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  • 1.
    Abdeldaim, Guma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Medicine, Clinical Bacteriology. Benghazi Univ, Fac Med, Dept Med Microbiol & Parasitol, Benghazi, Libya..
    Svensson, Erik
    Statens Serum Inst, Int Reference Lab Mycobacteriol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Blomberg, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Medicine, Clinical Virology.
    Herrmann, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Medicine, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Duplex detection of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and medically important non-tuberculosis mycobacteria by real-time PCR based on the rnpB gene2016In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 124, no 11, p. 991-995Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A duplex real-time PCR based on the rnpB gene was developed for Mycobacterium spp. The assay was specific for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB) and also detected all 19 tested species of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). The assay was evaluated on 404 clinical samples: 290 respiratory samples and 114 from tissue and other nonrespiratory body sites. M. tuberculosis was detected by culture in 40 samples and in 30 samples by the assay. The MTB assay showed a sensitivity similar to Roche Cobas Amplicor MTB-PCR (Roche Molecular Systems, Pleasanton, CA, USA). There were only nine samples with non-tuberculous mycobacteria detected by culture. Six of them were detected by the PCR assay.

  • 2.
    Ahlstrand, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Medicine, Hematology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bäckman, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Clinical Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Persson, Lennart
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Infectious diseases, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Mölling, Paula
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Tidefelt, Ulf
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Söderquist, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Infectious diseases & Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Evaluation of a PCR method to determine the clinical significance of blood cultures with Staphylococcus epidermidis in patients with hematological malignancies2014In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 122, no 6, p. 539-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate whether the detection and quantification of Staphylococcus epidermidis DNA in blood could distinguish S. epidermidis blood stream infections (BSIs) from blood culture contaminations in patients with hematological malignancies. The hld gene was chosen to identify S. epidermidis DNA and DNA in blood samples was detected by real-time PCR. Blood samples were obtained simultaneously with blood cultures positive for S. epidermidis (n = 30), during blood culture-negative episodes (n = 10) and episodes of bacteremia with other bacteria than S. epidermidis (n = 4) and from healthy blood donors (n = 10). In addition, DNA from S. epidermidis and a selection of other bacterial species were analyzed. Three different sets of criteria were used to classify episodes with positive blood cultures with S. epidermidis as BSIs or contaminations. All DNA preparations from S. epidermidis (n = 48) were hld-positive, but other bacterial species (n = 13) were negative. Sixteen (53%) of 30 blood samples from patients with blood cultures positive for S. epidermidis were hld-positive, but none of the controls. There was no clear association between a positive hld PCR and episodes interpreted as BSIs. In conclusion, hld PCR failed to distinguish S. epidermidis BSIs from blood culture contaminations in patients with hematological malignancies.

  • 3.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Christofferson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Paediatric Surgery.
    Lörelius, L-E
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Vascularization of the continuous human colonic cancer cell line LS 174 T deposited subcutaneously in nude rats1988In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 96, no 8, p. 701-710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The macro- and microvasculature of the human colonic cancer cell line LS 174 T, 2-8 weeks after subcutaneous deposition in both hind legs of congenitally athymic rats was investigated by light microscopy, angiography, and microvascular corrosion casting with analysis in a scanning electron microscope. The tumour blood vessels were connected to branches of the femoral artery. Only the outer 200-500 micron of the tumour was extensively vascularized, with several concentric, incomplete layers of tortuous vessels, resembling onion skin. Light microscopy revealed necrosis and bleeding in the centre of the tumour, especially in the older tumours, which corresponded well to the central avascularity observed in the casts. There was an increase in venular and capillary density and tortousity towards the tumour in the adjacent muscular fascia. It is concluded that the cell line LS 174 T grows invasively inwards and recruits its vessels from the nude rat host. The overall tumour vascular pattern was unorganized, suggesting limited control of new vessel formation. Extravasations of resin, which were encountered in all cast tumours, can be a rough indicator of enhanced vascular permeability.

  • 4. Belibasakis, George
    et al.
    Brage, Monica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Periodontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lagergård, Teresa
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology.
    Cytolethal distending toxin upregulates RANKL expression in Jurkat T-cells: Cdt upregulates RANKL2008In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 116, no 6, p. 499-506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cytolethal distending toxin, a bacterial exotoxin produced by a number of Gram-negative species, causes growth arrest and morphological alterations in host cells. Among these species are Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiological agent of chancroid, and the periodontal pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, highly implicated in localized aggressive periodontitis. CDT induces receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL) expression in periodontal fibroblasts, the key bone-resorbing cytokine. T-cells are actively involved in localized inflammation-induced bone destruction, including periodontitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of purified CDT on the expression of RANKL and its decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG), in the Jurkat T-cell line. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that 100 pg/ml of purified H. ducreyi CDT upregulated RANKL mRNA expression by 2.2-fold, after 24 h of exposure. This increase was corroborated by a 2.0-fold increase in RANKL protein release, as determined by ELISA. OPG was not detected in this experimental system. In conclusion, CDT enhances RANKL expression in T-cells, denoting that these cells are a potential target for the toxin and strengthening the potential link between this virulence factor and mechanisms associated with localized bone resorption.

  • 5.
    Belibasakis, Georgios N
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral Cell Biology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Mattsson, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Periodontology.
    Wang, Ying
    Chen, Casey
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Periodontology.
    Cell cycle arrest of human gingival fibroblasts and periodontal ligament cells by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans: involvement of the cytolethal distending toxin2004In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 112, no 10, p. 674-685Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt) is produced by several Gram-negative bacterial species and causes growth arrest and morphological alterations in mammalian cells. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, which is involved in the pathogenesis of localized aggressive periodontitis, also produces a Cdt that affects periodontal connective tissue cells. The aim of this study was to investigate in which phase of the cell cycle these cells are arrested and enlarged when challenged with A. actinomycetemcomitans, and to evaluate the involvement of its Cdt. Human gingival fibroblasts and periodontal ligament cells were challenged with A. actinomycetemcomitans extract, or with purified Cdt, and cell cycle analysis was performed by propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. Cells exposed to an A. actinomycetemcomitans wild-type strain, or to purified Cdt, were arrested in both G1 and G2/M phases, and appeared enlarged compared to the corresponding controls. The cellular enlargement occurred in both G1 and G2/M arrested cells. In contrast, cells exposed to an A. actinomycetemcomitans cdt-knockout mutant strain showed cell cycle phase distribution and size similar to the controls. In conclusion, A. actinomycetemcomitans causes a combined G1 and G2/M growth arrest and enlargement in periodontal connective tissue cells, which is attributed to its Cdt.

  • 6.
    Bergman, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Lignell, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    Melhus, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Bacteriology.
    The first documented case of Aspergillus cardiac surgical site infection in Sweden: an epidemiology study using arbitrarily primed PCR2009In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 117, no 8, p. 568-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we report two rare cases of severe thoracic Aspergillus fumigatus infections after lung and heart surgery at the same thoracic intensive care unit at the same time. The main objective was to identify a possible source of transmission. With arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction a patient-to-patient transmission could rapidly be ruled out as the cause of the first documented case of aspergillosis after open-heart surgery in Sweden. Although no definitive source was identified, a genetically similar strain was found in a contaminated supply room.

