated, whereas IL-8 and IL-6 as well as AC RELA were downregulated in patients compared with controls. In SM, nuclear RelA levels correlated positively with MMP3 gene expression in patients. A negative correlation was observed between SM nuclear RelA levels and AC NF-kappa B1-DNA binding, and SM nuclear NF-kappa B1-DNA binding correlated negatively with AC MMP3 and NFKB1 mRNA levels in patients. These findings highlight NF-kappa B-triggered cross-talk and feedback mechanisms between SM and AC in OA. Further, our findings strongly support a role for an activated NF-kappa B system in the transcriptional mechanism of inflammatory processes, especially in SM of patients with advanced OA.

  • 3. Ahrens, Richard
    et al.
    Waddell, Amanda
    Seidu, Luqman
    Blanchard, Carine
    Carey, Rebecca
    Forbes, Elizabeth
    Lampinen, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Wilson, Tara
    Cohen, Elizabeth
    Stringer, Keith
    Ballard, Edgar
    Munitz, Ariel
    Xu, Huan
    Lee, Nancy
    Lee, James J.
    Rothenberg, Marc E.
    Denson, Lee
    Hogan, Simon P.
    Intestinal Macrophage/Epithelial Cell-Derived CCL11/Eotaxin-1 Mediates Eosinophil Recruitment and Function in Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis2008In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 181, no 10, p. 7390-7399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical studies have demonstrated a link between the eosinophil-selective chemokines, eotaxins (eotaxin-1/CCL11 and eotaxin-2/CCL24), eosinophils, and the inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (UC). However, the cellular source and individual contribution of the eotaxins to colonic eosinophilic accumulation in inflammatory bowel diseases remain unclear. In this study we demonstrate, by gene array and quantitative PCR, elevated levels of eotaxin-1 mRNA in the rectosigmoid colon of pediatric UC patients. We show that elevated levels of eotaxin-1 mRNA positively correlated with rectosigmoid eosinophil numbers. Further, colonic eosinophils appeared to be degranulating, and the levels positively correlated with disease severity. Using the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced intestinal epithelial injury model, we show that DSS treatment of mice strongly induced colonic eotaxin-1 and eotaxin-2 expression and eosinophil levels. Analysis of eosinophil-deficient mice defined an effector role for eosinophils in disease pathology. DSS treatment of eotaxin-2(-/-) and eotaxin-1/2(-/-) mice demonstrated that eosinophil recruitment was dependent on eotaxin-1. In situ and immunofluorescence analysis-identified eotaxin-1 expression was restricted to intestinal F4/80(+)CD11b(+) macrophages in DSS-induced epithelia] injury and to CD68(+) intestinal macrophages and the basolateral compartment of intestinal epithelial cells in pediatric UC. These data demonstrate that intestinal macrophage and epithelial cell-derived eotaxin-1 plays a critical role in the regulation of eosinophil recruitment in colonic eosinophilic disease such as pediatric UC and provides a basis for targeting the eosinophil/eotaxin-1 axis in UC.

  • 4. Amara, Umme
    et al.
    Flierl, Michael A.
    Rittirsch, Daniel
    Klos, Andreas
    Chen, Hui
    Acker, Barbara
    Brueckner, Uwe B.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Gebhard, Florian
    Lambris, John D.
    Huber-Lang, Markus
    Molecular Intercommunication between the Complement and Coagulation Systems2010In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 185, no 9, p. 5628-5636Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complement system as well as the coagulation system has fundamental clinical implications in the context of life-threatening tissue injury and inflammation. Associations between both cascades have been proposed, but the precise molecular mechanisms remain unknown. The current study reports multiple links for various factors of the coagulation and fibrinolysis cascades with the central complement components C3 and C5 in vitro and ex vivo. Thrombin, human coagulation factors (F) XIa, Xa, and IXa, and plasmin were all found to effectively cleave C3 and C5. Mass spectrometric analyses identified the cleavage products as C3a and C5a, displaying identical molecular weights as the native anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Cleavage products also exhibited robust chemoattraction of human mast cells and neutrophils, respectively. Enzymatic activity for C3 cleavage by the investigated clotting and fibrinolysis factors is defined in the following order: FXa > plasmin > thrombin > FIXa > FXIa > control. Furthermore, FXa-induced cleavage of C3 was significantly suppressed in the presence of the selective FXa inhibitors fondaparinux and enoxaparin in a concentration-dependent manner. Addition of FXa to human serum or plasma activated complement ex vivo, represented by the generation of C3a, C5a, and the terminal complement complex, and decreased complement hemolytic serum activity that defines exact serum concentration that results in complement-mediated lysis of 50% of sensitized sheep erythrocytes. Furthermore, in plasma from patients with multiple injuries (n = 12), a very early appearance and correlation of coagulation (thrombin-antithrombin complexes) and the complement activation product C5a was found. The present data suggest that coagulation/fibrinolysis proteases may act as natural C3 and C5 convertases, generating biologically active anaphylatoxins, linking both cascades via multiple direct interactions in terms of a complex serine protease system. The Journal of Immunology, 2010, 185: 5628-5636.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Yvonne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Hammarström, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Lönnerdal, Bo
    Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
    Graverholt, Gitte
    Arla Foods Ingredients, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Fält, Helen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Hernell, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Formula feeding skews immune cell composition toward adaptive immunity compared to breastfeeding2009In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 183, no 7, p. 4322-4328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ontogeny of the immune system and the effect thereon by type of infant feeding is incompletely understood. We analyzed frequencies and composition of immune cells in blood of breastfed (BF) and formula-fed (FF) infants at 1.5, 4, and 6 mo of age. Three formulas with the same protein concentration but with varying levels of alpha-lactalbumin and caseinoglycomacropeptide were compared. Twenty-nine exclusively BF infants served as reference, and 17 infants in each formula group completed the study. Whole blood and PBMCs were analyzed by flow cytometry and immunoflow cytometry, respectively. Leukocyte count of BF infants increased with time due to increased frequency of neutrophils. Lymphocyte count was high at 1.5 mo and was unchanged over time, as were the relative proportions of CD4+ alphabetaT cells, CD8+ alphabetaT cells, B cells, NK cells, and gammadeltaT cells. Most CD45R0+CD3+ cells were HLA-DR- and hence memory cells. Compared with breastfeeding, formula feeding resulted in a significant decrease in proportion of NK cells, but a significant increase in naive CD4+ alphabetaT cells and an elevated CD4-to-CD8 ratio, that is, 3.3 in the combined FF groups compared with 2.6 in the BF group. No significant differences were found between the three groups of FF infants. In conclusion, blood cells of lymphoid lineage did not change significantly in frequencies or composition from 1.5 to 6 mo of age in BF infants. In contrast, FF infants displayed an ongoing maturation of adaptive immunity cells and a delayed recruitment of innate immunity cells as compared with BF infants.

  • 6. Arencibia, I
    et al.
    Suárez, N C
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Wolf-Watz, H
    Sundqvist, K G
    Yersinia invasin, a bacterial beta1-integrin ligand, is a potent inducer of lymphocyte motility and migration to collagen type IV and fibronectin.1997In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 159, no 4, p. 1853-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Yersinia pseudotuberculosis invasin protein was found to be a potent inducer of pseudopodia formation and chemotactic and haptotactic migration in human T lymphocytes. Checkerboard analysis confirmed that migration was directional. The Yersinia invasin triggered migration of otherwise poorly migratory normal T cells on fibronectin and in particular on collagen type IV, and augmented the migration of leukemic T cell lines on these components. Invasin-induced lymphocyte migration was inhibited by staurosporin that selectively prevented pseudopodia formation but, noteworthy, augmented adhesion. The motogenic and attractant properties of invasin (Inv) were mediated via beta1-integrins, as shown by lack of effect of Inv on the motility of a beta1-integrin-negative lymphoid cell line and inhibition of invasin-induced lymphocyte motility by anti-beta1 Abs. Inv was markedly more effective than the extracellular matrix components fibronectin, collagen type IV, and laminin, which also interact with lymphocyte beta1-integrins, with respect to induction of pseudopodia, chemotaxis, and haptotaxis. Thus, Yersinia invasin is a model ligand for induction of lymphocyte motility via beta1-integrins. The extraordinary capacity of Inv to trigger and guide T lymphocyte motility and potentiate lymphocyte migration to extracellular matrix components may be of pathogenetic significance for the movement of lymphocytes to extraintestinal sites secondary to Yersinia infection.

  • 7. Arruda, L. C. M.
    et al.
    Gaballa, A.
    Uhlin, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Graft γδ TCR Sequencing Identifies Public Clonotypes Associated with Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Efficacy in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients and Unravels Cytomegalovirus Impact on Repertoire Distribution2019In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 202, no 6, p. 1859-1870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the impact of donor graft composition on clinical outcomes after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been studied, little is known about the role of intragraft γδ TCR repertoire on clinical outcomes following HSCT. Using a high-throughput sequencing platform, we sought to analyze the TCR γ-chain (TRG) repertoire of γδ T cells within donor stem cell grafts and address its potential impact on clinical response in the corresponding patients. A total of 20 peripheral blood stem cell grafts were analyzed, and donors were classified as CMV+/- The respective acute myeloid leukemia recipients were followed for disease relapse and acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD) development post-HSCT. In all samples, TRG repertoire showed a reduced diversity and displayed overrepresented clones. This was more prominent in grafts from CMV+ donors, which presented a more private repertoire, lower diversity, skewed distribution, and reduced usage of the V9-JP pairing. Grafts given to nonrelapse patients presented a more public repertoire and increased presence of long sequence clonotypes. Variable-joining gene segment usage was not associated with aGvHD development, but a higher usage of V2-JP1 pairing and lower usage of V4-J2/V5-J2/V8-JP2 were observed in grafts given to nonrelapse patients. Our work identified five private overrepresented and one public CDR3 sequence (CATWDGPYYKKLF) associated with CMV infection, in addition to 12 highly frequent public sequences present exclusively in grafts given to nonrelapse patients. Our findings show that, despite CMV infection reshaping the TRG repertoire, TRG composition is not associated with aGvHD development, and several public sequences are associated with clinical remission.

