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  • 1.
    Astvaldsdottir, Alfheidur
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bostrom, Anne-Marie
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Western Norway Univ Appl Sci, Norway.
    Davidson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Malmo Univ, Sweden.
    Gabre, Pia
    Uppsala Cty Council, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gahnberg, Lars
    Reg Vastra Gotaland, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Englund, Gunilla Sandborgh
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Skott, Pia
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Stahlnacke, Katri
    Reg Orebro Cty, Sweden; Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Tranaeus, Sofia
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Malmo Univ, Sweden.
    Wilhelmsson, Hanna
    Malmo Univ, Sweden.
    Wardh, Inger
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ostlund, Pernilla
    Malmo Univ, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    Malmo Univ, Sweden.
    Oral health and dental care of older persons-A systematic map of systematic reviews2018In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 290-304Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To examine the current knowledge on oral health status and dental care of older persons through a systematic mapping of systematic reviews of low or moderate risk of bias. Background: Geriatric dentistry covers all aspects of oral health and oral care of older persons. Oral health is part of general health and contributes to a persons physical, psychological and social wellbeing. Methods: A literature search was performed in three different databases (PubMed, The Cochrane Library and Cinahl) within 12 domains: Dental caries, periodontitis, Orofacial pain and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain, mucosal lesions, oral motor function, dry mouth, halitosis, interaction between oral status and other medical conditions, ability to interrelate and communicate, quality of life, ethics and organisation of dental care for older persons. Systematic reviews were identified and scrutinised, highlighting scientific knowledge and knowledge gaps. Results: We included 32 systematic reviews of which 14 were judged to be of low/moderate risk of bias. Most of the domains lack systematic reviews with low or moderate risk of bias. In two of the domains evidence was identified; in institutionalised people aged 65 or older, effective oral hygiene can prevent pneumonia. Furthermore, there is an evidence of a relationship between malnutrition (protein energy-related malnutrition, PEM) and poor appetite and edentulousness. Conclusions: There is an urgent need for further research and evidence-based knowledge within most domains in geriatric dentistry and in other fields related to oral health and dental care for older persons striving for multi-disciplinary research programmes.

  • 2. Bergdahl, Maud
    et al.
    Bergdahl, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    Psykologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Difference in apolipoprotein E type 4 allele (APOE e4) amongdentate and edentulous subjects2008In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 179-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To evaluate the frequency of apolipoprotein (APOE) alleles and determine whether APOE type 4 allele (e4) was associated with edentulousness even when certain factors were controlled.Background: The APOE are important in lipid homeostasis, and APOE e4 has been found in many diseases and to have a negative impact on longevity. Tooth loss is more common in ill aged subjects with low income and education.Materials and methods: In a population-based study involving 1860 subjects between 35 and 85 years 1321 dentate (mean age = 54; 54% women, 46% men) and 539 edentulous (mean age = 72; 62% women, 38% men) subjects were studied. Logistic regression was performed with dentate/edentulous as dependent variables and years of education, socio-economic status, social network, stress level, handicap from birth, 23 various diseases and APOE e4 as covariates. Thereafter, APOE e4 frequencies were studied in 342 dentateand 336 edentulous subjects 50–85 years of age. The subjects were matched with regard to age, gender, years of education, living condition, stress level, handicap from birth and 23 various diseases.Results: APOE allele frequency in the total group was e2 = 7.8%, e3 = 76.4% and e4 = 15.8%. Age, living condition, years of education and APOE e4 were significant covariates in edentulous subjects (p £ 0.001).APOE e4 in the matched groups revealed significant differences between the dentate group and the edentulous group (v2 = 5.68; p = 0.017). There was no group effect (F(29,648) = 0.849; p < 0.696; Wilks’ lambda = 0.963). In the dentate group, the frequencies of APOE were: e2 = 8.8%, e3 = 77.9% ande4 = 13.3%. Corresponding frequencies of APOE in the edentulous group were: e2 = 6.6%, e3 = 75.4% and e4 = 18.0%.Conclusion: Despite matching both groups with regard to different background factors, the edentulous group had a higher frequency of APOE e4 than the dentate group. Thus, genetic factors might contribute to greater risk in developing complex oral diseases leading to tooth loss or just be an indication that the subjects in our study carrying APOE e4 are more fragile.

  • 3. Bergdahl, Maud
    et al.
    Bergdahl, Jan
    Nyberg, Lars
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Difference in apolipoprotein E type 4 allele (APOE ɛ4) among dentate and edentulous subjects2008In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 179-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To evaluate the frequency of apolipoprotein (APOE) alleles and determine whether APOE type 4 allele (ɛ4) was associated with edentulousness even when certain factors were controlled.

    Background: The APOE are important in lipid homeostasis, and APOE ɛ4 has been found in many diseases and to have a negative impact on longevity. Tooth loss is more common in ill aged subjects with low income and education.

    Materials and methods: In a population-based study involving 1860 subjects between 35 and 85 years 1321 dentate (mean age = 54; 54% women, 46% men) and 539 edentulous (mean age = 72; 62% women, 38% men) subjects were studied. Logistic regression was performed with dentate/edentulous as dependent variables and years of education, socio-economic status, social network, stress level, handicap from birth, 23 various diseases and APOE ɛ4 as covariates. Thereafter, APOE ɛ4 frequencies were studied in 342 dentate and 336 edentulous subjects 50–85 years of age. The subjects were matched with regard to age, gender, years of education, living condition, stress level, handicap from birth and 23 various diseases.

    Results: APOE allele frequency in the total group was ɛ2 = 7.8%, ɛ3 = 76.4% and ɛ4 = 15.8%. Age, living condition, years of education and APOE ɛ4 were significant covariates in edentulous subjects (p ≤ 0.001). APOE ɛ4 in the matched groups revealed significant differences between the dentate group and the edentulous group (χ2 = 5.68; p = 0.017). There was no group effect (F(29,648) = 0.849; p < 0.696; Wilks' lambda = 0.963). In the dentate group, the frequencies of APOE were: ɛ2 = 8.8%, ɛ3 = 77.9% and ɛ4 = 13.3%. Corresponding frequencies of APOE in the edentulous group were: ɛ2 = 6.6%, ɛ3 = 75.4% and ɛ4 = 18.0%.