  • 7.
    Björkqvist, Maria
    et al.
    Department of Paediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Söderquist, Bo
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro.
    Törnqvist, Eva
    Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro.
    Sjöberg, Lennart
    Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro.
    Fredlund, Hans
    Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro.
    Kühn, Inger
    Microbiology and Tumorbiology Centre, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Colque-Navarro, Patricia
    Microbiology and Tumorbiology Centre, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Schollin, Jens
    Department of Paediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Phenotypic and genotypic characterisation of blood isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci in the newborn2002In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 110, no 4, p. 332-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are the leading cause of late-onset sepsis in newborns (>72 h of age). Our aim was to determine whether phenotypic and/or genotypic differences existed between blood isolates of CNS regarded as inducers of sepsis or as contaminants. Ninety-seven bloodisolates of CNS recovered from newborns at the neonatal intensive care unit, Örebro, Sweden in 1983–1997 were analysed. Twenty-nine of them (30%) were classified as sepsis isolates and 68 (70%) as contaminants. The most prevalent species was Staphylococcus epidermidis (n=59). Staphylococcus haemolyticus (n=16) was most often isolated from newborns with the lowest gestational age and birth weight. Biochemical typing using the Phene Plate system (PhP) and genotyping using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) showed that the S. epidermidis isolates regarded as inducers of sepsis (n=16) were more homogeneous than isolates considered contaminants (n=37). One main genotypic group, representing seven (44%) isolates, was identified among the sepsis isolates. Phenotypically the S. epidermidis sepsis isolates comprised three major clusters. In contrast, among the S. epidermidis contaminants, eight genotypic groups and two phenotypic clusters were identified. The dominating genotypic group among the sepsis isolates of S. epidermidis may represent strains with higher invasive capacity.

  • 8.
    Bjørkeng, Eva
    et al.
    Research Group for Host-Microbe Interactions, Department of Medical Biology, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.
    Rasmussen, Gunlög
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Sundsfjord, Arnfinn
    Research Group for Host-Microbe Interactions, Department of Medical Biology, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway; Department of Microbiology and Infection Control, Reference Centre for Detection of Antimicrobial Resistance, University Hospital of North-Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Sjöberg, Lennart
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hegstad, Kristin
    Research Group for Host-Microbe Interactions, Department of Medical Biology, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway; Department of Microbiology and Infection Control, Reference Centre for Detection of Antimicrobial Resistance, University Hospital of North-Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Söderquist, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences. Department of Infectious Diseases and Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Clustering of polyclonal VanB-type vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium in a low-endemic area was associated with CC17-genogroup strains harbouring transferable vanB2-Tn5382 and pRUM-like repA containing plasmids with axe-txe plasmid addiction systems2011In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 119, no 4-5, p. 247-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    VanB-type vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates (n = 17) from 15 patients at the Örebro University hospital in Sweden during a span of 18 months was characterized. All patients had underlying disorders and received broad-spectrum antimicrobial therapy. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) grouped 14 isolates in three PFGE types and three isolates in unique PFGE patterns. All isolates had multi-locus sequence types [ST17 (n = 5); ST18 (n = 3); ST125 (n = 7); ST262 (n = 1); ST460 (n = 1)] belonging to the successful hospital-adapted clonal complex 17 (CC17), harboured CC17-associated virulence genes, were vanB2-positive and expressed diverse vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs; 8 to > 256 mg/L). Isolate 1 had a unique PFGE type and a chromosomal transferable vanB2-Tn5382 element. Interestingly, the other five PFGE types had Tn5382 located on plasmids containing pRUM-like repA and a plasmid addiction system (axe-txe) shown by co-hybridization analysis of PFGE-separated S1-nuclease digested total DNA. The resistance plasmids were mainly of 120-kb and supported intraspecies vanB transfer. Two strains were isolated from patient 6 and we observed a possible transfer of the vanB2-resistance genes from PFGE type III ST460 to a more successful PFGE type I ST125. This latter PFGE type I ST125 became the predominant type afterwards. Our observations support the notion that vanB-type vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium can persist in a low-endemic area through successful clones and plasmids with stability functions in hospital patients with known risk factors.

  • 9.
    Blom, Kristin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    ElShafie, Amir Ibrahim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Alribat Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Pathol & Microbiol, Khartoum, Sudan.
    Jönsson, Ulla-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Rönnelid, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Håkansson, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Venge, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    The genetically determined production of the alarmin eosinophil-derived neurotoxin is reduced in visceral leishmaniasis2018In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 126, no 1, p. 85-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is the most severe form of leishmaniasis. Recent findings indicate that dendritic cells have a key role in the defense against the Leishmania parasite and that the activity of this cell may be modified by the eosinophil secretory protein eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN). We hypothesized that the interactions between dendritic cells and EDN might be of importance in the disease development. Cellular content of EDN was analyzed by ELISA. The single-nucleotide polymorphisms at positions 405, 416, and 1122 in the EDN gene were analyzed by real-time PCR with TaqMan((R)) reagents. The study cohorts comprised 239 Sudanese subjects (65 healthy controls and 174 with VL) and 300 healthy Swedish controls. The eosinophil content of EDN was lower in VL as compared with controls (p < 0.0001). The EDN405 (G>C) genotype distribution was similar among Swedish and Sudanese controls, whereas VL subjects had a higher prevalence of the EDN405-GG genotype (p < 0.0001). The content of EDN in the eosinophils was closely linked to the EDN405 polymorphism (p = 0.0002). Our findings suggest that the predisposition to acquire VL is related to the genetic polymorphism of the EDN gene and the reduced production by the eosinophil of this gene product.

  • 10.
    Boiko, Iryna
    et al.
    Ternopil Regional Clinical Dermatovenerologic Dispensary, Clinical Laboratory Department, Ternopil, Ukraine; Department of Functional and Laboratory Diagnostics, I. Horbachevsky Ternopil State Medical University, Ternopil, Ukraine; WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other STIs, National Reference Laboratory for STIs, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Golparian, Daniel
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other STIs, National Reference Laboratory for STIs, Department of Laboratory Medicine.
    Krynsytska, Inna
    Department of Functional and Laboratory Diagnostics, I. Horbachevsky Ternopil State Medical University, Ternopil, Ukraine.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other STIs, National Reference Laboratory for STIs, Department of Laboratory Medicine.
    High prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and particularly Trichomonas vaginalis diagnosed using US FDA-approved Aptima molecular tests and evaluation of conventional routine diagnostic tests in Ternopil, Ukraine2019In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 127, no 9, p. 627-634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) remain major public health problems globally. Appropriate laboratory diagnosis of STIs is rare in Ukraine. We investigated the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) and Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) using the US FDA-approved Aptima Combo 2 and Aptima TV assays and compared the results with the conventional routine diagnostic tests (CDTs) in Ukraine. Urogenital swabs from consecutive mostly symptomatic females (n = 296) and males (n = 159) were examined. The prevalences were as follows: 10% (n = 47) of TV, 5.3% (n = 24) of CT and 1.5% (n = 7) of NG. The specificity of some CDTs was high, for example, 100% for NG culture, TV IgG ELISA, CT IgM ELISA and CT microscopy, but lower for other CDTs, that is, from 44% to 99.8%. The sensitivity of all CDTs was suboptimal, that is, 71% (n = 5) for NG microscopy, 57% (n = 4) for NG culture, 53% (n = 8) for CT IgG ELISA, 33% (n = 1) for TV IgG ELISA, 28% (n = 13) for TV microscopy, 25% (n = 1) for CT IgA ELISA, 20% (n = 3) for CT IgM ELISA and 0% (n = 0) for CT microscopy. The prevalences of particularly TV and CT were high, but substantial also for NG, in Ternopil, Ukraine. The sensitivities of all CDTs were low, and widespread implementation of validated, quality-assured and cost-effective molecular diagnostic STI tests in Ukraine is imperative.

