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  • 1.
    Algilani, Samal
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Östlund-Lagerström, Lina
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Schoultz, Ida
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Brummer, Robert J.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Increasing the qualitative understanding of optimal functionality in older adults: a focus group based study2016In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Decreased independence and loss of functional ability are issues regarded as inevitably connected to old age. This ageism may have negative influences on older adults' beliefs about aging, making it difficult for them to focus on their current ability to maintain a good health. It is therefore important to change focus towards promoting Optimal Functionality (OF). OF is a concept putting the older adult's perspective on health and function in focus, however, the concept is still under development. Hence, the aim was to extend the concept of optimal functionality in various groups of older adults.

    Methods: A qualitative study was conducted based on focus group discussions (FGD). In total 6 FGDs were performed, including 37 older adults from three different groups: group 1) senior athletes, group 2) free living older adults, group 3) older adults living in senior living homes. All data was transcribed verbatim and analyzed following the process of deductive content analysis.

    Results: The principal outcome of the analysis was "to function as optimally as you possibly can", which was perceived as the core of the concept. Further, the concept of OF was described as multifactorial and several new factors could be added to the original model of OF. Additionally the findings of the study support that all three cornerstones comprising OF have to occur simultaneously in order for the older adult to function as optimal as possible.

    Conclusions: OF is a multifaceted and subjective concept, which should be individually defined by the older adult. This study further makes evident that older adults as a group are heterogeneous in terms of their preferences and views on health and should thus be approached as such in the health care setting. Therefore it is important to promote an individualized approach as a base when caring for older adults.

  • 2. Baric, Vedrana
    et al.
    Andreassen, Maria
    Öhman, Annika
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Using an interactive digital calendar with mobile phone reminders by senior people - a focus group study2019In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 19, article id 116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    New technologies such as mobile/smartphones have the potential to help senior people perform everyday activities. However, senior people may find it difficult using mobile/smartphones, especially the digital calendar and short text message features. Therefore, senior people might need user-friendly, flexible, and interactive digital calendars that provide them with active reminders about their everyday activities. This study focuses on community dwelling seniors’ experiences learning and using RemindMe, an interactive digital calendar with active reminders, as part of customizing an intervention appropriate for senior people with cognitive impairments.

    Methods

    Four focus groups were conducted with 20 community dwelling seniors (11 men and 9 women) who all had used RemindMe for six weeks. The focus groups were tape recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed using content analysis.

    Results

    For participants in this study, using a calendar was an essential part of their everyday lives, but only a few had experiences using a digital calendar. Although the participants described RemindMe as easy to use, they had a difficult time incorporating RemindMe into their daily routines. In part, these difficulties were the result of the participants needing to change their mobile/smartphone routines. Some participants felt that using an interactive digital calendar was a sign of modernity allowing them to take part in the society at large, but others felt that their inability to use the technology was due to their age, dependence, and loss of function. Participants found that receiving active reminders through short text messages followed by actively acknowledging the reminder helped them perform more everyday life activities. This feature gave them a higher sense of independence and control.

    Conclusions

    Community dwelling seniors found that RemindMe was easy to learn and to use, although they also found it challenging to integrate into their everyday lives. For senior people to make the effort to develop new routines for mobile/smartphone use, a prerequisite for using a digital calendar, they need to be motivated and believe that the technology will make their lives better.

  • 3.
    Berggren, Monica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Stenvall, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Englund, Undis
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Co-morbidities, complications and causes of death among people with femoral neck fracture: a three-year follow-up study2016In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 16, article id 120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The poor outcome after a hip fracture is not fully understood. The aim of the study was to describe the prevalence of co-morbidities, complications and causes of death and to investigate factors that are able to predict mortality in old people with femoral neck fracture. Methods: Data was obtained from a randomized, controlled trial with a 3-year follow-up at Umea University Hospital, Sweden, which included 199 consecutive patients with femoral neck fracture, aged >= 70 years. The participants were assessed during hospitalization and in their homes 4, 12 and 36 months after surgery. Medical records and death certificates were analysed. Results: Multivariate analysis revealed that cancer, dependence in P-ADL (Personal Activities of Daily Living), cardiovascular disease, dementia at baseline or pulmonary emboli or cardiac failure during hospitalization were all independent predictors of 3-year mortality. Seventy-nine out of 199 participants (40 %) died within 3 years. Cardiovascular events (24 %), dementia (23 %), hip-fracture (19 %) and cancer (13 %) were the most common primary causes of death. In total, 136 participants suffered at least one urinary tract infection; 114 suffered 542 falls and 37 sustained 56 new fractures, including 13 hip fractures, during follow-up. Conclusion: Old people with femoral neck fracture have multiple co-morbidities and suffer numerous complications. Thus randomized intervention studies should focus on prevention of complications that might be avoidable such as infections, heart diseases, falls and fractures.

  • 4.
    Berglund, Mia
    et al.
    School of Health and Education, Health and Learning Research Centre: Aging and Long-Term Health Problems, University of Skövde.
    Nässén, Kristina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Gillsjö, Catharina
    School of Health and Education, Health and Learning Research Centre: Aging and Long-Term Health Problems, University of Skövde.
    Fluctuation between Powerlessness and Sense of Meaning - A Qualitative Study of Health Care Professionals' Experiences of Providing Health Care to Older Adults with Long-Term Musculoskeletal Pain.2015In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 15, article id 96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There is an increasing number of older adults living with long-term musculoskeletal pain and related disabilities. These problems are frequently unrecognized, underreported, and inadequately treated. Since many older adults desire to remain at home for as long as possible, it is important that individualized and holistically tailored care is provided in these settings. However, there is a complexity in providing care in this context. The aim of this study was to describe health care professionals' experiences of providing health care to older adults living with long-term musculoskeletal pain at home.

    METHODS: The phenomenon, "To provide health care to older adults living with long-term musculoskeletal pain at home", was studied using reflective lifeworld research (RLR) which is based on phenomenological epistemology. Ten health care providers (nurse, physiotherapists, and occupational therapists) were interviewed and data was analysed.

    RESULTS: The health care professional's emotions fluctuated between powerlessness and meaningfulness. Needs, opportunities, understanding and respect had to be balanced in the striving to do good in the provision of health care in differing situations. Caring for older adults with long-term pain required courage to remain in the encounter despite feelings of insecurity and uncertainty about the direction of the dialogue. The essence of caring for older adults with long-term pain consisted of the following constituents: Sense of powerlessness; striving to provide good health care; and understanding and respect.

    CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicated that the health care professionals strived to do good and to provide health care that was holistic and sensitive to the older adults' needs. A significant sense of powerlessness in the situation was experienced by the health care professionals. These findings address and support the need to develop methods that can be used to guide health care providers who support older adults in the context of their homes.

