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  • 1. Abonia, J Pablo
    et al.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
    Jones, Tatiana
    Shi, Tong
    Xu, Yuhui
    Koni, Pandelakis
    Flavell, Richard A
    Boyce, Joshua A
    Austen, K Frank
    Gurish, Michael F
    Alpha-4 integrins and VCAM-1, but not MAdCAM-1, are essential for recruitment of mast cell progenitors to the inflamed lung2006In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 108, no 5, p. 1588-1594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Normal mouse lungs lack appreciable numbers of mast cells (MCs) or MC progenitors (MCp's), yet the appearance of mature MCs in the tracheobronchial epithelial surface is a characteristic of allergic, T-cell-dependent pulmonary inflammation. We hypothesized that pulmonary inflammation would recruit MCp's to inflamed lungs and that this recruitment would be regulated by distinct adhesion pathways. Ovalbumin-sensitized and challenged mice had a greater than 28-fold increase in the number of MCp's in the lungs. In mice lacking endothelial vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) and in wild-type mice administered blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb) to VCAM-1 but not to mucosal addressin CAM-1 (MadCAM-1), recruitment of MCp's to the inflamed lung was reduced by greater than 75%. Analysis of the integrin receptors for VCAM-1 showed that in beta7 integrin-deficient mice, recruitment was reduced 73% relative to wild-type controls, and in either BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice, mAb blocking of alpha4, beta1, or beta7 integrins inhibited the recruitment of MCp's to the inflamed lung. Thus, VCAM-1 interactions with both alpha4beta1 and alpha4beta7 integrins are essential for the recruitment and expansion of the MCp populations in the lung during antigen-induced pulmonary inflammation. Furthermore, the MCp is currently unique among inflammatory cells in its partial dependence on alpha4beta7 integrins for lung recruitment.

  • 2.
    Agarwal, Prasoon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Kalushkova, Antonia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Enroth, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Alzrigat, Mohammad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Osterborg, Anders
    Nilsson, Kenneth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Öberg, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Jernberg-Wiklund, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    An Epigenomic Map of Multiple Myeloma Reveals the Importance of Polycomb Gene Silencing for the Malignancy2014In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 124, no 21Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3. Agathangelidis, Andreas
    et al.
    Darzentas, Nikos
    Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia
    Brochet, Xavier
    Murray, Fiona
    Yan, Xiao-Jie
    Davis, Zadie
    van Gastel-Mol, Ellen J.
    Tresoldi, Cristina
    Chu, Charles C.
    Cahill, Nicola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Giudicelli, Veronique
    Tichy, Boris
    Pedersen, Lone Bredo
    Foroni, Letizia
    Bonello, Lisa
    Janus, Agnieszka
    Smedby, Karin
    Anagnostopoulos, Achilles
    Merle-Beral, Helene
    Laoutaris, Nikolaos
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    di Celle, Paola Francia
    Pospisilova, Sarka
    Jurlander, Jesper
    Geisler, Christian
    Tsaftaris, Athanasios
    Lefranc, Marie-Paule
    Langerak, Anton W.
    Oscier, David Graham
    Chiorazzi, Nicholas
    Belessi, Chrysoula
    Davi, Frederic
    Rosenquist Brandell, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Ghia, Paolo
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Stereotyped B-cell receptors in one-third of chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a molecular classification with implications for targeted therapies2012In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 119, no 19, p. 4467-4475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mounting evidence indicates that grouping of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) into distinct subsets with stereotyped BCRs is functionally and prognostically relevant. However, several issues need revisiting, including the criteria for identification of BCR stereotypy and its actual frequency as well as the identification of "CLL-biased" features in BCR Ig stereotypes. To this end, we examined 7596 Ig VH (IGHV-IGHD-IGHJ) sequences from 7424 CLL patients, 3 times the size of the largest published series, with an updated version of our purpose-built clustering algorithm. We document that CLL may be subdivided into 2 distinct categories: one with stereotyped and the other with nonstereotyped BCRs, at an approximate ratio of 1: 2, and provide evidence suggesting a different ontogeny for these 2 categories. We also show that subset-defining sequence patterns in CLL differ from those underlying BCR stereotypy in other B-cell malignancies. Notably, 19 major subsets contained from 20 to 213 sequences each, collectively accounting for 943 sequences or one-eighth of the cohort. Hence, this compartmentalized examination of VH sequences may pave the way toward a molecular classification of CLL with implications for targeted therapeutic interventions, applicable to a significant number of patients assigned to the same subset.

  • 4. Aguilo, Francesca
    et al.
    Avagyan, Serine
    Labar, Amy
    Sevilla, Ana
    Lee, Dung-Fang
    Kumar, Parameet
    Lemischka, Ihor R
    Zhou, Betty Y
    Snoeck, Hans-Willem
    Prdm16 is a physiologic regulator of hematopoietic stem cells.2011In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 117, no 19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fetal liver and adult bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) renew or differentiate into committed progenitors to generate all blood cells. PRDM16 is involved in human leukemic translocations and is expressed highly in some karyotypically normal acute myeloblastic leukemias. As many genes involved in leukemogenic fusions play a role in normal hematopoiesis, we analyzed the role of Prdm16 in the biology of HSCs using Prdm16-deficient mice. We show here that, within the hematopoietic system, Prdm16 is expressed very selectively in the earliest stem and progenitor compartments, and, consistent with this expression pattern, is critical for the establishment and maintenance of the HSC pool during development and after transplantation. Prdm16 deletion enhances apoptosis and cycling of HSCs. Expression analysis revealed that Prdm16 regulates a remarkable number of genes that, based on knockout models, both enhance and suppress HSC function, and affect quiescence, cell cycling, renewal, differentiation, and apoptosis to various extents. These data suggest that Prdm16 may be a critical node in a network that contains negative and positive feedback loops and integrates HSC renewal, quiescence, apoptosis, and differentiation.

  • 5.
    Albertsson-Lindblad, Alexandra
    et al.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, SE-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Kolstad, Arne
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Oslo, Norway..
    Laurell, Anna
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Oncol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Raty, Riikka
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Dept Hematol, Helsinki, Finland..
    Gronbaek, Kirsten
    Rigshosp, Dept Hematol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Sundberg, Jan
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, SE-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Pedersen, Lone Bredo
    Rigshosp, Dept Hematol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Ralfkiaer, Elisabeth
    Rigshosp, Dept Pathol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Karjalainen-Lindsberg, Marja-Liisa
    Univ Helsinki, Cent Hosp, Dept Pathol, Helsinki, Finland..
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology. Department of Pathology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden; and..
    Ehinger, Mats
    Univ Lund Hosp, Dept Pathol Cytol, Lund, Sweden..
    Geisler, Christian
    Rigshosp, Dept Hematol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Jerkeman, Mats
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, SE-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Lenalidomide-bendamustine-rituximab in patients older than 65 years with untreated mantle cell lymphoma2016In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 128, no 14, p. 1814-1820Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For elderly patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), there is no defined standard therapy. In this multicenter, open-label phase 1/2 trial, we evaluated the addition of lenalidomide (LEN) to rituximab-bendamustine (R-B) as first-line treatment for elderly patients with MCL. Patients >65 years with untreated MCL, stages II-IV were eligible for inclusion. Primary end points were maximally tolerable dose (MTD) of LEN and progression-free survival (PFS). Patients received 6 cycles every four weeks of L-B-R (L D1-14, B 90 mg/m(2) IV, days 1-2 and R 375 mg/m(2) IV, day 1) followed by single LEN (days 1-21, every four weeks, cycles 7-13). Fifty-one patients (median age 71 years) were enrolled from 2009 to 2013. In phase 1, the MTD of LEN was defined as 10 mg in cycles 2 through 6, and omitted in cycle 1. After 6 cycles, the complete remission rate (CRR) was 64%, and 36% were MRD negative. At a median follow-up time of 31 months, median PFS was 42 months and 3-year overall survival was 73%. Infection was the most common nonhematologic grade 3 to 5 event and occurred in 21 (42%) patients. Opportunistic infections occurred in 3 patients: 2 Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and 1 cytomegalovirus retinitis. Second primary malignancies (SPM) were observed in 8 patients (16%). LEN could safely be combined with R-B when added from the second cycle in patients with MCL, and was associated with a high rate of CR and molecular remission. However, we observed a high degree of severe infections and an unexpected high number of SPMs, which may limit its use. This trial is registered at www.Clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00963534.

  • 6. Anderson, Kristina
    et al.
    Rusterholz, Corinne
    Månsson, Robert
    Jensen, Christina T
    Bacos, Karl
    Sasan, Zandi
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of cell biology.
    Sasaki, Yutaka
    Nerlov, Claus
    Sigvardsson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of cell biology.
    Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W
    Ectopic expression of PAX5 promotes maintenance of biphenotypic myeloid progenitors coexpressing myeloid and B-cell lineage-associated genes2007In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 109, no 9, p. 3697-3705Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transcription factor PAX5 is a critical regulator of B-cell commitment and development. Although normally not expressed in myeloid progenitors, PAX5 has recently been shown to be frequently expressed in myeloid malignancies and to suppress expression of myeloid differentiation genes, compatible with an effect on the differentiation or maintenance of myeloid progenitors. However, previous studies in which PAX5 was ectopically expressed in normal myeloid progenitors in vivo and in vitro provided conflicting results as to the effect of PAX5 on myeloid development. Herein, we demonstrate that on ectopic expression of PAX5 in bone marrow multipotent stem/progenitor cells, cells with a biphenotypic B220+GR-1/MAC-1+ phenotype are produced. These remain cytokine-dependent, but unlike control-transduced cells they sustain long-term generation of myeloid progenitors in vitro and remain capable of myeloid differentiation. Notably, PAX5+B220+GR-1/MAC- 1+ myeloid progenitors coexpress, at the single-cell level, myeloid genes and otherwise B-cell-specific PAX5 target genes. These findings establish that ectopic expression of PAX5 introduces extensive self-renewal properties in otherwise short-lived myeloid progenitors. Along with the established ectopic expression of PAX5 in acute myeloid leukemia, this motivates a careful investigation of the potential involvement of ectopic PAX5 expression in myeloid and biphenotypic leukemias. © 2007 by The American Society of Hematology.