  • 11.
    Boiko, Iryna
    et al.
    WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other STIs, National Reference Laboratory for STIs, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Clinical Laboratory Department, Ternopil Regional Clinical Dermatovenerologic Dispensary, Ternopil, Ukraine.
    Golparian, Daniel
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other STIs, National Reference Laboratory for STIs, Department of Laboratory Medicine.
    Krynytska, Inna
    Department of Functional and Laboratory Diagnostics, I. Horbachevsky Ternopil State Medical University, Ternopil, Ukraine.
    Bezkorovaina, Halyna
    Outpatient Department, Ternopil Regional Clinical Dermatovenerologic Dispensary, Ternopil, Ukraine.
    Frankenberg, Arkadii
    Dnipropetrovsk Regional Clinical Dermatovenerologic Dispensary, Dnipro, Ukraine.
    Onuchyna, Margarita
    Clinical Laboratory Department, Dnipropetrovsk Regional Clinical Dermatovenerologic Dispensary, Dnipro, Ukraine.
    Jacobsson, Susanne
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other STIs, National Reference Laboratory for STIs, Department of Laboratory Medicine.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other STIs, National Reference Laboratory for STIs, Department of Laboratory Medicine.
    Antimicrobial susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates and treatment of gonorrhoea patients in Ternopil and Dnipropetrovsk regions of Ukraine, 2013-20182019In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 127, no 7, p. 503-509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a major public health concern globally. However, recent gonococcal AMR data from Eastern Europe are extremely limited and no AMR data for strains spreading in Ukraine have ever been internationally published. We investigated the AMR of N. gonorrhoeae isolates in two regions of Ukraine (Ternopil 2013-2018, Dnipropetrovsk 2013-2014), and, where information was available, the treatment administered to the corresponding gonorrhoea patients. Determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of eight antimicrobials was performed using Etest and resistance breakpoints from the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) were applied. Overall, 9.3% of the examined 150 isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin, 6.0% to tetracycline, 2.0% to azithromycin, and 0.7% to benzylpenicillin. No isolates were resistant to ceftriaxone, cefixime, spectinomycin, or gentamicin. However, one (0.7%) isolate showed a MIC value of 0.125 mg/L for both ceftriaxone and cefixime, i.e., bordering resistance. Eighty-eight (67.2%) of 131 patients were administered dual therapy (ceftriaxone 1 g plus doxycycline/clarithromycin/azithromycin/ofloxacin) and 22 (16.8%) ceftriaxone 1 g monotherapy. Worryingly, 21 (16.0%) patients received monotherapy with clarithromycin/doxycycline/azithromycin/ofloxacin/benzylpenicillin. In conclusion, the antimicrobial susceptibility of gonococcal strains spreading in Ternopil and Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine during 2013-2018 was high. Low levels of resistance to ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, azithromycin, and benzylpenicillin were found, but no resistance to the internationally recommended ceftriaxone, cefixime, or spectinomycin. Ceftriaxone 1 g should remain as empiric first-line treatment, in dual therapy with azithromycin or doxycycline or in monotherapy. Continued and expanded gonococcal AMR surveillance in Ukraine is essential to monitor the susceptibility to particularly extended-spectrum cephalosporins, azithromycin and doxycycline.

  • 12. Bronner, Ulf
    et al.
    Karlsson, Lillemor
    Evengård, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Evaluation of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria in Swedish travellers2011In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 119, no 2, p. 88-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria have become valuable tools for the diagnosis of malaria in both endemic and non-endemic areas. During a 7-year period, first the MalaQuick rapid test and then the NOW Malaria test, were evaluated by well-trained laboratory technicians in a university hospital laboratory of parasitology. A total of 635 blood samples were selected from 4731 blood specimens obtained from travellers at the emergency department, at wards and at out-patient clinics. The samples were analysed by microscopy and RDT. Malaria parasites were detected in the blood films of 134 (21%) samples. The sensitivity of the RDT for Plasmodium falciparum was 97.7% (84 of 86 samples) with a negative predictive value of 99.6%. The two false-negative results were associated with low levels of parasitaemia. For non-falciparum species the sensitivity was only 58.3% (28 of 48 samples). Based on the excellent ability of the RDTs to detect P. falciparum infections, we recommend the use of the NOW Malaria test as a complement to microscopy in the laboratory.

  • 13. Carlson, Marie
    et al.
    Venge, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Lampinen, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    C3b-induced eosinophil degranulation involves PI3-kinases and is inhibited by protein kinase C activity2011In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 119, no 2, p. 119-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Selective release of individual eosinophil granule proteins has been demonstrated in eosinophilic conditions and in vitro using different stimuli. The aim of this study was to investigate if selective release of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), eosinophil protein X/eosinophil derived-neurotoxin (EPX/EDN) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) could be due to the involvement of different signal transduction pathways. Peripheral blood granulocytes from healthy donors were incubated with Wortmannin, LY294002, Genistein, Staurosporine, GÖ6976 or PD98059 prior to the induction of degranulation by C3b. The released amounts of ECP, EPO and EPX/EDN were determined by immunoassays, and related to the total cell content of respective protein. Wortmannin caused a significant, dose-dependent inhibition of all three granule proteins. LY294002 (10(-6)  M) also inhibited the release of all proteins. Genistein (10(-6)  M) inhibited the release of ECP, whereas the release of EPO was increased. However, there was a tendency towards similar concentration-dependent patterns of release of all three proteins. Staurosporine (10(-7)  M), GÖ6976 (10(-6)  M) and PD98059 (10(-5)  M) caused an increased release of the three proteins. PI3-kinases play an important role in the C3b-induced release of ECP, EPO and EPX/EDN, whereas protein kinase C seems to have inhibitory effects on C3b-induced degranulation.

  • 14.
    Casar Borota, Olivera
    et al.
    Tromsö University.
    Kloster, Roar
    Lindal, Sigurd
    Carcinoid tumour metastatic to the orbit with infiltration to the extraocular orbital muscle.2005In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 113, no 2, p. 135-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ninety-three percent of symptomatic patients with small intestinal carcinoid tumours have metastases. The most common sites of metastases are lymph nodes and liver. Orbital metastases have rarely been described and the majority of them involve the choroid rather than extraocular orbital structures. We report a patient who developed proptosis, impairment of vision and reduced ocular motility on the left side, eighteen months after operation for primary intestinal carcinoid tumour with hepatic metastases. CT and MR studies revealed the tumour mass infiltrating the inferior rectus muscle. Biopsy examined by imprint and frozen section showed tumour consistent with metastatic carcinoid. The tumour was removed. HE and staining for cytokeratin, chromogranin, NSE, serotonin, somatostatin and gastrin showed that the tumour tissue corresponded to that of the primary intestinal carcinoid tumour. Intramuscular orbital metastasis from a carcinoid tumour is a rare occurrence. Diagnosis may be difficult, especially where no evidence of primary carcinoid tumour is present. Metastatic orbital carcinoid should be suspected in patients with a clinical history of carcinoid tumour and who develop ocular complaints and mass lesion in the orbit. Complete surgical removal of the tumour is important for optimal restitution of vision and eye movements.