  • 8.
    Babbin, Brian A.
    et al.
    Epithelial Pathobiology Research Unit, Department of Pathology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Laukoetter, Mike G.
    Department of General Surgery, University of Muenster, Muenster, Germany.
    Nava, Porfirio
    Epithelial Pathobiology Research Unit, Department of Pathology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Koch, Stefan
    Epithelial Pathobiology Research Unit, Department of Pathology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Lee, Winston Y.
    Epithelial Pathobiology Research Unit, Department of Pathology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Capaldo, Christopher T.
    Epithelial Pathobiology Research Unit, Department of Pathology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Peatman, Eric
    Epithelial Pathobiology Research Unit, Department of Pathology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Severson, Eric A.
    Epithelial Pathobiology Research Unit, Department of Pathology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Flower, Roderick J.
    The William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
    Perretti, Mauro
    The William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
    Parkos, Charles A.
    Epithelial Pathobiology Research Unit, Department of Pathology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Nusrat, Asma
    Epithelial Pathobiology Research Unit, Department of Pathology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Annexin A1 regulates intestinal mucosal injury, inflammation, and repair2008In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, J Immunol, Vol. 181, no 7, p. 5035-5044Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During mucosal inflammation, a complex array of proinflammatory and protective mechanisms regulates inflammation and severity of injury. Secretion of anti-inflammatory mediators is a mechanism that is critical in controlling inflammatory responses and promoting epithelial restitution and barrier recovery. AnxA1 is a potent anti-inflammatory protein that has been implicated to play a critical immune regulatory role in models of inflammation. Although AnxA1 has been shown to be secreted in intestinal mucosal tissues during inflammation, its potential role in modulating the injury/inflammatory response is not understood. In this study, we demonstrate that AnxA1-deficient animals exhibit increased susceptibility to dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis with greater clinical morbidity and histopathologic mucosal injury. Furthermore, impaired recovery following withdrawal of DSS administration was observed in AnxA1 (-/-) animals compared with wild-type (WT) control mice that was independent of inflammatory cell infiltration. Since AnxA1 exerts its anti-inflammatory properties through stimulation of ALX/FPRL-1, we explored the role of this receptor-ligand interaction in regulating DSS-induced colitis. Interestingly, treatment with an ALX/FPRL-1 agonist, 15-epi-lipoxin A4 reversed the enhanced sensitivity of AnxA1 (-/-) mice to DSS colitis. In contrast, 15-epi-lipoxin A4 did not significantly improve the severity of disease in WT animals. Additionally, differential expression of ALX/FPLR-1 in control and DSS-treated WT and AnxA1-deficient animals suggested a potential role for AnxA1 in regulating ALX/FPRL-1 expression under pathophysiological conditions. Together, these results support a role of endogenous AnxA1 in the protective and reparative properties of the intestinal mucosal epithelium.

  • 9. Baharom, Faezzah
    et al.
    Thomas, Saskia
    Rankin, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lepzien, Rico
    Pourazar, Jamshid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Behndig, Annelie F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Smed-Sorensen, Anna
    Dendritic Cells and Monocytes with Distinct Inflammatory Responses Reside in Lung Mucosa of Healthy Humans2016In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 196, no 11, p. 4498-4509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Every breath we take contains potentially harmful pathogens or allergens. Dendritic cells (DCs), monocytes, and macrophages are essential in maintaining a delicate balance of initiating immunity without causing collateral damage to the lungs because of an exaggerated inflammatory response. To document the diversity of lung mononuclear phagocytes at steady-state, we performed bronchoscopies on 20 healthy subjects, sampling the proximal and distal airways (bronchial wash and bronchoalveolar lavage, respectively), as well as mucosal tissue (endobronchial biopsies). In addition to a substantial population of alveolar macrophages, we identified subpopulations of monocytes, myeloid DCs (MDCs), and plasmacytoid DCs in the lung mucosa. Intermediate monocytes and MDCs were highly frequent in the airways compared with peripheral blood. Strikingly, the density of mononuclear phagocytes increased upon descending the airways. Monocytes from blood and airways produced 10-fold more proinflammatory cytokines than MDCs upon ex vivo stimulation. However, airway monocytes were less inflammatory than blood monocytes, suggesting a more tolerant nature. The findings of this study establish how to identify human lung mononuclear phagocytes and how they function in normal conditions, so that dysregulations in patients with respiratory diseases can be detected to elucidate their contribution to immunity or pathogenesis.

  • 10. Bas, Anna
    et al.
    Hammarström, Sten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Hammarström, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Extrathymic TCR gene rearrangement in human small intestine: identification of new splice forms of recombination activating gene-1 mRNA with selective tissue expression.2003In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 171, no 7, p. 3359-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two new 5'-untranslated region (5'UTR) exons were identified in the human gene for the lymphocyte-specific endonuclease recombination activating gene-1 (RAG1) required for the somatic recombination yielding functional Ag receptors. These 5'UTR exons were used in three different splice forms by jejunal lymphocytes of the T cell lineage. RAG1 mRNA containing the previously described 5'UTR exon was not expressed in these cells. Conversely, one of the new 5'UTR exons was not expressed in thymus. The new RAG1 mRNA splice forms were all expressed in immature T cells (CD2(+)CD7(+)CD3(-)). This cell population also expressed high levels of mRNA for the pre-T alpha-chain. In situ hybridization demonstrated jejunal cells expressing the new splice forms of RAG1 mRNA, both intraepithelially and in lamina propria. Pre-T alpha-chain mRNA-expressing cells were detected at the same sites. These results strongly suggest ongoing TCR gene rearrangement in human small intestinal mucosa, yielding T cells specially adapted for this environment. This seems to be achieved by two parallel processes, extrathymic T cell development and peripheral Ag-driven TCR editing.

  • 11.
    Bendrik, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Estradiol Increases IL-8 Secretion of Normal Human Breast Tissue and Breast Cancer In Vivo2009In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 182, no 1, p. 371-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IL-8 or CXCL8 has been associated with tumor angiogenesis, metastasis, and poor prognosis in breast cancer. Estrogen is crucial in breast carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Whether sex steroids affect IL-8 secretion of normal breast tissue or breast cancer is not known. Several cell types in a tissue secrete IL-8. Hence, regulatory mechanisms of IL-8 need to be investigated in whole tissue. We used microdialysis to sample IL-8 in normal human breast tissue in situ in pre- and postmenopausal women, preoperatively in breast cancers of women, and in experimental breast cancer in mice. We found a significant positive correlation between IL-8 and estradiol in normal breast tissue and hormone-dependent breast cancer in vivo. Ex vivo, estradiol exposure increased the IL-8 secretion of normal whole breast tissue in culture. In experimental breast cancer, estradiol increased IL-8 whereas the anti-estrogen tamoxifen inhibited the secretion of IL-8 both in vitro and extracellularly in vivo in tumors of nude mice. An anti-IL-8 Ab inhibited endothelial cell proliferation induced by cancer cell produced IL-8 and tumors with low IL-8 levels exhibited decreased angiogenesis. Our results strongly suggest that estradiol has a critical role in the regulation of IL-8 in normal human breast tissue and human breast cancer. IL-8 may present a novel therapeutic target for estrogen driven breast carcinogenesis and tumor progression.

  • 12.
    Bengtson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundblad, Arne
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larson, Göran
    Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden .
    Påhlsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes from Individuals Carrying the G329A Mutation in the α1,3-Fucosyltransferase VII Gene (FUT7) Roll on E- and P-Selectins2002In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 169, no 7, p. 3940-3946Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We recently identified several individuals carrying a missense mutation (G329A; Arg110-Gln) in the FUT7 gene encoding fucosyltransferase VII. This enzyme is involved in the biosynthesis of the sialyl Lewis x (Lex) epitope on human leukocytes, which has been identified as an important component of leukocyte ligands for E- and P-selectin. No enzyme activity was measurable in expression studies in COS-7 cells using the mutated FUT7 construct. One of the identified individuals carried this mutation homozygously. Flow cytometry analysis of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) from this individual showed a nearly complete absence of staining with mAbs directed against sialyl Lex and a diminished staining with an E-selectin IgG chimera. However, staining with P-selectin IgG chimera and Abs directed against P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 was not affected by the mutation. PMN from the homozygously mutated individual was further analyzed in an in vitro flow chamber assay. The number of rolling PMN and the rolling velocities on both E- and P-selectin were in the range of PMN from nonmutated individuals. FUT4 and FUT7 mRNA was quantified in PMN isolated from individuals carrying the FUT7 mutation. It was found that PMN from both FUT7 homozygously and heterozygously mutated individuals exhibited an elevated expression of FUT4 mRNA compared with PMN from FUT7 nonmutated individuals. The elevated expression of fucosyltransferase IV was reflected as an increased expression of the Lex and CD65s Ags on PMN from these individuals. The significance of the mutation was supported by transfection of BJAB cells.

  • 13.
    Blomgran, Robert
    et al.
    New York University .
    Ernst, Joel D
    New York University .
    Lung neutrophils facilitate activation of naive antigen-specific CD4+ T cells during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection2011In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 186, no 12, p. 7110-7119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Initiation of the adaptive immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis occurs in the lung-draining mediastinal lymph node and requires transport of M. tuberculosis by migratory dendritic cells (DCs) to the local lymph node. The previously published observations that 1) neutrophils are a transiently prominent population of M. tuberculosis-infected cells in the lungs early in infection and 2) that the peak of infected neutrophils immediately precedes the peak of infected DCs in the lungs prompted us to characterize the role of neutrophils in the initiation of adaptive immune responses to M. tuberculosis. We found that, although depletion of neutrophils in vivo increased the frequency of M. tuberculosis-infected DCs in the lungs, it decreased trafficking of DCs to the mediastinal lymph node. This resulted in delayed activation (CD69 expression) and proliferation of naive M. tuberculosis Ag85B-specific CD4 T cells in the mediastinal lymph node. To further characterize the role of neutrophils in DC migration, we used a Transwell chemotaxis system and found that DCs that were directly infected by M. tuberculosis migrated poorly in response to CCL19, an agonist for the chemokine receptor CCR7. In contrast, DCs that had acquired M. tuberculosis through uptake of infected neutrophils exhibited unimpaired migration. These results revealed a mechanism wherein neutrophils promote adaptive immune responses to M. tuberculosis by delivering M. tuberculosis to DCs in a form that makes DCs more effective initiators of naive CD4 T cell activation. These observations provide insight into a mechanism for neutrophils to facilitate initiation of adaptive immune responses in tuberculosis.