  • 7. Aplenc, Richard
    et al.
    Zhang, Mei-Jie
    Sung, Lillian
    Zhu, Xiaochun
    Ho, Vincent T
    Cooke, Kenneth
    Dvorak, Christopher
    Hale, Gregory
    Isola, Luis M
    Lazarus, Hillard M
    McCarthy, Philip L
    Olsson, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Pulsipher, Michael
    Pasquini, Marcelo C
    Bunin, Nancy
    Effect of body mass in children with hematologic malignancies undergoing allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.2014In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 123, no 22, p. 3504-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rising incidence of pediatric obesity may significantly affect bone marrow transplantation (BMT) outcomes. We analyzed outcomes in 3687 children worldwide who received cyclophosphamide-based BMT regimens for leukemias between 1990 and 2007. Recipients were classified according to age-adjusted body mass index (BMI) percentiles as underweight (UW), at risk of UW (RUW), normal, overweight (OW), or obese (OB). Median age and race were similar in all groups. Sixty-one percent of OB children were from the United States/Canada. Three-year relapse-free and overall survival ranged from 48% to 52% (P = .54) and 55% to 58% (P = .81) across BMI groups. Three-year leukemia relapses were 33%, 33%, 29%, 25%, and 21% in the UW, RUW, normal, OW, and OB groups, respectively (P < .001). Corresponding cumulative incidences for transplant-related mortality (TRM) were 18%, 19%, 21%, 22%, and 28% (P < .01). Multivariate analysis demonstrated a decreased risk of relapse compared with normal BMI (relative risk [RR] = 0.73; P < .01) and a trend toward higher TRM (RR = 1.28; P = .014). BMI in children is not significantly associated with different survival after BMT for hematologic malignancies. Obese children experience less relapse posttransplant compared with children with normal BMI; however, this benefit is offset by excess in TRM.

  • 8.
    Apollonio, Benedetta
    et al.
    Kings Coll London, Dept Haematooncol, London WC2R 2LS, England..
    Nicholas, Nicole S.
    Kings Coll London, Dept Haematooncol, London WC2R 2LS, England..
    Sutton, Lesley-Ann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Salisbury, Jon
    Kings Coll Hosp London, London, England..
    Patten, Piers E.
    Kings Coll Hosp London, Haematol, London, England..
    Kassam, Shireen
    Kings Coll Hosp London, London, England..
    Devereux, Stephen
    Kings Coll Hosp London, Haematol, London, England..
    Amini, Rose Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Ramsay, Alan G.
    Kings Coll London, Dept Haematooncol, London WC2R 2LS, England..
    Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) Tumor Cells Reprogram Lymphatic Fibroblasts into Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts (CAFs) That Contribute to Tumor Microenvironment (TME)-Driven Immune Privilege2015In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 126, no 23Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Armand, Marine
    et al.
    Hop La Pitie Salpetriere, Dept Hematol, Paris, France.;Univ Paris 06, Paris, France..
    Boudjoghra, Myriam
    Hop La Pitie Salpetriere, Dept Hematol, Paris, France.;Univ Paris 06, Paris, France..
    Xochelli, Aliki
    CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Canioni, Danielle
    Univ Paris 05, Hop Necker, AP HP, Dept Pathol, Paris, France..
    Tavernier, Magali Le Garff
    Hop La Pitie Salpetriere, Dept Hematol, Paris, France.;Univ Paris 06, Paris, France..
    Colombo, Monica
    Azienda Osped Univ AOU San Martino IST, IRCCS, Direz Sci, Genoa, Italy..
    Rabiega, Pascaline
    Univ Paris 06, INSERM, UMR S1136, Inst Pierre Louis Epidemiol & Sante Publ, Paris, France..
    Molina, Thierry
    Univ Paris 05, Hop Necker, AP HP, Dept Pathol, Paris, France..
    Charlotte, Frederic
    Univ Paris 06, Paris, France.;Hop La Pitie Salpetriere, Dept Pathol, Paris, France..
    Michot, Jean-Marie
    Inst Gustave Roussy, Dept Hematol & Drug Developmen, Villejuif, France..
    Lesty, Claude
    Hop La Pitie Salpetriere, Dept Hematol, Paris, France.;Univ Paris 06, Paris, France..
    Carrat, Fabrice
    Univ Paris 06, INSERM, UMR S1136, Inst Pierre Louis Epidemiol & Sante Publ, Paris, France..
    Ferrarini, Manlio
    Azienda Osped Univ AOU San Martino IST, IRCCS, Direz Sci, Genoa, Italy..
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Besson, Caroline
    Hop Bicetre, Dept Internal Med & Clin Immunol Biol Immunol & H, Le Kremlin Bicetre, France.;Univ Paris Sud, F-94275 Le Kremlin Bicetre, France..
    Hermine, Olivier
    Hop Necker Enfants Malad, Dept Adult Hematol, Paris, France.;Paris Descartes Univ, Paris, France..
    Davi, Frederic
    Hop La Pitie Salpetriere, Dept Hematol, Paris, France.;Univ Paris 06, Paris, France..
    Auto-Immune Origin of B Cells from HCV-Associated Lymphoma2015In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 126, no 23Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10. Armstrong, Scott A
    et al.
    Mabon, Meghann E
    Silverman, Lewis B
    Li, Aihong
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Gribben, John G
    Fox, Edward A
    Sallan, Stephen E
    Korsmeyer, Stanley J
    FLT3 mutations in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.2004In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 103, no 9, p. 3544-3546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Activating mutations of the FLT3 receptor tyrosine kinase are common in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) but are rare in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We have recently shown that FLT3 is highly expressed and often mutated in ALLs with rearrangement of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene on chromosome 11q23. Because hyperdiploid ALL samples also show high-level expression of FLT3, we searched for the presence of FLT3 mutations in leukemic blasts from 71 patients with ALL. The data show that approximately 25% (6 of 25) of hyperdiploid ALL samples possess FLT3 mutations, whereas only 1 of 29 TEL/AML1-rearranged samples harbored mutations (P =.04, Fisher exact test). Three mutations are novel in-frame deletions within a 7-amino acid region of the receptor juxtamembrane domain. Finally, 3 samples from patients whose disease would relapse harbored FLT3 mutations. These data suggest that patients with hyperdiploid or relapsed ALL might be considered candidates for therapy with newly described small-molecule FLT3 inhibitors.

  • 11. Arne, Kolstad
    et al.
    Laurell, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Jerkeman, Mats
    Gronbaek, Kirsten
    Elonen, Erkki
    Raty, Riikka
    Pedersen, Lone Bredo
    Loft, Annika
    Bogsrud, Trond Velde
    Nordstrom, Marie
    Hansen, Per Boye
    Fagerli, Unn-Merete
    Nilsson-Ehle, Herman
    Lauritzsen, Grete Fossum
    Lehmann, Anne Kristine
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Karjalainen-Lindsberg, Marja-Liisa
    Ralfkiaer, Elisabeth
    Ehinger, Mats
    Delabie, Jan
    Bentzen, Hans
    Schildt, Jukka
    Kostova-Aherdan, Kamelia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Frederiksen, Henrik
    Brown, Peter de Nully
    Geisler, Christian H.
    Nordic MCL3 Study: Zevalin Combined with High-Dose Chemotherapy Followed by Autologous Stem Cell Support As Late Intensification for Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL) Patients < 66 Years Not in CR After Induction Chemoimmunotherapy: No Benefit of Zevalin2012In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 120, no 21, p. 747-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Avagyan, Serine
    et al.
    Aguilo, Francesca
    Kamezaki, Kenjiro
    Snoeck, Hans-Willem
    Quantitative trait mapping reveals a regulatory axis involving peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, PRDM16, transforming growth factor-β2 and FLT3 in hematopoiesis.2011In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 118, no 23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hematopoiesis is the process whereby BM HSCs renew to maintain their number or to differentiate into committed progenitors to generate all blood cells. One approach to gain mechanistic insight into this complex process is the investigation of quantitative genetic variation in hematopoietic function among inbred mouse strains. We previously showed that TGF-β2 is a genetically determined positive regulator of hematopoiesis. In the presence of unknown nonprotein serum factors TGF-β2, but not TGF-β1 or -β3, enhances progenitor proliferation in vitro, an effect that is subject to mouse strain-dependent variation mapping to a locus on chr.4, Tb2r1. TGF-β2-deficient mice show hematopoietic defects, demonstrating the physiologic role of this cytokine. Here, we show that TGF-β2 specifically and predominantly cell autonomously enhances signaling by FLT3 in vitro and in vivo. A coding polymorphism in Prdm16 (PR-domain-containing 16) underlies Tb2r1 and differentially regulates transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), identifying lipid PPAR ligands as the serum factors required for regulation of FLT3 signaling by TGF-β2. We furthermore show that PPARγ agonists play a FLT3-dependent role in stress responses of progenitor cells. These observations identify a novel regulatory axis that includes PPARs, Prdm16, and TGF-β2 in hematopoiesis.

  • 13. Baccarani, Michele
    et al.
    Deininger, Michael W.
    Rosti, Gianantonio
    Hochhaus, Andreas
    Soverini, Simona
    Apperley, Jane F.
    Cervantes, Francisco
    Clark, Richard E.
    Cortes, Jorge E.
    Guilhot, Francois
    Hjorth-Hansen, Henrik
    Hughes, Timothy P.
    Kantarjian, Hagop M.
    Kim, Dong-Wook
    Larson, Richard A.
    Lipton, Jeffrey H.
    Mahon, Francois-Xavier
    Martinelli, Giovanni
    Mayer, Jiri
    Mueller, Martin C.
    Niederwieser, Dietger
    Pane, Fabrizio
    Radich, Jerald P.
    Rousselot, Philippe
    Saglio, Giuseppe
    Saussele, Susanne
    Schiffer, Charles
    Silver, Richard
    Simonsson, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Steegmann, Juan-Luis
    Goldman, John M.
    Hehlmann, Ruediger
    European LeukemiaNet recommendations for the management of chronic myeloid leukemia: 20132013In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 122, no 6, p. 872-884Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advances in chronic myeloid leukemia treatment, particularly regarding tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mandate regular updating of concepts and management. A European LeukemiaNet expert panel reviewed prior and new studies to update recommendations made in 2009. We recommend as initial treatment imatinib, nilotinib, or dasatinib. Response is assessed with standardized real quantitative polymerase chain reaction and/or cytogenetics at 3, 6, and 12 months. BCR-ABL1 transcript levels <= 10% at 3 months, <1% at 6 months, and <= 0.1% from 12 months onward define optimal response, whereas >10% at 6 months and >1% from 12 months onward define failure, mandating a change in treatment. Similarly, partial cytogenetic response (PCyR) at 3 months and complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) from 6 months onward define optimal response, whereas no CyR (Philadelphia chromosome-positive [Ph1]>95%) at 3 months, less than PCyR at 6 months, and less than CCyR from 12 months onward define failure. Between optimal and failure, there is an intermediate warning zone requiring more frequent monitoring. Similar definitions are provided for response to second-line therapy. Specific recommendations are made for patients in the accelerated and blastic phases, and for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Optimal responders should continue therapy indefinitely, with careful surveillance, or they can be enrolled in controlled studies of treatment discontinuation once a deeper molecular response is achieved. (Blood. 2013; 122(6):872-884)