  • 5.
    Berglund, Mia
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Nässén, Kristina
    Academy of Care, Working Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Gillsjö, Catharina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. College of Nursing, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, USA.
    Fluctuation between Powerlessness and Sense of Meaning: A Qualitative Study of Health Care Professionals’ Experiences of Providing Health Care to Older Adults with Long-Term Musculoskeletal Pain2015In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 15, article id 96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is an increasing number of older adults living with long-term musculoskeletal pain and related disabilities. These problems are frequently unrecognized, underreported, and inadequately treated. Since many older adults desire to remain at home for as long as possible, it is important that individualized and holistically tailored care is provided in these settings. However, there is a complexity in providing care in this context.

    The aim of this study was to describe health care professionals’ experiences of providing health care to older adults living with long-term musculoskeletal pain at home.

    Methods: The phenomenon, “To provide health care to older adults living with long-term musculoskeletal pain at home”, was studied using reflective lifeworld research (RLR) which is based on phenomenological epistemology. Ten health care providers (nurse, physiotherapists, and occupational therapists) were interviewed and data was analysed.

    Results: The health care professional’s emotions fluctuated between powerlessness and meaningfulness. Needs, opportunities, understanding and respect had to be balanced in the striving to do good in the provision of health care in differing situations. Caring for older adults with long-term pain required courage to remain in the encounter despite feelings of insecurity and uncertainty about the direction of the dialogue. The essence of caring for older adults with long-term pain consisted of the following constituents: Sense of powerlessness; striving to provide good health care; and understanding and respect.

    Conclusions: The findings indicated that the health care professionals strived to do good and to provide health care that was holistic and sensitive to the older adults’ needs. A significant sense of powerlessness in the situation was experienced by the health care professionals. These findings address and support the need to develop methods that can be used to guide health care providers who support older adults in the context of their homes.

  • 6.
    Björk, Sabine
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Juthberg, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Wimo, Anders
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet; Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology.
    Winblad, Bengt
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University.
    Exploring the prevalence and variance of cognitive impairment, pain, neuropsychiatric symptoms and ADL dependency among persons living in nursing homes: a cross-sectional study2016In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 16, article id 154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Earlier studies in nursing homes show a high prevalence of cognitive impairment, dependency in activities of daily living (ADL), pain, and neuropsychiatric symptoms among residents. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of the above among residents in a nationally representative sample of Swedish nursing homes, and to investigate whether pain and neuropsychiatric symptoms differ in relation to gender, cognitive function, ADL-capacity, type of nursing-home unit and length of stay. Methods: Cross-sectional data from 188 randomly selected nursing homes were collected. A total of 4831 residents were assessed for cognitive and ADL function, pain and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and the chi-square test. Results: The results show the following: the prevalence of cognitive impairment was 67 %, 56 % of residents were ADL-dependent, 48 % exhibited pain and 92 % exhibited neuropsychiatric symptoms. The prevalence of pain did not differ significantly between male and female residents, but pain was more prevalent among cognitively impaired and ADL-dependent residents. Pain prevalence was not significantly different between residents in special care units for people with dementia (SCU) and general units, or between shorter-and longer-stay residents. Furthermore, the prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms did not differ significantly between male and female residents, between ADL capacities or in relation to length of stay. However, residents with cognitive impairment and residents in SCUs had a significantly higher prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms than residents without cognitive impairment and residents in general units. Conclusions: The prevalence rates ascertained in this study could contribute to a greater understanding of the needs of nursing-home residents, and may provide nursing home staff and managers with trustworthy assessment scales and benchmark values for further quality assessment purposes, clinical development work and initiating future nursing assessments.

  • 7.
    Björk, Sabine
    et al.
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing.
    Juthberg, Christina
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå universitet, Department of Statistics, Umeå School of Business and Economics, Umeå University.
    Wimo, Anders
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Winblad, Bengt
    Karolinska institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Family Medicine, Karolinska institute, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Umeå University, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Clinical Physiology, Umeå university, Department of Neurology, Umeå university.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing, Umeå university, School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Dundee.
    Exploring the prevalence and variance of cognitive impairment, pain, neuropsychiatric symptoms and ADL dependency among persons living in nursing homes: a cross-sectional study2016In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundEarlier studies in nursing homes show a high prevalence of cognitive impairment, dependency in activities of daily living (ADL), pain, and neuropsychiatric symptoms among residents. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of the above among residents in a nationally representative sample of Swedish nursing homes, and to investigate whether pain and neuropsychiatric symptoms differ in relation to gender, cognitive function, ADL-capacity, type of nursing-home unit and length of stay.MethodsCross-sectional data from 188 randomly selected nursing homes were collected. A total of 4831 residents were assessed for cognitive and ADL function, pain and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and the chi-square test.ResultsThe results show the following: the prevalence of cognitive impairment was 67 %, 56 % of residents were ADL-dependent, 48 % exhibited pain and 92 % exhibited neuropsychiatric symptoms. The prevalence of pain did not differ significantly between male and female residents, but pain was more prevalent among cognitively impaired and ADL-dependent residents. Pain prevalence was not significantly different between residents in special care units for people with dementia (SCU) and general units, or between shorter-and longer-stay residents. Furthermore, the prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms did not differ significantly between male and female residents, between ADL capacities or in relation to length of stay. However, residents with cognitive impairment and residents in SCUs had a significantly higher prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms than residents without cognitive impairment and residents in general units.ConclusionsThe prevalence rates ascertained in this study could contribute to a greater understanding of the needs of nursing-home residents, and may provide nursing home staff and managers with trustworthy assessment scales and benchmark values for further quality assessment purposes, clinical development work and initiating future nursing assessments.

  • 8.
    Bolic Baric, Vedrana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Andreassen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öhman, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Using an interactive digital calendar with mobile phone reminders by senior people - a focus group study2019In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 19, article id 116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundNew technologies such as mobile/smartphones have the potential to help senior people perform everyday activities. However, senior people may find it difficult using mobile/smartphones, especially the digital calendar and short text message features. Therefore, senior people might need user-friendly, flexible, and interactive digital calendars that provide them with active reminders about their everyday activities. This study focuses on community dwelling seniors experiences learning and using RemindMe, an interactive digital calendar with active reminders, as part of customizing an intervention appropriate for senior people with cognitive impairments.MethodsFour focus groups were conducted with 20 community dwelling seniors (11 men and 9 women) who all had used RemindMe for six weeks. The focus groups were tape recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed using content analysis.ResultsFor participants in this study, using a calendar was an essential part of their everyday lives, but only a few had experiences using a digital calendar. Although the participants described RemindMe as easy to use, they had a difficult time incorporating RemindMe into their daily routines. In part, these difficulties were the result of the participants needing to change their mobile/smartphone routines. Some participants felt that using an interactive digital calendar was a sign of modernity allowing them to take part in the society at large, but others felt that their inability to use the technology was due to their age, dependence, and loss of function. Participants found that receiving active reminders through short text messages followed by actively acknowledging the reminder helped them perform more everyday life activities. This feature gave them a higher sense of independence and control.ConclusionsCommunity dwelling seniors found that RemindMe was easy to learn and to use, although they also found it challenging to integrate into their everyday lives. For senior people to make the effort to develop new routines for mobile/smartphone use, a prerequisite for using a digital calendar, they need to be motivated and believe that the technology will make their lives better.

