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  • 1.
    Berg, Mari-Ann
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research.
    Toward Creative Understanding: Bakhtin and the Study of Old Age in Literature1996In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 15-26Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    et al.
    Department of Nursing, Unit of Caring Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University.
    Edberg, Anna-Karin
    Department of Nursing, Unit of Caring Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University.
    Rahm Hallberg, Ingalill
    The Vårdal Institute, The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Lund University.
    The experience of quality of life among older people2005In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 201-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although quality of life has been in the focus of attention for over a decade there are few studies available investigating, how the old and the oldest old experience their quality of life or what quality of life actually means for them? To illuminate this, eleven in-depth interviews were conducted with six women and five men (80+) living in their home. An interpretative hermeneutic phenomenological analysis revealed that quality of life in old age meant a preserved self and meaning in existence. Maintained self-image meant that the older people experienced a coherent life with an intact meaning. How quality of life was valued depended on the meaning the old people attached to the areas of importance as well as how they were evaluated. Additionally, areas not generally included when measuring quality of life became discernible. The meaning of home, how life was viewed, thoughts about death and dying, and telling ones story proved to be areas of importance for their perception of quality of life. Thus, indicating that older people's view of quality of life is more complex than some of today's most commonly used quality of life instruments capture and that quality of life assessment tools needs to measure beyond pure health indices. For nursing care the use of life review in everyday care, and an open way towards existential topics as well as a family oriented care along with preventive work helping people to remain in their own homes may enhance their experience of quality of life.

  • 3.
    Eman, Josefin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The role of sports in making sense of the process of growing old2012In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 467-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on interviews with 22 athletically active old men and women, the study explores whether and how the practice of sports can affect old adults' processes of sense-making about old age and the process of growing old in ways that challenge dominant constructions about old age. Thereto, the study will explore the possible impact of gender in this process. The results show that men and women who continue to practice competitive sports into old age make sense of the process of growing old by focusing primarily on their physical abilities, at least in the context of sports. This focus on capability age allows them partly, although not completely, to challenge the usual thinking about old age and the process of growing old.

  • 4.
    Hammarstrom, Gunhild
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Torres, Sandra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Being, feeling and acting. A qualitative study of Swedish home-help care recipients understandings of dependence and independence2010In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 75-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contributes to the debate on dependence and independence through a study of how a group of 29 cognitively healthy Swedish home-help care recipients between the ages of 77 and 93 perceive their situation. Two overall themes with regards to how the constructs of dependence and independence are understood were found. One of them concerns how being in need of help can be justified (i.e. the why of receiving help) and the other how the very situation of being in need of help and care can be regarded (i.e. the how of receiving help). The study reveals a clear distinction between receiving help and care and feeling dependent, as well as between receiving help and care and being able to remain an active agent. On the basis of these findings we argue for the fruitfulness of distinguishing between being, feeling and acting as aspects of dependence and independence.

  • 5.
    Hammarström, Gunhild
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The construct of intergenerational solidarity in a lineage perspective: A discussion on underlying theoretical assumptions2005In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 33-51Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Hammarström, Gunhild
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Torres, Sandra
    National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life (NISAL), Linköping University, Sweden.
    Being, feeling and acting: A qualitative study of Swedish home-help care recipients' understandings of dependence and independence2010In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 75-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contributes to the debate on dependence and independence through a study of how a group of 29 cognitively healthy Swedish home-help care recipients between the ages of 77 and 93 perceive their situation. Two overall themes with regards to how the constructs of dependence and independence are understood were found. One of them concerns how being in need of help can be justified (i.e. the why of receiving help) and the other how the very situation of being in need of help and care can be regarded (i.e. the how of receiving help). The study reveals a clear distinction between receiving help and care and feeling dependent, as well as between receiving help and care and being able to remain an active agent. On the basis of these findings we argue for the fruitfulness of distinguishing between ‘being’, ‘feeling’ and ‘acting’ as aspects of dependence and independence.

  • 7.
    Hammarström, Gunhild
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Torres, Sandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Variations in subjective well-being when 'aging in place': A matter of acceptance, predictability and control2012In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 192-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study is to explore how older home-help recipients regard their life situation in terms of subjective well-being. The background is that there seem to be two counteracting forces affecting the achievement of subjective well-being among home-help recipients: on one hand, both diminished everyday competence and dependence on others' help are supposed to reduce subjective well-being, and on the other hand, living in one's own home is supposed to affect subjective well-being positively. The analysis is based on qualitative interviews with 21 home-help recipients between the ages of 78 and 93. The findings indicate that the informants' expressions of subjective well-being fall into four main categories: 'well-being', 'well-being despite it all', 'well-being so far', and 'lack of well-being'. Three comprehensive core themes were identified as relevant to a deeper understanding of the informants' various expressions of well-being. These core themes are acceptance, predictability, and control. The findings point to the possibility of experiencing subjective well-being despite diminished everyday competence and dependence on help and support from others. They suggest, in short, that subjective well-being among older people who receive help and support in their everyday lives is not only related to socio-contextual factors - such as physical and mental capability, activities and/or engagement in the outside world, the spatial and social consequences of physical limitations, social and emotional relations, as well as the social support they receive - but also to how they regard and handle these matters in terms of acceptance, predictability and control.

  • 8.
    Harnett, Tove
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Seeking exemptions from nursing home routines: Residents' everyday influence attempts and institutional order2010In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 292-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using ethnographic data collected from a Swedish nursing home, this article analyzes residents’ everyday or subtle influence attempts relative to the maintenance of institutional routines. Residents’ efforts to carve out some autonomy or fulfill personal preferences in everyday matters could be categorized as (1) disruptions, (2) disturbances, or (3) “good matches” relative to ongoing and up-coming nursing home routines. Striking disruptions were often fruitless, while attempts rendered as disturbances were typically postponed or modified. In general, the outcomes of residents’ maneuvers were shaped by brief and situational negotiations of whether (and how) temporary exemptions from the institutional order were deemed accountable or not by the staff. Although staff sometimes arranged situations in which residents were given some defined or symbolic decision-making authority, the findings of this study show how an inflexible local routine culture can constitute a constraining and only occasionally porous framework for residents’ self constructions and everyday life.