    Conclusion: Despite matching both groups with regard to different background factors, the edentulous group had a higher frequency of APOE ɛ4 than the dentate group. Thus, genetic factors might contribute to greater risk in developing complex oral diseases leading to tooth loss or just be an indication that the subjects in our study carrying APOE ɛ4 are more fragile.

  • 4. de Almeida, Fernando J. Mota
    et al.
    Kivijarvi, Kristina
    Roos, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    A case of disseminated histoplasmosis diagnosed after oral presentation in an old HIV-negative patient in Sweden2015In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 234-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Histoplasmosis is an endemic disease in various regions such as North America and South-East Asia but remains rare in Europe. Disseminated histoplasmosis is unusual in HIV-negative patients. Here, we describe a case of disseminated histoplasmosis in an HIV-negative patient diagnosed after oral presentation.

  • 5. De Visschere, Luc
    et al.
    de Baat, Cees
    De Meyer, Lize
    van der Putten, Gert-Jan
    Peeters, Bart
    Soderfelt, Bjorn
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Vanobbergen, Jacques
    The integration of oral health care into day-to-day care in nursing homes: a qualitative study2015In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 115-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveThis qualitative study explored barriers and enabling factors to the implementation of an oral hygiene protocol in nursing homes. BackgroundOral health care in nursing homes in Flanders (Belgium) is inadequate. Materials and methodsQualitative data were obtained from nurses employed in 13 nursing homes involved in two randomised controlled trials in Flanders-Belgium. Data were collected by focus group and face-to-face interviews during April 2005 and December 2009. All transcripts were analysed with support of NVivo 8 (Version 2008). Transcripts were intuitively analysed in a two-step method. ResultsMost revealed barriers were consistent with previous findings in the literature. Newly reported barriers were respect for residents' self-determination, experience based oral health care by nurses, residents' oral health status and nurses' inability to notice residents' oral health status. Demand-driven oral health care was found to be a strong enabling factor. ConclusionThe integration of oral health care into day-to-day care seems to be a major problem due to a multitude of barriers. In future implementation innovations in oral health care an a priori assessment of influencing factors is recommended.

  • 6.
    Ekback, Gunnar
    et al.
    Regional Örebro County, Sweden; Örebro University, Sweden.
    Ordell, Sven
    Region Östergötland, Public Dental Health Care. Malmö University, Sweden.
    Self-perceived taste disturbance: a 20-year prospective study of a Swedish 1942 birth cohort2017In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 180-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of dental care factors, general health factors and socio-economic factors on perceived taste disturbance (PTD) over time and to assess the stability of or change in PTD in a panel of individuals as they progressed from middle age (50 years) to early old age (70 years). Materials and methods: Data collection was conducted from a cohort study beginning in 1992, when the participants were 50 years old, and again 5, 10, 15 and 20 years later. Stability and change in PTD were described using cross-tabulation. Perceived taste disturbance over the 20-year survey period was modelled using the generalised estimating equation (GEE). Results: The prevalence of PTD during a 5-year period found in this study ranged from 2.4 to 2.9%, the latter in individuals between 60 and 70 years of age. Women generally had PTD more often than men. The longitudinal analysis showed that problems with bad breath (OR = 3.6), blisters (OR = 3.4), burning mouth (OR = 3.4) and self-perceived health (OR = 2.7) were the most important factors explaining PTD. Conclusions: This study showed that PTD does not increase between 50 and 70 years of age in ordinary community-living individuals. There were no long-term impacts on PTD over time from socio-economic factors, and over time, there were a limited number of factors contributing to the effect. Bad breath, blisters, burning mouth and self-perceived health are important factors for the dentist to discuss with the patient in the case of PTD.

  • 7.
    Ekbäck, Gunnar
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dentistry, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ordell, Sven
    Dental Commissioning Unit, Östergötland County Council, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Oral Public Health, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Self-perceived taste disturbance: a 20-year prospective study of a Swedish 1942 birth cohort2017In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 180-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of dental care factors, general health factors and socio-economic factors on perceived taste disturbance (PTD) over time and to assess the stability of or change in PTD in a panel of individuals as they progressed from middle age (50 years) to early old age (70 years).

    Materials and methods: Data collection was conducted from a cohort study beginning in 1992, when the participants were 50 years old, and again 5, 10, 15 and 20 years later. Stability and change in PTD were described using cross-tabulation. Perceived taste disturbance over the 20-year survey period was modelled using the generalised estimating equation (GEE).

    Results: The prevalence of PTD during a 5-year period found in this study ranged from 2.4 to 2.9%, the latter in individuals between 60 and 70 years of age. Women generally had PTD more often than men. The longitudinal analysis showed that problems with bad breath (OR = 3.6), blisters (OR = 3.4), burning mouth (OR = 3.4) and self-perceived health (OR = 2.7) were the most important factors explaining PTD.

    Conclusions: This study showed that PTD does not increase between 50 and 70 years of age in ordinary community-living individuals. There were no long-term impacts on PTD over time from socio-economic factors, and over time, there were a limited number of factors contributing to the effect. Bad breath, blisters, burning mouth and self-perceived health are important factors for the dentist to discuss with the patient in the case of PTD.