  • 9. Boman, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Lundberg, Stefan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Starkhammar, Sofia
    Nygard, Louise
    Exploring the usability of a videophone mock-up for persons with dementia and their significant others2014In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 14, p. 49-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Persons with dementia might have considerable difficulties in using an ordinary telephone. Being able to use the telephone can be very important in order to maintain their social network, getting stimulation and for reaching help when needed. Therefore, persons with dementia might need an easy-to-use videophone to prevent social isolation and to feel safe and independent. This study reports the evaluation of the usability of a touch-screen videophone mock-up for persons with dementia and their significant others. Methods: Four persons with dementia and their significant others tested the videophone mock-up at a living laboratory. In order to gain knowledge of the participants' with dementia ability to use their own computers and telephones, interviews and observations were conducted. Results: Overall, the participants had a very positive attitude towards the videophone. The participants with dementia perceived that it was useful, enjoyable and easy to use, although they initially had difficulties in understanding how to handle some functions, thus indicating that the design needs to be further developed to be more intuitive. Conclusions: The findings suggest that the videophone has the potential to enable telephone calls without assistance and add quality in communication.

  • 10.
    Borgstrom Bolmsjo, Beata
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Molstad, Sigvard
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Midlov, Patrik
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Prevalence and treatment of heart failure in Swedish nursing homes2013In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 13, no 118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Since the burden of care for elderly patients with heart failure (HF) can be decreased by therapeutic measures, it is important that such patients are identified correctly. This study explores the prevalence of HF in nursing homes in Sweden, with special consideration of the risk of failure to diagnose HF in the study population. A second aim is to explore medication and the adherence to guidelines for the treatment of HF. Methods: 429 patients from 11 nursing homes were included during 2008-2011. Information about diagnoses and medications from patient records, blood samples, questionnaire responses and blood pressure measurements were collected. The baseline characteristics of the patients, their medications and one-year mortality were identified and then compared regarding HF diagnosis and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels. A BNP level of greater than 100 ng/L was used to identify potential cases of HF. Results: The point prevalence of HF diagnosis in the medical records in the study population was 15.4%. With the recommended cut-off value for BNP, up to 196 subjects in the study population (45.7%) qualified for further screening of potential HF. The subjects in the HF and non-HF groups were similar with the exception of mean age, BNP levels and Mini Mental State Examination results which were higher in the HF group, and the eGFR and blood pressure, which were lower when HF. The subjects with higher BNP values were older and had lower eGFR, Hb, diastolic blood pressure and BMI. The subjects with HF diagnoses were in many cases not treated according to the guidelines. Loop diuretics were often used without concomitant ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. The subjects without HF diagnoses in the medical records at inclusion but with BNP values greater than 100 ng/L had less appropriate HF medication. The one-year mortality was 52.9% in the population with HF. Conclusions: Our study suggests that the estimated prevalence of HF in nursing homes in Sweden would increase if BNP measurements were used to select patients for further examinations. The pharmacological treatment of HF varied substantially, as did adherence to guidelines.

  • 11.
    Bouillon, Kim
    et al.
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Hamer, Mark
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Sabia, Severine
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Gale, Catharine R.
    MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
    Batty, G. David
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Measures of frailty in population-based studies: An overview2013In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 13, no 64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although research productivity in the field of frailty has risen exponentially in recent years, there remains a lack of consensus regarding the measurement of this syndrome. This overview offers three services: first, we provide a comprehensive catalogue of current frailty measures; second, we evaluate their reliability and validity; third, we report on their popularity of use.

    Methods: In order to identify relevant publications, we searched MEDLINE (from its inception in 1948 to May 2011); scrutinized the reference sections of the retrieved articles; and consulted our own files. An indicator of the frequency of use of each frailty instrument was based on the number of times it had been utilized by investigators other than the originators.

    Results: Of the initially retrieved 2,166 papers, 27 original articles described separate frailty scales. The number (range: 1 to 38) and type of items (range of domains: physical functioning, disability, disease, sensory impairment, cognition, nutrition, mood, and social support) included in the frailty instruments varied widely. Reliability and validity had been examined in only 26% (7/27) of the instruments. The predictive validity of these scales for mortality varied: for instance, hazard ratios/odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for mortality risk for frail relative to non-frail people ranged from 1.21 (0.78; 1.87) to 6.03 (3.00; 12.08) for the Phenotype of Frailty and 1.57 (1.41; 1.74) to 10.53 (7.06; 15.70) for the Frailty Index. Among the 150 papers which we found to have used at least one of the 27 frailty instruments, 69% (n = 104) reported on the Phenotype of Frailty, 12% (n = 18) on the Frailty Index, and 19% (n = 28) on one of the remaining 25 instruments.

    Conclusions: Although there are numerous frailty scales currently in use, reliability and validity have rarely been examined. The most evaluated and frequently used measure is the Phenotype of Frailty.

  • 12.
    Bölenius, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lämås, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Division of Caring Sciences, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University.
    Effects and meanings of a person-centred and health-promoting intervention in homecare services: a study protocol of a non-randomised controlled trial2017In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 17, article id 57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The literature indicates that current home care service are largely task oriented with limited focus on the involvement of the older people themselves, and studies show that lack of involvement might reduce older people's quality of life. Person-centred care has been shown to improve the satisfaction with care and quality of life in older people cared for in hospitals and nursing homes, with limited published evidence about the effects and meanings of person-centred interventions in home care services for older people. This study protocol outlines a study aiming to evaluate such effects and meanings of a person-centred and health-promoting intervention in home aged care services. Methods/design: The study will take the form of a non-randomised controlled trial with a before/after approach. It will include 270 older people >65 years receiving home care services, 270 relatives and 65 staff, as well as a matched control group of equal size. All participants will be recruited from a municipality in northern Sweden. The intervention is based on the theoretical concepts of person-centredness and health-promotion, and builds on the four pedagogical phases of: theory apprehension, experimental learning, operationalization, and clinical supervision. Outcome assessments will focus on: a) health and quality of life (primary outcomes), thriving and satisfaction with care for older people; b) caregiver strain, informal caregiving engagement and relatives' satisfaction with care: c) job satisfaction and stress of conscience among care staff (secondary outcomes). Evaluation will be conducted by means of self-reported questionnaires and qualitative research interviews. Discussion: Person-centred home care services have the potential to improve the recurrently reported sub-standard experiences of home care services, and the results can point the way to establishing a more person-centred and health-promoting model for home care services for older people.

  • 13.
    Bölenius, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lämås, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Division of Caring Sciences, Depart Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia..
    Perceptions of self-determination and quality of life among Swedish home care recipients - across-sectional study2019In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 19, article id 142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It is acknowledged that preservation of self-determination is very important in order for older adults to experience good quality of life, but to what degree and in what areas people receiving help from home care service experience self-determination is unknown. Few studies have examined the perception of self-determination in relation to quality of life among older adults living at home with help from home care services. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore perceptions of self-determination among older adults living at home with the support of home care services, and to test whether older adults who perceive a higher degree of self-determination also feel they have a better quality of life.

    Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in one municipality in northern Sweden. A total of 134 older adults (≥ 65 years) were included. Data were collected by means of a survey including questionnaires about background characteristics, self-determination, and health-related quality of life. Descriptive statistics regarding background characteristics for groups with high and low self-determination respectively were presented and the differences between the groups were analyzed using the Chi-square test and the Mann-Whitney U test.

    Results: Our main finding shows that the majority of older adults with support from home care services experience self-determination in the dimensions use of time, and self-care. However, a wide variation was found in self-reported self-determination in all dimensions. Results also show that the group with higher self-reported self-determination also reported a greater degree of experienced quality of life in comparison with the group with lower self-reported self-determination.

    Conclusions: In line with earlier research, our results found a positive relation between self-determination and quality of life. The results are relevant for the care of older adults and indicate a need of further research. The results presented in this paper could serve as a guide when planning for improved self-determination among older adults in home care service.

  • 14. Chen, Lynna
    et al.
    Bell, J. Simon
    Visvanathan, Renuka
    Hilmer, Sarah N.
    Emery, Tina
    Robson, Leonie
    Hughes, Jessica M.
    Tan, Edwin C. K.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Monash University, Australia.
    The association between benzodiazepine use and sleep quality in residential aged care facilities: a cross-sectional study2016In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 16, article id 196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Benzodiazepines are commonly prescribed in residential aged care facilities (RACFs) for their sedative and anxiolytic effects. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between benzodiazepine use and sleep quality in residents of RACFs. Methods: A cross-sectional study involving 383 participants was conducted in six Australian RACFs. Night-time sleep quality, day-time drowsiness and day-time napping behavior were assessed using a validated questionnaire. Logistic regression was used to compute adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between benzodiazepine use and sleep quality. Covariates included pain, dementia severity, depression, insomnia and other sedative use. Results: Of the 383 residents (mean age 87.5 years, 77.5% female), 96(25.1%) used a benzodiazepine on a regular basis. Residents who used long-acting benzodiazepines on a regular basis had higher night-time sleep quality than non-users (AOR = 4.00, 95%CI 1.06 - 15.15). Residents who used short-acting benzodiazepines on a PRN only basis had longer daytime napping times than non-users (AOR = 1.77, 95% CI 1.01 - 3.08). No benzodiazepine category was associated with day-time drowsiness. Conclusions: The association between benzodiazepine use and sleep quality is dependent on the half-life and prescribing pattern of the benzodiazepine. Short-acting PRN benzodiazepines were associated with lower night time sleep quality and longer day-time napping compared to long-acting regular benzodiazepines. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether these findings reflect channeling of short-acting agents to residents at higher risk of sleep disorders.

  • 15. Christensen, Ib Thrane
    et al.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Holm, Ida E
    Nielsen, Ole B F
    Andersen, Stig
    Olfactory testing in consecutive patients referred with suspected dementia.2017In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia and early and accurate diagnosis is important. Olfactory dysfunction is an early sign of AD. The contribution by test of olfactory function has been surveyed in AD vs a line of conditions but remains to be settled in the workup of unselected patients referred with suspected dementia.

    METHODS: We performed a two-step investigation: first, a comparative study of healthy controls and probable AD patients to test the applicability of the chosen scents (cuisine study); second, a study of consecutive patients referred to our geriatric outpatient clinic for suspected dementia with the investigating personnel blinded to the results of the Olfactory Test (blinded study).

    RESULTS: The sum of scents detected discriminated patients with probable AD from controls in the cuisine study (n = 40; p < 0.001; area under ROC curve 0.94). In the blinded study (n = 50) the diagnosis was probable AD in 48%, minimal cognitive impairment in 24%, vascular dementia in 8%, alcohol induced impairment in 12%, depression in 4%, and Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia in 2%. Area under the ROC-curve was 0.67. The odds ratio for probable AD with 2+ smell errors was 12 (95%-CI: 1.3-101; p = 0.026 (reference 0-1 smell errors)) age adjusted. None in the AD group had zero smell errors (Negative Predictive Value 100%).

    CONCLUSION: Olfactory testing may support to dismiss the diagnosis of probable AD in the workup of a mixed group of patients referred with cognitive impairment. Still, it had a low sensitivity for probable AD.

  • 16.
    Condelius, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Andersson, Magdalena
    City Office, Unit of Research and Development and Social Sustainability Development, Malmö, Sweden.
    Exploring access to care among older people in the last phase of life using the behavioural model of health services use: a qualitative study from the perspective of the next of kin of older persons who had died in a nursing home2015In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 15, article id 138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is little investigation into what care older people access during the last phase of their life and what factors enable access to care in this group. Illuminating this from the perspective of the next of kin may provide valuable insights into how the health and social care system operates with reference to providing care for this vulnerable group. The behavioural model of health services use has a wide field of application but has not been tested conceptually regarding access to care from the perspective of the next of kin. The aim of this study was to explore the care accessed by older people during the last phase of their life from the perspective of the next of kin and to conceptually test the behavioural model of health services use.

    Methods: The data collection took place in 2011 by means of qualitative interviews with 14 next of kin of older people who had died in a nursing home. The interviews were analysed using directed content analysis. The behavioural model of health services use was used in deriving the initial coding scheme, including the categories: utilization of health services, consumer satisfaction and characteristics of the population at risk.

    Results: Utilization of health services in the last phase of life was described in five subcategories named after the type of care accessed i.e. admission to a nursing home, primary healthcare, hospital care, dental care and informal care. The needs were illuminated in the subcategories: general deterioration, medical conditions and acute illness and deterioration when death approaches. Factors that enabled access to care were described in three subcategories: the organisation of care, next of kin and the older person. These factors could also constitute barriers to accessing care. Next of kin's satisfaction with care was illuminated in the subcategories: satisfaction, dissatisfaction and factors influencing satisfaction. One new category was constructed inductively: the situation of the next of kin.

    Conclusions: A bed in a nursing home was often accessed during what the next of kin regarded as the last phase of life. The needs among older people in the last phase of life can be regarded as complex and worsening over time. Most enabling factors lied within the organisation of care but the next of kin enabled access to care and contributed significantly to care quality. More research is needed regarding ageism and stigmatic attitudes among professionals and informal caregivers acting as a barrier to accessing care for older people in the last phase of their life. The behavioural model of health services use was extended with a new category showing that the situation of the next of kin must be taken into consideration when investigating access to care from their perspective. It may also be appropriate to include informal care as part of the concept of access when investigating access to care among older people in the last phase of their life. The results may not be transferable to older people who have not gained access to a bed in a nursing home or to countries where the healthcare system differs largely from the Swedish. © 2015 Condelius and Andersson.