  • 9. Hedman, Ragnhild
    et al.
    Hellstrom, Ingrid
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Hansebo, Gorel
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Social positioning by people with Alzheimer's disease in a support group2014In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 28, p. 11-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are often negatively positioned by others, resulting in difficulties upholding a positive sense of self. This might cause them to withdraw socially and apparently 'lose their minds'. Conversely, the sense of self can be strengthened with the support from others. This study aimed to describe, in accordance with positioning theory, how people with moderate AD positioned themselves and each other in a support group for people with AD. We describe five first-order positions; the project manager, the storyteller, the moral agent, the person burdened with AD, and the coping person. In the interactions that followed among the support group participants, those positions were mainly affirmed. This enabled participants to construct strong and agentic personae, and to have the severity of their illness acknowledged. Despite their language impairment participants managed to position and reposition themselves and others by assistance of the trained facilitator.

  • 10.
    Hedman, Ragnhild
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Ersta Skondal University of Coll, Sweden Ersta Skondal University of Coll, Sweden .
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Ersta Skondal University of Coll, Sweden .
    Hansebo, Gorel
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Ersta Skondal University of Coll, Sweden .
    Norberg, Astrid
    Ersta Skondal University of Coll, Sweden Umeå University, Sweden .
    Social positioning by people with Alzheimers disease in a support group2014In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 28, p. 11-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People with Alzheimers disease (AD) are often negatively positioned by others, resulting in difficulties upholding a positive sense of self. This might cause them to withdraw socially and apparently lose their minds. Conversely, the sense of self can be strengthened with the support from others. This study aimed to describe, in accordance with positioning theory, how people with moderate AD positioned themselves and each other in a support group for people with AD. We describe five first-order positions; the project manager, the storyteller, the moral agent, the person burdened with AD, and the coping person. In the interactions that followed among the support group participants, those positions were mainly affirmed. This enabled participants to construct strong and agentic personae, and to have the severity of their illness acknowledged. Despite their language impairment participants managed to position and reposition themselves and others by assistance of the trained facilitator.

  • 11.
    Hedman, Ragnhild
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Linköpings universitet.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Karolinska Institutet.
    Hansebo, Görel
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Umeå universitet.
    Social positioning by people with Alzheimer's disease in a support group2014In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 28, p. 11-21Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Hjälm, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    "Because we know our limits": Elderly parents' views on intergenerational proximity and intimacy2012In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 296-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From an intergenerational family perspective, geographical distance and proximity have been shown to affect interaction and the extent of help and support between generations. Geographical separation and nearness hence do not only influence the family per se, but might also concern the welfare state, not least in times of population ageing. This study concerns exchange and assistance between elderly parents living very close to an adult child, and is based on interviews with 14 elderly parents. The interviews revealed that help and support flowed in both directions between the close-living generations, but that from the perspective of the elderly some types of help were more acceptable than others to give and receive. Further, the interviews suggested that living close, albeit discussed as allowing extensive interaction and support, should not be understood as a sign of wanting or even accepting more extensive help from the close-living adult child.

  • 13.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cutting Brussels sprouts: Collaboration involving persons with dementia2014In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 29, p. 115-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How people with dementia collaborate with other people is an area in need of more research and conceptualizations. Collaboration introduces a number of new possibilities and demands concerning cognitive and linguistic abilities and it is suggested that a theoretical framework that emphasize that cognitive resources are not exclusively individual, but are part of cognitive and communicative context. In this article focus is on joint activities and their collaborative organization is analyzed using an example involving persons with dementia working together with staff preparing a meal. The analysis shows that persons with dementia are able to collaborate in fairly advanced activities if they are supported in such a way that they can make use of the cognitive and linguistic resources of others, in particular cognitive functions having to do with planning and execution of actions. The organization of artifacts like kitchen tools can function as an external memory support. The results support a theoretical framework that help to understand what people can do together rather than focus on individual abilities. The results also indicate that is possible to learn how to organize collaboration involving persons with dementia by understanding how other persons abilities as well as artifacts can be used as external resources for support of cognitive and linguistic abilities. 

  • 14.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Narrative collaboration and scaffolding in dementia2011In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 339-347Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Narrative Collaboration and Scaffolding in Dementia2011In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 339-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 16.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Örulv, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Narrative and identity in Alzheimer’s disease: a case study2009In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 205-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this case study, focus is on how persons with AD use their remaining linguistic and cognitive resources, together with non-verbal aspects of the storytelling event, as resources in communicating and negotiating their identities in everyday encounters. The results of the analysis, focusing on the telling of the stories, indicate that other aspects than the temporal and referential organization of the narratives has become important resources for the teller in establishing and negotiating identity. The telling of temporally discontinuous narratives does not appear to affect or disrupt the teller's experience of some sort of a continuous sense of self and identity but are probably more a problem to persons without this kind of diagnosis. Being afflicted by AD most likely leads persons to try to invent and use alternative communicative recourses in order to sustain factors like their senses of self and identities. For researchers this makes it important to try to base their analysis on the actual organization of the talk and to focus on the functions of various responses and utterances in the interaction.