  • 14. Baccarani, Michele
    et al.
    Hoffmann, Verena Sophia
    Rosti, Gianantonio
    Castagnetti, Fausto
    Saussele, Susanne
    Guilhot, Joelle
    Simonsson, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Steegmann, Juan Luis
    Mayer, Jiri
    Indrak, Karel
    Turkina, Anna G.
    Zaritskey, Andrey
    Labar, Boris
    Zupan, Irena
    Thielen, Noortje
    Clark, Richard E.
    Thaler, Josef
    Melanthiou, Frederiki
    Everaus, Hele
    Porkka, Kimmo
    Bogdanovic, Andrija
    Schubert-Fritschle, Gabriel
    Panagiotidis, Panagiotis
    Masszi, Tamas
    Lejniece, Sandra
    Griskevicius, Laimonas
    Hellmann, Andrzej
    Prejzner, Witold
    Sacha, Tomasz
    Almeida, Antonio
    Dyagil, Irina
    Colita, Adriana
    Mihaylov, Georgi G.
    Hehlmann, Rudiger
    Hasford, Joerg
    Lindoerfer, Doris
    Baseline Characteristics of CML Patients Accross Europe - Comparing Real-World Patients with Patient Collectives Included in Clinical Trials2014In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 124, no 21Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15. Baccarani, Michele
    et al.
    Rosti, Gianantonio
    Castagnetti, Fausto
    Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim
    Porkka, Kimmo
    Abruzzese, Elisabetta
    Alimena, Giuliana
    Ehrencrona, Hans
    Hjorth-Hansen, Henrik
    Kairisto, Veli
    Levato, Luciano
    Martinelli, Giovanni
    Nagler, Arnon
    Lanng Nielsen, Johan
    Ozbek, Ugur
    Palandri, Francesca
    Palmieri, Fausto
    Pane, Fabrizio
    Rege-Cambrin, Giovanna
    Russo, Domenico
    Specchia, Giorgina
    Testoni, Nicoletta
    Weiss-Bjerrum, Ole
    Saglio, Giuseppe
    Simonsson, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Comparison of imatinib 400 mg and 800 mg daily in the front-line treatment of high-risk, Philadelphia-positive chronic myeloid leukemia: a European LeukemiaNet Study2009In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 113, no 19, p. 4497-4504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Imatinib mesylate (IM), 400 mg daily, is the standard treatment of Philadelphia-positive (Ph(+)) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Preclinical data and results of single-arm studies raised the suggestion that better results could be achieved with a higher dose. To investigate whether the systematic use of a higher dose of IM could lead to better results, 216 patients with Ph(+) CML at high risk (HR) according to the Sokal index were randomly assigned to receive IM 800 mg or 400 mg daily, as front-line therapy, for at least 1 year. The CCgR rate at 1 year was 64% and 58% for the high-dose arm and for the standard-dose arm, respectively (P = .435). No differences were detectable in the CgR at 3 and 6 months, in the molecular response rate at any time, as well as in the rate of other events. Twenty-four (94%) of 25 patients who could tolerate the full 800-mg dose achieved a CCgR, and only 4 (23%) of 17 patients who could tolerate less than 350 mg achieved a CCgR. This study does not support the extensive use of high-dose IM (800 mg daily) front-line in all CML HR patients. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00514488.

  • 16. Baccarani, Michele
    et al.
    Saglio, Giuseppe
    Goldman, John
    Hochhaus, Andreas
    Simonsson, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Appelbaum, Frederick
    Apperley, Jane
    Cervantes, Francisco
    Cortes, Jorge
    Deininger, Michael
    Gratwohl, Alois
    Guilhot, Francois
    Horowitz, Mary
    Hughes, Timothy
    Kantarjian, Hagop
    Larson, Richard
    Niederwieser, Dietger
    Silver, Richard
    Hehlmann, Rudiger
    Evolving concepts in the management of chronic myeloid leukemia: recommendations from an expert panel on behalf of the European LeukemiaNet2006In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 108, no 6, p. 1809-1820Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction of imatinib mesylate (IM) has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Although experience is too limited to permit evidence-based evaluation of survival, the available data fully justify critical reassessment of CML management. The panel therefore reviewed treatment of CML since 1998. It confirmed the value of IM (400 mg/day) and of conventional allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT). It recommended that the preferred initial treatment for most patients newly diagnosed in chronic phase should now be 400 mg IM daily. A dose increase of IM, alloHSCT, or investigational treatments were recommended in case of failure, and could be considered in case of suboptimal response. Failure was defined at 3 months (no hematologic response [HR]), 6 months (incomplete HR or no cytogenetic response [CgR]), 12 months (less than partial CgR [Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) > 35%]), 18 months (less than complete CgR), and in case of HR or CgR loss, or appearance of highly IM-resistant BCR-ABL mutations. Suboptimal response was defined at 3 months (incomplete HR), 6 months (less than partial CgR), 12 months (less than complete CgR), 18 months (less than major molecular response [MMolR]), and, in case of MMolR loss, other mutations or other chromosomal abnormalities. The importance of regular monitoring at experienced centers was highlighted.

  • 17.
    Bahram, Fuad
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Wu, Siqin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Öberg, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Luscher, Bernhard
    Larsson, Lars-Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Posttranslational regulation of Myc function in response to phorbol ester/interferon-gamma-induced differentiation of v-Myc-transformed U-937 monoblasts1999In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 93, no 11, p. 3900-3912Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transcription factors of the Myc/Max/Mad network are important regulators of cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis and are frequently involved in tumor development. Constitutive expression of v-Myc blocks phorbol ester (TPA)-induced differentiation of human U-937 monoblasts. However, costimulation with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and TPA restores terminal differentiation and G1 cell-cycle arrest despite continuous expression of v-Myc. The mechanism by which TPA + IFN-gamma counteract v-Myc activity has not been unravelled. Our results show that TPA + IFN-gamma treatment led to an inhibition of v-Myc- and c-Myc-dependent transcription, and a specific reduction of v-Myc:Max complexes and associated DNA-binding activity, whereas the steady state level of the v-Myc protein was only marginally affected. In contrast, TPA + IFN-gamma costimulation neither increased the expression of Mad1 or other mad/mnt family genes nor altered heterodimerization or DNA-binding activity of Mad1. The reduced amount of v-Myc:Max heterodimers in response to treatment was accompanied by partial dephosphorylation of v-Myc and c-Myc. Phosphatase treatment of Myc:Max complexes lead to their dissociation, thus mimicking the effect of TPA + IFN-gamma. In addition to modulation of the expression of Myc/Max/Mad network proteins, posttranslational negative regulation of Myc by external signals may, therefore, be an alternative biologically important level of control with potential therapeutic relevance for hematopoietic and other tumors with deregulated Myc expression.

  • 18. Balgobind, Brian V
    et al.
    Raimondi, Susana C
    Harbott, Jochen
    Zimmermann, Martin
    Alonzo, Todd A
    Auvrignon, Anne
    Beverloo, H Berna
    Chang, Myron
    Creutzig, Ursula
    Dworzak, Michael N
    Forestier, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Gibson, Brenda
    Hasle, Henrik
    Harrison, Christine J
    Heerema, Nyla A
    Kaspers, Gertjan J L
    Leszl, Anna
    Litvinko, Nathalia
    Nigro, Luca Lo
    Morimoto, Akira
    Perot, Christine
    Pieters, Rob
    Reinhardt, Dirk
    Rubnitz, Jeffrey E
    Smith, Franklin O
    Stary, Jan
    Stasevich, Irina
    Strehl, Sabine
    Taga, Takashi
    Tomizawa, Daisuke
    Webb, David
    Zemanova, Zuzana
    Zwaan, C Michel
    van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M
    Novel prognostic subgroups in childhood 11q23/MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia: results of an international retrospective study.2009In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 114, no 12, p. 2489-2496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Translocations involving chromosome 11q23 frequently occur in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and are associated with poor prognosis. In most cases, the MLL gene is involved, and more than 50 translocation partners have been described. Clinical outcome data of the 11q23-rearranged subgroups are scarce because most 11q23 series are too small for meaningful analysis of subgroups, although some studies suggest that patients with t(9;11)(p22;q23) have a more favorable prognosis. We retrospectively collected outcome data of 756 children with 11q23- or MLL-rearranged AML from 11 collaborative groups to identify differences in outcome based on translocation partners. All karyotypes were centrally reviewed before assigning patients to subgroups. The event-free survival of 11q23/MLL-rearranged pediatric AML at 5 years from diagnosis was 44% (+/- 5%), with large differences across subgroups (11% +/- 5% to 92% +/- 5%). Multivariate analysis identified the following subgroups as independent prognostic predictors: t(1;11)(q21;q23) (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.1, P = .004); t(6;11)(q27;q23) (HR = 2.2, P < .001); t(10;11)(p12;q23) (HR = 1.5, P = .005); and t(10;11)(p11.2;q23) (HR = 2.5, P = .005). We could not confirm the favorable prognosis of the t(9;11)(p22;q23) subgroup. We identified large differences in outcome within 11q23/MLL-rearranged pediatric AML and novel subgroups based on translocation partners that independently predict clinical outcome. Screening for these translocation partners is needed for accurate treatment stratification at diagnosis.

  • 19.
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Agathangelidis, Andreas
    Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Sutton, Lesley-Ann
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Minga, Eva
    Tsanousa, Athina
    Scarfo, Lydia
    Davis, Zadie
    Yan, Xiao-Jie
    Shanafelt, Tait
    Plevova, Karla
    Sandberg, Yorick
    Vojdeman, Fie Juhl
    Boudjogra, Myriam
    Tzenou, Tatiana
    Chatzouli, Maria
    Chu, Charles C.
    Veronese, Silvio
    Gardiner, Anne
    Mansouri, Larry
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Smedby, Karin E.
    Pedersen, Lone Bredo
    Moreno, Denis
    Van Lom, Kirsten
    Giudicelli, Veronique
    Francova, Hana Skuhrova
    Nguyen-Khac, Florence
    Panagiotidis, Panagiotis
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    Angelis, Lefteris
    Anagnostopoulos, Achilles
    Lefranc, Marie-Paule
    Facco, Monica
    Trentin, Livio
    Catherwood, Mark
    Montillo, Marco
    Geisler, Christian H.
    Langerak, Anton W.
    Pospisilova, Sarka
    Chiorazzi, Nicholas
    Oscier, David
    Jelinek, Diane F.
    Darzentas, Nikos
    Belessi, Chrysoula
    Davi, Frederic
    Ghia, Paolo
    Rosenquist, Richard Brandell
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Not all IGHV3-21 chronic lymphocytic leukemias are equal: prognostic considerations2015In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 125, no 5, p. 856-859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An unresolved issue in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is whether IGHV3-21 gene usage, in general, or the expression of stereotyped B-cell receptor immunoglobulin defining subset # 2 (IGHV3-21/IGLV3-21), in particular, determines outcome for IGHV3-21-utilizing cases. We reappraised this issue in 8593 CLL patients of whom 437 (5%) used the IGHV3-21 gene with 254/437 (58%) classified as subset # 2. Within subset # 2, immunoglobulin heavy variable (IGHV)-mutated cases predominated, whereas non-subset # 2/IGHV3-21 was enriched for IGHV-unmutated cases (P =.002). Subset # 2 exhibited significantly shorter time-to-first-treatment (TTFT) compared with non-subset # 2/IGHV3-21 (22 vs 60 months, P =.001). No such difference was observed between non-subset # 2/IGHV3-21 vs the remaining CLL with similar IGHV mutational status. In conclusion, IGHV3-21 CLL should not be axiomatically considered a homogeneous entity with adverse prognosis, given that only subset # 2 emerges as uniformly aggressive, contrasting non-subset # 2/IGVH3-21 patients whose prognosis depends on IGHV mutational status as the remaining CLL.