  • 17.
    Cronholm, Felix
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci & Orthoped, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res Unit, Malmo, Sweden.
    Rosengren, Björn E.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci & Orthoped, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res Unit, Malmo, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Jan-Åke
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci & Orthoped, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res Unit, Malmo, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr,Inst Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mellström, Dan
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Geriatr Med,Inst Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ribom, Eva L
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Karlsson, Magnus K.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci & Orthoped, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res Unit, Malmo, Sweden.
    The fracture predictive ability of a musculoskeletal composite score in old men - data from the MrOs Sweden study2019In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 19, article id 90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Detection of high-risk individuals for fractures are needed. This study assessed whether level of physical activity (PA) and a musculoskeletal composite score could be used as fracture predictive tools, and if the score could predict fractures better than areal bone mineral density (aBMD).

    Methods: MrOs Sweden is a prospective population-based observational study that at baseline included 3014 men aged 69-81years. We assessed femoral neck bone mineral content (BMC), bone area, aBMD and total body lean mass by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, calcaneal speed of sound by quantitative ultrasound and hand grip strength by a handheld dynamometer. PA was assessed by the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) questionnaire. We followed the participants until the date of first fracture, death or relocation (median 9.6years). A musculoskeletal composite score was calculated as mean Z-score of the five measured traits. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to analyze the association between the musculoskeletal traits, the composite score and incident fractures (yes/no) during the follow-up period. Data are presented as hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for fracture for a+1 standard deviation (SD) change (+1 Z-score) in the various musculoskeletal traits as well as the composite score. We used a linear regression model to estimate the association between level of PA, measured as PASE-score and the different musculoskeletal traits as well as the composite score.

    Results: A+1 SD higher composite score was associated with an incident fracture HR of 0.61 (0.54, 0.69), however not being superior to aBMD in fracture prediction. A+1 SD higher PASE-score was associated with both a higher composite score and lower fracture incidence (HR 0.83 (0.76, 0.90)).

    Conclusions: The composite score was similar to femoral neck aBMD in predicting fractures, and also low PA predicted fractures. This highlights the need of randomized controlled trials to evaluate if PA could be used as a fracture preventive strategy.

  • 18.
    Dahlin-Ivanoff, Synneve
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Eklund, Kajsa
    University of Gothenburg.
    Wilhelmson, Katarina
    University of Gothenburg.
    Behm, Lina
    Lund University.
    Häggblom-Kronlöf, Greta
    University of Gothenburg.
    Zidén, Lena
    University of Gothenburg.
    Landahl, Sten
    University of Gothenburg.
    Gustafsson, Susanne
    University of Gothenburg.
    For whom is a health-promoting intervention effective?: predictive factors for performing activities of daily living independently2016In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Health-promoting interventions tailored to support older persons to remain in their homes, so-called "ageing in place" is important for supporting or improving their health. The health-promoting programme "Elderly Persons in the Risk Zone," (EPRZ) was set up for this purpose and has shown positive results for maintaining independence in activities of daily living for older persons 80 years and above at 1- and 2 year follow-ups. The aim of this study was to explore factors for maintaining independence in the EPRZ health-promoting programme.

    METHODS: Total of 459 participants in the original trial was included in the analysis; 345 in the programme arm and 114 in the control arm. Thirteen variables, including demographic, health, and programme-specific indicators, were chosen as predictors for independence of activities of daily living. Logistic regression was performed separately for participants in the health promotion programme and in the control arm.

    RESULTS: In the programme arm, being younger, living alone and self-rated lack of tiredness in performing mobility activities predicted a positive effect of independence in activities of daily living at 1-year follow-up (odds ratio [OR] 1.18, 1.73, 3.02) and 2-year, (OR 1.13, 2.01, 2.02). In the control arm, being less frail was the only predictor at 1-year follow up (OR 1.6 1.09, 2.4); no variables predicted the outcome at the 2-year follow-up.

    CONCLUSIONS: Older persons living alone - as a risk of ill health - should be especially recognized and offered an opportunity to participate in health-promoting programmes such as "Elderly Persons in the Risk Zone". Further, screening for subjective frailty could form an advantageous guiding principle to target the right population when deciding to whom health-promoting intervention should be offered.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: The original clinical trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov. Identifier: NCT00877058 , April 6, 2009.

  • 19.
    Dahlin-Ivanoff, Synneve
    et al.
    Vårdalinstitutet, The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Universities of Gothenburg and Lund, Sweden .
    Gosman-Hedström, Gunilla
    Vårdalinstitutet, The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Universities of Gothenburg and Lund, Sweden .
    Edberg, Anna-Karin
    Vårdalinstitutet, The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Universities of Gothenburg and Lund.
    Wilhelmson, Katarina
    Vårdalinstitutet, The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Universities of Gothenburg and Lund, Sweden .
    Eklund, Kajsa
    Vårdalinstitutet, The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Universities of Gothenburg and Lund, Sweden .
    Duner, Anna
    Vårdalinstitutet, The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Universities of Gothenburg and Lund, Sweden .
    Ziden, Lena
    Vårdalinstitutet, The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Universities of Gothenburg and Lund, Sweden .
    Welmer, Anna-Karin
    Vårdalinstitutet, The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Universities of Gothenburg and Lund, Sweden .
    Landahl, Sten
    Vårdalinstitutet, The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Universities of Gothenburg and Lund, Sweden .
    Elderly persons in the risk zone: design of a multidimensional, health-promoting, randomised three-armed controlled trial for "prefrail" people of 80+ years living at home2010In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 10, article id 27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The very old (80+) are often described as a "frail" group that is particularly exposed to diseases and functional disability. They are at great risk of losing the ability to manage their activities of daily living independently. A health-promoting intervention programme might prevent or delay dependence in activities of daily life and the development of functional decline. Studies have shown that those who benefit most from a health-promoting and disease-preventive programme are persons with no, or discrete, activity restrictions. The three-armed study "Elderly in the risk zone" is designed to evaluate if multi-dimensional and multi-professional educational senior meetings are more effective than preventive home visits, and if it is possible to prevent or delay deterioration if an intervention is made when the persons are not so frail. In this paper the study design, the intervention and the outcome measures as well as the baseline characteristics of the study participants are presented.

    METHODS/DESIGN: The study is a randomised three-armed single-blind controlled trial with follow-ups 3 months, 1 and 2 years. The study group should comprise a representative sample of pre-frail 80-year old persons still living at home in two municipalities of Gothenburg. To allow for drop-outs, it was estimated that a total of about 450 persons would need to be included in the study. The participants should live in their ordinary housing and not be dependent on the municipal home help service or care. Further, they should be independent of help from another person in activities of daily living and be cognitively intact, having a score of 25 or higher as assessed with the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE).

    DISCUSSION: We believe that the design of the study, the randomisation procedure, outcome measurements and the study protocol meetings should ensure the quality of the study. Furthermore, the multi-dimensionality of the intervention, the involvement of both the professionals and the senior citizens in the planning of the intervention should have the potential to effectively target the heterogeneous needs of the elderly.