  • 8. Ekbäck, Gunnar
    et al.
    Ordell, Sven
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Self-perceived taste disturbance: a 20-year prospective study of a Swedish 1942 birth cohort2017In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 180-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of dental care factors, general health factors and socio-economic factors on perceived taste disturbance (PTD) over time and to assess the stability of or change in PTD in a panel of individuals as they progressed from middle age (50 years) to early old age (70 years). Materials and methods: Data collection was conducted from a cohort study beginning in 1992, when the participants were 50 years old, and again 5, 10, 15 and 20 years later. Stability and change in PTD were described using cross-tabulation. Perceived taste disturbance over the 20-year survey period was modelled using the generalised estimating equation (GEE). Results: The prevalence of PTD during a 5-year period found in this study ranged from 2.4 to 2.9%, the latter in individuals between 60 and 70 years of age. Women generally had PTD more often than men. The longitudinal analysis showed that problems with bad breath (OR = 3.6), blisters (OR = 3.4), burning mouth (OR = 3.4) and self-perceived health (OR = 2.7) were the most important factors explaining PTD. Conclusions: This study showed that PTD does not increase between 50 and 70 years of age in ordinary community-living individuals. There were no long-term impacts on PTD over time from socio-economic factors, and over time, there were a limited number of factors contributing to the effect. Bad breath, blisters, burning mouth and self-perceived health are important factors for the dentist to discuss with the patient in the case of PTD.

  • 9. Eskafi, Mahmoud
    et al.
    Ekberg, EwaCarin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Cline, Charles
    Israelsson, Bo
    Nilner, Maria
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Use of a Mandibular Advancement Device in Patients with Con-gestive Heart Failure and Sleep Apnoea2004In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 100-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate the practical use of the mandibular advancement device (MAD) for treatment of sleep apnoea (SA) in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) over 1 year. Subjects: Twentyfive patients aged 66 ± 8 years (mean ± SD) met the inclusion criteria and were included in the study. Design: In a prospective, clinical trial, the apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI), a measure of SA, was determined with a portable device. Failure to enter treatment and compliance, adverse events and signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) were examined before intervention and 4-6 weeks, 6 months and 1 year after intervention. Results: Six patients had removable dentures of whom four had complete dentures. Before treatment, eight patients reported minor symptoms of TMD. The AHI fell from 19.3 ± 12.1 to 11.8 ± 9.5 (p = 0.004) with use of the device. In most patients, use of the MAD had no severe effects on the signs and symptoms of TMD. Adverse events such as pain in the temporomandibular joints, soreness in the teeth, and tiredness in the jaws were reported by ten patients. Dental complications were observed in two patients. Sixtyfour per cent of the patients were still using the MAD at the 1-year follow-up. Conclusion: both the general and oral health of CHF patients were important in treatment with a MAD. The MAD therapy had no severe effect on the masticatory system and edentulous patients could be treated.

  • 10. Gerdin, Elisabeth Wärnberg
    et al.
    Einarson, Susanne
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Jonsson, Margareta
    Aronsson, Kerstin
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Impact of dry mouth conditions on oral health-related quality of life in older people2005In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 219-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of dry mouth conditions on oral health-related quality of life in frail old people, residents at community care centers. Further, reliability and validity of a visual analogue scale (VAS) for dry mouth symptoms were determined within the study cohort. BACKGROUND: In old people functional, social and psychological impacts of oral conditions are associated with an overall sense of well being and general health. Subjective dry mouth and reduced saliva flow are common disorders in old people caused by disease and medication. Thus, dry mouth conditions may be determinants for compromised oral health-related quality of life in old people. METHOD: In total, 50 old people living at service homes for the old people were asked to answer questionnaires on subjective dry mouth (VAS) and Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP14) for oral health-related quality of life. Saliva flow was estimated by absorbing saliva into a pre-weighed cotton roll. RESULTS: The final study cohort comprised 41 old people (aged 83-91 years). Significant associations were identified between both objective and subjective dry mouth and overall or specific aspects of oral health-related quality of life. CONCLUSION: Dry mouth (objective and subjective) is significantly associated with oral health-related quality of life strengthening the value of monitoring dry mouth conditions in the care of frail old people.

  • 11. Gerdin, EW
    et al.
    Einarson, S
    Jonsson, M
    Aronsson, K
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Cariology.
    Impact of dry mouth conditions on oral health-related quality of life in older people.2005In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 219-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of dry mouth conditions on oral health-related quality of life in frail old people, residents at community care centers. Further, reliability and validity of a visual analogue scale (VAS) for dry mouth symptoms were determined within the study cohort. BACKGROUND: In old people functional, social and psychological impacts of oral conditions are associated with an overall sense of well being and general health. Subjective dry mouth and reduced saliva flow are common disorders in old people caused by disease and medication. Thus, dry mouth conditions may be determinants for compromised oral health-related quality of life in old people. METHOD: In total, 50 old people living at service homes for the old people were asked to answer questionnaires on subjective dry mouth (VAS) and Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP14) for oral health-related quality of life. Saliva flow was estimated by absorbing saliva into a pre-weighed cotton roll. RESULTS: The final study cohort comprised 41 old people (aged 83-91 years). Significant associations were identified between both objective and subjective dry mouth and overall or specific aspects of oral health-related quality of life. CONCLUSION: Dry mouth (objective and subjective) is significantly associated with oral health-related quality of life strengthening the value of monitoring dry mouth conditions in the care of frail old people.

  • 12.
    Grönbeck Lindén, Ingela
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Andersson, Pia
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Oral hälsa och folkhälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research environment Oral Health - Public Health - Quality of Life (OHAL). Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Dahlin-Ivanoff, Synneve
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Gahnberg, Lars
    Karolinska institutet.
    Hägglin, Catharina
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Development of an instrument to assess oral hygiene ability in older adults: the oral hygiene ability instrument2019In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the development process of an instrument to assess the ability to manage daily oral hygiene and the cause of impaired oral hygiene. The instrument is initially aimed for use by the dental team in the ageing population.

    BACKGROUND: Oral hygiene is an important component of oral health. Inability to manage oral hygiene combined with other risk factors often results in poor oral health and impaired quality of life.