  • 20.
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Agathangelidis, Andreas
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, I-20132 Milan, Italy.;Ist Sci San Raffaele, Ist Ricovero & Cura Carattere Sci, Div Expt Oncol, Dept Oncohematol, I-20132 Milan, Italy..
    Rossi, Davide
    Amedeo Avogadro Univ Eastern Piedmont, Dept Translat Med, Div Haematol, Novara, Italy..
    Sutton, Lesley-Ann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kminkova, Jana
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic.;Univ Hosp, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Scarfo, Lydia
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, I-20132 Milan, Italy.;Ist Sci San Raffaele, Ist Ricovero & Cura Carattere Sci, Div Expt Oncol, Dept Oncohematol, I-20132 Milan, Italy..
    Pospisilova, Sarka
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic.;Univ Hosp, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Gaidano, Gianluca
    Amedeo Avogadro Univ Eastern Piedmont, Dept Translat Med, Div Haematol, Novara, Italy..
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ghia, Paolo
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, I-20132 Milan, Italy.;Ist Sci San Raffaele, Ist Ricovero & Cura Carattere Sci, Div Expt Oncol, Dept Oncohematol, I-20132 Milan, Italy..
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Prognostic relevance of MYD88 mutations in CLL: the jury is still out2015In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 126, no 8, p. 1043-1044Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21. Baliakas, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia
    Sutton, Lesley-Ann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Minga, Evangelia
    Agathangelidis, Andreas
    Tsanousa, Athina
    Scarfo, Lydia
    Davis, Zadie
    Yan, Joy
    Shanafelt, Tait D.
    Plevova, Karla
    Sandberg, Yorick
    Vojdeman, Fie Juhl
    Boudjoghra, Myriam
    Tzenou, Tatiana
    Chatzouli, Maria
    Chu, Charles C.
    Veronese, Silvio
    Gardiner, Anne Catherine
    Mansouri, Larry
    Smedby, Karin E.
    Pedersen, Lone
    Moreno, Denis
    van Lom, Kirsten
    Giudicelli, Veronique
    Francova, Hana
    Nguyen-Khac, Florence
    Panagiotidis, Panagiotis
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    Angelis, Lefteris
    Anagnostopoulos, Achilles
    Lefranc, Marie-Paule
    Facco, Monica
    Trentin, Livio
    Catherwood, Mark
    Montillo, Marco
    Geisler, Christian H.
    Langerak, Anton W.
    Pospisilova, Sarka
    Chiorazzi, Nicholas
    Oscier, David
    Jelinek, Diane F.
    Darzentas, Nikos
    Belessi, Chrysoula
    Davi, Frederic
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Ghia, Paolo
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Clinical Impact of Stereotyped Antigen Receptors in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia2014In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 124, no 21Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Jeromin, Sabine
    Munich Leukemia Lab, Munich, Germany.
    Iskas, Michalis
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Puiggros, Anna
    Hosp del Mar, Serv Patol, Lab Citogenet Mol, Barcelona, Spain;Inst Hosp del Mar Invest Med IMIM, Programa Recerca Canc, Grp Recerca Translac Neoplasies Hematol, Barcelona, Spain.
    Plevova, Karla
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol CEITEC, Brno, Czech Republic;Univ Hosp Brno, Dept Internal Med Hematol & Oncol, Brno, Czech Republic;Masaryk Univ, Fac Med, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Nguyen-Khac, Florence
    Hematol Dept, Paris, France;Sorbonne Univ, Hop Pitie Salpetriere, INSERM, U1138, Paris, France.
    Davis, Zadie
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Haematol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England.
    Rigolin, Gian Matteo
    St Anna Univ Hosp, Hematol Sect, Ferrara, Italy.
    Visentin, Andrea
    Univ Padua, Dept Med, Hematol Div, Padua, Italy.
    Xochelli, Aliki
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki 57001, Greece.
    Delgado, Julio
    Univ Barcelona, Hosp Clin, Dept Hematol, Inst Invest Biomed August Pi & Sunyer, Barcelona, Spain.
    Baran-Marszak, Fanny
    Hop Avicenne, Assistance Publ Hop Paris, Lab Hematol, Paris, France.
    Stalika, Evangelia
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki 57001, Greece.
    Abrisqueta, Pau
    Hosp Valle De Hebron, Serv Hematol, Barcelona, Spain.
    Durechova, Kristina
    Univ Hosp Brno, Dept Internal Med Hematol & Oncol, Brno, Czech Republic;Masaryk Univ, Fac Med, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Papaioannou, George
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Eclache, Virginie
    Hop Avicenne, Assistance Publ Hop Paris, Lab Hematol, Paris, France.
    Dimou, Maria
    Univ Athens, Laikon Univ Hosp, Dept Propedeut Internal Med 1, Hematol Sect, Athens, Greece.
    Iliakis, Theodoros
    Univ Athens, Laikon Univ Hosp, Dept Propedeut Internal Med 1, Hematol Sect, Athens, Greece.
    Collado, Rosa
    Consorcio Hosp Gen Univ, Serv Hematol, Valencia, Spain.
    Doubek, Michael
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol CEITEC, Brno, Czech Republic;Univ Hosp Brno, Dept Internal Med Hematol & Oncol, Brno, Czech Republic;Masaryk Univ, Fac Med, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Jose Calasanz, M.
    Univ Navarra, Dept Genet, Serv Genet Citogenet, Pamplona, Spain.
    Ruiz-Xiville, Neus
    Univ Autonoma Barcelona, Inst Recerca Leucemia Josep Carreras IJC, ICO Hosp Germans Trias & Pujol, Serv Lab Hematol, Badalona, Spain.
    Moreno, Carolina
    Hosp Univ Santa Creu & St Pau, Serv Hematol, Barcelona, Spain.
    Jarosova, Marie
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol CEITEC, Brno, Czech Republic;Univ Hosp Brno, Dept Internal Med Hematol & Oncol, Brno, Czech Republic;Masaryk Univ, Fac Med, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Leeksma, Alexander C.
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr Amsterdam, Dept Hematol & Lymphoma, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr Amsterdam, Myeloma Ctr Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Canc Ctr Amsterdam, Dept Expt Immunol, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Infect & Immun Inst Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Panayiotidis, Panayiotis
    Univ Athens, Laikon Univ Hosp, Dept Propedeut Internal Med 1, Hematol Sect, Athens, Greece.
    Podgornik, Helena
    Univ Med Ctr Ljubljana, Dept Hematol, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Cymbalista, Florence
    Hop Avicenne, Assistance Publ Hop Paris, Lab Hematol, Paris, France.
    Anagnostopoulos, Achilles
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Trentin, Livio
    Univ Padua, Dept Med, Hematol Div, Padua, Italy.
    Stavroyianni, Niki
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Davi, Fred
    Hematol Dept, Paris, France;Sorbonne Univ, Hop Pitie Salpetriere, INSERM, U1138, Paris, France.
    Ghia, Paolo
    IRCCS San Raffaele Sci Inst, Div Expt Oncol, Strateg Res Program CLL, Milan, Italy;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.
    Kater, Arnon P.
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr Amsterdam, Dept Hematol & Lymphoma, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr Amsterdam, Myeloma Ctr Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Canc Ctr Amsterdam, Dept Expt Immunol, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Infect & Immun Inst Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Cuneo, Antonio
    St Anna Univ Hosp, Hematol Sect, Ferrara, Italy.
    Pospisilova, Sarka
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol CEITEC, Brno, Czech Republic;Univ Hosp Brno, Dept Internal Med Hematol & Oncol, Brno, Czech Republic;Masaryk Univ, Fac Med, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Espinet, Blanca
    Hosp del Mar, Serv Patol, Lab Citogenet Mol, Barcelona, Spain;Inst Hosp del Mar Invest Med IMIM, Programa Recerca Canc, Grp Recerca Translac Neoplasies Hematol, Barcelona, Spain.
    Athanasiadou, Anastasia
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Oscier, David
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Haematol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England.
    Haferlach, Claudia
    Munich Leukemia Lab, Munich, Germany.
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki 57001, Greece.
    Cytogenetic complexity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: definitions, associations, and clinical impact2019In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 133, no 11, p. 1205-1216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent evidence suggests that complex karyotype (CK) defined by the presence of >= 3 chromosomal aberrations (structural and/or numerical) identified by using chromosome-banding analysis (CBA) may be relevant for treatment decision-making in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). However, many challenges toward the routine clinical application of CBA remain. In a retrospective study of 5290 patients with available CBA data, we explored both clinicobiological associations and the clinical impact of CK in CLL. We found that patients with >= 5 abnormalities, defined as high-CK, exhibit uniformly dismal clinical outcomes, independently of clinical stage, TP53 aberrations (deletion of chromosome 17p and/or TP53 mutations [TP53abs]), and the expression of somatically hypermutated (M-CLL) or unmutated immunoglobulin heavy variable genes. Thus, they contrasted with CK cases with 3 or 4 aberrations (low-CK and intermediate-CK, respectively) who followed aggressive disease courses only in the presence of TP53abs. At the other end of the spectrum, patients with CK and 112,119 displayed an exceptionally indolent profile. Building upon CK, TP53abs, and immunoglobulin heavy variable gene somatic hyper-mutation status, we propose a novel hierarchical model in which patients with high-CK exhibit the worst prognosis, whereas those with mutated CLL lacking CK or TP53abs, as well as CK with 112,119, show the longest overall survival. Thus, CK should not be axiomatically considered unfavorable in CLL, representing a heterogeneous group with variable clinical behavior. High-CK with >= 5 chromosomal aberrations emerges as prognostically adverse, independent of other biomarkers. Prospective clinical validation is warranted before ultimately incorporating high-CK in risk stratification of CLL.