  • 14. Brauner, Hanna
    et al.
    Elemans, Marjet
    Lemos, Sara
    Broberger, Christian
    Holmberg, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Flodström-Tullberg, Malin
    Kärre, Klas
    Höglund, Petter
    Distinct phenotype and function of NK cells in the pancreas of nonobese diabetic mice.2010In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 184, no 5, p. 2272-2280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about target organ-infiltrating NK cells in type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune diseases. In this study, we identified NK cells with a unique phenotype in the pancreas of NOD mice. Pancreatic NK cells, localized to the endocrine and exocrine parts, were present before T cells during disease development and did not require T cells for their infiltration. Furthermore, NK cells, or NK cell precursors, from the spleen could traffic to the pancreas, where they displayed the pancreatic phenotype. Pancreatic NK cells from other mouse strains shared phenotypic characteristics with pancreatic NK cells from NOD mice, but displayed less surface killer cell lectin-like receptor G1, a marker for mature NK cells that have undergone proliferation, and also did not proliferate to the same extent. A subset of NOD mouse pancreatic NK cells produced IFN-gamma spontaneously, suggesting ongoing effector responses. However, most NOD mouse pancreatic NK cells were hyporesponsive compared with spleen NK cells, as reflected by diminished cytokine secretion and a lower capacity to degranulate. Interestingly, such hyporesponsiveness was not seen in pancreatic NK cells from the nonautoimmune strain C57BL/6, suggesting that this feature is not a general property of pancreatic NK cells. Based on our data, we propose that NK cells are sentinel cells in a normal pancreas. We further speculate that during inflammation, pancreatic NK cells initially mediate proinflammatory effector functions, potentially contributing to organ-specific autoimmunity, but later become hyporesponsive because of exhaustion or regulation.

  • 15. Brenner, David
    et al.
    Andersen, Peter M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience. Univ Ulm, Dept Neurol, Ulm, Germany.
    Ludolph, Albert C.
    Weishaupt, Jochen H.
    Comment on "Cutting Edge: Inhibiting TBK1 by Compound II Ameliorates Autoimmune Disease in Mice"2016In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 196, no 2, p. 530-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Båve, Ullvi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Alm, Gunar V.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    The combination of apoptotic U937 cells and lupus IgG is a potent IF inducer2000In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 165, no 6, p. 3519-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have signs of an ongoing IFN-alpha production, that may be of pathogenic significance in the disease. We previously showed that SLE patients have an IFN-alpha-inducing factor in blood, probably consisting of complexes containing anti-DNA Abs and immunostimulatory DNA. The DNA component could be derived from apoptotic cells, because SLE patients have been reported to have both increased apoptosis and reduced clearance of apoptotic cell material. In the present study, we therefore investigated whether apoptotic cells, together with IgG from SLE patients, could act as an IFN-alpha inducer in normal PBMC in vitro. We found that apoptotic cells of the myeloid leukemia cell line U937 as well as four other cell lines (MonoMac6, H9, Jurkat, U266) could induce IFN-alpha production in PBMC when combined with IgG from SLE patients. The IFN-alpha production by PBMC was much enhanced when PBMC were costimulated by IFN-alpha2b. The ability of IgG from different SLE patients to promote IFN-alpha induction by apoptotic U937 cells was associated with the presence of anti-ribonucleoprotein Abs, but not clearly with occurrence of anti-DNA Abs. These results suggest that apoptotic cells in the presence of autoantibodies can cause production of a clearly immunostimulatory cytokine, which is IFN-alpha. This mechanism for induction of IFN-alpha production could well be operative also in vivo, explain the IFN-alpha production seen in SLE patients, and be important in the pathogenesis of SLE.

  • 17.
    Båve, Ullvi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Magnuson, Mattias
    Eloranta, Maija-Leena
    Perers, Anders
    Alm, Gunnar V.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Fc gamma RIIa is expressed on natural IFN-alpha-producing cells (plasmacytoid dendritic cells) and is required for the IFN-alpha production induced by apoptotic cells combined with lupus IgG2003In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 171, no 6, p. 3296-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An ongoing production of IFN-alpha may be of etiopathogenic significance in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It may be due to the natural IFN-producing cells (NIPC), also termed plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC), activated by immune complexes that contain nucleic acids derived from apoptotic cells. We here examined the role of FcgammaR in the IFN-alpha production in vitro by PBMC induced by the combination of apoptotic U937 cells and autoantibody-containing IgG from SLE patients (SLE-IgG). The Fc portion of the SLE-IgG was essential to induce IFN-alpha production, because Fab fragments or F(ab')(2) were ineffective. Normal, especially heat-aggregated, IgG inhibited the IFN-alpha production, suggesting a role for FcgammaR on PBMC. Using blocking anti-FcgammaR Abs, the FcgammaRIIa,c (CD32) but not FcgammaRI or FcgammaRIII were shown to be involved in the IFN-alpha induction by apoptotic cells combined with SLE-IgG, but not by HSV or CpG DNA. In contrast, the action of all of these inducers was inhibited by the anti-FcgammaRIIa,b,c mAb AT10 or heat-aggregated IgG. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that approximately 50% of the BDCA-2-positive PBMC, i.e., NIPC/PDC, expressed low but significant levels of FcgammaRII, as did most of the actual IFN-alpha producers activated by HSV. RT-PCR applied to NIPC/PDC purified by FACS demonstrated expression of FcgammaRIIa, but not of FcgammaRIIb or FcgammaRIIc. We conclude that FcgammaRIIa on NIPC/PDC is involved in the activation of IFN-alpha production by interferogenic immune complexes, but may also mediate inhibitory signals. The FcgammaRIIa could therefore have a key function in NIPC/PDC and be a potential therapeutic target in SLE.

  • 18.
    Båve, Ullvi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Mattias
    Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Eloranta, Maija-Leena
    Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Perers, Anders
    Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Alm, Gunnar V.
    Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Fc gamma RIIa is expressed on natural IFN-alpha-producing cells (plasmacytoid dendritic cells) and is required for the IFN-alpha production induced by apoptotic cells combined with lupus IgG2003In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 171, no 6, p. 3296-3302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An ongoing production of IFN-alpha may be of etiopathogenic significance in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It may be due to the natural IFN-producing cells (NIPC), also termed plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC), activated by immune complexes that contain nucleic acids derived from apoptotic cells. We here examined the role of FcgammaR in the IFN-alpha production in vitro by PBMC induced by the combination of apoptotic U937 cells and autoantibody-containing IgG from SLE patients (SLE-IgG). The Fc portion of the SLE-IgG was essential to induce IFN-alpha production, because Fab fragments or F(ab)(2) were ineffective. Normal, especially heat-aggregated, IgG inhibited the IFN-alpha production, suggesting a role for FcgammaR on PBMC. Using blocking anti-FcgammaR Abs, the FcgammaRIIa,c (CD32) but not FcgammaRI or FcgammaRIII were shown to be involved in the IFN-alpha induction by apoptotic cells combined with SLE-IgG, but not by HSV or CpG DNA. In contrast, the action of all of these inducers was inhibited by the anti-FcgammaRIIa,b,c mAb AT10 or heat-aggregated IgG. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that similar to50% of the BDCA-2-positive PBMC, i.e., NIPC/PDC, expressed low but significant levels of FcgammaRII, as did most of the actual IFN-a producers activated by HSV. RT-PCR applied to NIPC/PDC purified by FACS demonstrated expression of FcgammaRIIa, but not of FcgammaRIIb or FcgammaRIIc. We conclude that FcgammaRIIa on NIPC/PDC is involved in the activation of IFN-alpha production by interferogenic immune complexes, but may also mediate inhibitory signals. The FcgammaRIIa could therefore have a key function in NIPC/PDC and be a potential therapeutic target in SLE.

  • 19.
    Carlson, M
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Peterson, C G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Venge, P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Human eosinophil peroxidase: purification and characterization1985In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 134, no 3, p. 1875-1879Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) was isolated from granules from granulocytes of a patient with hypereosinophilia. The granules were extracted by means of 0.2 M NaAc, pH 4.0. The purification steps included gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-75 superfine and ion-exchange chromatography on CM-Sephadex G-50. The purified protein showed one band on agarose-electrophoresis, a high peroxidase activity, and a 415-nm/280 nm ratio of 1.15. After reduction, EPO showed two bands on SDS-PAGE of m.w. 52,000 and 15,000, respectively. On gel filtration, the unreduced protein had a m.w. of approximately 77,000. Amino acid analyses showed a high content of arginine and aspartic acid. Monospecific antibodies to EPO were prepared in rabbits, and a specific radioimmunoassay was developed. There was an almost linear correlation between the content of EPO measured by the radioimmunoassay and the number of eosinophils in a mixed cell extract from reference material, indicating the eosinophil origin of EPO. The content of EPO was estimated to be 15.0 micrograms/10(6) eosinophils.

  • 20.
    Carlsson, Emma
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine, Jonköping University, Jönköping, Sweden, Division of Medical Diagnostics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Frostell, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Faresjo, Maria
    School of Health Sciences, Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine, Jonköping University, Jönköping, Sweden, Division of Medical Diagnostics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jonköping, Sweden.
    Psychological stress in children may alter the immune response2014In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 192, no 5, p. 2071-2081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychological stress is a public health issue even in children and has been associated with a number of immunological diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between psychological stress and immune response in healthy children, with special focus on autoimmunity. In this study, psychological stress was based on a composite measure of stress in the family across the domains: 1) serious life events, 2) parenting stress, 3) lack of social support, and 4) parental worries. PBMCs, collected from 5-y-old high-stressed children (n = 26) and from 5-y-old children without high stress within the family (n = 52), from the All Babies In Southeast Sweden cohort, were stimulated with Ags (tetanus toxoid and b-lactoglobulin) and diabetes-related autoantigens (glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, insulin, heat shock protein 60, and tyrosine phosphatase). Immune markers (cytokines and chemokines), clinical parameters (C-peptide, proinsulin, glucose), and cortisol, as an indicator of stress, were analyzed. Children from families with high psychological stress showed a low spontaneous immune activity (IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL10; p less than 0.01) but an increased immune response to tetanus toxoid, b-lactoglobulin, and the autoantigens glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, heat shock protein 60, and tyrosine phosphatase (IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, IFN-g, TNF-A, CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL10; p less than 0.05). Children within the high-stress group showed high level of cortisol, but low level of C-peptide, compared with the control group (p less than 0.05). This supports the hypothesis that psychological stress may contribute to an imbalance in the immune response but also to a pathological effect on the insulin-producing b cells.Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists.