    METHODS: A guideline for instrument development was used during the construction of the instrument. The method included three phases: I. planning: the purpose and target group of the instrument were determined, and a literature review and qualitative focus-group study were conducted; II. construction: objectives were formulated, and a pool of items was built; and III. evaluation and validation, which included two pilot studies, interviews, item analyses and revision of the instrument.

    RESULTS: The planning and construction phases resulted in an instrument with 47 items comprising three parts: (a) interview, (b) clinical examination and (c) observation of activities of daily living (oral hygiene). After two pilot studies, the instrument was found to have good content validity. Analyses of qualitative and quantitative data resulted in a reduction in the number of items to 33.

    CONCLUSION: OHAI can be a valuable tool as a preventive method to identify older adults at risk of impaired oral health. However, the instrument needs further evaluation before wider use.

  • 13.
    Gullberg, Joanna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology.
    Lindh, Christina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology.
    Axtelius, Bjorn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology.
    Horner, Keith
    Devlin, Hugh
    Povlsen, Lene
    Osteoporosis risk assessment in primary dental care-The attitudes of Swedish dentists, patients and medical specialists2020In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To explore and identify the attitudes of dentists, patients and medical specialists regarding implementation of osteoporosis risk assessment into Swedish primary dental care. Background Osteoporosis is a major health problem leading to fragility fractures. As shown in academic-based research, dental radiological examination can be used for osteoporosis risk assessment. A substantial number of patients undergo radiographic examinations in primary dental care each year, but little is known about implementation of osteoporosis risk assessment in this setting. Materials and methods A qualitative research approach using focus group discussions and manifest content analysis was applied. Five focus groups with dentists and representatives from patient support groups and a single individual interview with one medical specialist were included in the sample. Results From the manifest content analysis, three categories emerged: (a) barriers to change in practice, (b) benefits to change in practice, and (c) needs and requirements prior to change in practice. Most participants felt that there was insufficient knowledge of osteoporosis as well as a heavy existing workload. A concern was expressed about medical practitioners' willingness to take on responsibility for patients referred by dentists. Representatives from patient support groups highlighted a lack of knowledge about osteoporosis among both the general public and the medical professionals. Clear guidelines and improved communication channels between stakeholders would have to be established to ensure a smooth treatment path for patients. Conclusion Despite interest in osteoporosis risk assessment in primary dental care, there are political, workflow and educational barriers that must be overcome for successful implementation.

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  • 14. Hägglin, C
    et al.
    Berggren, U
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Ahlqwist, M
    Dental anxiety among middle-aged and elderly women in Sweden: A study of oral state, utilisation of dental services and concomitant factors.1996In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 25-34Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15. Isaksson, Rita
    et al.
    Becktor, Jonas P
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Brown, Andrew
    Laurizohn, Christer
    Isaksson, Sten
    Oral health and oral implant status in edentulous patients with implant-supported dental prostheses who are receiving long-term nursing care2009In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 245-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate oral health and oral implant status in a group of edentulous patients receiving long-term residential or nursing care (LTC), all of whom had implant-supported fixed or removable dental prostheses. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A dental examination was performed on a total of 3310 patients receiving LTC and from this population 35 edentulous patients in whom dental implants had been placed formed the cohort for this study. All examinations were performed by a specialist in hospital dentistry and took place in the patients' own home environment. Oral health was assessed by means of a protocol which evaluated oral hygiene status, possible oral mucosal inflammation and oral mucosal friction levels. Any problems with the implant-supported prosthesis, implant mobility or other complications were also assessed. In addition, patients were asked about any oral symptoms and their usual oral hygiene procedures. RESULTS: About half of the subjects (17/35) were registered as having no/mild inflammation with 18 of 35 having moderate/severe inflammation. Twelve of the 35 patients had good/acceptable oral hygiene and 23 of 35 had poor/bad oral hygiene. Twenty-one of the 35 patients depended on help from the nursing personnel for their daily oral hygiene procedures. Obvious problems with food impaction were noted in 11 patients. A total of 229 implants had been placed in 43 jaws supporting 40 full arch-fixed prostheses and three implant-borne overdentures. There was no evidence of mobility or fractures of either the implants or the prostheses. Fifteen implants showed some exposed screw threads. Pus was exuding from one implant site and general peri-implant gingival hyperplasia was noted in two patients. Twenty-four patients were completely satisfied with the function and appearance of their implant-supported prostheses. Two patients were totally dissatisfied. CONCLUSION: This study indicates that oral implant therapy can be considered as a treatment of choice in elderly patients, even if oral hygiene is sub-optimal.

  • 16.
    Johansson, Ann-Katrin
    et al.
    University of Bergen, Norway .
    Johansson, Anders
    University of Bergen, Norway .
    Unell, Lennart
    Örebro County Council, Sweden .
    Ekbaeck, Gunnar
    Örebro County Council, Sweden .
    Ordell, Sven
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Carlsson, Gunnar E
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Self-reported dry mouth in Swedish population samples aged 50, 65 and 75 years2012In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 29, no 2, p. E107-E115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Reduced salivary flow may have a negative impact on general well-being, quality of life and oral health. Objectives: To examine xerostomia in 50-, 65- and 75-year-olds, background factors and effect on Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (OIDP). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: In 1992, a questionnaire was sent to all 50-year-old persons (n = 8888) in two Swedish counties. In 2007, the same questionnaire was sent to all 65-year-olds (n = 8313) in the two counties and to all 75-year-olds (n = 5195). Response rate was for the 50, 65 and 75 year olds 71.4, 73.1 and 71.9%, respectively. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Xerostomia was higher in women than in men in all age groups. There was higher prevalence of xerostomia with increasing age in both sexes and it was more frequent at night than during daytime. ` Often mouth dryness was 2.6-3.4 times more prevalent in those who reported an impact from OIDP. The highest odd ratios were for daytime xerostomia and for the variables burning mouth (17.1), not feeling healthy (4.5), daily smoking (4.4), and medication (4.1). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: The dramatic increase of xerostomia between age 50 and 75, especially amongst women, needs to be considered in the management of this age group.