  • 17.
    Jönson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies.
    Social democratic aging in the People's Home of Sweden2005In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 291-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article describes collective action frames and ideologically informed identities provided by the senior rights movement in Sweden, with special focus on the optimistic and future-oriented descriptions produced by the National Organization of Pensioners (PRO) between 1941 and 1976. These images are related to concepts from social movement theory and compared with competing action frames. It is concluded that the success of the PRO perspective should be understood in relation to the development and political culture of the Swedish welfare state during the 20th century. By presenting a history about the development from poor-law society to welfare state, PRO representatives mobilized members in resistance to enemies and injustices that were identified as forces of the past. The rhetoric of welfare progress helped members of PRO to frame improvements that would only benefit future pensioners, as part of a struggle against the stigma of poverty in old age. © 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 18.
    Jönson, Håkan
    et al.
    Socialhögskolan, Lunds Universitet.
    Siverskog, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Turning vinegar into wine: Humorous self-presentations among older GLBTQ online daters2012In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 55-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates humorous and self-mocking comments about age and age-related appearance among older gay, lesbian, bisexual, transsexual and queer advertisers in two Swedish Internet dating forums. Using a perspective where age is regarded as an accomplishment, humor was investigated as a way of relating to restrictive norms concerning age and sexuality. It was concluded that self-mocking comments, although sometimes subverting norms of age-appropriate behavior, contributed to allocating ambiguous problematic status to old age. According to this analysis, humor appeared as a form of age-salient maneuvering. If we change analytical focus and regard self-presentations as performances of marketability, the study illustrated that self-mocking comments on old age, being overweight, impotence and other age-related changes were in fact part of a repertoire that displayed marketable characteristics such as humor, self-distance and honesty among advertisers. The last part of the paper discusses these findings in terms of a need to focus on aspects that are relevant to the local context where the enactment is taking place, and the need to take care not to construct age and aging as the only objects of knowledge within aging research.

  • 19.
    Jönson, Håkan
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Taghizadeh Larsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The exclusion of older people in disability activism and policies - A case of inadvertent ageism?2009In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 69-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using Sweden as a case, the article discusses the tendency within disability activism and policies to overlook elderly people. From an analysis of a major Swedish government investigation on disability it is clear that disability policies in Sweden have come to rest upon stereotyped age norms that divide the life course into set stages, and there has been a tendency to define elderly disabled people as elderly rather than disabled. It is argued that this exclusion is partly the result of a successful endeavor to provide disabled people of younger ages with rights that are typical of non-disabled citizens. justice and equality have been defined in comparison to citizens of similar ages: children, youth and adults of "active age". Based on the analysis of the paper it is argued that activities of movements struggling to liberate oppressed Populations may contribute to ageism, and that anti-ageist research must go beyond the idea that ageism is a simple matter of attitudes towards older people.

  • 20.
    Kania-Lundholm, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Torres, Sandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The Divide Within: Older Active ICT Users Position Themselves Against Different 'Others'2015In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 35, p. 26-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although research into older people's internet usage patterns is rapidly growing, their understandings of digital technologies, particularly in relation to how these are informed by their understandings of aging and old age, remain unexplored. This is the case because research on older active ICT users tends to regard old age as an empirically interesting part of the life-course as opposed to a theoretically profuse source of information about why and how older people engage with digital technologies. This article explores - through focus group interviews with 30 older adults (aged 66-89) - the ways in which the social position of old age is used by older active ICT users in order to make sense of how and why they engage with these technologies. In this article, positioning theory is used to shed light on how the older people interviewed positioned themselves as 'active older users' in the interviews. The analysis brings to the fore the divide that older people themselves create as they discursively position themselves against different types of ICT users and non-users (young and old) when describing how and why they engage with digital technologies.

  • 21.
    Komp, Kathrin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Department of Political Science and Government, Aarhus University, Bartholins Allé 7, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.
    Van Kersbergen, Kees
    Faculty of Social Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1081, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Van Tilburg, Theo
    Faculty of Social Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1081, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Policies for older volunteers: A study of Germany and Italy, 1990–20082013In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 443-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older people increase their well-being and contribute to the community when they volunteer. Therefore, policy-makers sometimes consider supporting older volunteers. However, they reach different conclusions on whether they should introduce policies for older volunteers, and on what policy would be the most suitable. This article studies how policies for older volunteers emerged in Germany and Italy, both countries having one of the oldest populations in the world. It explores the political discourse on older volunteers, and how this discourse translates into policies. To do this, the article presents data collected in expert interviews and document analysis. Findings show that German policy-makers stress the contribution of volunteering to older people's well-being and have introduced policies for older volunteers. Italian policy-makers, in contrast, frame older volunteers as social service providers and have decided not to single out specific age groups in their policies for volunteers. Moreover, the policies are influenced by the policy-makers' perceptions and path-dependencies, meaning policies and institutions that were introduced in the past. These findings suggest that whether or not policies for older volunteers emerge depends less on the characteristics of the older population and more on the society and its political traditions.

  • 22.
    Krekula, Clary
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Arvidson, Markus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Heikkinen, Satu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Henriksson, Andreas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Olsson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    On gray dancing: Constructions of age-normality through choreography and temporal codes2017In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 42, p. 38-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Against the background of population aging, older peoples dance has attracted attention in research and its health promoting effects and social meanings have been brought to the fore. In this article we focus on the context and power dimensions of dance with an emphasis on the organizing of dance among older adults in terms of social discourses and age relationships. On the basis of qualitative interviews with 33 older dancers and 11 dance providers in Sweden, the study illustrates how dance is organized through social discourses on healthism and on the increasing group of older people as a powerful consumer group. The study highlights that older people and their social dance contexts are marked and subordinated in relation to younger age groups through non-verbal practices such as choreography and temporal codes. In short, dancing among older adults is not only a common health promoting and social activity, but also an arena in which age and age normality are negotiated and constructed.

  • 23.
    Larsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Silverstein, Merril
    The effects of marital and parental status on informal support and service utilization: A study of older Swedes living alone2004In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 231-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Never-married individuals and childless persons living alone are at greater risk of having insufficient support in old age. This study investigated whether community-dwelling older people, living alone in an urban area of Sweden, benefit from having been previously married and having had children in terms of informal care received, and whether those without such filial support were compensated by formal services. The study sample consisted of 390 persons, 81 years and older, who were interviewed about family support and the use of public eldercare and market-based services. The study showed that parents had considerably higher odds of receiving informal support, whereas previously married individuals without children were no more likely to receive support than their never-married counterparts. Public home-help services did not fully buffer the lack of care among childless individuals. This indicates that even in an advanced welfare state like Sweden, children are assets for receipt of care in old age.