  • 21.
    Carlsson, Emma
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Frostell, Anneli
    Division of Medical Diagnostics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Division of Paediatrics and Diabetes Research Centre, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Psychological Stress in Children May Alter the Immune Response2014In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 192, no 5, p. 2071-2081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychological stress is a public health issue even in children and has been associated with a number of immunological diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between psychological stress and immune response in healthy children, with special focus on autoimmunity. In this study, psychological stress was based on a composite measure of stress in the family across the domains: 1) serious life events, 2) parenting stress, 3) lack of social support, and 4) parental worries. PBMCs, collected from 5-y-old high-stressed children (n = 26) and from 5-y-old children without high stress within the family (n = 52), from the All Babies In Southeast Sweden cohort, were stimulated with Ags (tetanus toxoid and β-lactoglobulin) and diabetes-related autoantigens (glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, insulin, heat shock protein 60, and tyrosine phosphatase). Immune markers (cytokines and chemokines), clinical parameters (C-peptide, proinsulin, glucose), and cortisol, as an indicator of stress, were analyzed. Children from families with high psychological stress showed a low spontaneous immune activity (IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL10; p < 0.01) but an increased immune response to tetanus toxoid, β-lactoglobulin, and the autoantigens glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, heat shock protein 60, and tyrosine phosphatase (IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, IFN-γ, TNF-α, CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL10; p < 0.05). Children within the high-stress group showed high level of cortisol, but low level of C-peptide, compared with the control group (p < 0.05). This supports the hypothesis that psychological stress may contribute to an imbalance in the immune response but also to a pathological effect on the insulin-producing β cells.

  • 22. Chatzouli, Maria
    et al.
    Ntoufa, Stavroula
    Papakonstantinou, Nikos
    Chartomatsidou, Elisavet
    Anagnostopoulos, Achilles
    Kollia, Panagoula
    Ghia, Paolo
    Muzio, Marta
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Belessi, Chrysoula
    Heterogeneous Functional Effects of Concomitant B Cell Receptor and TLR Stimulation in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia with Mutated versus Unmutated Ig Genes2014In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 192, no 10, p. 4518-4524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We recently reported that chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) subgroups with distinct clonotypic BCRs present discrete patterns of TLR expression, function, and/ or tolerance. In this study, to explore whether specific types of BCR/TLR collaboration exist in CLL, we studied the effect of single versus concomitant BCR and/or TLR stimulation on CLL cells from mutated (M-CLL) and unmutated CLL (U-CLL) cases. We stimulated negatively isolated CLL cells by using anti-IgM, imiquimod, and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide for BCR, TLR7, and TLR9, respectively, alone or in combination for different time points. After in vitro culture in the absence of stimulation, differences in p-ERK were identified at any time point, with higher p-ERK levels in U-CLL versus M-CLL. Pronounced p-ERK induction was seen by single stimulation in U-CLL, whereas BCR/TLR synergism was required in M-CLL, in which the effect was overall limited in scale. An opposite pattern was observed regarding induction of apoptosis, as studied by Western blotting for the cleaved fragment of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and the active isoform of caspase-8, with M-CLL responding even to single stimulation, contrasting with U-CLL that showed minimal response. Our findings suggest that concomitant engagement of BCR and TLR leads to differential responses in CLL depending on the mutational status of the BCR. Differential intensity and duration of responses in M-CLL versus U-CLL indicates that the differences in signal transduction between the two subgroups may be primarily quantitative rather than qualitative.

  • 23. Collington, Sarah J
    et al.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Pease, James E
    Jones, Tatiana G
    Rollins, Barrett J
    Westwick, John
    Austen, K Frank
    Williams, Timothy J
    Gurish, Michael F
    Weller, Charlotte L
    The role of the CCL2/CCR2 axis in mouse mast cell migration in vitro and in vivo2010In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 184, no 11, p. 6114-6123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tissue-resident mast cells (MCs) are important in allergic diseases. In a mouse model of allergic airways inflammation, an increase in peribronchiolar MCs was associated with increased concentrations of the chemokine CCL2 in lung lavage. MC progenitors (MCps) arising in bone marrow (BM) are recruited to tissues by transendothelial migration, and we found that CCL2 is chemotactic for MCps in freshly isolated BM in vitro. Immature, but not mature, BM-derived MCs migrated in response to CCL2 when cultured in IL-3+stem cell factor (SCF) but not when cultured in IL-3 alone. However, the cells under both culture conditions expressed mRNA for CCR2, the receptor for CCL2, and bound the radiolabeled chemokine with similar affinities, highlighting SCF as a key mediator in coupling CCR2 to downstream events, culminating in chemotaxis. Immature BM-derived MCs from IL-3 +SCF cultures, when administered i.v., accumulated at skin sites injected with CCL2 in vivo. MCp recruitment to the allergen-sensitized/challenged lung was significantly reduced in CCR2(-/-) and CCL2(-/-) mouse strains. However, reconstitution studies of sublethally irradiated and BM-reconstituted mice indicated that BM cells and stromal elements could provide CCL2, whereas the CCR2 function resided with stromal elements rather than BM cells. These experiments revealed a new function of SCF in chemokine receptor coupling, but they suggest a complex role of the CCL2/CCR2 axis in recruiting MCps during pulmonary inflammation.

  • 24. Cui, Yue
    et al.
    Dahlin, Joakim S.
    Feinstein, Ricardo
    Bankova, Lora G.
    Xing, Wei
    Shin, Kichul
    Gurish, Michael F.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    Mouse Mast Cell Protease-6 and MHC Are Involved in the Development of Experimental Asthma2014In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 193, no 10, p. 4783-4789Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Cui, Yue
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Dahlin, Joakim S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Feinstein, Ricardo
    Bankova, Lora G.
    Xing, Wei
    Shin, Kichul
    Gurish, Michael F.
    Hallgren, Jenny Martinsson
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Mouse Mast Cell Protease-6 and MHC Are Involved in the Development of Experimental Asthma2014In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 193, no 10, p. 4783-4789Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Allergic asthma is a complex disease with a strong genetic component where mast cells play a major role by the release of proinflammatory mediators. In the mouse, mast cell protease-6 (mMCP-6) closely resembles the human version of mast cell tryptase, beta-tryptase. The gene that encodes mMCP-6, Tpsb2, resides close by the H-2 complex (MHC gene) on chromosome 17. Thus, when the original mMCP-6 knockout mice were backcrossed to the BALB/c strain, these mice were carrying the 129/Sv haplotype of MHC (mMCP-6(-/-)/H-2bc). Further backcrossing yielded mMCP-6(-/-) mice with the BALB/c MHC locus. BALB/c mice were compared with mMCP-6(-/-) and mMCP-6(-/-)/H-2bc mice in a mouse model of experimental asthma. Although OVA-sensitized and challenged wild type mice displayed a striking airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), mMCP-6(-/-) mice had less AHR that was comparable with that of mMCP-6(-/-)/H-2bc mice, suggesting that mMCP-6 is required for a full-blown AHR. The mMCP-6(-/-)/H-2bc mice had strikingly reduced lung inflammation, IgE responses, and Th2 cell responses upon sensitization and challenge, whereas the mMCP-6(-/-) mice responded similarly to the wild type mice but with a minor decrease in bronchoalveolar lavage eosinophils. These findings suggest that inflammatory Th2 responses are highly dependent on the MHC-haplotype and that they can develop essentially independently of mMCP-6, whereas mMCP-6 plays a key role in the development of AHR.

  • 26. Dahlberg, Carin I. M.
    et al.
    He, Minghui
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Visnes, Torkild
    Torres, Magda Liz
    Cortizas, Elena M.
    Verdun, Ramiro E.
    Westerberg, Lisa S.
    Severinson, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Ström, Lena
    A Novel Mouse Model for the Hyper-IgM Syndrome: A Spontaneous Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Mutation Leading to Complete Loss of Ig Class Switching and Reduced Somatic Hypermutation2014In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 193, no 9, p. 4732-4738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe a spontaneously derived mouse line that completely failed to induce Ig class switching in vitro and in vivo. The mice inherited abolished IgG serum titers in a recessive manner caused by a spontaneous G -> A transition mutation in codon 112 of the aicda gene, leading to an arginine to histidine replacement (AID(R112H)). Ig class switching was completely reconstituted by expressing wild-type AID. Mice homozygous for AID(R112H) had peripheral B cell hyperplasia and large germinal centers in the absence of Ag challenge. Immunization with SRBCs elicited an Ag-specific IgG1 response in wild-type mice, whereas AID(R112H) mice failed to produce IgG1 and had reduced somatic hypermutation. The phenotype recapitulates the human hyper-IgM (HIGM) syndrome that is caused by point mutations in the orthologous gene in humans, and the AID(R112H) mutation is frequently found in HIGM patients. The AID(R112H) mouse model for HIGM provides a powerful and more precise tool than conventional knockout strategies.

  • 27.
    Dahlin, Joakim S
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Feinstein, Ricardo
    Statens veterinärmedicinska anstalt.
    Cui, Yue
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Heyman, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    CD11c(+) Cells Are Required for Antigen-Induced Increase of Mast Cells in the Lung2012In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 189, no 8, p. 3869-3877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with allergic asthma have more lung mast cells, which likely worsens the symptoms. In experimental asthma, CD11c(+) cells have to be present during the challenge phase for several features of allergic inflammation to occur. Whether CD11c(+) cells play a role for Ag-induced increases of lung mast cells is unknown. In this study, we used diphtheria toxin treatment of sensitized CD11c-diphtheria toxin receptor transgenic mice to deplete CD11c(+) cells. We demonstrate that recruitment of mast cell progenitors to the lung is substantially reduced when CD11c(+) cells are depleted during the challenge phase. This correlated with an impaired induction of endothelial VCAM-1 and led to a significantly reduced number of mature mast cells 1 wk after challenge. Collectively, these data suggest that Ag challenge stimulates CD11c(+) cells to produce cytokines and/or chemokines required for VCAM-1 upregulation on the lung endothelium, which in turn is crucial for the Ag-induced mast cell progenitor recruitment and the increase in mast cell numbers.