  • 15.
    Claesson, Rolf
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Kanasi, Eleni
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Anders, Johansson
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Sotirios, Kalfas
    School of Dentistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    A new cleavage site for elastase within the complement component 32010In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 118, no 10, p. 765-768Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lysosomal enzyme elastase was earlier shown to cleave the complement molecule C3. During somepreliminary experiments on the interactions of certain pathogenic bacteria with the innate defencemechanisms, we observed C3 cleavage, in the presence of elastase, to fragments not previouslydescribed. To elucidate this proteolytic reaction, the present study was conducted. Degradation of C3in mixtures with elastase or cathepsin G was detected by an immunoblot procedure using anti-C3c andanti-C3d antibodies after separating the proteins by SDS-PAGE. Certain C3 fragments were analysedfor amino acid sequence. The results revealed the existence of a cleavage site for elastase at the positionalanine1350 ⁄ lysine1351 of the C3 molecule, which has not been previously described. The fragmentresulted from this cleavage has a size of about 39 kDa and it contains a part or the whole of C3d. Thiscleavage was distinct from the one previously described at position 987 ⁄ 988, which gives a 34 kDaC3d-containing fragment.

  • 16.
    Cristea-FernstrOm, M.
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Karolinska University Laboratory, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Margaretha
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Chryssanthou, E.
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Karolinska University Laboratory, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Karolinska University Laboratory, SE 17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jonasson, Jon
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Petrini, B.
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Karolinska University Laboratory, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pyrosequencing of a short hypervariable 16S rDNA fragment for the identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria - A comparison with conventional 16S rDNA sequencing and phenotyping2007In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 115, no 11, p. 1252-1259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conventional methods for identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are often inexact and time consuming. Sequencing of bacterial 16S rDNA is accurate, rapid and effective. We have retrospectively evaluated the discriminative power of pyrosequencing of a short hypervariable 16S rDNA fragment as a simple and rapid tool for NTM characterization. A series of 312 clinical NTM isolates, excluding the M. avium/intracellulare complex, was investigated. When species could not be resolved by sequencing alone, growth rate and pigment production were also examined. 54% (170/312) of the isolates were unambiguously identified by both methods. An additional 14% (45/312) were directly identified to species by conventional 16S rDNA sequencing but needed complementary phenotypic analysis when examined by pyrosequencing. The remaining 31% (97/312) needed additional phenotypic analysis for both sequencing methods. We consider the pyrosequencing procedure to be a useful alternative for the identification of several NTM species, and a versatile tool for the characterization of clinical NTM isolates. At times it requires additional tests for definite species diagnosis and correct identification. Copyright © Apmis 2007.

  • 17.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kvarnström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Margareta
    Neurology Unit, Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Elevated number of cells secreting transforming growth factor β in Guillain-Barré syndrome2003In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 111, no 12, p. 1095-1104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used ELISPOT and cell ELISA to study secretion of IL-4, IFN-γ, TGF-β, IL-6, and TNF-α by circulating mononuclear cells during the course of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Compared to healthy controls, patients with GBS had higher numbers of TGF-β-secreting cells and the number of individuals with myelin-peptide-induced IL-4 and TGF-β secretion was higher in the GBS group. No significant differences were seen concerning the predominantly pro-inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, IL-6 or TNF-α. Our findings indicate a down-regulatory role for TGF-β and IL-4 in GBS.

  • 18.
    Dahlin, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    The Linköping experience - ups and downs2007In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 115, p. 1029-1031Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 19.
    Delbro, Dick S.
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Surg, Inst Clin Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Karlstad Univ, Dept Chem & Biomed Sci, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Hallsberg, Lena
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Surg, Inst Clin Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Wallin, Monica
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Surg, Inst Clin Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Gustafsson, Bengt I.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Surg, Inst Clin Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sahlgrenska Transplant Inst, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Friman, Styrbjorn
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Surg, Inst Clin Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sahlgrenska Transplant Inst, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Expression of the non-neuronal cholinergic system in rat liver2011In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 119, no 3, p. 227-228Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Demirel, Isak
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Säve, Susanne
    School of Natural Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Kruse, Robert
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Persson, Katarina
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Expression of suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 (SOCS3) in human bladder epithelial cells infected with uropathogenic Escherichia coli2013In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 121, no 2, p. 158-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS) proteins inhibit pro-inflammatory signalling mediated by Janus-activated kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathways. To evade the immune response some pathogens appear to modify the host SOCS proteins. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are able to subvert the host response evoked by bladder epithelial cells, but the mechanisms are not fully understood. The objective of this study was to investigate whether UPEC can modify the host SOCS and STAT3 response. Real time RT-PCR studies demonstrated an increased SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression in the isolated human bladder epithelial cell lines (RT-4 and 5637) in response to cytokines. UPEC strain IA2 increased SOCS3, but not SOCS1, mRNA levels with a peak at 6 h after infection. The increase of SOCS3 was confirmed at the protein level by Western blotting. The UPEC strain IA2 caused a time-dependent decrease in the phosphorylation of STAT3. This study demonstrates that UPEC are able to affect SOCS3 and STAT3 signalling in human uroepithelial cells. The finding that UPEC are able to induce mediators involved in suppression of host cytokine signalling may help to elucidate how UPEC may circumvent the host response during urinary tract infection.

  • 21.
    Demirel, Isak
    et al.
    Univ Örebro, Dept Clin Med, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, Örebro, Sweden.
    Säve, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Kruse, Robert
    Univ Örebro, Dept Clin Med, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, Örebro, Sweden.
    Persson, Katarina
    Univ Örebro, Dept Clin Med, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, Örebro, Sweden.
    Expression of suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 (SOCS3) in human bladder epithelial cells infected with uropathogenic Escherichia coli2013In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 121, no 2, p. 158-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS) proteins inhibit pro-inflammatory signalling mediated by Janus-activated kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathways. To evade the immune response some pathogens appear to modify the host SOCS proteins. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are able to subvert the host response evoked by bladder epithelial cells, but the mechanisms are not fully understood. The objective of this study was to investigate whether UPEC can modify the host SOCS and STAT3 response. Real time RT-PCR studies demonstrated an increased SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression in the isolated human bladder epithelial cell lines (RT-4 and 5637) in response to cytokines. UPEC strain IA2 increased SOCS3, but not SOCS1, mRNA levels with a peak at 6h after infection. The increase of SOCS3 was confirmed at the protein level by Western blotting. The UPEC strain IA2 caused a time-dependent decrease in the phosphorylation of STAT3. This study demonstrates that UPEC are able to affect SOCS3 and STAT3 signalling in human uroepithelial cells. The finding that UPEC are able to induce mediators involved in suppression of host cytokine signalling may help to elucidate how UPEC may circumvent the host response during urinary tract infection.