  • 17.
    Johansson, Ann-Katrin
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Dentistry – Cariology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Johansson, Anders
    Department of Clinical Dentistry – Prosthodontics, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Unell, Lennart
    Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ekbäck, Gunnar
    Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ordell, Sven
    Östergötland County Council, Linköping, Sweden;.
    Carlsson, Gunnar E
    Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Self-reported dry mouth in Swedish population samples aged 50, 65 and 75 years2012In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 29, no 2, p. e107-e115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Reduced salivary flow may have a negative impact on general well-being, quality of life and oral health.

    OBJECTIVES: To examine xerostomia in 50-, 65- and 75-year-olds, background factors and effect on Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (OIDP).

    METHODS: In 1992, a questionnaire was sent to all 50-year-old persons (n = 8888) in two Swedish counties. In 2007, the same questionnaire was sent to all 65-year-olds (n = 8313) in the two counties and to all 75-year-olds (n = 5195). Response rate was for the 50, 65 and 75 year olds 71.4, 73.1 and 71.9%, respectively.

    RESULTS: Xerostomia was higher in women than in men in all age groups. There was higher prevalence of xerostomia with increasing age in both sexes and it was more frequent at night than during daytime. 'Often mouth dryness' was 2.6-3.4 times more prevalent in those who reported an impact from OIDP. The highest odd ratios were for daytime xerostomia and for the variables burning mouth (17.1), not feeling healthy (4.5), daily smoking (4.4), and medication (4.1).

    CONCLUSIONS: The dramatic increase of xerostomia between age 50 and 75, especially amongst women, needs to be considered in the management of this age group.

  • 18. Liedberg, Birgitta
    et al.
    Stoltze, Kaj
    Norlén, Per
    Öwall, Bengt
    'Inadequate' dietary habits and mastication in elderly men2007In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 41-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: the aim of this study was to re-evaluate data about oral status, mastication and nutrition in elderly men in Malmö, Sweden, recorded in 1985-1987, to assess associations between inadequate dietary habits, oral conditions and masticatory function. Material and methods: Four hundred and eighty-one med, aged 67-68, participated in a comprehensive health examination, including tooth and denture status and masticatory tests. A separate study of dietary habits and nutritional status was made. Ninety-five men had inadequate dietary habits. The databases of dental/denture status, mastication, nutritional status and social network factors were re-evaluated for assessment of associations. Results: No significant differences between those with adequate or inadequate nutrition were found with regard to the number of teeth, occlusal contracts or removable dentures. Also self-assessed chewing did not show any differences. Conclusion: Inadequate dietary habits were independent of teeth and denture status. Some correlations to social network conditions could be identified. Overweight, obesity, low physical activity and high alcohol intake were more common among those with inadequate nutritional intake.

  • 19. Liedberg, Birgitta
    et al.
    Stoltze, Kaj
    Öwall, Bengt
    The Masticatory Handicap of Wearing Removable Dentures in Elderly Men2005In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 10-16Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aimed at describing the masticatory handicap of wearing removable dentures measured by some masticatory tests and the intake of hard and soft foods. Materials and methods: The subjects were participants in a comprehensive health examination of 67- 68-year-old men living in Malmö, Sweden. Four hundred eighty-three men took part in a clinical oral examination which recorded the number of teeth and removable dentures. One hundred and one had complete dentures in both jaws and 131 had removable partial dentures in different combinations. Masticatory tests used almonds to record the number of strokes to the first swallow, and two-coloured chewing gums for recording bolus kneading and shaping. A nutritionist paid a home visit to assess dietary habits including the consumption of hard and soft foods. The data could be split into groups of different tooth and denture situations which were large enough to enable statistical analysis to be carried out. The results of a regression analysis of the group with different numbers of natural teeth (NT) and no removable dentures could be used as a reference for correlation with the masticatory capacity of removable denture wearers. Results: Number of strokes to the first swallow revealed no masticatory limitations of wearing removable dentures, while chewing gum colour-mixing and shaping revealed more differentiated impairments equivalent to the function of five to 16 teeth in a remaining natural dentition. Hard food intake for the removable denture groups was comparable to 17-19 NT. Soft food intake was not influenced by denture wearing. In a ranking of oral conditions, those with more than 24 NT had the highest test values for all tests, and those with complete sets of dentures the lowest except for the number of strokes to the first swallow of an almond. Conclusion: Removable denture wearing can be regarded as a handicap when measured with objective masticatory tests using chewing gum and the intake of hard foods. The number of chewing strokes to the first swallow of an almond and the intake of soft foods is not affected by the wearing of removable dentures.

  • 20.
    Morse, Douglas E.
    et al.
    New York University College of Dentistry, Department of Epidemiology & Health Promotion, New York, NY USA.
    Holm-Pedersen, Poul
    Copenhagen Gerontological Oral Health Research Center, University of Copenhagen School of Dentistry, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Holm-Pedersen, Jytte
    Formerly Division of Prosthodonties. School of Dentistry, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge.
    Katz, Ralph V.
    New York University College of Dentistry, Department of Epidemiology & Health Promotion, New York, NY USA.
    Viitanen, Matti
    Aging Research Center (ARC), Division of Geriatric Epidemiology & Medicine, NEUROTEC, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Stockholm.
    von Strauss, Eva
    Aging Research Center (ARC), Division of Geriatric Epidemiology & Medicine, NEUROTEC, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Stockholm.
    Winblad, Bengt
    Aging Research Center (ARC), Division of Geriatric Epidemiology & Medicine, NEUROTEC, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Stockholm.
    Prosthetic crowns and other clinical risk indicators of caries among old-old Swedish adults: Findings from the KEOHS Project. Kungsholmen Elders Oral Health Study2002In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 73-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The Kungsholmen Elders Oral Health Study (KEOHS) evaluated the oral health status of generally healthy, community-dwelling persons over the age of 80 living in Kungsholmen, Sweden. This paper explored possible clinical risk indicators of coronal and root caries among the KEOHS subjects.