  • 20.
    Dong, Huan-Ji
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Is excess weight a burden for older adults who suffer chronic pain?2018In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 18, article id 270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundObesity and chronic pain are common comorbidities and adversely influence each other. Advanced age is associated with more comorbidities and multi-morbidities. In this study, we investigated the burden of overweight/obesity and its comorbidities and their associations with chronic pain in a random population sample of Swedish older adults.MethodsThe cross-sectional analysis involved a random sample of a population65years in south-eastern Sweden (N=6243). Data were collected from a postal questionnaire that addressed pain aspects, body mass index (BMI), and health experiences. Chronic pain was defined as pain during the previous three months. According to the 0-10 Numeric Rating Scale, pain scored 7 corresponds to severe pain. Binary logistic regression was used to determine the variables associated to pain aspects.ResultsA total of 2633 (42%) reported chronic pain. More obese older adults (BMI 30kg/m(2)) experienced chronic pain (58%) than those who were low-normal weight (BMI amp;lt;25kg/m(2), 39%) or overweight (25BMI amp;lt;30kg/m(2), 41%). Obese elderly more frequently had pain in extremities and lower back than their peers. In the multivariate model, obesity (Odds Ratio (OR) 1.59, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.33-1.91) but not overweight (OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.95-1.22) was associated with chronic pain. Obesity (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.16-2.01) was also significantly related to severe pain. We also found other comorbidities - i.e., traumatic history (OR 2.52, 95% CI 1.99-3.19), rheumatic diseases (OR 5.21, 95% CI 4.54-5.97), age85years (OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.22-2.25), and depression or anxiety diagnosis (OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.32-2.53) - showed stronger associations with pain aspects than weight status. Conclusion: In older adults, excess weight (BMI 30 or above) is a potentially modifiable factor but not the only risk factor that is associated with chronic pain and severe pain. Future studies should investigate the effectiveness of interventions that treat comorbid pain and obesity in older adults.

  • 21.
    Dong, Huan-Ji
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Multimorbidity patterns of and use of health services by Swedish 85-year-olds: an exploratory study2013In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 13, no 120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    As life expectancy continues to rise, more elderly are reaching advanced ages (≥80 years). The increasing prevalence of multimorbidity places additional demands on health-care resources for the elderly. Previous studies noted the impact of multimorbidity on the use of health services, but the effects of multimorbidity patterns on health-service use have not been well studied, especially for very old people. This study determines patterns of multimorbidity associated with emergency-room visits and hospitalization in an 85-year-old population.

    Methods

    Health and living conditions were reported via postal questionnaire by 496 Linköping residents aged 85 years (189 men and 307 women). Diagnoses of morbidity were reviewed in patients’ case reports, and the local health-care register provided information on the use of health services. Hierarchical cluster analysis was applied to evaluate patterns of multimorbidity with gender stratification. Factors associated with emergency-room visits and hospitalization were analyzed using logistic regression models.

    Results

    Cluster analyses revealed five clusters: vascular, cardiopulmonary, cardiac (only for men), somatic–mental (only for men), mental disease (only for women), and three other clusters related to aging (one for men and two for women). Heart failure in men (OR = 2.4, 95% CI = 1–5.7) and women (OR = 3, 95% CI = 1.3–6.9) as a single morbidity explained more variance than morbidity clusters in models of emergency-room visits. Men's cardiac cluster (OR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1–2.7) and women's cardiopulmonary cluster (OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.2–2.4) were significantly associated with hospitalization. The combination of the cardiopulmonary cluster with the men’s cardiac cluster (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1–2.4) and one of the women’s aging clusters (OR = 0.5, 95% CI = 0.3–0.8) showed interaction effects on hospitalization.

    Conclusion

    In this 85-year-old population, patterns of cardiac and pulmonary conditions were better than a single morbidity in explaining hospitalization. Heart failure was superior to multimorbidity patterns in explaining emergency-room visits. A holistic approach to examining the patterns of multimorbidity and their relationships with the use of health services will contribute to both local health care policy and geriatric practice.

  • 22.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Theander, Kersti
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Geriatr Med, Norrkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Norrkoping, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst KI, Div Clin Geriatr, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc NVS, Solna, Sweden..
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Wirehn, Ann-Britt
    Linkoping Univ, Cty Council Ostergotland, Local Hlth Care Res & Dev Unit, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Milberg, Anna
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Norrkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Adv Home Care, Norrkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Palliat Educ & Res Ctr, Norrkoping, Sweden..
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity: a cross-sectional study2015In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 15, article id 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Globally, the population is ageing and lives with several chronic diseases for decades. A high symptom burden is associated with a high use of healthcare, admissions to nursing homes, and reduced quality of life. The aims of this study were to describe the multidimensional symptom profile and symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity, and to describe factors related to symptom burden. Methods: A cross-sectional study including 378 community-dwelling people >= 75 years, who had been hospitalized >= 3 times during the previous year, had >= 3 diagnoses in their medical records. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale was used to assess the prevalence, frequency, severity, distress and symptom burden of 31 symptoms. A multiple linear regression was performed to identify factors related to total symptom burden. Results: The mean number of symptoms per participant was 8.5 (4.6), and the mean total symptom burden score was 0.62 (0.41). Pain was the symptom with the highest prevalence, frequency, severity and distress. Half of the study group reported the prevalence of lack of energy and a dry mouth. Poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diagnoses of the digestive system were independently related to the total symptom burden score. Conclusion: The older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity in this study suffered from a high symptom burden with a high prevalence of pain. Persons with poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diseases of the digestive system are at risk of a higher total symptom burden and might need age-specific standardized guidelines for appropriate management.

  • 23.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Theander, Kersti
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Karolinska Institute KI, Sweden.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity: a cross-sectional study2015In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 15, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Globally, the population is ageing and lives with several chronic diseases for decades. A high symptom burden is associated with a high use of healthcare, admissions to nursing homes, and reduced quality of life. The aims of this study were to describe the multidimensional symptom profile and symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity, and to describe factors related to symptom burden. Methods: A cross-sectional study including 378 community-dwelling people greater than= 75 years, who had been hospitalized greater than= 3 times during the previous year, had greater than= 3 diagnoses in their medical records. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale was used to assess the prevalence, frequency, severity, distress and symptom burden of 31 symptoms. A multiple linear regression was performed to identify factors related to total symptom burden. Results: The mean number of symptoms per participant was 8.5 (4.6), and the mean total symptom burden score was 0.62 (0.41). Pain was the symptom with the highest prevalence, frequency, severity and distress. Half of the study group reported the prevalence of lack of energy and a dry mouth. Poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diagnoses of the digestive system were independently related to the total symptom burden score. Conclusion: The older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity in this study suffered from a high symptom burden with a high prevalence of pain. Persons with poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diseases of the digestive system are at risk of a higher total symptom burden and might need age-specific standardized guidelines for appropriate management.