  • 24.
    Larsson Ranada, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hagberg, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    All the things I have - handling one’s material room in old age2014In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 31, p. 110-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article explores how old people who live in their ordinary home, reason and act regarding their ‘material room’ (technical objects, such as household appliances, communication tools and things, such as furniture, personal belongings, gadgets, books, paintings, and memorabilia). The interest is in how they, as a consequence of their aging, look at acquiring new objects and phasing out older objects from the home. This is a broader approach than in most other studies of how old people relate to materiality in which attention is mostly paid either to adjustments to the physical environment or to the importance of personal possessions. In the latter cases, the focus is on downsizing processes (e.g. household disbandment or casser maison) in connection with a move to smaller accommodation or to a nursing home. The article is based on a study in which thirteen older people (median age 87), living in a Swedish town of medium size were interviewed (2012) for a third time. The questions concerned the need and desire for new objects, replacement of broken objects, sorting out the home or elsewhere, most cherished possessions, and the role of family members such as children and grandchildren. The results reveal the complexity of how one handles the material room. Most evident is the participants' reluctance to acquire new objects or even to replace broken things. Nearly all of them had considered, but few had started, a process of sorting out objects. These standpoints in combination resulted in a relatively intact material room, which was motivated by an ambition to simplify daily life or to facilitate the approaching dissolution of the home. Some objects of special value and other cherished objects materialized the connections between generations within a family. Some participants wanted to spare their children the burden of having to decide on what to do with their possessions. Others (mostly men), on the contrary, relied on their children to do the sorting out after they had died.

  • 25.
    Lundgren, Anna Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    “In the good old days”: Insidious nostalgia and the constitution of old age identity2010In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 248-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper older people are studied through qualitative in-depth interviews regarding the constitution of identity. This is based on their participation in specific projects where they take part in schoolwork. The point of departure is that these more or less organised projects provide older people with a physical as well as a social space in which such a constitution can take place. Specific attention is not only directed toward the productive use of nostalgia, but also at the rhetorical use of already established subject positions drawn from the fields of production and reproduction, and from discourses on productive ageing and participation. The intersection of these discourses was not only found to be normative and excluding, but also liberating and a necessity.

  • 26.
    Lundgren, Anna Sofia
    et al.
    Umeå Universitet.
    Liliequist, Evelina
    Umeå Universitet.
    Sjöstedt Landén, Angelika
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences. Umeå Universitet.
    Between activity and solidarity: Comprehending retirement and extendedworking lives in Swedish rural areas2018In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 44, no March 2018, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The expected costs of population ageing have generally led to perceived needs to postpone the age of retirement. Drawing on 20 semi-structured interviews, the aim of this paper is to describe the ways that the possibility of an extended working life is comprehended by persons over the age of 60 living in sparsely populated areas in northern Sweden. While defining themselves as active, the interviewees argued strongly in favour of the right to retire. What are often described as opposing retiree subject positions – healthy and active vs. vulnerable and dependent – were partly transgressed in the interviews. The interviewees performed a solidarity that had the potential of including their future selves as possible objects of solidarity. Another important result was that in comprehending the possibility of an extended working life, morally charged notions of geographic place became central.

  • 27.
    Lundgren, Anna Sofia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Liliequist, Evelina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Sjöstedt Landén, Angelika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Between activity and solidarity: comprehending retirement and extendedworking lives in Swedish rural areas2018In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 44, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The expected costs of population ageing have generally led to perceived needs to postpone the age of retirement. Drawing on 20 semi-structured interviews, the aim of this paper is to describe the ways that the possibility of an extended working life is comprehended by persons over the age of 60 living in sparsely populated areas in northern Sweden. While defining themselves as active, the interviewees argued strongly in favour of the right to retire. What are often described as opposing retiree subject positions healthy and active vs. vulnerable and dependent were partly transgressed in the interviews. The interviewees performed a solidarity that had the potential of including their future selves as possible objects of solidarity. Another important result was that in comprehending the possibility of an extended working life, morally charged notions of geographic place became central.

  • 28.
    Lundin, Anette
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Högskolan i Skövde.
    Berg, Lars-Erik
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Hellström Muhli, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Witnessing presence: Swedish care professionals’ experiences of supporting older people´s well-being processes within the frame of residential home care (RHC)2016In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 37, p. 1-9Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we are concerned with analyzing the phenomenon of supportive social care for older people`s well-being from the carers’ meaning making through their life world perspective at a residential care home (RCH). Based on empirical data consisting of interview material with 12 care professionals in the context of Swedish eldercare, a phenomenological analysis was undertaken. The result shows that the phenomenon of supportive social care for well-being is a question of ambiguity in the professionals’ meaning making and in practice it balances between the residents´ needs and the conditions of the care organization. This phenomenon of ambiguity (the what) is made up by three constituents: (i) freedom of choice for the older people vs. institutional constraints, (ii) the residents’ need for activation vs. wanting not to be activated, and (iii) the residents’ need for routine vs. the carers´ not being able to know what the residents need. The conclusions drawn are that this ambiguity has consequences for the carers’ positions for supportive social care for older people´s well-being (the how) in that they have to navigate between the support for authenticity, dwelling and mobility, and carers’ presence and time. In performing a supportive social care for well-being, the carers have to consider aspects concerning the older person’s lifeworld, the social setting of the eldercare ward, and the institutional demands of the organisation. The practical implications for supporting well-being in the social care of older people is manifested in the importance of ‘the little things’, and the carer’s ability to give receptive attention, which requires the presence.  