  • 23.
    Ballesteros, Joan
    et al.
    Vivia Biotech, Madrid, Spain..
    Scarfo, Lydia
    Ist Sci San Raffaele, Unit Lymphoid Malignancies, Dept Oncohematol, I-20132 Milan, Italy..
    Mattsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Xochelli, Aliki
    CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Ranghetti, Pamela
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.;Osped San Raffaele, Madrid, Spain..
    Primo, Daniel
    Vivia Biotech, Madrid, Spain..
    Robles, Alicia
    Vivia Biotech, Madrid, Spain..
    Gorrochategui, Julian
    Vivia Biotech, Madrid, Spain..
    Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin
    Hosp Univ 12 Octubre, Madrid, Spain..
    De la Serna, Javier
    Hosp Univ 12 Octubre, Madrid, Spain..
    Gonzalez, Marcos
    Hosp Clin Univ Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain..
    Munugalavadla, Veerendra
    Gilead Sci, Foster City, CA USA..
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Queva, Christophe
    Gilead Sci, Foster City, CA USA..
    Ghia, Paolo
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.;IRCCS Ist Sci San Raffaele, Milan, Italy..
    An Innovative High-Throughput Ex Vivo Drug Assay Incorporating the Native Microenvironment Reveals a Novel Mechanism of Action of Idelalisib in CLL2015In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 126, no 23Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24. Barosi, Giovanni
    et al.
    Birgegård, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Finazzi, Guido
    Griesshammer, Martin
    Harrison, Claire
    Hasselbalch, Hans Carl
    Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques
    Lengfelder, Eva
    McMullin, Mary Frances
    Passamonti, Francesco
    Reilly, John T.
    Vannucchi, Alessandro M.
    Barbui, Tiziano
    Response criteria for essential thrombocythemia and polycythemia vera: result of a European LeukemiaNet consensus conference2009In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 113, no 20, p. 4829-4833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    European experts were convened to develop a definition of response to treatment in polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET). Clinicohematologic (CH), molecular, and histologic response categories were selected. In ET, CH complete response (CR) was: platelet count less than or equal to 400 x 10(9)/L, no disease-related symptoms, normal spleen size, and white blood cell count less than or equal to 10 x 10(9)/L. Platelet count less than or equal to 600 x 10(9)/L or a decrease greater than 50% was partial response (PR). In PV, CH-CR was: hematocrit less than 45% without phlebotomy, platelet count less than or equal to 400 x 10(9)/L, white blood cell count less than or equal to 10 x 10(9)/L, and no disease-related symptoms. A hematocrit less than 45% without phlebotomy or response in 3 or more of the other criteria was defined as PR. In both ET and in PV, molecular CR was a reduction of any molecular abnormality to undetectable levels. Molecular PR was defined as a reduction more than or equal to 50% in patients with less than 50% mutant allele burden, or a reduction more than or equal to 25% in patients with more than 50% mutant allele burden. Bone marrow histologic response in ET was judged on megakaryocyte hyperplasia while on cellularity and reticulin fibrosis in PV. The combined use of these response definitions should help standardize the design and reporting of clinical studies.

  • 25. Barragan, A
    et al.
    Fernandez, V
    Chen, Q
    von Euler, A
    Wahlgren, M
    Spillmann, Dorothe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    The duffy-binding-like domain 1 of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is a heparan sulfate ligand that requires 12 mers for binding2000In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 95, no 11, p. 3594-3599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1), present on the surfaces of parasitized red blood cells (pRBC), mediates rosetting, a virulent phenotype. Here, we show that pRBC specifically bind heparan sulfate (HS) and heparin onto their surfaces and that the rosetting ligand PfEMP1 specifically adheres to heparin-Sepharose when extracted from the surfaces of radioiodinated infected RBC. An analysis of the binding properties of the different regions of PfEMP1 provides evidence that the Duffy-binding-like domain-1 (DBL-1) is the predominant ligand involved in HS and heparin binding. Soluble DBL-1 requires a minimal heparin fragment size of a 12-mer ( approximately 4 kd) for binding and is critically dependent on N-sulfation. A 12-mer is also the minimal heparin fragment that disrupts naturally formed rosettes. DBL-1 binds specifically to erythrocytes and also to HS from endothelial cells and human aorta but not to chondroitin sulfate A, suggesting that different PfEMP1s mediate adhesion to distinct glycosaminoglycans in individual malaria parasites. Present data suggest that HS on endothelial cells may also be involved in the sequestration of pRBC. Elucidation of these binding mechanisms opens up new possibilities for therapeutic strategies targeting adhesive interactions of pRBC.

  • 26. Barrington, Sally F
    et al.
    Kirkwood, Amy A
    Franceschetto, Antonella
    Fulham, Michael J
    Roberts, Thomas H
    Almquist, Helén
    Brun, Eva
    Hjorthaug, Karin
    Viney, Zaid N
    Pike, Lucy C
    Federico, Massimo
    Luminari, Stefano
    Radford, John
    Trotman, Judith
    Fosså, Alexander
    Berkahn, Leanne
    Molin, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    D'Amore, Francesco
    Sinclair, Donald A
    Smith, Paul
    O'Doherty, Michael J
    Stevens, Lindsey
    Johnson, Peter W
    PET-CT for staging and early response: results from the Response-Adapted Therapy in Advanced Hodgkin Lymphoma study.2016In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 127, no 12, p. 1531-1538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    International guidelines recommend that positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) should replace CT in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). The aims of this study were to compare PET-CT with CT for staging and measure agreement between expert and local readers, using a 5-point scale (Deauville criteria), to adapt treatment in a clinical trial: Response-Adapted Therapy in Advanced Hodgkin Lymphoma (RATHL). Patients were staged using clinical assessment, CT, and bone marrow biopsy (RATHL stage). PET-CT was performed at baseline (PET0) and after 2 chemotherapy cycles (PET2) in a response-adapted design. PET-CT was reported centrally by experts at 5 national core laboratories. Local readers optionally scored PET2 scans. The RATHL and PET-CT stages were compared. Agreement among experts and between expert and local readers was measured. RATHL and PET0 stage were concordant in 938 (80%) patients. PET-CT upstaged 159 (14%) and downstaged 74 (6%) patients. Upstaging by extranodal disease in bone marrow (92), lung (11), or multiple sites (12) on PET-CT accounted for most discrepancies. Follow-up of discrepant findings confirmed the PET characterization of lesions in the vast majority. Five patients were upstaged by marrow biopsy and 7 by contrast-enhanced CT in the bowel and/or liver or spleen. PET2 agreement among experts (140 scans) with a κ (95% confidence interval) of 0.84 (0.76-0.91) was very good and between experts and local readers (300 scans) at 0.77 (0.68-0.86) was good. These results confirm PET-CT as the modern standard for staging HL and that response assessment using Deauville criteria is robust, enabling translation of RATHL results into clinical practice.

  • 27.
    Berglund, Mattias
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Thunberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    SNP rs6457327 is a predictor for overall survival in follicular lymphoma as well as survival after transformation2011In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 118, no 16, p. 4489-4489Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Bergsten, Elisabet
    et al.
    Childhood Cancer Research Unit, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Theme of Children’s and Women’s Health, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Horne, AnnaCarin
    Childhood Cancer Research Unit, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Theme of Children’s and Women’s Health, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Aricó, Maurizio
    Direzione Generale, Azienda Sanitaria Provinciale, Ragusa, Italy.
    Astigarraga, Itziar
    Servicio de Pediatria, BioCruces Health Research Institute, Hospital Universitario Cruces, Universidad del Pais Vasco–Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea (UPV/EHU), Barakaldo, Spain.
    Egeler, R. Maarten
    Division of Hematology & Oncology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto ON, Canada.
    Filipovich, Alexandra H.
    Division of Bone Marrow Transplant and Immune Deficiency, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati OH, USA.
    Ishii, Eiichi
    Department of Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Ehime University, Ehime, Japan.
    Janka, Gritta
    Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    Ladisch, Stephan
    Center for Cancer and Immunology Research, Children’s Research Institute, Children’s National Medical Center, Washington DC, USA.
    Lehmberg, Kai
    Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    McClain, Kenneth L.
    Texas Children’s Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston TX, USA.
    Minkov, Milen
    University Clinic of Pediatrics, St. Anna Children’s Hospital, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Montgomery, Scott
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Nanduri, Vasanta
    Department of Pediatrics, Watford General Hospital, Watford, United Kingdom.
    Rosso, Diego
    Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Hospital de Niños Dr Pedro De Elizalde, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Department of Pediatrics, Hospital de Clinicas Jose de San Martin, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Henter, Jan-Inge
    Childhood Cancer Research Unit, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Theme of Children’s and Women’s Health, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Confirmed efficacy of etoposide and dexamethasone in HLH treatment: long-term results of the cooperative HLH-2004 study2017In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 130, no 25, p. 2728-2738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a life-threatening hyperinflammatory syndrome comprising familial/genetic HLH (FHL) and secondary HLH. In the HLH-94 study, with an estimated 5-year probability of survival (pSu) of 54% (95% confidence interval, 48%-60%), systemic therapy included etoposide, dexamethasone, and, from week 9, cyclosporine A (CSA). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) was indicated in patients with familial/genetic, relapsing, or severe/persistent disease. In HLH-2004, CSA was instead administered upfront, aiming to reduce pre-HSCT mortality and morbidity. From 2004 to 2011, 369 children aged <18 years fulfilled HLH-2004 inclusion criteria (5 of 8 diagnostic criteria, affected siblings, and/or molecular diagnosis in FHL-causative genes). At median follow-up of 5.2 years, 230 of 369 patients (62%) were alive (5-year pSu, 61%; 56%-67%). Five-year pSu in children with (n = 168) and without (n = 201) family history/genetically verified FHL was 59% (52%-67%) and 64% (57%-71%), respectively (familial occurrence [n = 47], 58% [45%-75%]). Comparing with historical data (HLH-94), using HLH-94 inclusion criteria, pre-HSCT mortality was nonsignificantly reduced from 27% to 19% (P = .064 adjusted for age and sex). Time from start of therapy to HSCT was shorter compared with HLH-94 (P =020 adjusted for age and sex) and reported neurological alterations at HSCT were 22% in HLH-94 and 17% in HLH-2004 (using HLH-94 inclusion criteria). Five-year pSu post-HSCT overall was 66% (verified FHL, 70% [63%-78%]). Additional analyses provided specific suggestions on potential pre-HSCT treatment improvements. HLH-2004 confirms that a majority of patients may be rescued by the etoposide/dexamethasone combination but intensification with CSA upfront, adding corticosteroids to intrathecal therapy, and reduced time to HSCT did not improve outcome significantly.