    Design: In this cross-sectional study, dentate KEOHS subjects received a caries assessment using defined visual, tactile criteria.

    Setting: Examinations were carried out in two local clinics by standardized examiners.

    Subjects: One hundred twenty-nine dentate persons were examined.

    Main Outcome Measures: The examination identified decayed and filled surfaces, prosthetic crowns, and missing teeth.

    Results: More root than coronal surfaces had untreated decay, and secondary root caries contributed the greatest number of decayed surfaces. Ninety percent of the examined dentate subjects had at least one prosthetic crown. Root surfaces exposed to crown margins were more likely to have caries than root surfaces not so exposed, particularly among women. The presence of untreated coronal caries (yes/no) was positively associated with having untreated root caries and an intermediate number (14–20) of teeth, but inversely associated with having 4+ prosthetic crowns. Active root caries (yes/no) was positively associated with having untreated coronal caries, 14–20 teeth, and 4+ prosthetic crowns. Nearly 20% of ident2ified root lesions were present at or below the gingival margin, and most (88%) were secondary caries associated with crown margins (65%) or other restorations (23%).

    Conclusions: Our findings suggest that some dental characteristics, including the presence of prosthetic crowns, are risk indicators for the presence of untreated coronal and root caries.

  • 21.
    Norderyd, Ola
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Moesgaard Henriksen, Birgitte
    Jansson, Henrik
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Periodontal disease in Norwegian old-age pensioners2012In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 4-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:  To identify factors of importance for periodontal health and disease on an old-age Norwegian population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From a random sample of 1152 urban and rural elderly Norwegians, aged 67 years or older, 582 individuals were agreed to participate in the study. After exclusion of edentulous individuals, 394 individuals were remained. A standardised clinical examination was performed by the same examiner. In conjunction with the clinical examination, a questionnaire was filled out regarding demographic and social status, educational level, tobacco habits and general condition. RESULTS: In the examined population, 33% of the subjects had periodontal disease. Out of those, 12% had severe periodontitis, that is, ≥3 periodontal pockets ≥6 mm. All variables were tested separately in a logistic regression model with periodontal pockets 6 mm and above, as the outcome variable. After univariate testing the following variables were included in a multivariate logistic regression model: daily smoking, higher plaque score, rural living and lower education. Only daily smoking remained significantly correlated to periodontal disease in the multivariate model. CONCLUSIONS:  This study has shown a prevalence of periodontal disease in 33% of the study population. Out of those approximately 12% had more severe periodontitis. Daily tobacco use was the only factor significantly correlated to presence of periodontal disease.

  • 22. Paulsson, G
    et al.
    Söderfeldt, B
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Nederfors, T
    Recall of an oral health education programme by nursing personnel in special housing facilities for the elderly2001In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 7-14Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Paulsson, Gun
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Oral Health Centre, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Söderfeldt, Björn
    Department of Oral Public Health, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nederfors, Tommy
    Oral Health Centre, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Recall of an oral health education programme by nursing personnel in special housing facilities for the elderly2001In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 7-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate the recall of oral health knowledge and confidence by nursing personnel in special housing facilities for the elderly, three years after an education programme.

    Design: A cross sectional design using a questionnaire.

    Sample: All nursing personnel, a total of 2,901 subjects, in five municipalities in south-western Sweden; of whom 950 had attended the programme. The response rate was 67% (1930 subjects).

    Intervention: An oral health education programme consisting of four one-hour lessons.

    Results: The oral health education programme still had an effect on the participants' attitudes towards oral health three years later. When comparing the trained group (OHEP+) which attended the programme with those who did not have training (OHEP-), the perceived ability, opportunity and the knowledge of oral health were significantly better in the former group, p<0.01 Eurther, within the OHEP- group who did not attend the programme there was a significant difference in the perceived ability, opportunity and the knowledge of oral health between those with a higher level of health care education, p<0.01.

    Conclusions: The effect of an oral health education programme on the participants' attitudes towards oral health persists at least for three years. The data indicate that trainees with a low level of health care education benefit most.

  • 24.
    Persson, Anitha
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Dental Hygiene.
    Lingström, Peter
    Bergdahl, Maud
    Claesson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology.
    van Dijken, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Dental Hygiene.
    Buffering effect of a prophylactic gel on dental plaque in institutionalised elderly2007In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 98-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The effect of multiple daily applications of a prophylactic gel, with buffering substances, on plaque acidogenicity in elderly institutionalised individuals was evaluated. Background: Many elderly suffer from reduced salivary flow, poor oral hygiene and increased levels of cariogenic bacteria and are considered to be at an increased risk for coronal and root caries. Reinforcing the buffering capacity of dental plaque by the addition of substances such as bicarbonate and phosphates may decrease their caries activity. Materials and methods: Fourteen elderly, with subjective dry mouth, were treated for 16-day-periods at random with: (i) Profylin fluoride gel with buffering components; (ii) Profylin fluoride gel without buffering components and (iii) rinsing with water. Applications were made four times a day and each period was followed by a 2-week wash-out period. The plaque pH was registered after a carbohydrate challenge and the following were recorded before and after each test period: stimulated salivary secretion rate, buffer capacity, number Colony Farming Units (CFU) mutans streptococci, lactobacilli and a sample of Candida albicans on oral mucosa. Results: Eleven participants (mean age 76.6 years) fulfilled the study. Changes in plaque pH measurements, when calculated as area under the curve (AUC(6.2) and AUC(5.7)) values (pH x min), before and after each of the three treatments, showed no significant differences. A tendency to a higher plaque acidogenicity and amount of cariogenic microorganisms was found after the gel treatments. C. albicans was found in low levels. Conclusion: Frequent applications of the gel did not result in an improved neutralising effect in the elderly. This may be caused by a combination of several factors, such as the level of oral dryness of the individuals and low solubility, release and retention of the gel substances in plaque. Instead, an increased plaque acidogenicity was noted.