  • 22.
    Dimberg, Jan
    et al.
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Skarstedt, Marita
    Regional Jönköping County, Sweden.
    Slind Olsen, Renate
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Regional Jönköping County, Sweden.
    Andersson, Roland E.
    Regional Jönköping County, Sweden.
    Matussek, Andreas
    Regional Jönköping County, Sweden.
    Gene polymorphism in DNA repair genes XRCC1 and XRCC6 and association with colorectal cancer in Swedish patients2016In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 124, no 9, p. 736-740Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The DNA repair genes XRCC1 and XRCC6 have been proposed to participate in the pathological process of cancer by modulating the DNA repair capacity. This study evaluated the susceptibility of the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) XRCC1 (rs25487, G amp;gt; A) and XRCC6 (rs2267437, C amp;gt; G) to colorectal cancer (CRC) and their association with clinical parameters in Swedish patients with CRC. Using the TaqMan system, these SNPs were screened in 452 patients and 464 controls. No significant difference in genotype distribution was found between the patients and controls, or any significant association with cancer-specific or disease-free survival in patients. However, we showed that the carriers of allele A in XRCC1 (rs25487, G amp;gt; A) were connected with a higher risk of disseminated CRC (Odds Ratio = 1.64; 95% Confidence Interval = 1.12-2.41, p = 0.012).

  • 23.
    Dimberg, Jan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Skarstedt, Marita
    Division of Medical Diagnostics, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Slind Olsen, Renate
    Division of Medical Diagnostics, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, Roland E.
    Department of Surgery, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Matussek, Andreas
    Division of Medical Diagnostics, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Gene polymorphism in DNA repair genes XRCC1 and XRCC6 and association with colorectal cancer in Swedish patients2016In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 124, no 9, p. 736-740Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The DNA repair genes XRCC1 and XRCC6 have been proposed to participate in the pathological process of cancer by modulating the DNA repair capacity. This study evaluated the susceptibility of the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) XRCC1 (rs25487, G > A) and XRCC6 (rs2267437, C > G) to colorectal cancer (CRC) and their association with clinical parameters in Swedish patients with CRC. Using the TaqMan system, these SNPs were screened in 452 patients and 464 controls. No significant difference in genotype distribution was found between the patients and controls, or any significant association with cancer-specific or disease-free survival in patients. However, we showed that the carriers of allele A in XRCC1 (rs25487, G > A) were connected with a higher risk of disseminated CRC (Odds Ratio = 1.64; 95% Confidence Interval = 1.12–2.41, p = 0.012).

  • 24. Edvinsson, Benjamin
    et al.
    Lundquist, Jessica
    Ljungman, Per
    Ringdén, Olle
    Evengård, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    A prospective study of diagnosis of Toxoplasma gondii infection after bone marrow transplantation.2008In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 116, no 5, p. 345-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Active infection with Toxoplasma gondii in immunocompromised transplant recipients can lead to toxoplasmosis, which may have a rapid disease course and in some cases be fatal. It is of paramount importance to diagnose toxoplasmosis at an early stage, and to initiate specific treatment to improve the outcome. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is today the primary diagnostic tool to diagnose toxoplasmosis in immunocompromised patients. Timely diagnosis may, however, be difficult if toxoplasmosis is at first asymptomatic. To investigate the magnitude of toxoplasmosis after bone marrow transplantation (BMT), we conducted a screening study by PCR where 21 autologous and 12 allogeneic BMT recipients were included. Peripheral blood samples were taken one week prior to BMT; thereafter, blood samples were drawn weekly for the first 6 months, and monthly up to one year after BMT. The samples were analyzed by conventional PCR and real-time PCR. T. gondii DNA was detected in peripheral blood from one patient 5 days post allogeneic BMT. There were no clinical signs of toxoplasmosis. Medical records were reviewed and showed a previously undiagnosed eye infection in another allogeneic BMT recipient. These two patients were seropositive for T. gondii. We concluded that monitoring for T. gondii DNA in peripheral blood samples using PCR might be a valuable method for identifying toxoplasma-seropositive stem cell transplant recipients.

  • 25.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Jönsson, Anna-Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ärlehag, L
    Forsum, Urban
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Lyme borreliosis in Sweden - Diagnostic performance of five commercial Borrelia serology kits using sera from well-defined patient groups2004In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 112, no 1, p. 74-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Five commercial Borrelia serology kits available in Sweden were evaluated and compared for their diagnostic performance in sera from clinically well-characterized patient groups. With the clinically defined groups as the gold standard, i.e. without knowledge of antibody status in serum and cerebrospinal fluid, the diagnostic performance of the kits was compared and important differences in diagnostic usefulness were found. The kits from Abbot and DAKO, that often predict clinically relevant Borrelia infection and do not detect antibodies in sera from patients without strong suspicion of Borrelia infection, were considered the most useful in the population studied. This kind of validation study is an important part of good laboratory practice and should be performed by laboratories serving patient populations with varying endemicity of Borrelia.

  • 26.
    Eriksson, Catharina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Sundqvist, Karl-Gösta
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Clinical Immunology, Karolinska Institute at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    T-cell expression of CD91: a marker of unresponsiveness to anti-TNF therapy in rheumatoid arthritis2010In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 118, no 11, p. 837-845Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) and its receptors, lipoprotein receptor-related protein/cluster of differentiation (CD)91, calreticulin (CRT), and CD47, on T cells and monocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy. The surface expression of CD91 and associated components on CD3- and CD14-positive cells was examined using flow cytometry in 12 patients with established RA before and after beginning therapy and compared with that of 9 healthy controls and 12 patients with early RA treated with conventional therapies. CD3-positive cells from anti-TNF non-responders showed significantly greater expression of CD91 expression than those from responders (p<0.05) after 6 weeks and when all measurements were pooled (p<0.001). CD91 expression on CD3-positive cells from non-responders to other therapies was at the same level as in healthy controls. In contrast, CD14-positive cells showed no differences in CD91 expression between patients and controls or between responders and non-responders to anti-TNF therapy. The expression of TSP-1, CRT, and CD47 showed no differences between responders and non-responders. The results suggest T-lymphocyte expression of CD91 to be a biomarker that signifies unresponsiveness to anti-TNF therapy in patients with RA and may be used to identify potential responders and non-responders.

  • 27.
    Eriksson, K
    et al.
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ålands Centralsjukhus, Finland.
    Forsum, Urban
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Björnerem, A
    Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Regionssjukhuset, Tromsö, Norway.
    Platz-Christensen, JJ
    Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital of Malmö.
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gender and Medicine.
    Validation of the use of Pap-stained vaginal smears for diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis2007In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 115, no 7, p. 809-813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Papanicolaou-stained cervicovaginal smears (Pap smears) are used to screen for cervical cancer. Since there is a lack of consensus in published reports respecting the efficacy of Pap-stained smears in BV diagnostics, there is a need to validate their use for diagnosis of BV. Slides from the international BV00 workshop were Pap stained and independently analyzed by four investigators under a phase-contrast microscope. All workshop slides - whether Pap-stained, Gram-stained or rehydrated air-dried smears - were scored according to the same Nugent classification. The diagnostic accuracy of Pap smears for diagnosis of BV had a sensitivity of 0.85 and a specificity of 0.92, with a positive and negative predictive value of 0.84 and 0.93, respectively. The interobserver weighted kappa index was 0.86 for Pap-stained smears compared to 0.81 for Gram-stained smears, and 0.70 for rehydrated air-dried smears using the mean Nugent score as the criterion standard. Provided that the samples are taken from equivalent locations (the vaginal fornix) and analyzed according to the same scoring criteria, there is no discernable difference in the diagnostic accuracy of the three smear-staining methods. The Pap-stained vaginal smears can be used as a wholly adequate alternative to Gram-stained smears for BV diagnosis. © Apmis 2007.