  • 29. Beziat, Vivien
    et al.
    Liu, Lisa L.
    Malmberg, Jenny-Ann
    Ivarsson, Martin A.
    Sohlberg, Ebba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Björklund, Andreas T.
    Retiere, Christelle
    Sverremark-Ekström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Traherne, James
    Ljungman, Per
    Schaffer, Marie
    Price, David A.
    Trowsdale, John
    Michaelsson, Jakob
    Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf
    Malmberg, Karl-Johan
    NK cell responses to cytomegalovirus infection lead to stable imprints in the human KIR repertoire and involve activating KIRs2013In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 121, no 14, p. 2678-2688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human natural killer (NK) cells are functionally regulated by killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and their interactions with HLA class I molecules. As KIR expression in a given NK cell is genetically hard-wired, we hypothesized that KIR repertoire perturbations reflect expansions of unique NK-cell subsets and may be used to trace adaptation of the NK-cell compartment to virus infections. By determining the human KIR-ome at a single-cell level in more than 200 donors, we were able to analyze the magnitude of NK cell adaptation to virus infections in healthy individuals. Strikingly, infection with human cytomegalovirus (CMV), but not with other common herpesviruses, induced expansion and differentiation of KIR-expressing NK cells, visible as stable imprints in the repertoire. Education by inhibitory KIRs promoted the clonal-like expansion of NK cells, causing a bias for self-specific inhibitory KIRs. Furthermore, our data revealed a unique contribution of activating KIRs (KIR2DS4, KIR2DS2, or KIR3DS1), in addition to NKG2C, in the expansion of human NK cells. These results provide new insight into the diversity of KIR repertoire and its adaptation to virus infection, suggesting a role for both activating and inhibitory KIRs in immunity to CMV infection.

  • 30.
    Birgegård, Gunnar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Besses, Carlos
    Griesshammer, Martin
    Gugliotta, Luigi
    Harrison, Claire N.
    Hamdani, Mohamed
    Achenbach, Heinrich
    Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques
    Treatment of Essential Thrombocythemia in Europe: An Observational Study of 3649 High-Risk Patients in Exels2014In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 124, no 21Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31. Bjorklund, Andreas T.
    et al.
    Carlsten, Mattias
    Schaffer, Marie
    Liu, Lisa
    Cooley, Sarah A.
    Miller, Jeffrey S.
    Watz, Emma
    Palma, Marzia
    Hansson, Lotta
    Wahlin, Bjorn E.
    Mollgard, Lars
    Hägglund, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Blomberg, Pontus
    Ljungman, Per T.
    Hellstrom-Lindberg, Eva
    Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf
    Malmberg, Karl-Johan
    Early and Transient Microchimerism Associated with Complete Remission after Adoptively Transferred Haploidentical NK Cells Against High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia2014In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 124, no 21Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Björkholm, Magnus
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Div Hematol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bower, Hannah
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Dickman, Paul W.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lambert, Paul C.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Leicester, Dept Hlth Sci, Leicester, Leics, England..
    Höglund, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Andersson, Therese M-L
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Temporal Trends in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Outcome Using the Loss in Expectation of Life: A Swedish Population-Based Study2015In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 126, no 23Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Björkman, Sven
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Oh, MyungShin
    Spotts, Gerald
    Schroth, Phillip
    Fritsch, Sandor
    Ewenstein, Bruce M.
    Casey, Kathleen
    Fischer, Kathelijn
    Blanchette, Victor S.
    Collins, Peter W.
    Population pharmacokinetics of recombinant factor VIII: the relationships of pharmacokinetics to age and body weight2012In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 119, no 2, p. 612-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Comparison of the pharmacokinetics (PK) of a coagulation factor between groups of patients can be biased by differences in study protocols, in particular between blood sampling schedules. This could affect clinical dose tailoring, especially in children. The aim of this study was to describe the relationships of the PK of factor VIII (FVIII) with age and body weight by a population PK model. The potential to reduce blood sampling was also explored. A model was built for FVIII PK from 236 infusions of recombinant FVIII in 152 patients (1-65 years of age) with severe hemophilia A. The PK of FVIII over the entire age range was well described by a 2-compartment model and a previously reported problem, resulting from differences in blood sampling, to compare findings from children and adults was practically abolished. The decline in FVIII clearance and increase in half-life with age could be described as continuous functions. Retrospective reduction of blood sampling from 11 to 5 samples made no important difference to the estimates of PK parameters. The obtained findings can be used as a basis for PK-based dose tailoring of FVIII in clinical practice, in all age groups, with minimal blood sampling.

  • 34.
    Björnsson, Jon Mar
    et al.
    Molecular Medicine and Gene Therapy, Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University.
    Andersson, Elisabet
    Molecular Medicine and Gene Therapy, Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University.
    Lundström, Patrik
    Molecular Medicine and Gene Therapy, Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University.
    Larsson, Nina
    Molecular Medicine and Gene Therapy, Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University.
    Xu, Xiufeng
    Molecular Medicine and Gene Therapy, Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University.
    Repetowska, Ewa
    Molecular Medicine and Gene Therapy, Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University.
    Humphries, R. Keith
    Terry Fox Laboratory, British Columbia Cancer Agency.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Molecular Medicine and Gene Therapy, Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University.
    Proliferation of primitive myeloid progenitors can be reversibly  induced by HOXA102001In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 98, no 12, p. 3301-3308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies show that several Hox transcription factors are important for regulation of proliferation and differentiation in hematopoiesis. Among these is H0XA10, which is selectively expressed at high levels in the most primitive subpopulation of human CD34+ bone marrow cells. When overexpressed, H0XA10 increases the proliferation of early progenitor cells and can lead to the development of myeloid leukemia. To study the effects of H0XA10 on primitive hematopoietic progenitors in more detail, transgenic mice were generated with regulatable H0XA10 expression. The transgenic mouse model, referred to astetO-HOXA10, contains theH0XA10 gene controlled by a tetracycline-responsive element and a minimal promoter. Thus, the expression of H0XA10 is inducible and reversible depending on the absence or presence of tetracycline or its analog, doxycycline. A retroviral vector containing the tetracycline transactivator gene (tTA) was used to induce expression of the H0XA10 gene in bone marrow cells from the transgenic mice. Reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed regulatable H0XA10 expression in several transgenic lines. H0XA10 induction led to the formation of hematopoietic colonies containing blastlike cells and megakaryocytes. Moreover, the induction of H0XA10 resulted in significant proliferative advantage of primitive hematopoietic progenitors (spleen colony-forming units [CFUS12]), which was reversible on withdrawal of induction. Activation of H0XA10 expression in tet0-H0XA10 mice will therefore govern proliferation of primitive myeloid progenitors in a regulated fashion. This novel animal model can be used to identify the target genes of HOXA10 and better clarify the specific role of HOXA10 in normal and malignant hematopoiesis.

  • 35.
    Björnsson, Jon Mar
    et al.
    Lund University, Department of Molecular Medicine.
    Larsson, Nina
    Lund University, Department of Molecular Medicine.
    Brun, Ann C. M.
    Lund University, Department of Molecular Medicine.
    Andersson, Elisabet
    Lund University, Department of Molecular Medicine.
    Lundström, Patrik
    Lund University, Department of Molecular Medicine.
    Larsson, Jonas
    Lund University, Department of Molecular Medicine.
    Repetowska, Ewa
    Lund University, Department of Molecular Medicine.
    Ehinger, Mats
    Lund University, Department of Molecular Medicine.
    Humphries, R. Keith
    University of British Columbia, Department of Medicine.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Lund University, Department of Molecular Medicine.
    Reduced proliferative capacity of hematopoietic stem cells deficient in hoxb3 and hoxb42003In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 23, no 11, p. 3872-3883Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several homeobox transcription factors, such as HOXB3 and HOXB4, have been implicated in regulation of hematopoiesis. In support of this, studies show that overexpression of HOXB4 strongly enhances hematopoietic stem cell regeneration. Here we find that mice deficient in both Hoxb3 and Hoxb4 have defects in endogenous hematopoiesis with reduced cellularity in hematopoietic organs and diminished number of hematopoietic progenitors without perturbing lineage commitment. Analysis of embryonic day 14.5 fetal livers revealed a significant reduction in the hematopoietic stem cell pool, suggesting that the reduction in cellularity observed postnatally is due to insufficient expansion during fetal development. Primitive Lin(-) Scal(+) c-kit(+) hematopoietic progenitors lacking Hoxb3 and Hoxb4 displayed impaired proliferative capacity in vitro. Similarly, in vivo repopulating studies of Hoxb3/Hoxb4-deficient hematopoietic cells resulted in lower repopulating capability compared to normal littermates. Since no defects in homing were observed, these results suggest a slower regeneration of mutant HSC. Furthermore, treatment with cytostatic drugs demonstrated slower cell cycle kinetics of hematopoietic stem cells deficient in Hoxb3 and Hoxb4, resulting in increased tolerance to antimitotic drugs. Collectively, these data suggest a direct physiological role of Hoxb4 and Hoxb3 in regulating stem cell regeneration and that these genes are required for maximal proliferative response.

  • 36.
    Boknäs, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Faxälv, Lars
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Ström, Jakob O.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Tengvall, Pentti
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Ramström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Lindahl, Tomas L.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Platelets do not generate activated factor XII: how inappropriate experimental models have led to misleading conclusions2014In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 124, no 10, p. 1692-1694Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Boknäs, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Faxälv, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ström, Jakob O
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ramström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindahl, Tomas L
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Response: platelets do not generate activated factor XII--how inappropriate experimental models have led to misleading conclusions2014In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 124, no 10, p. 1692-1694Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38. Bomben, Riccardo
    et al.
    Dal Bo, Michele
    Capello, Daniela
    Benedetti, Dania
    Marconi, Daniela
    Zucchetto, Antonella
    Forconi, Francesco
    Maffei, Rossana
    Ghia, Emanuela M.
    Laurenti, Luca
    Bulian, Pietro
    Del Principe, Maria Ilaria
    Palermo, Giuseppe
    Thorselius, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Degan, Massimo
    Campanini, Renato
    Guarini, Anna
    Del Poeta, Giovanni
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Efremov, Dimitar G.
    Marasca, Roberto
    Foa, Robin
    Gaidano, Gianluca
    Gattei, Valter
    Comprehensive characterization of IGHV3-21-expressing B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia: an Italian multicenter study2007In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 109, no 7, p. 2989-2998Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IGHV3-21-using chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a distinct entity with restricted immunoglobulin gene features and poor prognosis and is more frequently encountered in Northern than Southern Europe. To further investigate this subset and its geographic distribution in the context of a country (Italy) with both continental and Mediterranean areas, 37 IGHV3-21 CLLs were collected out of 1076 cases enrolled by different institutions from Northern or Central Southern Italy. Of the 37 cases, 18 were identified as homologous (hom)HCDR3-IGHV3-21 CLLs and were found almost exclusively (16 of 18) in Northern Italy; in contrast, 19 nonhomHCDR3-IGHV3-21 cases were evenly distributed throughout Italy. Clinically, poor survivals were documented for IGHV3-21 CLLs as well as for subgroups of mutated and homHCDR3-IGHV3-21 CLLs. Negative prognosticators CD38, ZAP-70, CD49d, and CD79b were expressed at higher levels in homHCDR3 than nonhomHCDR3-IGHV3-21 cases. Differential gene expression profiling (GEP) of 13 IGHV3-21 versus 52 non-IGHV3-21 CLLs identified, among 122 best-correlated genes, TGFB2 and VIPR1 as down- and up-regulated in IGHV3-21 CLL cases, respectively. Moreover, GEP of 7 homHCDR3 versus 6 nonhomHCDR3-IGHV3-21 CLLs yielded 20 differentially expressed genes, with WNT-16 being that expressed at the highest levels in homHCDR3-IGHV3-21 CLLs. Altogether, IGHV3-21 CLLs, including those with homHCDR3, had a peculiar global phenotype in part explaining their worse clinical outcome.