  • 28. Davids, Barbara J.
    et al.
    Palm, J. E. Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Housley, Michael P.
    Smith, Jennifer R.
    Andersen, Yolanda S.
    Martin, Martin G.
    Hendrickson, Barbara A.
    Johansen, Finn-Eirik
    Svärd, Staffan G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Gillin, Frances D.
    Eckmann, Lars
    Polymeric immunoglobulin receptor in intestinal immune defense against the lumen-dwelling protozoan parasite Giardia2006In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 177, no 9, p. 6281-6290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR) is conserved in mammals and has an avian homologue, suggesting evolutionarily important functions in vertebrates. It transports multimeric IgA and IgM across polarized epithelia and is highly expressed in the intestine, yet little direct evidence exists for its importance in defense against common enteric pathogens. In this study, we demonstrate that pIgR can play a critical role in intestinal defense against the lumen-dwelling protozoan parasite Giardia, a leading cause of diarrheal disease. The receptor was essential for the eradication of Giardia when high luminal IgA levels were required. Clearance of Giardia muris, in which IgA plays a dominant role, was severely compromised in pIgR-deficient mice despite significant fecal IgA output at 10% of normal levels. In contrast, eradication of the human strain Giardia lamblia GS/M, for which adaptive immunity is less IgA dependent in mice, was unaffected by pIgR deficiency, indicating that pIgR had no physiologic role when lower luminal IgA levels were sufficient for parasite elimination. Immune IgA was greatly increased in the serum of pIgR-deficient mice, conferred passive protection against Giardia, and recognized several conserved giardial Ags, including ornithine carbamoyltransferase, arginine deiminase, alpha-enolase, and alpha- and beta-giardins, that are also detected in human giardiasis. Corroborative observations were made in mice lacking the J chain, which is required for pIgR-dependent transepithelial IgA transport. These results, together with prior data on pIgR-mediated immune neutralization of luminal cholera toxin, suggest that pIgR is essential in intestinal defense against pathogenic microbes with high-level and persistent luminal presence.

  • 29. Dawoodji, Amina
    et al.
    Chen, Ji-Li
    Shepherd, Dawn
    Dalin, Frida
    Centre of Molecular Medicine, Department of Medicine (Solna), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tarlton, Andrea
    Alimohammadi, Mohammad
    Penna-Martinez, Marissa
    Meyer, Gesine
    Mitchell, Anna L.
    Gan, Earn H.
    Bratland, Eirik
    Bensing, Sophie
    Husebye, Eystein S.
    Pearce, Simon H.
    Badenhoop, Klaus
    Kämpe, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Autoimmunity. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Cerundolo, Vincenzo
    High Frequency of Cytolytic 21-Hydroxylase-Specific CD8(+) T Cells in Autoimmune Addison's Disease Patients2014In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 193, no 5, p. 2118-2126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanisms behind destruction of the adrenal glands in autoimmune Addison's disease remain unclear. Autoantibodies against steroid 21-hydroxylase, an intracellular key enzyme of the adrenal cortex, are found in >90% of patients, but these autoantibodies are not thought to mediate the disease. In this article, we demonstrate highly frequent 21-hydroxylase-specific T cells detectable in 20 patients with Addison's disease. Using overlapping 18-aa peptides spanning the full length of 21-hydroxylase, we identified immunodominant CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell responses in a large proportion of Addison's patients both ex vivo and after in vitro culture of PBLs <= 20 y after diagnosis. In a large proportion of patients, CD8(+) and CD4(+) 21-hydroxylase-specific T cells were very abundant and detectable in ex vivo assays. HLA class I tetramer guided isolation of 21-hydroxylase-specific CD8(+) T cells showed their ability to lyse 21-hydroxylase-positive target cells, consistent with a potential mechanism for disease pathogenesis. These data indicate that strong CTL responses to 21-hydroxylase often occur in vivo, and that reactive CTLs have substantial proliferative and cytolytic potential. These results have implications for earlier diagnosis of adrenal failure and ultimately a potential target for therapeutic intervention and induction of immunity against adrenal cortex cancer.

  • 30.
    Denk, Stephanie
    et al.
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Germany.
    Neher, Miriam D.
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Germany.
    Messerer, David A. C.
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Germany.
    Wiegner, Rebecca
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Germany.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University.
    Rittirsch, Daniel
    Univ Hosp Zurich, Switzerland.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Weckbach, Sebastian
    Ulm Univ, Germany.
    Ignatius, Anita
    Ulm Univ, Germany.
    Kalbitz, Miriam
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Germany.
    Gebhard, Florian
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Germany.
    Weiss, Manfred E.
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Germany.
    Vogt, Josef
    Ulm Univ, Germany.
    Radermacher, Peter
    Ulm Univ, Germany.
    Koehl, Joerg
    Univ Lubeck, Germany;Cincinnati Childrens Hosp Med Ctr, USA.
    Lambris, John D.
    Univ Penn, USA.
    Huber-Lang, Markus S.
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Germany.
    Complement C5a Functions as a Master Switch for the pH Balance in Neutrophils Exerting Fundamental Immunometabolic Effects2017In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 198, no 12, p. 4846-4854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During sepsis, excessive activation of the complement system with generation of the anaphylatoxin C5a results in profound disturbances in crucial neutrophil functions. Moreover, because neutrophil activity is highly dependent on intracellular pH (pH(i)), we propose a direct mechanistic link between complement activation and neutrophil pHi. In this article, we demonstrate that in vitro exposure of human neutrophils to C5a significantly increased pHi by selective activation of the sodium/hydrogen exchanger. Upstream signaling of C5a-mediated intracellular alkalinization was dependent on C5aR1, intracellular calcium, protein kinase C, and calmodulin, and downstream signaling regulated the release of antibacterial myeloperoxidase and lactoferrin. Notably, the pH shift caused by C5a increased the glucose uptake and activated glycolytic flux in neutrophils, resulting in a significant release of lactate. Furthermore, C5a induced acidification of the extracellular micromilieu. In experimental murine sepsis, pHi of blood neutrophils was analogously alkalinized, which could be normalized by C5aR1 inhibition. In the clinical setting of sepsis, neutrophils from patients with septic shock likewise exhibited a significantly increased pHi. These data suggest a novel role for the anaphylatoxin C5a as a master switch of the delicate pHi balance in neutrophils resulting in profound inflammatory and metabolic changes that contribute to hyperlactatemia during sepsis.

  • 31.
    Denk, Stephanie
    et al.
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Inst Clin & Expt Trauma Immunol, Helmholtzstr 8-1, D-89081 Ulm, Germany..
    Neher, Miriam D.
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Inst Clin & Expt Trauma Immunol, Helmholtzstr 8-1, D-89081 Ulm, Germany..
    Messerer, David A. C.
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Inst Clin & Expt Trauma Immunol, Helmholtzstr 8-1, D-89081 Ulm, Germany..
    Wiegner, Rebecca
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Inst Clin & Expt Trauma Immunol, Helmholtzstr 8-1, D-89081 Ulm, Germany..
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Rittirsch, Daniel
    Univ Hosp Zurich, Dept Plast Surg & Hand Surg, CH-8091 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Nilsson-Ekdahl, Kristina
    Linnaeus Univ, Linnaeus Ctr Biomat Chem, S-39182 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Weckbach, Sebastian
    Ulm Univ, Univ & Rehabil Clin Ulm, Dept Orthoped Surg, D-89081 Ulm, Germany..
    Ignatius, Anita
    Ulm Univ, Inst Orthoped Res & Biomech, D-89081 Ulm, Germany..
    Kalbitz, Miriam
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Dept Traumatol Hand Plast & Reconstruct Surg, D-89081 Ulm, Germany..
    Gebhard, Florian
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Dept Traumatol Hand Plast & Reconstruct Surg, D-89081 Ulm, Germany..
    Weiss, Manfred E.
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Dept Anesthesiol, D-89081 Ulm, Germany..
    Vogt, Josef
    Ulm Univ, Inst Anesthesiol Pathophysiol & Proc Engn, D-89081 Ulm, Germany..
    Radermacher, Peter
    Ulm Univ, Inst Anesthesiol Pathophysiol & Proc Engn, D-89081 Ulm, Germany..
    Köhl, Jörg
    Univ Lubeck, Inst Syst Inflammat Res, D-23538 Lubeck, Germany.;Cincinnati Childrens Hosp Med Ctr, Div Immunobiol, Cincinnati, OH 45229 USA..
    Lambris, John D.
    Univ Penn, Dept Pathol & Lab Med, Perelman Sch Med, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Huber-Lang, Markus S.
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Inst Clin & Expt Trauma Immunol, Helmholtzstr 8-1, D-89081 Ulm, Germany..
    Complement C5a Functions as a Master Switch for the pH Balance in Neutrophils Exerting Fundamental Immunometabolic Effects2017In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 198, no 12, p. 4846-4854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During sepsis, excessive activation of the complement system with generation of the anaphylatoxin C5a results in profound disturbances in crucial neutrophil functions. Moreover, because neutrophil activity is highly dependent on intracellular pH (pH(i)), we propose a direct mechanistic link between complement activation and neutrophil pHi. In this article, we demonstrate that in vitro exposure of human neutrophils to C5a significantly increased pHi by selective activation of the sodium/hydrogen exchanger. Upstream signaling of C5a-mediated intracellular alkalinization was dependent on C5aR1, intracellular calcium, protein kinase C, and calmodulin, and downstream signaling regulated the release of antibacterial myeloperoxidase and lactoferrin. Notably, the pH shift caused by C5a increased the glucose uptake and activated glycolytic flux in neutrophils, resulting in a significant release of lactate. Furthermore, C5a induced acidification of the extracellular micromilieu. In experimental murine sepsis, pHi of blood neutrophils was analogously alkalinized, which could be normalized by C5aR1 inhibition. In the clinical setting of sepsis, neutrophils from patients with septic shock likewise exhibited a significantly increased pHi. These data suggest a novel role for the anaphylatoxin C5a as a master switch of the delicate pHi balance in neutrophils resulting in profound inflammatory and metabolic changes that contribute to hyperlactatemia during sepsis.

  • 32.
    Duarte, Nadia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Stenström, Martin
    Campino, Susana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Bergman, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Lundholm, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Holmberg, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Cardell, Susanna L
    Prevention of diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice mediated by CD1d-restricted nonclassical NKT cells.2004In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 173, no 5, p. 3112-3118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A role for regulatory lymphocytes has been demonstrated in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes in the NOD mouse but the nature of these cells is debated. CD1d-restricted NKT lymphocytes have been implicated in this process. Previous reports of reduced diabetes incidence in NOD mice in which the numbers of NKT cells are artificially increased have been attributed to the enhanced production of IL-4 by these cells and a role for classical NKT cells, using the Valpha14-Jalpha18 rearrangement. We now show that overexpression in NOD mice of CD1d-restricted TCR Valpha3.2(+)Vbeta9(+) NKT cells producing high levels of IFN-gamma but low amounts of IL-4 leads to prevention of type 1 diabetes, demonstrating a role for nonclassical CD1d-restricted NKT cells in the regulation of autoimmune diabetes.