  • 29.
    Lundin, Anette
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. School of Health Sciences at Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Berg, Lars-Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Hellström Muhli, Ulla
    Department of Sociology (Faculty of Social Sciences), Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Witnessing presence: Swedish care professionals' experiences of supporting resident's well-being processes within the frame of residential care homes (RCH)2016In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 37, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to analyse the phenomenon of supportive care for older persons' well-being. The phenomenon is seen from the eldercarers' meaning-making through their lifeworld perspective at a residential care home. Based on primary empirical interview material with twelve professionals in the context of Swedish eldercare, a phenomenological analysis was undertaken. The result shows that the phenomenon of supportive care for older persons' well-being creates certain ambiguities in the professionals' meaning-making. In practice, it balances between the older persons' (from hereon called residents) needs and the conditions of the eldercare organization. The ambiguities (the what) is made up by three constituents: (i) freedom of choice for the older persons vs. institutional constraints, (ii) the residents' need for activation vs. wanting not to be activated, and (iii) the residents' need for routine vs. the eldercarers' not being able to know what the residents need. The conclusions drawn are that this ambiguity has consequences for the eldercarers' choice of handling supportive care for older persons' well-being (the how). They have to navigate between the support for authenticity, dwelling and mobility, and their own presence and time. In performing supportive care for older persons' well-being, the eldercarers have to consider aspects concerning the resident's lifeworld, the social setting of the eldercare ward, and the institutional demands of the organization. The practical implications for supporting well-being in the care of older residents are manifested in the importance of 'the little things', and the eldercarer's ability to give receptive attention, which requires presence.

  • 30.
    Lundin, Anette
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Berg, Lars-Erik
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Hellström Muhli, Ulla
    Department of Sociology (Faculty of Social Sciences), Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Witnessing presence: Swedish care professionals' experiences of supporting resident's well-being processes within the frame of residential care homes (RCH)2016In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 37, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to analyse the phenomenon of supportive care for older persons' well-being. The phenomenon is seen from the eldercarers' meaning-making through their lifeworld perspective at a residential care home. Based on primary empirical interview material with twelve professionals in the context of Swedish eldercare, a phenomenological analysis was undertaken. The result shows that the phenomenon of supportive care for older persons' well-being creates certain ambiguities in the professionals' meaning-making. In practice, it balances between the older persons' (from hereon called residents) needs and the conditions of the eldercare organization. The ambiguities (the what) is made up by three constituents: (i) freedom of choice for the older persons vs. institutional constraints, (ii) the residents' need for activation vs. wanting not to be activated, and (iii) the residents' need for routine vs. the eldercarers' not being able to know what the residents need. The conclusions drawn are that this ambiguity has consequences for the eldercarers' choice of handling supportive care for older persons' well-being (the how). They have to navigate between the support for authenticity, dwelling and mobility, and their own presence and time. In performing supportive care for older persons' well-being, the eldercarers have to consider aspects concerning the resident's lifeworld, the social setting of the eldercare ward, and the institutional demands of the organization. The practical implications for supporting well-being in the care of older residents are manifested in the importance of 'the little things', and the eldercarer's ability to give receptive attention, which requires presence.

  • 31.
    Mahler, Marianne
    et al.
    Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic School of Public Health NHV.
    Sarvimäki, Anneli
    Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic School of Public Health NHV.
    Indispensable chairs and comforting cushions: — Falls and the meaning of falls in six older persons lives2010In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 88-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to illuminate the meaning of falls for older adults in an everyday perspective. In narrative in-depth interviews, four women and two men, 80–94 years old, told their stories from a daily-life perspective; they had experienced falling several times. The methodological approach used was interpretive phenomenology, in order to grasp the meaning of the participants' situations and everyday practices. The women had learned and used a special technique; they had disciplined their bodies with exercises and training activities, although they suffered from several chronic illnesses. In order to cope with the falling episodes, the women had equipped sofas and chairs with cushions to soften the process of getting up again, whereas the two men sat in a chair moving as little as possible. In handling the falls, each participant showed individual coping strategies and adaptive resources to achieve a life, experiencing a feeling of being well

  • 32.
    Majlesi, Ali Reza
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Linköping University, Campus Norrköping, Sweden.
    Ekström, Anna
    Baking together - the coordination of actions in activities involving people with dementia2016In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 38, p. 37-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores interaction and collaboration between people with dementia and their spouses in relation to the performance of household chores with the focus on instruction as an interactional context to engage the person with dementia in collaboration to accomplish joint activities. Dementia is generally associated with pathological changes in people's cognitive functions such as diminishing memory functions, communicative abilities and also diminishing abilities to take initiative as well as to plan and execute tasks. Using video recordings of everyday naturally occurring activities, we analyze the sequential organization of actions (see Schegloff, 2007) oriented toward the accomplishment of a joint multi-task activity of baking. The analysis shows the specific ways of collaboration through instructional activities in which the person with dementia exhibits his competence and skills in accomplishing the given tasks through negotiating the instructions with his partner and carrying out instructed actions. Although the driving force of the collaboration seems to be a series of directive sequences only initiated by the partner throughout the baking activity, our analyses highlight how the person with dementia can actively use the material environment including collaborating partners to compensate for challenges and difficulties encountered in achieving everyday, tasks. The sequential organization of instructions and instructed actions are in this sense argued to provide an interactional environment wherein the person with dementia can make contributions to the joint activity in an efficient way. While a collaborator has been described as necessary for a person with dementia to be able to partake in activities, this study shows that people with dementia are not only guided by their collaborators in joint activities but they can also actively use their collaborators in intricate compensatory ways.