  • 25.
    Persson, Anitha
    et al.
    Department of Odontology, University of Umeå.
    Lingström, Peter
    Kristianstad University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Bergdahl, Maud
    Institute of Clinical Dentistry, University of Tromsö.
    Claesson, Rolf
    Department of Odontology, University of Umeå.
    van Dijken, Jan W. V.
    Department of Odontology, University of Umeå.
    Buffering effect of a prophylactic gel on dental plaque in institutionalised elderly2007In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 98-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The effect of multiple daily applications of a prophylactic gel, with buffering substances, on plaque acidogenicity in elderly institutionalised individuals was evaluated. BACKGROUND: Many elderly suffer from reduced salivary flow, poor oral hygiene and increased levels of cariogenic bacteria and are considered to be at an increased risk for coronal and root caries. Reinforcing the buffering capacity of dental plaque by the addition of substances such as bicarbonate and phosphates may decrease their caries activity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fourteen elderly, with subjective dry mouth, were treated for 16-day-periods at random with: (i) Profylin fluoride gel with buffering components; (ii) Profylin fluoride gel without buffering components and (iii) rinsing with water. Applications were made four times a day and each period was followed by a 2-week wash-out period. The plaque pH was registered after a carbohydrate challenge and the following were recorded before and after each test period: stimulated salivary secretion rate, buffer capacity, number Colony Farming Units (CFU) mutans streptococci, lactobacilli and a sample of Candida albicans on oral mucosa. RESULTS: Eleven participants (mean age 76.6 years) fulfilled the study. Changes in plaque pH measurements, when calculated as area under the curve (AUC(6.2) and AUC(5.7)) values (pH x min), before and after each of the three treatments, showed no significant differences. A tendency to a higher plaque acidogenicity and amount of cariogenic microorganisms was found after the gel treatments. C. albicans was found in low levels. CONCLUSION: Frequent applications of the gel did not result in an improved neutralising effect in the elderly. This may be caused by a combination of several factors, such as the level of oral dryness of the individuals and low solubility, release and retention of the gel substances in plaque. Instead, an increased plaque acidogenicity was noted.

  • 26.
    Persson, G.Rutger
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    The significance of periodontal inflammation on systemic health in old age2012In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 169-170Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Thorstensson, Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Johansson, Boo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Why do some people lose teeth across their lifespan whereas others retain a functional dentition into very old age?2010In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 19-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To analyse the importance of caries, periodontitis, and medical and psychosocial factors for risk of becoming edentulous across their lifespan and to examine factors critical for retaining functional dentition into very old age.

    METHODS: From the longitudinal population-based Octogenarian Twin study which analysed psychosocial and health variables, 357 individuals aged 82 + in 1995-1998 were collected. Information about number of teeth, decayed and filled surfaces percentage and periodontal disease experience were drawn from dental records. Reasons for and time of edentulousness were recorded.

    RESULTS: Outcome varied - depending on perspective and factors for losing or retaining teeth. Significant factors for losing teeth varied over the lifespan. Losing teeth early in life was related to lower social class; in middle age, to lower education; and in old age, to poor lifestyle factors and low social class. Caries constituted the main reason for tooth loss (about 55%). This increased substantially in the >80 year age-group (75%). Maintaining a functional dentition into old age was significantly associated with non-smoking, more education, being married and good periodontal health.

    CONCLUSION: It is important to apply life-span and cohort perspectives to oral health and disease. In our sample of persons born before World War I, caries was the main reason for losing all teeth, with substantially increased prevalence by age. Lifestyle factors were significant for losing and for retaining teeth. Periodontal condition had a significant influence on the likelihood of retaining functional dentition, and also when taking psychosocial variables into account.

  • 28. Unell, Lennart
    et al.
    Johansson, Anders Arne
    Ekbäck, Gunnar
    Ordell, Sven
    Carlsson, Gunnar E
    Prevalence of troublesome symptoms related to temporomandibular disorders and awareness of bruxism in 65- and 75-year-old subjects2012In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 29, no 2, p. e772-e779Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess the prevalence of 3 troublesome temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms and awareness of bruxism in 2 cohorts of subjects aged 65 and 75 years. Background: Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a high, though varying, prevalence of TMD symptoms. The results concerning elderly people are inconclusive. Material and methods: Identical questionnaires were in 2007 sent to all subjects born in 1942 and 1932 living in two Swedish counties. The response rate was 73.1% for the 65- and 71.9 % for the 75-year-old subjects, totally 9093 subjects. This study focused on 3 questions on the severity of TMD symptoms and 1 question on awareness of bruxism. Results: The great majority reported no or only few TMD problems. Less than 3 % (måste kontrolleras!) considered their TMD symptoms to be rather great or severe. The mean prevalence of TMD-related symptoms and bruxism was greater in women than in men in both age groups. The 75-year-old women reported a marked lower prevalence of TMD symptoms and bruxism than the 65-year-old women, whereas the age differences were small among the men. Self-reported bruxism was associated with higher prevalence of TMD symptoms. Conclusions: The great majority of the 65- and 75 year-old subjects did not report any troublesome TMD related symptoms.

  • 29.
    Unell, Lennart
    et al.
    Department of Oral Public Health, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden; Post Graduate Dental Education Centre, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden .
    Johansson, Anders
    Department of Clinical Dentistry - Prosthodontics, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Ekbäck, Gunnar
    Department of Dentistry, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ordell, Sven
    Department of Oral Public Health, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden; Dental Commissioning Unit, Östergötland County Council, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Gunnar E
    Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Prevalence of troublesome symptoms related to temporomandibular disorders and awareness of bruxism in 65- and 75-year-old subjects2012In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 29, no 2, p. e772-e779Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of three troublesome temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms and awareness of bruxism in two cohorts of subjects aged 65 and 75 years.