  • 33. Duelli, Annette
    et al.
    Rönnberg, Elin
    Waern, Ida
    Ringvall, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Kolset, Svein O.
    Pejler, Gunnar
    Mast cell differentiation and activation is closely linked to expression of genes coding for the serglycin proteoglycan core protein and a distinct set of chondroitin sulfate and heparin sulfotransferases2009In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 183, no 11, p. 7073-7083Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Serglycin (SG) proteoglycan consists of a small core protein to which glycosaminoglycans of chondroitin sulfate or heparin type are attached. SG is crucial for maintaining mast cell (MC) granule homeostasis through promoting the storage of various basic granule constituents, where the degree of chondroitin sulfate/heparin sulfation is essential for optimal SG functionality. However, the regulation of the SG core protein expression and of the various chondroitin sulfate/heparin sulfotransferases during MC differentiation and activation are poorly understood. Here we addressed these issues and show that expression of the SG core protein, chondroitin 4-sulfotransferase (C4ST)-1, and GalNAc(4S)-6-O-sulfotransferase (GalNAc4S6ST) are closely linked to MC maturation. In contrast, the expression of chondroitin 6-sulfotransferase correlated negatively with MC maturation. The expression of N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase (NDST)-2, a key enzyme in heparin synthesis, also correlated strongly with MC maturation, whereas the expression of the NDST-1 isoform was approximately equal at all stages of maturation. MC activation by either calcium ionophore or IgE ligation caused an up-regulated expression of the SG core protein, C4ST-1, and GalNAc4S6ST, accompanied by increased secretion of chondroitin sulfate as shown by biosynthetic labeling experiments. In contrast, NDST-2 was down-regulated after MC activation, suggesting that MC activation modulates the nature of the glycosaminoglycan chains attached to the SG core protein. Taken together, these data show that MC maturation is associated with the expression of a distinct signature of genes involved in SG proteoglycan synthesis, and that MC activation modulates their expression.

  • 34.
    Ekdahl, K N
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson, B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Phosphorylation of complement component C3 and C3 fragments by a human platelet protein kinase. Inhibition of factor I-mediated cleavage of C3b.1995In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 154, no 12, p. 6502-6510Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphorylation of C3 in vitro has been shown previously to lead to significantly altered function of the protein. Platelets are known to contain and release considerable amounts of protein kinases and ATP, which are prerequisites for protein phosphorylation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether C3 is phosphorylated extracellularly by human platelets. Platelet-rich plasma was stimulated by human aggregated gamma-globulin or ADP. The remaining cells were removed by centrifugation, and the plasma was incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP. After precipitation with Sepharose-bound Abs to C3c followed by SDS-PAGE, it was shown that C3 was phosphorylated in the alpha-chain by a protein kinase dependent on Mn2+, Ca2+, or Mg2+ ions. The supernatant from washed, activated platelets was incubated with purified C3 or soluble or activated thiol Sepharose-bound C3b, together with [gamma-32P]ATP. Phosphorylation was seen in the alpha-chain of C3, and to the same extent in the alpha'-chain of both C3b preparations. The analysis of acid hydrolysate demonstrated that C3 contained 32P-labeled Thr and 32P-labeled Ser. After extensive proteolysis with trypsin, the major phosphorylation site was located to a peptide of 3 to 4 kDa that was bound to the activated thiol Sepharose via the free sulphydryl group in the C3d fragment. Incubation of phosphorylated C3b with factors I and H showed that phosphorylation inhibited the cleavage of the alpha'-chain of C3b. The results in this study suggest that phosphorylation is a regulator of C3 during platelet activation induced, for example, by immune complexes.

  • 35.
    Ekdahl, K N
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson, U R
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson, B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Inhibition of factor I by diisopropylfluorophosphate. Evidence of conformational changes in factor I induced by C3b and additional studies on the specificity of factor I.1990In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 144, no 11, p. 4269-4274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The factor I-mediated cleavage of C3b, using factor H as a cofactor was completely inhibited by diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) when factor I and C3b were incubated with DFP before the addition of factor H. Inhibition, although to a lesser degree, was observed when factor H was present during DFP-exposure. No inhibition in factor I activity was seen when factor I and H were incubated with DFP either alone or together. It was also demonstrated that the 38-kDa subunit of factor I bound radiolabeled DFP when factor I and C3b together were exposed to DFP. These observations suggest that factor I interacts with C3b in a manner that exposes its catalytic site to DFP, an interaction that is independent of factor H. The inhibitory effect by DFP on factor I led us to further investigate the factor I cleavage products of iC3b, inasmuch as previous reports were ambiguous as to whether digestion occurs in the presence of DFP. Digestion of C3b bound to activated thiol Sepharose (ATS-C3b) in the presence of factor H at low pH and ionic strength and in serum by complement activation produced C3d,g-like fragments with apparent molecular mass of 41 and 43 kDa. These fragments were shown to have three different N-terminal and two different C-terminal ends. The major fragments had N-terminal sequences starting with Glu933, as shown by sequence determination. Traces of fragments extending beyond this point were also found, shown by Western blot analysis using a panel of mAb previously shown to bind to epitopes exposed within a region of C3 spanning residues 929 to 943, as well as a shorter fragment starting with Glu938. When digestion of C3b is carried out in the presence of DFP, the factor I level necessary for digestion is elevated and may explain how the first two cleavages producing iC3b but not the following giving C3d,g, can occur. The finding of several factor I cleavage sites in the C3d,g region of C3 demonstrates that factor I has a broad specificity, mainly for arginyl bonds. It has also been shown to digest a lysyl bond exposed in ATS-bound C3b.

  • 36.
    Ellegård, Rada
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Crisci, Elisa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Shankar, Esaki M.
    University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Hinkula, Jorma
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Impaired NK Cell Activation and Chemotaxis toward Dendritic Cells Exposed to Complement-Opsonized HIV-12015In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 195, no 4, p. 1698-1704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mucosa resident dendritic cells (DCs) may represent one of the first immune cells that HIV-1 encounters during sexual transmission. The virions in body fluids can be opsonized with complement factors because of HIV-mediated triggering of the complement cascade, and this appears to influence numerous aspects of the immune defense targeting the virus. One key attribute of host defense is the ability to attract immune cells to the site of infection. In this study, we investigated whether the opsonization of HIV with complement (C-HIV) or a mixture of complement and Abs (CI-HIV) affected the cytokine and chemokine responses generated by DCs, as well as their ability to attract other immune cells. We found that the expression levels of CXCL8, CXCL10, CCL3, and CCL17 were lowered after exposure to either C-HIV or CI-HIV relative to free HIV (F-HIV). DCs exposed to F-HIV induced higher cell migration, consisting mainly of NK cells, compared with opsonized virus, and the chemotaxis of NK cells was dependent on CCL3 and CXCL10. NK cell exposure to supernatants derived from HIV-exposed DCs showed that F-HIV induced phenotypic activation (e.g., increased levels of TIM3, CD69, and CD25) and effector function (e.g., production of IFN gamma and killing of target cells) in NK cells, whereas C-HIV and CI-HIV did not. The impairment of NK cell recruitment by DCs exposed to complement-opsonized HIV and the lack of NK activation may contribute to the failure of innate immune responses to control HIV at the site of initial mucosa infection.

  • 37.
    Ellegård, Rada
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Crisci, Elisa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Burgener, Adam
    University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada; Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Sjöwall, Christoffer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Birse, Kenzie
    University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada; Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Westmacott, Garrett
    Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Hinkula, Jorma
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lifson, Jeffrey D.
    Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick, MD, USA.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Complement Opsonization of HIV-1 Results in Decreased Antiviral and Inflammatory Responses in Immature Dendritic Cells via CR32014In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 193, no 9, p. 4590-4601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Immature dendritic cells (iDCs) in genital and rectal mucosa may be one of the first cells to come into contact with HIV-1 during sexual transmission of virus. HIV-1 activates the host complement system, which results in opsonization of virus by inactivated complement fragments, for example, iC3b. We investigated antiviral and inflammatory responses induced in human iDCs after exposure to free HIV-1 (F-HIV), complement-opsonized HIV-1 (C-HIV), and complement and Ab-opsonized HIV-1 (CI-HIV). F-HIV gave rise to a significantly higher expression of antiviral factors such as IFN-beta, myxovirus resistance protein A, and IFN-stimulated genes, compared with C-HIV and CI-HIV. Additionally, F-HIV induced inflammatory factors such as IL-1 beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha, whereas these responses were weakened or absent after C-HIV or CI-HIV exposure. The responses induced by F-HIV were TLR8-dependent with subsequent activation of IFN regulatory factor 1, p38, ERK, PI3K, and NF-kappa B pathways, whereas these responses were not induced by C-HIV, which instead induced activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 and Lyn. This modulation of TLR8 signaling was mediated by complement receptor 3 and led to enhanced infection. The impact that viral hijacking of the complement system has on iDC function could be an important immune evasion mechanism used by HIV-1 to establish infection in the host.

  • 38.
    Elshafie, Amir Ibrahim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Åhlin, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Mathsson, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    ElGhazali, Gehad
    Rönnelid, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Circulating immune complexes (IC) and IC-induced levels of GM-CSF are increased in sudanese patients with acute visceral Leishmania donovani infection undergoing sodium stibogluconate treatment: implications for disease pathogenesis2007In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 178, no 8, p. 5383-5389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Infection with Leishmania donovani is associated with IL-10 as well as with GM-CSF. Immune complexes (IC) exert important functions by stimulation of monocytes/macrophage-mediated production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in rheumatic diseases. In this investigation, we have explored IC-induced cytokine production during Leishmania infection. Sera from 43 patients with visceral leishmaniasis (VL), 17 patients with post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis, and 20 healthy Sudanese controls were precipitated with polyethylene glycol (PEG). The PEG precipitates were added to serum-free PBMC for 20 h,whereupon supernatant levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-1 receptor antagonist protein, TNF-α, TNF receptor p75, and GM-CSF were investigated using ELISA. Circulating levels of C1q-binding IC were also measured in the serum samples. PEG precipitates from Leishmania-infected patients induced significantly higher levels of GM-CSF (p = 0.0037) and IL-10 (p < 0.0001), as well as of IL-6 (p < 0.0001) and IL-1 receptor antagonist (p = 0.0238) as compared with PEG precipitates from controls. Patients with acute VL as well as VL patients receiving sodium stibogluconate treatment displayed significantly increased levels of PEG precipitate-induced GM-CSF. The induction of GM-CSF by circulating IC was especially prominent in acute VL patients receiving sodium stibogluconate treatment; ANOVA revealed significant interaction between disease activity and treatment for PEG precipitate-induced levels of GM-CSF (disease activity, p = 0.0006; treatment, p = 0.0005; interaction, p = 0.0046). Parallel associations were determined for C1q-binding immune complexes, but not for any cytokine other than GM-CSF. The importance of IC-induced GM-CSF in leishmaniasis warrants further study.