  • 33.
    Majlesi, Ali Reza
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Education, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Ekström, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Baking together-the coordination of actions in activities involving people with dementia2016In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 38, p. 37-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores interaction and collaboration between people with dementia and their spouses in relation to the performance of household chores with the focus on instruction as an interactional context to engage the person with dementia in collaboration to accomplish joint activities. Dementia is generally associated with pathological changes in peoples cognitive functions such as diminishing memory functions, communicative abilities and also diminishing abilities to take initiative as well as to plan and execute tasks. Using video recordings of everyday naturally occurring activities, we analyze the sequential organization of actions (see Schegloff, 2007) oriented toward the accomplishment of a joint multi-task activity of baking. The analysis shows the specific ways of collaboration through instructional activities in which the person with dementia exhibits his competence and skills in accomplishing the given tasks through negotiating the instructions with his partner and carrying out instructed actions. Although the driving force of the collaboration seems to be a series of directive sequences only initiated by the partner throughout the baking activity, our analyses highlight how the person with dementia can actively use the material environment including collaborating partners to compensate for challenges and difficulties encountered in achieving everyday, tasks. The sequential organization of instructions and instructed actions are in this sense argued to provide an interactional environment wherein the person with dementia can make contributions to the joint activity in an efficient way. While a collaborator has been described as necessary for a person with dementia to be able to partake in activities, this study shows that people with dementia are not only guided by their collaborators in joint activities but they can also actively use their collaborators in intricate compensatory ways. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 34.
    Michailakis, Dimitris
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Schirmer, Werner
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The lost Gemeinschaft: How people working with the elderly explain loneliness2015In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, no 33, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We conducted a qualitative interview study with people of different professions working with lonely elderly people. The rationale of the study was to examine how these respondents explain loneliness among the elderly. The present article focuses on the social explanations, i.e. explanations that identify causes of loneliness in the structure of modern society. We found that many of the social explanations given are aspects of a more encompassing and general pattern underlying all the reasoning about loneliness among the elderly. This pattern is the expression of two contrasting images of society which the classical sociologist Ferdinand Tönnies termed Gemeinschaft (community) and Gesellschaft (society). The former refers to traditional or small-size rural communities characterized by high degrees of social cohesion, integration, solidarity, proximity and familiarity, whereas the latter refers to functional differentiation, distance, individualization, exchanged-based social relations and anonymity. Loneliness among the elderly is explained by the lack of Gemeinschaft and its characteristics in contemporary society. This explanatory pattern goes hand in hand with a critical view of contemporary society and a nostalgic yearning for the lost communities of past societies, where inhabitants find their staked-out place and sense of belonging, and thus loneliness hardly seems to occur. We summarized this view under the label the "lost Gemeinschaft".

  • 35.
    Nedlund, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nordh, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Crafting citizen(ship) for people with dementia: How policy narratives at national level in Sweden informed politics of time from 1975 to 20132015In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 34, p. 123-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how policy narratives in national policy documents in Sweden inform associated politics on people with dementia. This is disentangled in terms of how people with dementia have been defined, what the problems and their imminent solutions have been, and if and how these have differed overtime. Based on a textual analysis of policy documents at national level in Sweden, covering nearly 40 years the study shows how divergent policy narratives shape the construction of citizens with dementia as policy target groups. This study shows the temporal character of people with dementia as a political problem, the implications of policy narratives on people with dementia as a citizen group, and policy narratives as something being crafted rather than shaped by fixed pre-existing "facts". Dementia, and further citizens living with dementia, does not have a once and for all stabilised meaning. Instead, the meanings behind the categories continue to evolve and to be crafted, which affects the construction of citizens living with dementia, the space in which to exercise their citizenship and further belonging to the society.

  • 36.
    Nilsson, Gabriella
    et al.
    Department of Arts and Cultural Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ekstam, Lisa
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Andersson, Janicke
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Pushing for Miracles, Pulling Away from Risk: An Ethnographic Analysis of the Force Dynamics at Senior Summer Camps in Sweden2018In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 47, p. 96-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With an ageing population and a discourse of active ageing guiding welfare policies, initiatives to engage older people in health promoting activities have been established. One growing phenomenon is Senior Summer Camps, arranged all over Sweden in beautiful natural environments close to water. Their main purpose is to enable older people to participate in outdoor activities in an institutionalized setting. Although many professionals consider acts of infantilization as highly inappropriate, research has shown that still this is frequently done in institutional settings targeting older people. This paper wish to contribute to this field of research. The objective is to study how the camp leaders handle the dilemma of on the one hand, wanting to push senior campers into participating in challenging activities, and on the other, needing to pull them away, to reduce risk and ensure their safety, as well as how senior campers experience alternately being pushed into and pulled away from activities. What strategies are used by the camp leaders to push the campers to challenge themselves without taking unnecessary risks, and what consequences do these strategies have for the campers? The study was conducted in the form of ethnographic observations at two different camps. During one week at each camp we stayed with the participants, alternately being a silent observer and listener in the background, and an active participant in conversations and activities. Narratives, direct quotes, descriptions and reflections were written down in a field diary that forms the empirical basis for the analysis. Various modes of pushing and pulling were identified and defined as cheering, tricking, compelling, monitoring and restricting. These different modes of pushing and pulling were analyzed as manifestations of force, exerted by the camp leaders within a certain age-based force dynamic that resulted in different responses among the campers, especially in terms of how they “did age” in relation to notions on autonomy and vulnerability. It is shown that manifestations of force involve the risk of putting the campers in a position of vulnerability, regardless of whether or not they are actually vulnerable. The main argument in this paper is that initiatives that in an institutionalized context aim to promote a prolonged health and well-being, targeting “older people” in a general sense, run the risk of getting the exact opposite result, namely instead learned vulnerability is implicitly promoted by removing or downplaying the agency and autonomy of the campers. © 2018

  • 37. Nilsson, Jan
    et al.
    Grafström, Margareta
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Zaman, Shahaduz
    Research and Evaluation Division, BRAC.
    Nahar Kabir, Zarina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Role and function: Aspects of quality of life of older peoplein rural Bangladesh2005In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, no 19, p. 363-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to explore the meaning of quality of life (QoL) for elderly people in a rural communityin Bangladesh. Data were obtained through in-depth interviews with 11 elderly persons aged 63–86 years.Interview data were analysed using content analysis to determine the conceptual meaning of elderly peoples’experiences of QoL. Two major themes emerged from the data as being of utmost importance in QoL of elderlypeople in rural Bangladesh. These were: (i) having a role in the family and the community and (ii) beingfunctional, both physically and economically. Results also showed that elderly people in rural Bangladeshprioritise being healthy, having a good social network, social support and a secure financial situation in order tohave good QoL. This study is a step towards a better understanding of QoL experienced by the elderly peoplethemselves in a rural Bangladeshi context.