  • 28.
    Eriksson, Katarina
    et al.
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ålands Centralsjukhus, Finland.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Science, Linköpings University.
    Forsum, Urban
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kärnsjukhuset, Skövde.
    Larsson, Per Göran
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Prevalence of BV on the Åland Islands. Reply to Professor Donders2011In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 119, no 3, p. 226-226Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Eriksson, Katarina
    et al.
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ålands Centralsjukhus, Mariehamn, Finland; Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Science, Linköpings University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Science, Linköpings University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kärnsjukhuset, Skövde, Sweden; School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Forsum, Urban
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Science, Linköpings University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Science, Linköpings University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kärnsjukhuset, Skövde, Sweden; School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    The prevalence of BV in the population on the Åland Islands during a 15-year period2010In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 118, no 11, p. 903-908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe the prevalence and age distribution of bacterial vaginosis (BV) during an observation period of 15 years in a population study with cross-sectional samples of adult women living on the Åland Islands. The Åland Islands form an archipelago in the Baltic Sea and are a province of Finland. Every fifth year, specific age groups in the adult female population are invited to participate in a screening program for early diagnosis of cervical cancer using a papanicolaou (PAP)-stained vaginal smear. Women in the age groups of 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, and 60 years are called each year. BV diagnosis of the PAP-stained smears uses the classification according to Nugent. The PAP-stained smears from the screening program of cervical cancer 1993, 1998, 2003, and 2008 were used in this study. A total of 3456 slides were investigated and 271 women could be followed for the 15-year observation period. The prevalence of BV declined from 15.6% in 1993 to 8.6% in 2008. The highest prevalence occurred among the age groups of 35 and 50 years. Among the 271 women who could be followed for the 15-year observation period, two-third showed normal/intermediate flora and one-third were infected with BV at least once. As this is a cross-sectional population study spanning 15 years, the prevalence of BV in the female adult population of the Åland Islands can be estimated. The prevalence has declined between 1993 and 2008 from 15.6% to 8.6%.

  • 30.
    Eriksson, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Forsum, Urban
    Linköping University.
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    The prevalence of BV in the population on the Åland Islands during a 15-year period2010In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 118, no 11, p. 903-908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe the prevalence and age distribution of bacterial vaginosis (BV) during an observation period of 15 years in a population study with cross-sectional samples of adult women living on the Åland Islands. The Åland Islands form an archipelago in the Baltic Sea and are a province of Finland. Every fifth year, specific age groups in the adult female population are invited to participate in a screening program for early diagnosis of cervical cancer using a papanicolaou (PAP)-stained vaginal smear. Women in the age groups of 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, and 60 years are called each year. BV diagnosis of the PAP-stained smears uses the classification according to Nugent. The PAP-stained smears from the screening program of cervical cancer 1993, 1998, 2003, and 2008 were used in this study. A total of 3456 slides were investigated and 271 women could be followed for the 15-year observation period. The prevalence of BV declined from 15.6% in 1993 to 8.6% in 2008. The highest prevalence occurred among the age groups of 35 and 50 years. Among the 271 women who could be followed for the 15-year observation period, two-third showed normal ⁄ intermediate flora and one-third were infected with BV at least once. As this is a cross-sectional population study spanning 15 years, the prevalence of BV in the female adult population of the Åland Islands can be estimated. The prevalence has declined between 1993 and 2008 from 15.6% to 8.6%.

  • 31.
    Eriksson, Katarina
    et al.
    Alands Cent Sjukhus, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Mariehamn, Finland / Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden .
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Nilsson, Maud
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden .
    Forsum, Urban
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden .
    Vaginal retention of locally administered clindamycin2011In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 119, no 6, p. 373-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since bacterial vaginosis (BV) is characterized by a lack of, or very few, lactobacilli and high numbers of small, mostly anaerobic bacteria, an obvious treatment modality would be eradication of the BV-associated bacterial flora followed by reintroduction of lactobacilli vaginally. As probiotic treatment with lactobacilli is one tool for improving the cure rate when treating BV, it is necessary to know the length of time after treatment that clindamycin can be found in the vagina and if this could interfere with the growth of the probiotic lactobacilli. We evaluated the vaginal concentration of clindamycin in 12 women for 8 days to obtain data on the concentration of clindamycin in the vagina after intravaginal treatment with the drug. The participants were examined five times between two menstrual periods: before treatment, the day after treatment was finished, and 3, 5 and 8 days post-treatment. The first day post-treatment clindamycin 0.46 x 10-3 to 8.4 x 10-3 g/g vaginal fluid (median 2.87 x 10-3) was found. Thereafter, the concentration of clindamycin decreased rapidly. In 10 patients clindamycin was found after 3 days. A very low concentration was still present 5 days after treatment in four patients. After 8 days no clindamycin was found. Clindamycin is rapidly eliminated from the vagina, within 3-8 days, after local administration. Our results indicate that treatment with probiotic lactobacilli could be problematic if carried out within 5 days after cessation of clindamycin treatment.

  • 32.
    Erlandsson, Ann
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Örebro Medical Center Hospital.
    Bäckman, Anders
    Orebro Medical Center Hospital.
    Nygren, Malin
    KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Olcén, Per
    Orebro Medical Center Hospital.
    Quantification of Bordetella pertussis in clinical samples by colorimetric detection of competitive PCR products1998In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 106, no 7-12, p. 1041-1048Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantification of microorganisms is an important part of the normal diagnostic work of a clinical microbiology laboratory. Traditionally the diagnosis of pertussis is subject to a yes or no approach with no quantitative dimension. This can, however, be of interest as a factor when judging the risk of a patient spreading the bacterium and as a research tool. The aim of the present study was to develop a PCR-based quantitative assay for Bordetella pertussis DNA in clinical nasopharyngeal aspirates by combining a quantitative PCR with a colorimetric detection principle, DIANA (detection of immobilised amplified nucleic acid). A competitor to the PCR target sequence in IS-481, containing a lac-operator, was constructed and calibrated, and a test protocol prepared. A total of 46 clinical nasopharyngeal aspirates, previously diagnosed using a standard nested PCR assay and quantified by culture, were analysed by the quantitative PCR. The method showed acceptable precision and accuracy considering that it estimates the total number of bacterial genomes while culture detects viable bacteria. Recognised advantages were the simple colorimetric detection, the inborn indication of a working PCR assay, and the possibility of obtaining results even when partial inhibition of the PCR assay was seen. In addition, the quantitative PCR result can be obtained within one day compared to 3–10 days for culture. The present results and the qualities of the quantitative PCR suggest that this assay will be a useful complement in routine diagnostics and in research.

  • 33. Evertsson, U
    et al.
    Monstein, Hans-Jurg
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of health and environment. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Johansson, AG
    Detection and identification of fungi in blood using broad-range 28S rDNA PCR amplification and species-specific hybridisation2000In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 108, no 5, p. 385-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to develop a PCR-based method to detect and identify fungi directly from human venous blood. We used broad-range PCR primers that targeted a part of the large subunit 28S rRNA genes. To obtain species-specific hybridisation probes, type strains of Candida albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis and Cryptococcus neoformans were PCR amplified, and the amplicons were analysed by gene sequencing. Based on the sequence analysis, species-specific probes that targeted variable regions were designed and used in hybridisation analyses. Between 2 to 10 fungal cells/ml of spiked blood samples could be detected and correctly identified to species. We applied the technique to blood samples obtained from two patients with or two patients without verified candidaemia. The three samples of candidaemia patients were correctly identified to species level, and those of the negative patients remained negative. This method is a potential tool for diagnosis of systemic invasive candidiasis.