  • 24.
    Edvardsson, David
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. College of Science, Health and Engineering, School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Level 4 Austin Tower, PO Box 5555, Heidelberg 3084, VIC, Australia..
    Sjögren, Karin
    College of Science, Health and Engineering, School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Level 4 Austin Tower, PO Box 5555, Heidelberg 3084, VIC, Australia..
    Lood, Qarin
    College of Science, Health and Engineering, School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Level 4 Austin Tower, PO Box 5555, Heidelberg 3084, VIC, Australia..
    Bergland, Adel
    Kirkevold, Marit
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Division of Caring Sciences, Depart Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Health Sciences, University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    A person-centred and thriving-promoting intervention in nursing homes - study protocol for the U-Age nursing home multi-centre, non-equivalent controlled group before-after trial2017In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 17, article id 22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The literature suggests that person-centred care can contribute to quality of life and wellbeing of nursing home residents, relatives and staff. However, there is sparse research evidence on how person-centred care can be operationalised and implemented in practice, and the extent to which it may promote wellbeing and satisfaction. Therefore, the U-Age nursing home study was initiated to deepen the understanding of how to integrate person-centred care into daily practice and to explore the effects and meanings of this.

    Methods: The study aims to evaluate effects and meanings of a person-centred and thriving-promoting intervention in nursing homes through a multi-centre, non-equivalent controlled group before-after trial design. Three nursing homes across three international sites have been allocated to a person-centred and thriving-promoting intervention group, and three nursing homes have been allocated to an inert control group. Staff at intervention sites will participate in a 12-month interactive educational programme that operationalises thriving-promoting and person-centred care three dimensions: 1) Doing a little extra, 2) Developing a caring environment, and 3) Assessing and meeting highly prioritised psychosocial needs. A pedagogical framework will guide the intervention. The primary study endpoints are; residents’ thriving, relatives’ satisfaction with care and staff job satisfaction. Secondary endpoints are; resident, relative and staff experiences of the caring environment, relatives’ experience of visiting their relative and the nursing home, as well as staff stress of conscience and perceived person-centredness of care. Data on study endpoints will be collected pre-intervention, post-intervention, and at a six-month follow up. Interviews will be conducted with relatives and staff to explore experiences and meanings of the intervention.

    Discussion: The study is expected to provide evidence that can inform further research, policy and practice development on if and how person-centred care may improve wellbeing, thriving and satisfaction for people who reside in, visit or work in nursing homes. The combination of quantitative and qualitative data will illuminate the operationalisation, effects and meaning of person-centred and thriving-promoting care.

  • 25.
    Edvardsson, David
    et al.
    The Medical Faculty, Department of Nursing, Umeå University, .
    Sjögren, Karin
    The Medical Faculty, Department of Nursing, Umeå University, .
    Lood, Qarin
    The Medical Faculty, Department of Nursing, Umeå University, .
    Bergland, Ådel
    Department of Nursing Science, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo .
    Kirkevold, Marit
    Department of Nursing Science, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    A person-centred and thriving-promoting intervention in nursing homes: study protocol for the U-Age nursing home multi-centre, non-equivalent controlled group before-after trial2017In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 17, article id 22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The literature suggests that person-centred care can contribute to quality of life and wellbeing of nursing home residents, relatives and staff. However, there is sparse research evidence on how person-centred care can be operationalised and implemented in practice, and the extent to which it may promote wellbeing and satisfaction. Therefore, the U-Age nursing home study was initiated to deepen the understanding of how to integrate person-centred care into daily practice and to explore the effects and meanings of this.

    Methods

    The study aims to evaluate effects and meanings of a person-centred and thriving-promoting intervention in nursing homes through a multi-centre, non-equivalent controlled group before-after trial design. Three nursing homes across three international sites have been allocated to a person-centred and thriving-promoting intervention group, and three nursing homes have been allocated to an inert control group. Staff at intervention sites will participate in a 12-month interactive educational programme that operationalises thriving-promoting and person-centred care three dimensions: 1) Doing a little extra, 2) Developing a caring environment, and 3) Assessing and meeting highly prioritised psychosocial needs. A pedagogical framework will guide the intervention. The primary study endpoints are; residents’ thriving, relatives’ satisfaction with care and staff job satisfaction. Secondary endpoints are; resident, relative and staff experiences of the caring environment, relatives’ experience of visiting their relative and the nursing home, as well as staff stress of conscience and perceived person-centredness of care. Data on study endpoints will be collected pre-intervention, post-intervention, and at a six-month follow up. Interviews will be conducted with relatives and staff to explore experiences and meanings of the intervention.

    Discussion

    The study is expected to provide evidence that can inform further research, policy and practice development on if and how person-centred care may improve wellbeing, thriving and satisfaction for people who reside in, visit or work in nursing homes. The combination of quantitative and qualitative data will illuminate the operationalisation, effects and meaning of person-centred and thriving-promoting care.

  • 26.
    Ekdahl, Anne W
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Norrköping.
    Andersson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Are elderly people with co-morbidities involved adequately in medical decision making when hospitalised?: A cross-sectional survey2011In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 11, no 46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Medical decision making has long been in focus, but little is known of the preferences and conditions for elderly people with co-morbidities to participate in medical decision making. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the preferred and the actual degree of control, i.e. the role elderly people with co-morbidities wish to assume and actually had with regard to information and participation in medical decision making during their last stay in hospital.This study was a cross-sectional survey including three Swedish hospitals with acute admittance. The participants were patients aged 75 years and above with three or more diagnoses according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) and three or more hospitalisations during the last year.

    METHODS:

    We used a questionnaire combined with a telephone interview, using the Control Preference Scale to measure each participant's preferred and actual role in medical decision making during their last stay in hospital. Additional questions were asked about barriers to participation in decision making and preferred information seeking role. The results are presented with descriptive statistics with kappa weights.

    RESULTS:

    Of the 297 elderly patients identified, 52.5% responded (n = 156, 46.5% male). Mean age was 83.1 years. Of the respondents, 42 of 153 patients said that they were not asked for their opinion (i.e. no shared decision making). Among the other 111 patients, 49 had their exact preferred level of participation, 37 had less participation than they would have preferred, and 23 had more responsibility than they would have preferred. Kappa statistics showed a moderate agreement between preferred and actual role (κw = 0.57; 95% CI: 0.45-0.69). Most patients wanted to be given more information without having to ask. There was no correlation between age, gender, or education and preferred role. 35% of the patients agreed that they experienced some of the various barriers to decision making that they were asked about: 1) the severity of their illness, 2) doctors with different treatment strategies, 3) difficulty understanding the medical information, and 4) difficulty understanding doctors who did not speak the patient's own language.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Physicians are not fully responsive to patient preferences regarding either the degree of communication or the patient's participation in decision making. Barriers to participation can be a problem, and should be taken into account more often when dealing with hospitalised elderly people.