  • 38.
    Nord, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A day to be lived. Elderly peoples' possessions for everyday life in assisted living2013In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 135-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is a qualitative interview study about the household possessions that elderly women and men brought with them when moving into assisted living. The move implied a substantial reduction of their possessions since, in all cases, they had left a larger dwelling than the one they moved to. The study gives a glimpse into the everyday life of the oldest old in assisted living. The things the elderly participants brought were of three types; cherished objects, representations of who they were, and mundane objects. The most important objects indicated by the elderly often belonged to the third type, and were preferred for the significance they had for the everyday life of the individual. These objects revealed a circumscribed but dignified life in their private bed-sitting room, often in solitude, where the elderly individuals pursued various interests and small-scale activities. However, this life was organized and preferred by the individuals themselves, in accordance with the principles of resident autonomy and individual choice that are promoted in assisted living. The author suggests that these self-engaged pursuits can contribute to bridging the gap between disengagement and activity theories. The study results also contribute to making visible the private life of the oldest old in assisted living.

  • 39.
    Nord, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Free choice in residential care for older people– a philosophical reflection2016In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 37, no April, p. 59-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Free choice in elderly care services is a debated issue. Using the theoretical support of philosophers of free will, this paper explores free choice in relocation to residential care. The three dominant perspectives within this field of philosophy, libertarianism, determinism and compatibilism, are applied from the perspective of the older individual to the process of moving. Empirical data were collected through qualitative interviews with 13 older individuals who had recently moved into residential care. These individuals had made the choice to move following either a health emergency or incremental health problems. In a deterministic perspective they had no alternative to moving, which was the inevitable solution to their various personal problems. A network of people important to them assisted in the move, making the choice possible. However, post-move the interviewees’ perspective had changed to a libertarian or compatibilist interpretation, whereby although the circumstances had conferred little freedom regarding the move, the interviewees reported a high degree of self-determination in the process. It appeared that in order to restore self-respect and personal agency, the older individuals had transformed their restricted choice into a choice made of free will or freer will.

  • 40.
    Nyman, Anneli
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Josephsson, Staffan
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Isaksson, Gunilla
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Being part of an enacted togetherness: narratives of elderly people with depression2012In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 410-418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we explored how five elderly persons with depression engaged in everyday activities with others, over time, and how this was related to their experience of meaning. Repeated interviews and participant observations generated data that was analysed using a narrative approach. Analysis identified togetherness as an acted relation, “enacted togetherness”, emphasising how the act of doing everyday activities with someone created togetherness and belonging, and being part of an enacted togetherness seemed to be a way for the participants to negotiate and construct meaning. Opportunities for doing things together with someone were closely associated to the place where the participants lived. Furthermore, engagement in activities together with others created hope and expectations of future acting. Findings from this research can extend our understanding of how participating in everyday activities is experienced as a social process including change over time, presenting the perspective of elderly people themselves. In light of these findings, we highlight the need to consider how opportunities to become part of an enacted togetherness can be created. Also, we aspire to contribute to the debate on how to understand the complexity related to social aspects of ageing and add to the emerging understanding of everyday activities as transactional, incorporating people and the environment in a dynamic process that goes beyond the individual.

  • 41.
    Näslund, Shirley
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language.
    Age ascription as a resource and a source of resistance: An interactional study of health professionals’ castings of patients into the category ‘old’2017In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 41, no 41, p. 41-35, article id 2017Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study aims to give an understanding of what actions health professionals' castings of patients into the category ‘old’ perform on a medical and social level as well as what actions patients' interactional management of these castings perform. Particularly, this study aims to bring to the fore the negotiability of health professionals' perspectivating age ascriptions. This is done with the conversation analytic method (CA) according to which altercasting is a mutual construction performed turn by turn and shaped by the reactions of the interlocutor who can approve, resist, or modify the identity in question. The data are drawn from two Swedish television documentaries on health encounters. Three major findings are presented. Firstly, the castings of the patients into the category ‘old’ are in several cases embedded in metaphors that either position the patient's body in the role of a victim of old age or in the role of a machine to routinely check. Secondly, the castings with a fateful approach to old age are ambivalent; whereas they serve as resources for the health professionals' normalizing of medical projects and perspectives, they can constitute sources of problems for the patients' doctorability and/or agency. Thirdly, the health professionals' perspectivating age ascriptions are negotiable; their design facilitates resistance to them, and the patients accept, modify, interrupt or reverse them.

  • 42.
    Olaison, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Assessment for home care: Negotiating solutions for individual needs2006In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 367-380 Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores care management as an activity that regulates the distribution of society's resources for home care. It focuses on interaction in assessment meetings, which are part of the planning of services and care for old people in Sweden. The aim was to acquire an understanding of how old people, as applicants, account for their needs for care, and how these accounts are negotiated and positioned in talk. Twenty home care assessments were audio-taped and the data were analyzed using discursive analysis. It was found that the assessment meetings had an institutional structure within, which old people, as applicants and with individual needs for care, were assessed within fixed institutional categories. Furthermore, analysis showed how interaction during assessment meetings functioned as formal problem-solving, in which applicants' accounts of their health issues were negotiated, contributing to the construction of their identity as home care receivers.

  • 43.
    Olaison, Anna
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, NISAL - Nationella institutet för forskning om äldre och åldrande.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Linköpings universitet, NISAL - Nationella institutet för forskning om äldre och åldrande.
    Assessment for home care: Negotiating solutions for individual needs2006In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 367-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores care management as an activity that regulates the distribution of society's resources for home care. It focuses on interaction in assessment meetings, which are part of the planning of services and care for old people in Sweden. The aim was to acquire an understanding of how old people, as applicants, account for their needs for care, and how these accounts are negotiated and positioned in talk. Twenty home care assessments were audio-taped and the data were analyzed using discursive analysis. It was found that the assessment meetings had an institutional structure within, which old people, as applicants and with individual needs for care, were assessed within fixed institutional categories. Furthermore, analysis showed how interaction during assessment meetings functioned as formal problem-solving, in which applicants' accounts of their health issues were negotiated, contributing to the construction of their identity as home care receivers.