  • 34. Foerster, Sunniva
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Tomas N.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Sunderby Research Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Brochado, Anna Rita
    Desilvestro, Valentino
    Typas, Athanasios
    Unemo, Magnus
    The first wide-scale drug repurposing screen using the Prestwick Chemical Library (1200 bioactive molecules) against Neisseria gonorrhoeae identifies high in vitro activity of auranofin and many additional drugs2020In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Treatment options for gonorrhoea are scarce. Drug repurposing of bioactive molecules approved for other conditions might therefore be of value. We developed a method for wide-scale, systematic drug repurposing screen to identify molecules with activity against Neisseria gonorrhoeae and screened the Prestwick Chemical Library (1200 FDA-approved drugs). As a proof-of-concept, we further examined one promising and interesting screening hit (auranofin; antirheumatic agent). Three WHO gonococcal reference strains (WHO F, O, P) were used for the Library screening. The strains were grown in presence of a fixed concentration of the library drugs in 384-well plates for 12 h, and the remaining bacterial respiration, to reflect growth, was then quantitatively measured using optical density (OD) 450 nm and a resazurin assay. The activity of auranofin was further examined using in vitro susceptibility testing (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC)) against genetically diverse antimicrobial-resistant N. gonorrhoeae strains and time-kill assays. Sixty-eight molecules significantly inhibited bacterial growth of WHO F, O and P. Auranofin showed potent in vitro bactericidal activity (in MIC-, MBC- and time-kill assays) against four WHO reference strains. No cross-resistance between auranofin and any antimicrobial currently or previously used for gonorrhoea treatment was found when examining 51 selected antimicrobial-resistant gonococcal strains. In conclusion, this is the first wide-scale systematic screening effort for repurposing drugs for future treatment of gonorrhoea. Additional studies examining mechanism(s) of action, resistance development, in vivo anti-gonococcal activity and pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics for gonococcal infections of auranofin and several other significant screening hits would be valuable.

  • 35.
    Foerster, Sunniva
    et al.
    WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other STIs, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Genome Biology Unit, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Gustafsson, Tomas N.
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Sunderby Research Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Rita Brochado, Anna
    European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Genome Biology Unit, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Desilvestro, Valentino
    World Trade Institute (WTI), University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Typas, Athanasios
    European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Genome Biology Unit, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other STIs, Department of Laboratory Medicine.
    The first wide-scale drug repurposing screen using the Prestwick Chemical Library (1200 bioactive molecules) against Neisseria gonorrhoeae identifies high in vitro activity of auranofin and many additional drugs2020In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Treatment options for gonorrhoea are scarce. Drug repurposing of bioactive molecules approved for other conditions might therefore be of value. We developed a method for wide-scale, systematic drug repurposing screen to identify molecules with activity against Neisseria gonorrhoeae and screened the Prestwick Chemical Library (1200 FDA-approved drugs). As a proof-of-concept, we further examined one promising and interesting screening hit (auranofin; antirheumatic agent). Three WHO gonococcal reference strains (WHO F, O, P) were used for the Library screening. The strains were grown in presence of a fixed concentration of the library drugs in 384-well plates for 12 hours and the remaining bacterial respiration, to reflect growth, was then quantitatively measured using optical density (OD) 450 nm and a resazurin assay. The activity of auranofin was further examined using in vitro susceptibility testing (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC)) against genetically diverse antimicrobial-resistant N. gonorrhoeae strains and time-kill assays. Sixty-eight molecules significantly inhibited bacterial growth of WHO F, O and, P. Auranofin showed potent in vitro bactericidal activity (in MIC-, MBC-, and time-kill assays) against four WHO reference strains. No cross resistance between auranofin and any antimicrobial currently or previously used for gonorrhoea treatment was found when examining 51 selected antimicrobial-resistant gonococcal strains. In conclusion, this is the first wide-scale systematic screening effort for repurposing drugs for future treatment of gonorrhoea. Additional studies examining mechanism(s) of action, resistance development, in vivo anti-gonococcal activity, and pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics for gonococcal infections of auranofin and several other significant screening hits would be valuable.

  • 36. Foglé-Ansson, Margaretha
    et al.
    White, Peter
    Hermansson, Ann
    Melhus, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Otomicroscopic findings and systemic interleukin-6 levels in relation to etiologic agent during experimental acute otitis media2006In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 114, no 4, p. 285-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to explore whether it was possible to differentiate the clinical course and the otomicroscopic appearance of acute otitis media (AOM) caused by common otitis pathogens in an animal model. Systemic interleukin (IL)-6 levels as early markers for bacterial AOM were also studied. Four groups of rats were inoculated with either Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae or Moraxella catarrhalis. The animals were monitored by otomicroscopy, photos of the tympanic membrane, cultures and IL-6 detection in serum the following 4 days. The gram-positive S. pneumoniae and S. pyogenes induced severe AOM with opaque effusion behind the tympanic membrane, pronounced dilation of the vessels and spontaneous perforations. The gram-negative H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis induced a less severe infection with cloudy, sometimes foamy effusion, and no spontaneous perforations. With the otomicroscopic findings it was possible to distinguish between infections induced by gram-positive bacteria and gram-negative bacteria. Detection of interleukin-6 in serum appeared to be of limited use for all infections except the pneumococcal AOM, but this needs to be further investigated.

  • 37.
    Forsum, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Danielsson, Dan
    Uppsala.
    Developments in the recent past - Immunology2007In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 115, no 5, p. 406-408Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Forsum, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology . Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology .
    Hallen, A.
    Hallén, A., Dept. of Dermatology and Venereology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine .
    Bacterial vaginosis - A laboratory and clinical diagnostics enigma: Review article II2005In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 113, no 3, p. 153-161Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis (BV) has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel et al., whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Though there are other criteria and scoring methods which function well in comparison (i.e. Nugent scoring), it is not certain that they will always identify the same category of patients. Point-of-care methods based on various combinations of microbial products, presence of RNA, or more complex laboratory instrumentations such as sensor arrays, have also been introduced for the diagnosis of BV No method for diagnosing BV can at present be regarded as the best. It could be that - based partly on tacit knowledge on the part of the clinical investigators scoring in the clinic - various scoring systems have been chosen to fit a particular BV-related problem in a particular population. In this review we critically examine these pertinent issues influencing clinical scoring and laboratory diagnostics of BV. Copyright © APMIS 2005.

  • 39.
    Forsum, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Holst, E
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology.
    Vasquesz, A
    Jakobsson, Tell
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology.
    Mattsby-Baltzer, I
    Bacterial vaginosis - A microbiological and immunological enigma2005In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 113, no 2, p. 81-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of bacterial vaginosis (BV) among women of childbearing age and the resulting quantitative and qualitative shift from normally occurring lactobacilli in the vagina to a mixture of mainly anaerobic bacteria is a microbiological and immunological enigma that so far has precluded the formulation of a unifying generally accepted theory on the aetiology and clinical course of BV. This critical review highlights some of the more important aspects of BV research that could help in formulating new basic ideas respecting the biology of BV, not least the importance of the interleukin mediators of local inflammatory responses and the bacterial shift from the normally occurring lactobacilli species: L. crispatus, L. gasseri, L. jensenii, and L. iners to a mixed flora dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Copyright © APMIS 2005.