  • 39.
    Bornhauser, Beat C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Bonapace, Laura
    Lindholm, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Martinez, Rodrigo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Cario, Gunnar
    Schrappe, Martin
    Niggli, Felix K
    Schäfer, Beat W
    Bourquin, Jean-Pierre
    Low-dose arsenic trioxide sensitizes glucocorticoid-resistant acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells to dexamethasone via an Akt-dependent pathway2007In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 110, no 6, p. 2084-2091Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Incorporation of apoptosis-inducing agents into current therapeutic regimens is an attractive strategy to improve treatment for drug-resistant leukemia. We tested the potential of arsenic trioxide (ATO) to restore the response to dexamethasone in glucocorticoid (GC)–resistant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Low-dose ATO markedly increased in vitro GC sensitivity of ALL cells from T-cell and precursor B-cell ALL patients with poor in vivo response to prednisone. In GC-resistant cell lines, this effect was mediated, at least in part, by inhibition of Akt and affecting downstream Akt targets such as Bad, a proapoptotic Bcl-2 family member, and the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). Combination of ATO and dexamethasone resulted in increased Bad and rapid down-regulation of XIAP, while levels of the antiapoptotic regulator Mcl-1 remained unchanged. Expression of dominant-active Akt, reduction of Bad expression by RNA interference, or overexpression of XIAP abrogated the sensitizing effect of ATO. The inhibitory effect of XIAP overexpression was reduced when the Akt phosphorylation site was mutated (XIAP-S87A). These data suggest that the combination of ATO and glucocorticoids could be advantageous in GC-resistant ALL and reveal additional targets for the evaluation of new antileukemic agents.

  • 40.
    Breitbach, Martin
    et al.
    University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Bostani, Toktam
    University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Roell, Wilhelm
    University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Xia, Ying
    University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Dewald, Oliver
    University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Nygren, Jens Martin
    Lund Strategic Research Center for Stem Cell Biology and Cell Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Fries, Jochen W. U.
    University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Tiemann, Klaus
    University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Bohlen, Heribert
    Axiogenesis AG, Cologne, Germany.
    Hescheler, Juergen
    University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Welz, Armin
    University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Bloch, Wilhelm
    German Sport University, Cologne, Germany.
    Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W
    Lund Strategic Research Center for Stem Cell Biology and Cell Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Fleischmann, Bernd K
    University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Potential risks of bone marrow cell transplantation into infarcted hearts2007In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 110, no 4, p. 1362-1369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellular replacement therapy has emerged as a novel strategy for the treatment of heart failure. The aim of our study was to determine the fate of injected mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and whole bone marrow (BM) cells in the infarcted heart. MSCs were purified from BM of transgenic mice and characterized using flow cytometry and in vitro differentiation assays. Myocardial infarctions were generated in mice and different cell populations including transgenic MSCs, unfractionated BM cells, or purified hematopoietic progenitors were injected. Encapsulated structures were found in the infarcted areas of a large fraction of hearts after injecting MSCs (22 of 43, 51.2%) and unfractionated BM cells (6 of 46, 13.0%). These formations contained calcifications and/or ossifications. In contrast, no pathological abnormalities were found after injection of purified hematopoietic progenitors (0 of 5, 0.0%), fibroblasts (0 of 5, 0.0%), vehicle only (0 of 30, 0.0%), or cytokine-induced mobilization of BM cells (0 of 35, 0.0%). We conclude that the developmental fate of BM-derived cells is not restricted by the surrounding tissue after myocardial infarction and that the MSC fraction underlies the extended bone formation in the infarcted myocardium. These findings seriously question the biologic basis and clinical safety of using whole BM and in particular MSCs to treat nonhematopoietic disorders.

  • 41. Bruce, Lesley J
    et al.
    Ghosh, Sandip
    King, May Jean
    Layton, D Mark
    Mawby, William J
    Stewart, Gordon W
    Oldenborg, Per-Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Histology and Cell Biology.
    Delaunay, Jean
    Tanner, Michael J A
    Absence of CD47 in protein 4.2-deficient hereditary spherocytosis in man: an interaction between the Rh complex and the band 3 complex.2002In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 100, no 5, p. 1878-1885Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present data on a patient of South Asian origin with recessive hereditary spherocytosis (HS) due to absence of protein 4.2 [4.2 (-) HS]. Protein 4.2 cDNA sequence analysis showed the presence of a novel 41-bp frameshift deletion that predicts a truncated peptide designated protein 4.2 Hammersmith. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction indicated that the mutant mRNA was unstable. Sequencing of protein 4.2 genomic DNA revealed that the deletion stems from aberrant splicing. The proband was homozygous for a G>T substitution at position 1747 (cDNA numbering) that activates a cryptic acceptor splice site within exon 11 of the protein 4.2 gene (EPB42). The proband's mother was found to be heterozygous for this substitution. Unlike protein 4.2 null mice, the proband's red cells showed no evidence for abnormal cation permeability. Quantitation of red cell membrane proteins was carried out by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), Western blotting, and flow cytometric measurement. CD47, a protein associated with the Rh complex, was markedly reduced to about 1% (in the proband) and 65% (in the mother) that found in healthy controls. The Rh-associated glycoprotein migrated with a higher than normal apparent molecular weight on SDS-PAGE. There was no obvious reduction in Rh polypeptides. These observations indicate that protein 4.2 and CD47 interact in the human red cell membrane. They provide further evidence for an association between the band 3 complex (band 3, ankyrin, protein 4.2, glycophorin A) and the Rh complex (Rh-associated glycoprotein, Rh polypeptides, glycophorin B, CD47, LW) and define a point of attachment between the Rh complex and the red cell cytoskeleton.

  • 42. Brune, Mats
    et al.
    Castaigne, Sylvie
    Catalano, John
    Gehlsen, Kurt
    Ho, Anthony D.
    Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten
    Hogge, Donna E.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Or, Reuven
    Romero, Ana I.
    Rowe, Jacob M.
    Simonsson, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Spearing, Ruth
    Stadtmauer, Edward A.
    Szer, Jeff
    Wallhult, Elisabeth
    Hellstrand, Kristoffer
    Improved leukemia-free survival after postconsolidation immunotherapy with histamine dihydrochloride and interleukin-2 in acute myeloid leukemia: results of a randomized phase 3 trial2006In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 108, no 1, p. 88-96Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary objective of this phase 3 study was to determine whether postconsolidation immunotherapy with interleukin-2 (IL-2) and histamine dihydrochloride (HDC) improved the leukemia-free survival (LFS) of adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in complete remission (CR). Three hundred twenty patients with AML (median age, 57 years; range, 18-84 years) were stratified by CR1 or subsequent CR (CR > 1) and randomly assigned to treatment with HDC/IL-2 or no treatment (control). Treatment comprised 10 21-day cycles with IL-2 (16 400 U/kg) plus HDC (0.5 mg); both compounds were administered by subcutaneous injection twice daily. Study arms were balanced for age, sex, previous treatment, leukemic karyotypes, time from CR to inclusion, and frequency of secondary leukemia. Three years after enrollment of the last patient, treatment with HDC/IL-2 was found to improve LFS over control in the study population (CR1 + CR > 1, n = 320; P < .01, log-rank test). For patients in CR1 (n = 261), treatment significantly improved LFS (P = .01) with 3-year LFS estimates of 40% (HDC/IL-2) compared with 26% (control). Side effects were typically mild to moderate. These results indicate that HDC/IL-2 treatment offers an efficacious and tolerable treatment for patients with AML in remission.

  • 43. Bruzelius, M.
    et al.
    Iglesias, Maria Jesus
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hong, Mun-Gwan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sanchez-Rivera, Laura
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gyorgy, B.
    Souto, J. C.
    Franberg, M.
    Fredolini, Claudia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Strawbridge, R. J.
    Holmström, M.
    Hamsten, A.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Silveira, A.
    Soria, J. M.
    Smadja, D. M.
    Butler, L. M.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Morange, P. -E
    Trégouët, D. -A
    Odeberg, Jacob
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    PDGFB, a new candidate plasma biomarker for venous thromboembolism: Results from the VEREMA affinity proteomics study2016In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 128, no 23, p. e59-e66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a clear clinical need for high-specificity plasma biomarkers for predicting risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), but thus far, such markers have remained elusive. Utilizing affinity reagents from the Human Protein Atlas project and multiplexed immuoassays, we extensively analyzed plasma samples from 2 individual studies to identify candidate protein markers associated with VTE risk. We screened plasma samples from 88 VTE cases and 85 matched controls, collected as part of the Swedish ¡°Venous Thromboembolism Biomarker Study,¡± using suspension bead arrays composed of 755 antibodies targeting 408 candidate proteins. We identified significant associations between VTE occurrence and plasma levels of human immunodeficiency virus type I enhancer binding protein 1 (HIVEP1), von Willebrand factor (VWF), glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPX3), and platelet-derived growth factor β (PDGFB). For replication, we profiled plasma samples of 580 cases and 589 controls from the French FARIVE study. These results confirmed the association of VWF and PDGFB with VTE after correction for multiple testing, whereas only weak trends were observed for HIVEP1 and GPX3. Although plasma levels of VWF and PDGFB correlated modestly (p ~ 0.30) with each other, they were independently associated with VTE risk in a joint model in FARIVE (VWF P < .001; PDGFB P 5 .002). PDGF was verified as the target of the capture antibody by immunocapture mass spectrometry and sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In conclusion, we demonstrate that high-throughput affinity plasma proteomic profiling is a valuable research strategy to identify potential candidate biomarkers for thrombosis-related disorders, and our study suggests a novel association of PDGFB plasma levels with VTE.