  • 39.
    Elshafie, Amir
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Åhlin, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Mathsson, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    EIGhazali, Gehad
    Rönnelid, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Circulating immune complexes (IC) and IC-induced levels of GM-CSF are increased in sudanese patients with acute visceral Leishmania donovani infection undergoing sodium stibogluconate treatment: implications for disease pathogenesis2007In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 178, no 8, p. 5383-5389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Infection with Leishmania donovani is associated with IL-10 as well as with GM-CSF. Immune complexes (IC) exert important functions by stimulation of monocytes/macrophage-mediated production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in rheumatic diseases. In this investigation, we have explored IC-induced cytokine production during Leishmania infection. Sera from 43 patients with visceral leishmaniasis (VL), 17 patients with post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis, and 20 healthy Sudanese controls were precipitated with polyethylene glycol (PEG). The PEG precipitates were added to serum-free PBMC for 20 h,whereupon supernatant levels of IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-10, IL-1 receptor antagonist protein, TNF-alpha, TNF receptor p75, and GM-CSF were investigated using ELISA. Circulating levels of C1q-binding IC were also measured in the serum samples. PEG precipitates from Leishmania-infected patients induced significantly higher levels of GM-CSF (p = 0.0037) and IL-10 (p < 0.0001), as well as of IL-6 (p < 0.0001) and IL-1 receptor antagonist (p = 0.0238) as compared with PEG precipitates from controls. Patients with acute VL as well as VL patients receiving sodium stibogluconate treatment displayed significantly increased levels of PEG precipitate-induced GM-CSF. The induction of GM-CSF by circulating IC was especially prominent in acute VL patients receiving sodium stibogluconate treatment; ANOVA revealed significant interaction between disease activity and treatment for PEG precipitate-induced levels of GM-CSF (disease activity, p = 0.0006; treatment, p = 0.0005; interaction, p = 0.0046). Parallel associations were determined for C1q-binding immune complexes, but not for any cytokine other than GM-CSF. The importance of IC-induced GM-CSF in leishmaniasis warrants further study.

  • 40. Enqvist, M.
    et al.
    Ask, E. H.
    Forslund, E.
    Carlsten, M.
    Abrahamsen, G.
    Béziat, V.
    Andersson, S.
    Schaffer, M.
    Spurkland, A.
    Bryceson, Y.
    Önfelt, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Malmberg, K. -J
    Coordinated expression of DNAM-1 and LFA-1 in educated NK cells2015In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 194, no 9, p. 4518-4527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The functional capacity of NK cells is dynamically tuned by integrated signals from inhibitory and activating cell surface receptors in a process termed NK cell education. However, the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms behind this functional tuning is limited. In this study, we show that the expression of the adhesion molecule and activation receptor DNAX accessory molecule 1 (DNAM-1) correlates with the quantity and quality of the inhibitory input by HLA class I-specific killer cell Ig-like receptors and CD94/NKG2A as well as with the magnitude of functional responses. Upon target cell recognition, the conformational state of LFA-1 changed in educated NK cells, associated with rapid colocalization of both active LFA-1 and DNAM-1 at the immune synapse. Thus, the coordinated expression of LFA-1 and DNAM-1 is a central component of NK cell education and provides a potential mechanism for controlling cytotoxicity by functionally mature NK cells.

  • 41.
    Ericsson, Anna
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Kotarsky, Knut
    Lund University.
    Svensson, Marcus
    Lund University.
    Sigvardsson, Mikael
    Lund University.
    Agace, William
    Lund University.
    Functional characterization of the CCL25 promoter in small intestinal epithelial cells suggests a regulatory role for caudal-related homeobox (Cdx) transcription factors2006In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 176, no 6, p. 3642-3651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chemokine CCL25 is selectively and constitutively expressed in the small intestinal epithelium and plays an important role in mediating lymphocyte recruitment to this site. In this study, we demonstrate that CCL25 expression in murine small intestinal epithelial cells is independent of signaling through the lymphotoxin 0 receptor and is not enhanced by inflammatory stimuli, pathways involved in driving the expression of most other chemokines. We define a transcriptional start site in the CCL25 gene and a region -141 to -5 proximal of exon 1 that is required for minimal promoter activity in the small intestinal epithelial cell lines, MODE-K and mICc12. These cell lines expressed far less CCL25 mRNA than freshly isolated small intestinal epithelial cells indicating that they are missing important factors driving CCL25 expression. The CCL25 promoter contained putative binding sites for,the intestinal epithelial-associated Caudal-related homeobox (Cdx) transcription factors Cdx-1 and Cdx-2, and small intestinal epithelial cells but not MODE-K and mICc12 cells expressed Cdx-1 and Cdx-2. EMSA analysis demonstrated that Cdx proteins were present in nuclear extracts from freshly isolated small intestinal epithelial cells but not in MODE-K or mICcl2 cells, and bound to putative Cdx sites within the CCL25 promoter. Finally, cotransfection of MODE-K cells with Cdx transcription factors significantly increased CCL25 promoter activity as well as endogenous CCL25 mRNA levels. Together these results demonstrate a unique pattern of regulation for CCL25 and suggest a role for Cdx proteins in regulating CCL25 transcription.

  • 42.
    Eriksson, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Milenova, Ioanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wenthe, Jessica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Moreno, Rafael
    Inst Catala Oncol, Inst Invest Biomed Bellvitge, Barcelona 08908, Spain.
    Alemany, Ramon
    Inst Catala Oncol, Inst Invest Biomed Bellvitge, Barcelona 08908, Spain.
    Loskog, Angelica S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Lokon Pharma AB, S-75183 Uppsala, Sweden.
    IL-6 Signaling Blockade during CD40-Mediated Immune Activation Favors Antitumor Factors by Reducing TGF-beta, Collagen Type I, and PD-L1/PD-12019In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 202, no 3, p. 787-798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IL-6 plays a role in cancer pathogenesis via its connection to proteins involved in the formation of desmoplastic stroma and to immunosuppression by driving differentiation of myeloid suppressor cells together with TGF-beta. Inhibition of IL-6 signaling in the tumor microenvironment may, thus, limit desmoplasia and myeloid suppressor cell differentiation. CD40 signaling can further revert myeloid cell differentiation toward antitumor active phenotypes. Hence, the simultaneous use of IL-6 blockade with CD40 stimuli may tilt the tumor microenvironment to promote antitumor immune responses. In this paper, we evaluated the mechanisms of LOAd713, an oncolytic adenovirus designed to block IL-6R signaling and to provide myeloid cell activation via a trimerized membrane-bound isoleucine zipper (TMZ) CD40L. LOAd713-infected pancreatic cancer cells were killed by oncolysis, whereas infection of stellate cells reduced factors involved in stroma formation, including TGF-beta-1 and collagen type I. Virus infection prevented IL-6/GM-CSF-mediated differentiation of myeloid suppressors, but not CD163 macrophages, whereas infection of dendritic cells led to upregulation of maturation markers, including CD83, CD86, IL-12p70, and IFN-gamma. Further, IL-6R blockade prevented upregulation of programed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) and PD-1 on the stimulated dendritic cells. These results suggest that LOAd713 can kill infected tumor cells and has the capacity to affect the tumor microenvironment by stimulating stellate cells and myeloid suppressors with TMZ-CD40L and IL-6R blockade. Gene transfer of murine TMZ-CD40L prolonged survival in an animal model. LOAd713 may be an interesting therapeutic option for cancers connected to IL-6 signaling, such as pancreatic cancer.

  • 43. Eriksson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Tsagozis, Panagiotis
    Lundberg, Kajsa
    Parsa, Roham
    Mangsbo, Sara M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Persson, Mats A. A.
    Harris, Robert A.
    Pisa, Pavel
    Tumor-Specific Bacteriophages Induce Tumor Destruction through Activation of Tumor-Associated Macrophages2009In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 182, no 5, p. 3105-3111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We recently reported that administration of tumor-specific bacteriophages initiates infiltration of neutrophilic granulocytes with subsequent regression of established B16 tumors. The aim of the current study was to investigate the mechanism of action of bacteriophage-induced tumor regression and to examine possible stimulatory effects of bacteriophages on macrophages. We observed that the mechanism of phage-induced tumor regression is TLR dependent as no signs of tumor destruction or neutrophil infiltration were observed in tumors in MyD88(-/-) mice in which TLR signaling is abolished. The microenvironment of bacteriophage-treated tumors was further analyzed by gene profiling through applying a low-density array preferentially designed to detect genes expressed by activated APCs, which demonstrated that the M2-polarized tumor microenvironment switched to a more M1-polarized milieu following phage treatment. Bacteriophage stimulation induced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in both normal mouse macrophages and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and increased expression of molecules involved in Ag presentation and costimulation. Furthermore, mouse neutrophils selectively migrated toward mediators secreted by bacteriophage-stimulated TAMs. Under these conditions, the neutrophils also exhibited increased cytotoxicity toward 1316 mouse melanoma target cells. These results describe a close interplay of the innate immune system in which bacteriophages, located to the tumor microenvironment due to their specificity, stimulate TAMs to secrete factors that promote recruitment of neutrophils and potentiate neutrophil-mediated tumor destruction.

  • 44.
    Ermann, Joerg
    et al.
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
    Szanya, Veronika
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
    Ford, Gregory S.
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
    Paragas, Violette
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
    Garrison Fathman, C.
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
    Lejon, Kristina
    UmanGenomics, Umestans Företagspark, Umeå, Sweden.
    CD4+CD25+ T cells facilitate the induction of T cell anergy2001In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 167, no 8, p. 4271-4275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    T cell anergy is characterized by the inability of the T cell to produce IL-2 and proliferate. It is reversible by the addition of exogenous IL-2. A similar state of unresponsiveness is observed when the proliferative response of murine CD4+CD25- T cells is suppressed in vitro by coactivated CD4+CD25+ T cells. We have developed a suppression system that uses beads coated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 Abs as surrogate APCs to study the interaction of CD4+CD25+ and CD4+CD25- T cells in vitro. CD4+CD25+ T cell-induced suppression, in this model, was not abrogated by blocking the B7-CTLA-4 pathway. When the CD4+CD25- T cells were separated from the CD4+CD25+ suppressor cells after 24 h of coactivation by the Ab-coated beads, the CD4+CD25- T cells were unable to proliferate or to produce IL-2 upon restimulation. The induction of this anergic phenotype in the CD4+CD25- T cells correlated with the up-regulated expression of the gene related to anergy in lymphocytes (GRAIL), a novel anergy-related gene that acts as a negative regulator of IL-2 transcription. This system constitutes a novel mechanism of anergy induction in the presence of costimulation.