  • 40.
    Forsum, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology.
    Kronvall, Göran
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Clinical microbiology informatics - Developments in Sweden2007In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 115, no 5, p. 415-421Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Forsum, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Larsson, P.-G.
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Skövde, Sweden.
    Spiegel, C.
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA.
    Scoring vaginal fluid smears for diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis: Need for quality specifications2008In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 116, no 2, p. 156-159Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Forsum, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Olcén, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology.
    Skurnik, Mikael
    Diagnostic clinical bacteriology - Recent developments in the application of molecular biology tools2004In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 112, no 11-12, p. 709-712Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Forsum, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Vainio, O
    Ögmundsdottir, H
    Special edition: Dendritic cells.2003In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 111, p. 673-674Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44. Friberg, Örjan
    et al.
    Källman, Jan
    Söderquist, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Olcén, P.
    Introduction: [to prevention of surgical site infections in cardiac surgery]2007In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 115, no 9, p. 987-988Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Gideskog, Maria
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Communicable Disease and Infection Control.
    Melhus, Asa
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Communicable Disease and Infection Control. Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Outbreak of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Hospital Center for Childrens and Womens Health in a Swedish County2019In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 127, no 4, p. 181-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to investigate a sudden increase in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) cases primarily in one maternity ward at the Center for Childrens and Womens Health at Linkoping University Hospital, Sweden. Approximately 300 individuals including patients, their family members, and healthcare workers were screened for MRSA. The antibiotic susceptibility was tested and isolates polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-positive for the mecA gene were spa typed. Isolates with the same antibiogram and spa type were further whole genome sequenced. Compliance to current cleaning and hygiene routines was also controlled, and environmental samples collected. The results showed that a total of 13 individuals were involved in the outbreak. It was caused by a t386 MRSA strain (ST-1, NCBI-accession AB505628) with additional resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin. All cases were epidemiologically connected to the index patient, who had recently emigrated from a high-endemic area for MRSA. With improved cleaning and better compliance to basic hygiene routines, no further cases were reported. This study demonstrates how rapid an MRSA strain can disseminate in a ward with susceptible patients and insufficient cleaning and hygiene. For a better control of MRSA, clinical cultures and screening samples need to be obtained early and more extensively than according to the current recommendations.

  • 46.
    Gideskog, Maria
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Infect Control & Hyg, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Melhus, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Microbiology. Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Infect Control & Hyg, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Outbreak of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Hospital Center for Children's and Women's Health in a Swedish County2019In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 127, no 4, p. 181-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to investigate a sudden increase in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) cases primarily in one maternity ward at the Center for Children's and Women's Health at Linkoping University Hospital, Sweden. Approximately 300 individuals including patients, their family members, and healthcare workers were screened for MRSA. The antibiotic susceptibility was tested and isolates polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-positive for the mecA gene were spa typed. Isolates with the same antibiogram and spa type were further whole genome sequenced. Compliance to current cleaning and hygiene routines was also controlled, and environmental samples collected. The results showed that a total of 13 individuals were involved in the outbreak. It was caused by a t386 MRSA strain (ST-1, NCBI-accession AB505628) with additional resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin. All cases were epidemiologically connected to the index patient, who had recently emigrated from a high-endemic area for MRSA. With improved cleaning and better compliance to basic hygiene routines, no further cases were reported. This study demonstrates how rapid an MRSA strain can disseminate in a ward with susceptible patients and insufficient cleaning and hygiene. For a better control of MRSA, clinical cultures and screening samples need to be obtained early and more extensively than according to the current recommendations.

  • 47. Glazkova, Slavyana
    et al.
    Golparian, Daniel
    Titov, Leonid
    Pankratova, Nataliya
    Suhabokava, Nataliya
    Shimanskaya, Irina
    Domeika, Marius
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Antimicrobial susceptibility/resistance and molecular epidemiological characteristics of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in 2009 in Belarus2011In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 119, no 8, p. 537-542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a global concern, and ultimately gonorrhoea may become untreatable. Nonetheless, AMR data from East-Europe are scarce beyond Russia, and no AMR data or other characteristics of gonococci have been reported from Belarus for more than 20 years. The aim was to describe the prevalence of AMR, and report molecular epidemiological characteristics of gonococci circulating in 2009 in Belarus. In a sample of 80 isolates, resistance prevalences to antimicrobials used for gonorrhoea treatment in Belarus were: Ceftriaxone 0%, spectinomycin 0%, azithromycin 17.3%, tetracycline 25.9%, ciprofloxacin 34.6% and erythromycin 59.2%. The isolates displayed no penA mosaic alleles, 38 porB gene sequences and 35 N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence types, of which 20 have not been described before worldwide. Due to the high levels of antimicrobial resistance, only ceftriaxone and spectinomycin can be recommended for empirical treatment of gonorrhoea in Belarus according to WHO recommendations. Continuous gonococcal AMR surveillance in Eastern Europe is crucial. This is now initiated in Belarus using WHO protocols.

  • 48.
    Golparian, Daniel
    et al.
    WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other Sexually Transmitted Infections, Swedish Reference Laboratory for Pathogenic Neisseria, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hellmark, Bengt
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other Sexually Transmitted Infections, Swedish Reference Laboratory for Pathogenic Neisseria, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other Sexually Transmitted Infections, Swedish Reference Laboratory for Pathogenic Neisseria, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Analytical specificity and sensitivity of the novel dual-target GeneProof Neisseria gonorrhoeae PCR kit for detection of N-gonorrhoeae2015In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 123, no 11, p. 955-958Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae relies increasingly on nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs). The specificity of many gonococcal NAATs has been suboptimal and supplementary testing remains recommended in Europe and several additional countries. The novel dual-target GeneProofNeisseria gonorrhoeae PCR kit, targeting porA pseudogene and 16S rRNA gene, showed a high specificity and sensitivity when isolates of non-gonococcal Neisseria and related species (n=144), and gonococci (n=104) were tested. However, rare gonococcal porA mutants were only detected in the 16S rRNA gene target and two non-gonococcal isolates showed a low-level cross-reactivity in the 16S rRNA gene target. The detection limit for both targets was 1.5 copies per reaction.

  • 49. Gullsby, Karolina
    et al.
    Hallander, Hans O.
    Bondeson, Kåre
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Virology.
    Performance of Bordetella pertussis IS481 real-time PCR in a vaccine trial setting2007In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 115, no 12, p. 1370-1375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A real-time PCR method targeting the Bordetella pertussis IS481 gene fragment was evaluated in a vaccine trial setting in which real-time PCR results could be validated against culture and serology results. Two commonly used DNA extraction methods, Amplicor((R)) Respiratory Preparation kit and the QIAamp((R)) DNA Mini Kit, were compared. An approximately 50-fold higher sensitivity was achieved using the Amplicor kit. 89 of 276 aspirates analysed with the IS481 real-time PCR were positive. Interestingly, six of these were culture negative and came from serology-negative patients. Defining true positive cases either as culture-positive or as PCR-positive cases that had been confirmed with a serology-positive result or verified with a newly constructed recA PCR, the sensitivity and specificity of the IS481 real-time PCR were 89% and 98%, respectively. This study confirms the specificity and high diagnostic sensitivity of IS481-based PCR methods for diagnosis of B. pertussis.

  • 50.
    Gullsby, Karolina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Hallander, Hans Olov
    Bondeson, Kåre
    Performance of Bordetella pertussis IS481 real-time PCR in a vaccine trial setting2007In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463Article in journal (Refereed)
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