  • 44. Bruzelius, Maria
    et al.
    Iglesias, Maria Jesus
    Hong, Mun-Gwan
    Sanchez-Rivera, Laura
    Gyorgy, Beata
    Carlos Souto, Juan
    Frånberg, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science (NADA). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Fredolini, Claudia
    Strawbridge, Rona J.
    Holmström, Margareta
    Hamsten, Anders
    Uhlén, Mathias
    Silveira, Angela
    Manuel Soria, Jose
    Smadja, David M.
    Butler, Lynn M.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel
    Tregouet, David-Alexandre
    Odeberg, Jacob
    PDGFB, a new candidate plasma biomarker for venous thromboembolism: results from the VEREMA affinity proteomics study2016In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 128, no 23, p. E59-E66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a clear clinical need for high-specificity plasma biomarkers for predicting risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), but thus far, such markers have remained elusive. Utilizing affinity reagents from the Human Protein Atlas project and multiplexed immuoassays, we extensively analyzed plasma samples from 2 individual studies to identify candidate protein markers associated with VTE risk. We screened plasma samples from 88 VTE cases and 85 matched controls, collected as part of the Swedish Venous Thromboembolism Biomarker Study, using suspension bead arrays composed of 755 antibodies targeting 408 candidate proteins. We identified significant associations between VTE occurrence and plasma levels of human immunodeficiency virus type I enhancer binding protein 1 (HIVEP1), von Willebrand factor (VWF), glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPX3), and platelet-derived growth factor beta (PDGFB). For replication, we profiled plasma samples of 580 cases and 589 controls from the French FARIVE study. These results confirmed the association of VWF and PDGFB with VTE after correction for multiple testing, whereas only weak trends were observed for HIVEP1 and GPX3. Although plasma levels of VWF and PDGFB correlated modestly (rho similar to 0.30) with each other, they were independently associated with VTE risk in a joint model in FARIVE (VWF P < .001; PDGFB P = .002). PDGF. was verified as the target of the capture antibody by immunocapture mass spectrometry and sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In conclusion, we demonstrate that high-throughput affinity plasma proteomic profiling is a valuable research strategy to identify potential candidate biomarkers for thrombosis-related disorders, and our study suggests a novel association of PDGFB plasma levels with VTE.

  • 45. Buitenkamp, Trudy D.
    et al.
    Izraeli, Shai
    Zimmermann, Martin
    Forestier, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Heerema, Nyla A.
    van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.
    Pieters, Rob
    Korbijn, Carin M.
    Silverman, Lewis B.
    Schmiegelow, Kjeld
    Liang, Der-Cheng
    Horibe, Keizo
    Arico, Maurizio
    Biondi, Andrea
    Basso, Giuseppe
    Rabin, Karin R.
    Schrappe, Martin
    Cario, Gunnar
    Mann, Georg
    Morak, Maria
    Panzer-Grumayer, Renate
    Mondelaers, Veerle
    Lammens, Tim
    Cave, Helene
    Stark, Batia
    Ganmore, Ithamar
    Moorman, Anthony V.
    Vora, Ajay
    Hunger, Stephen P.
    Pui, Ching-Hon
    Mullighan, Charles G.
    Manabe, Atsushi
    Escherich, Gabriele
    Kowalczyk, Jerzy R.
    Whitlock, James A.
    Zwaan, C. Michel
    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children with Down syndrome: a retrospective analysis from the Ponte di Legno study group2014In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 123, no 1, p. 70-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) have an increased risk of B-cell precursor (BCP) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The prognostic factors and outcome of DS-ALL patients treated in contemporary protocols are uncertain. We studied 653 DS-ALL patients enrolled in 16 international trials from 1995 to 2004. Non-DS BCP-ALL patients from the Dutch Child Oncology Group and Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster were reference cohorts. DS-ALL patients had a higher 8-year cumulative incidence of relapse (26% +/- 2% vs 15% +/- 1%, P < .001) and 2-year treatment-related mortality (TRM) (7% +/- 1% vs 2.0% +/- < 1%, P < .0001) than non-DS patients, resulting in lower 8-year event-free survival (EFS) (64% +/- 2% vs 81% +/- 2%, P < .0001) and overall survival (74% +/- 2% vs 89% +/- 1%, P < .0001). Independent favorable prognostic factors include age <6 years (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.58, P = .002), white blood cell (WBC) count <10 x 10(9)/L (HR = 0.60, P = .005), and ETV6-RUNX1 (HR = 0.14, P = .006) for EFS and age (HR = 0.48, P < .001), ETV6-RUNX1 (HR = 0.1, P = .016) and high hyperdiploidy (HeH) (HR = 0.29, P = .04) for relapse-free survival. TRM was the major cause of death in ETV6-RUNX1 and HeH DS-ALLs. Thus, while relapse is the main contributor to poorer survival in DS-ALL, infection-associated TRM was increased in all protocol elements, unrelated to treatment phase or regimen. Future strategies to improve outcome in DS-ALL should include improved supportive care throughout therapy and reduction of therapy in newly identified good-prognosis subgroups.

  • 46.
    Cantù, Claudio
    et al.
    Dipartimento di Biotecnologie e Bioscienze, Universita` di Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Italy.
    Ierardi, Rossella
    San Raffaele Telethon Institute for Gene Therapy (HSR-TIGET), San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano, Italy.
    Alborelli, Ilaria
    Dipartimento di Biotecnologie e Bioscienze, Universita` di Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Italy.
    Fugazza, Cristina
    John Radcliffe Hospital, Molecular Hematology Unit, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Cassinelli, Letizia
    Dipartimento di Biotecnologie e Bioscienze, Universita` di Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Italy.
    Piconese, Silvia
    Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano, Italy.
    Bosè, Francesca
    5INGM-Fondazione Istituto Nazionale di Genetica molecolare, Milano, Italy.
    Ottolenghi, Sergio
    Dipartimento di Biotecnologie e Bioscienze, Universita` di Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Italy.
    Ferrari, Giuliana
    San Raffaele Telethon Institute for Gene Therapy (HSR-TIGET), San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano, Italy / Universita` Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Milano, Italy.
    Ronchi, Antonella
    Dipartimento di Biotecnologie e Bioscienze, Universita` di Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Italy.
    Sox6 enhances erythroid differentiation in human erythroid progenitors.2011In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 117, no 13, p. 3669-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sox6 belongs to the Sry (sex-determining region Y)-related high-mobility-group-box family of transcription factors, which control cell-fate specification of many cell types. Here, we explored the role of Sox6 in human erythropoiesis by its overexpression both in the erythroleukemic K562 cell line and in primary erythroid cultures from human cord blood CD34+ cells. Sox6 induced significant erythroid differentiation in both models. K562 cells underwent hemoglobinization and, despite their leukemic origin, died within 9 days after transduction; primary erythroid cultures accelerated their kinetics of erythroid maturation and increased the number of cells that reached the final enucleation step. Searching for direct Sox6 targets, we found SOCS3 (suppressor of cytokine signaling-3), a known mediator of cytokine response. Sox6 was bound in vitro and in vivo to an evolutionarily conserved regulatory SOCS3 element, which induced transcriptional activation. SOCS3 overexpression in K562 cells and in primary erythroid cells recapitulated the growth inhibition induced by Sox6, which demonstrates that SOCS3 is a relevant Sox6 effector.

  • 47. Caruso, Christina
    et al.
    Guruprasad, Puneeth
    Mannino, Robert G.
    Zhang, Hanqing
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Josephson, Cassandra D.
    Roback, John D.
    Lam, Wilbur A.
    Integrated Microfluidic Automated Particle Tracking Enables High-Throughput Cell Deformability Cytometry for Red Cell Disorders2018In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 132Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Chatzilari, Elisavet
    et al.
    CERTH, Inst Informat Technol, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Xochelli, Aliki
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Thessaloniki, Greece.;CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Maronidis, Anastasios
    CERTH, Inst Informat Technol, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Vardi, Anna
    CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Mattsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Larsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Douka, Vassiliki
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Iskas, Michail
    George Papanicolaou Gen Hosp, Hematol BMT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Karavalakis, George
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, BMT Unit, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Papalexandri, Apostolia
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Niemann, Carsten
    Rigshosp, Dept Hematol, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Montillo, Marco
    Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Niguarda Canc Ctr, Mol Pathol Unit, Milan, Italy.;Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Niguarda Canc Ctr, Dept Haematol, Milan, Italy..
    Anagnostopoulos, Achilles
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Oscier, David
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Haematol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England..
    Pospisilova, Sarka
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic.;Univ Hosp Brno, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Davi, Frederic
    Hop La Pitie Salpetriere, Dept Biol Hematol, Paris, France.;Univ Paris 06, Paris, France..
    Stavroyianni, Niki
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Ghia, Paolo
    IRCCS San Raffaele Sci Inst, Div Expt Oncol, Milan, Italy.;IRCCS San Raffaele Sci Inst, Dept Oncohematol, Milan, Italy..
    Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia
    CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Nikolopoulos, Spiros
    CERTH, Inst Informat Technol, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Kompatsiaris, Yannis
    CERTH, Inst Informat Technol, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Personalized Modeling of Disease Evolution in CLL: Does Statistical Significance Translate into Predictive Accuracy?2015In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 126, no 23Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Chatzilari, Elisavet
    et al.
    CERTH, Inst Informat Technol, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Xochelli, Aliki
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Thessaloniki, Greece.;CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Maronidis, Anastasios
    CERTH, Inst Informat Technol, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Vardi, Anna
    CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Mattsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Larsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Douka, Vassiliki
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Iskas, Michail
    George Papanicolaou Gen Hosp, Hematol BMT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Karavalakis, George
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, BMT Unit, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Papalexandri, Apostolia
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Niemann, Carsten
    Rigshosp, Dept Hematol, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Montillo, Marco
    Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Niguarda Canc Ctr, Mol Pathol Unit, Milan, Italy.;Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Niguarda Canc Ctr, Dept Haematol, Milan, Italy..
    Anagnostopoulos, Achilles
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Oscier, David
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Haematol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England..
    Pospisilova, Sarka
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic.;Univ Hosp Brno, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Davi, Frederic
    Hop La Pitie Salpetriere, Dept Biol Hematol, Paris, France.;Univ Paris 06, Paris, France..
    Stavroyianni, Niki
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Ghia, Paolo
    IRCCS San Raffaele Sci Inst, Div Expt Oncol, Milan, Italy.;IRCCS San Raffaele Sci Inst, Dept Oncohematol, Milan, Italy..
    Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia
    CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Nikolopoulos, Spiros
    CERTH, Inst Informat Technol, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Kompatsiaris, Yannis
    CERTH, Inst Informat Technol, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Personalized Modeling of Disease Evolution in CLL: Does Statistical Significance Translate into Predictive Accuracy?2015In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 126, no 23Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 50. Chen, Leslie Y.
    et al.
    Eriksson, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Gwilliam, Rhian
    Bentley, David
    Deloukas, Panos
    Wadelius, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Gamma-glutamyl carboxylase (GGCX) microsatellite and warfarin dosing2005In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 106, no 10, p. 3673-4Article in journal (Refereed)
1234567 1 - 50 of 388
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