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have demonstrated varying prevalence of TMD symptoms. The results concerning elderly people are inconclusive.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 2007 identical questionnaires were sent to all subjects born in 1942 and 1932 living in two Swedish counties. The response rate was 73.1% for the 65- and 71.9% for the 75-year-old subjects, totally 9093 subjects.

    RESULTS: The great majority reported no or only a few TMD problems. Less than 4% considered their TMD symptoms to be rather great or severe. The mean prevalence of TMD-related symptoms and bruxism was greater in women than in men in both age groups. The 75-year-old women reported a marked lower prevalence of TMD symptoms and bruxism than the 65-year-old women, whereas the age differences were small among the men. Self-reported bruxism was associated with a higher prevalence of TMD symptoms.

    CONCLUSIONS: The great majority of the subjects did not report any troublesome TMD related symptoms. However, 5.4% of the 65-year-old women and 3.8% of the 75-year-old women considered their symptoms severe or rather severe.

  • 30.
    Ástvaldsdóttir, Álfheidur
    et al.
    Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Boström, Anne-Marie
    Division of nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Theme Aging, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of nursing, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Haugesund, Norway.
    Davidson, Thomas
    Division of health Care Analysis, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Health Technology Assessment-Odontology (HTA-O), Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Gabre, Pia
    Department of Preventive Dentistry, Public Dental Health, Uppsala County Council, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Cariology, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gahnberg, Lars
    Department of Preventive Dentistry, Public Dental Service, Region Västra Götaland, Sweden; Department of Behavioral and Community Dentistry, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Englund, Gunilla Sandborgh
    Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Academic Center of Geriatric Dentistry, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Skott, Pia
    Academic Center of Geriatric Dentistry, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ståhlnacke, Katri
    Örebro University Hospital. Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Tranaeus, Sofia
    Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Health Technology Assessment-Odontology (HTA-O), Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Wilhelmsson, Hanna
    University Library, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Wårdh, Inger
    Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Academic Center of Geriatric Dentistry, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Östlund, Pernilla
    Health Technology Assessment-Odontology (HTA-O), Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    Health Technology Assessment-Odontology (HTA-O), Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Oral health and dental care of older persons: A systematic map of systematic reviews2018In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 290-304Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To examine the current knowledge on oral health status and dental care of older persons through a systematic mapping of systematic reviews of low or moderate risk of bias.

    Background: Geriatric dentistry covers all aspects of oral health and oral care of older persons. Oral health is part of general health and contributes to a person's physical, psychological and social wellbeing.

    Methods: A literature search was performed in three different databases (PubMed, The Cochrane Library and Cinahl) within 12 domains: Dental caries, periodontitis, Orofacial pain and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain, mucosal lesions, oral motor function, dry mouth, halitosis, interaction between oral status and other medical conditions, ability to interrelate and communicate, quality of life, ethics and organisation of dental care for older persons. Systematic reviews were identified and scrutinised, highlighting scientific knowledge and knowledge gaps.

    Results: We included 32 systematic reviews of which 14 were judged to be of low/moderate risk of bias. Most of the domains lack systematic reviews with low or moderate risk of bias. In two of the domains evidence was identified; in institutionalised people aged 65 or older, effective oral hygiene can prevent pneumonia. Furthermore, there is an evidence of a relationship between malnutrition (protein energy-related malnutrition, PEM) and poor appetite and edentulousness.

    Conclusions: There is an urgent need for further research and evidence-based knowledge within most domains in geriatric dentistry and in other fields related to oral health and dental care for older persons striving for multi-disciplinary research programmes.

  • 31. Ástvaldsdóttir, Álfheiður
    et al.
    Boström, Anne-Marie
    Davidson, Thomas
    Gabre, Pia
    Gahnberg, Lars
    Sandborgh Englund, Gunilla
    Skott, Pia
    Tranaeus, Sofia
    Wilhelmsson, Hanna
    Wårdh, Inger
    Östlund, Pernilla
    Ástvaldsdóttir, Álfheiður
    Boström, Anne-Marie
    Davidson, Thomas
    Gabre, Pia
    Gahnberg, Lars
    Sandborgh Englund, Gunilla
    Skott, Pia
    Ståhlnacke, Katri
    Tranaeus, Sofia
    Wilhelmsson, Hanna
    Wårdh, Inger
    Östlund, Pernilla
    Nilsson, Mikael
    Oral health and dental care of older persons: A systematic map of systematic reviews2018In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, no 4, p. 290-304Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the current knowledge on oral health status and dental care of older persons through a systematic mapping of systematic reviews of low or moderate risk of bias. BACKGROUND: Geriatric dentistry covers all aspects of oral health and oral care of older persons. Oral health is part of general health and contributes to a person's physical, psychological and social wellbeing. METHODS: A literature search was performed in three different databases (PubMed, The Cochrane Library and Cinahl) within 12 domains: Dental caries, periodontitis, Orofacial pain and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain, mucosal lesions, oral motor function, dry mouth, halitosis, interaction between oral status and other medical conditions, ability to interrelate and communicate, quality of life, ethics and organisation of dental care for older persons. Systematic reviews were identified and scrutinised, highlighting scientific knowledge and knowledge gaps. RESULTS: We included 32 systematic reviews of which 14 were judged to be of low/moderate risk of bias. Most of the domains lack systematic reviews with low or moderate risk of bias. In two of the domains evidence was identified; in institutionalised people aged 65 or older, effective oral hygiene can prevent pneumonia. Furthermore, there is an evidence of a relationship between malnutrition (protein energy-related malnutrition, PEM) and poor appetite and edentulousness. CONCLUSIONS: There is an urgent need for further research and evidence-based knowledge within most domains in geriatric dentistry and in other fields related to oral health and dental care for older persons striving for multi-disciplinary research programmes.

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