  • 45.
    Fletcher, Erika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences. Immuneed AB, S-75237 Uppsala, Sweden.
    van Maren, Wendy
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Immunohematol & Blood Transfus, NL-2300 RC Leiden, Netherlands.
    Cordfunke, Robert
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Immunohematol & Blood Transfus, NL-2300 RC Leiden, Netherlands.
    Dinkelaar, Jasper
    Leiden Univ, Leiden Inst Chem, Dept Bioorgan Synth, NL-2300 RA Leiden, Netherlands.
    Codee, Jeroen D. C.
    Leiden Univ, Leiden Inst Chem, Dept Bioorgan Synth, NL-2300 RA Leiden, Netherlands.
    van der Marel, Gijs
    Leiden Univ, Leiden Inst Chem, Dept Bioorgan Synth, NL-2300 RA Leiden, Netherlands.
    Melief, Cornelis J. M.
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Immunohematol & Blood Transfus, NL-2300 RC Leiden, Netherlands.
    Ossendorp, Ferry
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Immunohematol & Blood Transfus, NL-2300 RC Leiden, Netherlands.
    Drijfhout, Jan Wouter
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Immunohematol & Blood Transfus, NL-2300 RC Leiden, Netherlands.
    Mangsbo, Sara
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences. Immuneed AB, S-75237 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Formation of Immune Complexes with a Tetanus-Derived B Cell Epitope Boosts Human T Cell Responses to Covalently Linked Peptides in an Ex Vivo Blood Loop System2018In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 201, no 1, p. 87-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enhancing T cell responses against both viral and tumor Ags requires efficient costimulation and directed delivery of peptide Ags into APCs. Long peptide vaccines are considered favorable vaccine moieties from a clinical perspective, as they can harbor more than one immunogenic epitope enabling treatment of a broader target population. In addition, longer peptides are not extracellularly loaded on MHC class I; rather, they require intracellular processing and will thereby be presented to T cells mainly by professional APCs, thereby avoiding the risk of tolerance induction. The drawback of peptide vaccines regardless of peptide length is that naked peptides are not actively targeted to and taken up by APCs, and the standard nonconjugated adjuvant-peptide mixtures do not ensure cotargeting of the two to the same APC. We have identified a tetanus toxin-derived B cell epitope that can mediate the formation of immune complexes in the presence of circulating Abs. In this study, we show that these immune complexes improve both Ag uptake by APCs (blood monocytes and CD1c(+) dendritic cells) and consequently improve CD8(+) T cell recall responses in a human ex vivo blood loop system. The uptake of the peptide conjugate by blood monocytes is dependent on Abs and the complement component C1q. We envision that this strategy can be used to facilitate active uptake of Ags into APCs to improve T cell responses against pathogens or cancer.

  • 46. Fleury, Christophe
    et al.
    Su, Yu-Ching
    Hallstroem, Teresia
    Sandblad, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Zipfel, Peter F.
    Riesbeck, Kristian
    Identification of a Haemophilus influenzae Factor H-Binding Lipoprotein Involved in Serum Resistance2014In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 192, no 12, p. 5913-5923Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Haemophilus influenzae is a Gram-negative human pathogen that resides in the upper respiratory tract. Encapsulated H. influenzae type b (Hib) and type f (Hif) are the most common serotypes associated with invasive disease. H. influenzae displays various strategies to circumvent the host innate immune response, including the bactericidal effect of the complement system. In this study, we identified an H. influenzae lipoprotein having the ability to bind factor H (FH), the major regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation. This protein, named protein H (PH), was surface exposed and was found in all clinical Hib and Hif isolates tested. Deletion of the gene encoding for PH (lph) in Hib and Hif significantly reduced the interaction between bacteria and FH. When Hib and Hif PH variants were separately expressed in nontypeable ( unencapsulated) H. influenzae, which did not bind FH, an increased FH affinity was observed. We recombinantly expressed the two PH variants in Escherichia coli, and despite sharing only 56% identical amino acids, both FH-binding Haemophilus proteins similarly interacted with the complement regulator FH short consensus repeats 7 and 18-20. Importantly, Hib and Hif resistance against the bactericidal effect of human serum was significantly reduced when bacterial mutants devoid of PH were tested. In conclusion, we have characterized a hitherto unknown bacterial protein that is crucial for mediating an interaction between the human pathogen H. influenzae and FH. This novel interaction is important for H. influenzae resistance against complement activation and will consequently promote bacterial pathogenesis.

  • 47. Forslund, Elin
    et al.
    Sohlberg, Ebba
    Enqvist, Monika
    Olofsson, Per E.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Malmberg, Karl-Johan
    Önfelt, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Inst, Sci Life Lab, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol, S-17165 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Microchip-Based Single-Cell Imaging Reveals That CD56(dim) CD57(-)KIR(-)NKG2A(+) NK Cells Have More Dynamic Migration Associated with Increased Target Cell Conjugation and Probability of Killing Compared to CD56(dim)CD57(-)KIR(-)NKG2A(-) NK Cells2015In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 195, no 7, p. 3374-3381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    NK cells are functionally educated by self-MHC specific receptors, including the inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIRs) and the lectin-like CD94/NKG2A heterodimer. Little is known about how NK cell education influences qualitative aspects of cytotoxicity such as migration behavior and efficacy of activation and killing at the single-cell level. In this study, we have compared the behavior of FACS-sorted CD56(dim)CD57(-)KIR(-)NKG2A(+) (NKG2A(+)) and CD56(dim)CD57(-)KIR(-)NKG2A(+) (lacking inhibitory receptors; IR-) human NK cells by quantifying migration, cytotoxicity, and contact dynamics using microchip-based live cell imaging. NKG2A(+) NK cells displayed a more dynamic migration behavior and made more contacts with target cells than IR-NK cells. NKG2A(+) NK cells also more frequently killed the target cells once a conjugate had been formed. NK cells with serial killing capacity were primarily found among NKG2A(+) NK cells. Conjugates involving IR- NK cells were generally more short-lived and IR- NK cells did not become activated to the same extent as NKG2A(+) NK cells when in contact with target cells, as evident by their reduced spreading response. In contrast, NKG2A(+) and IR- NK cells showed similar dynamics in terms of duration of conjugation periods and NK cell spreading response in conjugates that led to killing. Taken together, these observations suggest that the high killing capacity of NKG2A(+) NK cells is linked to processes regulating events in the recognition phase of NK-target cell contact rather than events after cytotoxicity has been triggered.

  • 48.
    Fu, Zhirong
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Thorpe, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Alemayehu, Rahel
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Biomed Sci & Vet Publ Hlth, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Roy, Ananya
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Biomed Sci & Vet Publ Hlth, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Kervinen, Jukka
    Fraunhofer USA Ctr Mol Biotechnol, Newark, DE 19711 USA..
    de Garavilla, Lawrence
    GDL Pharmaceut Consulting & Contracting, Downingtown, PA 19335 USA..
    Abrink, Magnus
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Biomed Sci & Vet Publ Hlth, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hellman, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Highly Selective Cleavage of Cytokines and Chemokines by the Human Mast Cell Chymase and Neutrophil Cathepsin G2017In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 198, no 4, p. 1474-1483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human mast cell chymase (HC) and human neutrophil cathepsin G (hCG) show relatively similar cleavage specificities: they both have chymotryptic activity but can also cleave efficiently after leucine. Their relatively broad specificity suggests that they may cleave almost any substrate if present in high enough concentrations or for a sufficiently long time. A number of potential substrates have been identified for these enzymes and, recently, these enzymes have also been implicated in regulating cytokine activity by cleaving numerous cytokines and chemokines. To obtain a better understanding of their selectivity for various potential in vivo substrates, we analyzed the cleavage of a panel of 51 active recombinant cytokines and chemokines. Surprisingly, our results showed a high selectivity of HC; only 4 of 51 of these proteins were substantially cleaved. hCG cleaved a few additional proteins, although this occurred after adding almost equimolar amounts of enzyme to target. The explanation for this wide difference in activity against peptides or other linear substrates compared with native proteins is most likely related to the reduced accessibility of the enzymes to potential cleavage sites in folded proteins. In this article, we present evidence that sites not exposed on the surface of the protein are not cleaved by the enzyme. Interestingly, both enzymes readily cleaved IL-18 and IL-33, two IL-1-related alarmins, as well as the cytokine IL-15, which is important for T cell and NK cell homeostasis. Cleavage of the alarmins by HC and hCG suggests a function in regulating excessive inflammation.

  • 49.
    Gerasimcik, Natalija
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Dahlberg, Carin I. M.
    Baptista, Marisa A. P.
    Massaad, Michel J.
    Geha, Raif S.
    Westerberg, Lisa S.
    Severinson, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    The Rho GTPase Cdc42 Is Essential for the Activation and Function of Mature B Cells2015In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 194, no 10, p. 4750-4758Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Rho GTPase Cdc42 coordinates regulation of the actin and the microtubule cytoskeleton by binding and activating the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein. We sought to define the role of intrinsic expression of Cdc42 by mature B cells in their activation and function. Mice with inducible deletion of Cdc42 in mature B cells formed smaller germinal centers and had a reduced Ab response, mostly of low affinity to T cell-dependent Ag, compared with wild-type (WT) controls. Spreading formation of long protrusions that contain F-actin, microtubules, and Cdc42-interacting protein 4, and assumption of a dendritic cell morphology in response to anti-CD40 plus IL-4 were impaired in Cdc42-deficient B cells compared with WT B cells. Cdc42-deficient B cells had an intact migratory response to chemokine in vitro, but their homing to the B cell follicles in the spleen in vivo was significantly impaired. Cdc42-deficient B cells induced a skewed cytokine response in CD4(+) T cells, compared with WT B cells. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Cdc42 in the motility of mature B cells, their cognate interaction with T cells, and their differentiation into Ab-producing cells.

  • 50.
    Girnyk, Maksym A.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Communication Theory.
    Vehkapera, Mikko
    Rasmussen, Lars Kildehoj
    Christakou, Athanasia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Wiklund, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Onfelt, Bjorn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Orange, Jordan
    Lytic granule convergence is essential for NK cells to promote targeted killing while preventing collateral damage2016In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 196Article in journal (Other academic)
12345 1 - 50 of 205
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