  • 44. Olaison, Anna
    et al.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Assessment for home care: Negotiating solutions for individual needs.2006In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 367-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores care management as an activity that regulates the distribution of society's resources for home care. It focuses on interaction in assessment meetings, which are part of the planning of services and care for old people in Sweden. The aim was to acquire an understanding of how old people, as applicants, account for their needs for care, and how these accounts are negotiated and positioned in talk. Twenty home care assessments were audio-taped and the data were analyzed using discursive analysis. It was found that the assessment meetings had an institutional structure within, which old people, as applicants and with individual needs for care, were assessed within fixed institutional categories. Furthermore, analysis showed how interaction during assessment meetings functioned as formal problem-solving, in which applicants' accounts of their health issues were negotiated, contributing to the construction of their identity as home care receivers

  • 45.
    Olsson, Eva
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Heikkinen, Satu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    “I will never quit dancing”. The emotional experiences of social dancing among older persons2019In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, article id 100786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on dancing in later life has mainly focused on the health-promoting effects of dance, including aspects of well-being, while studies focusing on emotions are rare. The purpose of this article is therefore to contribute to research on older people's dancing through examining emotions in social dancing. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 44 older persons. The analysis shows how successful interaction rituals create positive emotions such as joy and pride and contribute to emotional energy. However, there are also unsuccessful interaction rituals which contribute to negative emotions of sadness and anger. These negative emotions can drain emotional energy, but, importantly for this study, they may also contribute to a forceful counter-energy which motivates the interviewees to try again. We discuss these patterns as emotional energy tropism and as negative emotional energy and positive emotional energy working together. The study provides insight into how and why dancing feels good as well as why older people do not give up dancing despite setbacks. Overall, the study contributes to research discussions about emotions in gray dancing as well as sociology of emotions.

  • 46.
    Persson, Tove
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Wästerfors, David
    Sociologiska institutionen, Lunds universitet.
    Such Trivial Matters: How staff account for restrictions of residents' influence in nursing homes2009In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    National policies emphasize older people’s right to autonomy, yet nursing home residents often have restricted opportunities to make decisions about everyday matters. We use qualitative interview data to analyze staff members’ explanations of actions that conflict with both social norms and national policies. Two types of problematic actions are discussed: restrictions of elderly residents’ influence in decision making and neglect of residents' complaints. While staff members describe residents’ influence as desirable, they simultaneously formulate accounts that justify their inability to live up to this ideal. Further, we demonstrate how certain complaints are “made trivial” when they are described and treated in particular ways by the staff. We argue that the accounts offered by staff members draw on an implicit folk logic, a logic in which residents are allowed to exercise influence only as long as it does not conflict with the efficient running of the institution as a whole.

  • 47.
    Pietilä Rosendahl, Sirpa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Bülow, Pia
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Older twins´ experiences of the relationship with their co-twin over the life course2011In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 119-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on 35 life stories of aging twins, this study focuses on personal experiences and recollections of their relationships with the co-twin over the life-course. The participants are part of two longitudinal Swedish twin studies on aging, SATSA and Gender. In the narrative analysis, three relationship patterns, labeled 'nurturing', 'draining', and 'superficial', emerged, pointing to qualitative aspects in the co-twin relationship. The dominating aspect was emotional closeness, which differed in the three relationship patterns. In the nurturing twin relationship pattern, emotional closeness was experienced as intimacy and yet independence, while in the draining relationship pattern it was experienced as dependence. The superficial twin relationship was experienced as distant and lacking in emotional involvement. Most of the relationship patterns seemed to remain the same throughout life. However, seen from a life course perspective, this study pointed to complexity and diversity in lifelong twin relationships.

  • 48.
    Pietilä Rosendahl, Sirpa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping Universit, Sweden.
    Bülow, Pia
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    We are not as alike as you think – sense of individuality within the co-twin relationship2013In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 339-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have explored how older twins experience and describe themselves in relation to their co-twin. The life stories of 20 older twins were analyzed with narrative analysis.Results showed that the twinsdescribed themselves from the point of differences in relation to the co-twin. This was based on experiences of how other people viewed them as alike, as well as on life events along the life course, which contributed to the perception of oneself as an individual in relation to the co-twin. The emphasis on unlikeness was therefore interpreted as a way of trying to establish a position as an individual within theco-twin relationship and to assert ones individuality to the rest of the social environment. To claim oneself as an individual was an ongoing identity work along the life course.

  • 49.
    Pietilä, Sirpa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Bülow, Pia
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work.
    Older twins' experiences of the relationship with their co-twin over the life course2012In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 119-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on 35 life stories of aging twins, this study focuses on personal experiences and recollections of their relationships with the co-twin over the life course. The participants are part of two longitudinal Swedish twin studies on aging, SATSA and Gender. In the narrative analysis, three relationship patterns, labeled ‘nurturing’, ‘draining’, and ‘superficial’, emerged, pointing to qualitative aspects in the co-twin relationship. The dominating aspect was emotional closeness, which differed in the three relationship patterns. In the nurturing twin relationship pattern, emotional closeness was experienced as intimacy and yet independence, while in the draining relationship pattern it was experienced as dependence. The superficial twin relationship was experienced as distant and lacking in emotional involvement. Most of the relationship patterns seemed to remain the same throughout life. However, seen from a life course perspective, this study pointed to complexity and diversity in lifelong twin relationships.

  • 50.
    Pietilä, Sirpa
    et al.
    Research School of Health and Welfare, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden / Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Björklund, Anita
    Department of Rehabilitation, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Bülow, Pia
    Department of Behavioral Science and Social Work, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Older twins' experiences of the relationship with their co-twin over the life course2012In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 119-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on 35 life stories of aging twins, this study focuses on personal experiences and recollections of their relationships with the co-twin over the life course. The participants are part of two longitudinal Swedish twin studies on aging, SATSA and Gender. In the narrative analysis, three relationship patterns, labeled ‘nurturing’, ‘draining’, and ‘superficial’, emerged, pointing to qualitative aspects in the co-twin relationship. The dominating aspect was emotional closeness, which differed in the three relationship patterns. In the nurturing twin relationship pattern, emotional closeness was experienced as intimacy and yet independence, while in the draining relationship pattern it was experienced as dependence. The superficial twin relationship was experienced as distant and lacking in emotional involvement. Most of the relationship patterns seemed to remain the same throughout life. However, seen from a life course perspective, this study pointed to complexity and diversity in lifelong twin relationships.

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