  • 27.
    Flodin, Lena
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Geriatr Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol CLINTEC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Saaf, Maria
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Diabet Endocrinol & Metab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Samnegard, Eva
    Danderyd Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci, Div Orthoped, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ekstrom, Wilhelmina
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Sect Orthoped & Sports Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Al-Ani, Amer N.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Orthopaed, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol CLINTEC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hedstrom, Margareta
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Orthopaed, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol CLINTEC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Effects of protein-rich nutritional supplementation and bisphosphonates on body composition, handgrip strength and health-related quality of life after hip fracture: a 12-month randomized controlled study2015In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 15, article id 149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The catabolic state that follows hip fracture contributes to loss of muscle mass and strength, that is sarcopenia, which impacts functional ability and health-related quality of life. Measures to prevent such long-term postoperative consequences are of important concern. The aim of this study was to evaluate the combined effects of protein-rich nutritional supplementation and bisphosphonate on body composition, handgrip strength and health-related quality of life following hip fracture. Methods: The study included 79 men and women with hip fracture, mean age 79 years (SD 9), without severe cognitive impairment, who were ambulatory and living independently before fracture. Patients were randomized postoperatively to receive liquid supplementation that provided 40 g of protein and 600 kcal daily for six months after the fracture, in addition to bisphosphonates once weekly for 12 months (group N, n = 26), or bisphosphonates alone once weekly for 12 months (group B, n = 28). All patients, including the controls (group C, n = 25) received calcium 1 g and vitamin D3 800 IU daily. Body composition as measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), handgrip strength (HGS) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) were registered at baseline, six and 12 months postoperatively. Results: There were no differences among the groups regarding change in fat-free mass index (FFMI), HGS, or HRQoL during the study year. Intra-group analyses showed improvement of HGS between baseline and six months in the N group (P = 0.04). HRQoL decreased during the first year in the C and B groups (P = 0.03 and P = 0.01, respectively) but not in the nutritional supplementation N group (P = 0.22). Conclusions: Protein-rich nutritional supplementation was unable to preserve FFMI more effectively than vitamin D and calcium alone, or combined with bisphosphonate, in this relatively healthy group of hip fracture patients. However, trends toward positive effects on both HGS and HRQoL were observed following nutritional supplementation.

  • 28.
    Franzon, Kristin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Zethelius, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Kilander, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    The impact of muscle function, muscle mass and sarcopenia on independent ageing in very old Swedish men2019In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 19, article id 153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Preserved functions of daily life and cognition are cornerstones of independent aging, which is crucial for maintaining a high quality of life. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of sarcopenia, and its underlying components, on independent ageing in a cohort study of very old men.

    Methods The presence of sarcopenia and independent ageing at a mean age of 87 was investigated in 287 men from the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men. Five years later 127 men were re-evaluated for independent ageing. Sarcopenia was defined by two different definitions from the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People. In the first definition sarcopenia was defined as skeletal muscle index < 7.26 kg/m2 and either gait speed ≤0.8 m/s or hand grip strength < 30 kg. In the later up-dated definition, HGS < 27 kg and/or chair stand test > 15 s defines probable sarcopenia, which is confirmed by SMI < 7.0 kg/m2. Independent ageing was defined as a Mini-Mental State Examination score of ≥25 points, absence of diagnosed dementia, community-dwelling, independency in personal care and ability to walk outdoors alone.

    Results Sarcopenia at baseline was observed in 21% (60/287) and 20% (58/287), respectively, due to definition. The prevalence of independent ageing was 83% (239/288) at baseline and 69% (87/127) five years later. None of the sarcopenia diagnoses were associated with independent ageing. In contrast, gait speed was both in cross-sectional (odds ratio (OR) per one standard deviation increase 2.15, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.47–3.15), and in longitudinal multivariate analyses (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.19–2.82). In the cross-sectional analysis also higher hand grip strength was associated with independent ageing (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.12–2.22), while a slower chair stand test was inversely associated (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.43–0.86). Muscle mass; i.e. skeletal muscle index, was not associated with independent ageing.

    Conclusions For very old men, especially a higher gait speed, but also a higher hand grip strength and a faster chair stand test, were associated with independent ageing, while skeletal muscle index alone, and the composite sarcopenia phenotype measured with two different definitions, were not.

  • 29.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jonköping University, Sweden; Futurum Regiona Jönköping County.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Futurum Region Jönköping County, Sweden.
    Bravell Ernsth, Marie
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Concurrent validity of the Swedish version of the life-space assessment questionnaire2016In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 16, p. 181-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Life-Space Assessment (LSA), developed in the USA, is an instrument focusing on mobility with respect to reaching different areas defined as life-spaces, extending from the room where the person sleeps to mobility outside ones hometown. A newly translated Swedish version of the LSA (LSA-S) has been tested for test-retest reliability, but the validity remains to be tested. The purpose of the present study was to examine the concurrent validity of the LSA-S, by comparing and correlating the LSA scores to other measures of mobility. Method: The LSA was included in a population-based study of health, functioning and mobility among older persons in Sweden, and the present analysis comprised 312 community-dwelling participants. To test the concurrent validity, the LSA scores were compared to a number of other mobility-related variables, including the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) as well as "stair climbing", "transfers", "transportation", "food shopping", "travel for pleasure" and "community activities". The LSA total mean scores for different levels of the other mobility-related variables, and measures of correlation were calculated. Results: Higher LSA total mean scores were observed with higher levels of all the other mobility related variables. Most of the correlations between the LSA and the other mobility variables were large (r = 0.5-1.0) and significant at the 0.01 level. The LSA total score, as well as independent life-space and assistive life-space correlated with transportation (0.63, 0.66, 0.64) and food shopping (0.55, 0.58, 0.55). Assistive life-space also correlated with SPPB (0.47). With respect to maximal life-space, the correlations with the mobility-related variables were generally lower (below 0.5), probably since this aspect of life-space mobility is highly influenced by social support and is not so dependent on the individuals own physical function. Conclusion: LSA was shown to be a valid measure of mobility when using the LSA total, independent LS or assistive LSA.

  • 30.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Futurum – the Academy for Healthcare, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Fransson, Eleonor I
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Concurrent validity of the Swedish version of the life-space assessment questionnaire2016In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 16, article id 181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The Life-Space Assessment (LSA), developed in the USA, is an instrument focusing on mobility with respect to reaching different areas defined as life-spaces, extending from the room where the person sleeps to mobility outside one's hometown. A newly translated Swedish version of the LSA (LSA-S) has been tested for test-retest reliability, but the validity remains to be tested. The purpose of the present study was to examine the concurrent validity of the LSA-S, by comparing and correlating the LSA scores to other measures of mobility.

    METHOD: The LSA was included in a population-based study of health, functioning and mobility among older persons in Sweden, and the present analysis comprised 312 community-dwelling participants. To test the concurrent validity, the LSA scores were compared to a number of other mobility-related variables, including the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) as well as "stair climbing", "transfers", "transportation", "food shopping", "travel for pleasure" and "community activities". The LSA total mean scores for different levels of the other mobility-related variables, and measures of correlation were calculated.

    RESULTS: Higher LSA total mean scores were observed with higher levels of all the other mobility related variables. Most of the correlations between the LSA and the other mobility variables were large (r = 0.5-1.0) and significant at the 0.01 level. The LSA total score, as well as independent life-space and assistive life-space correlated with transportation (0.63, 0.66, 0.64) and food shopping (0.55, 0.58, 0.55). Assistive life-space also correlated with SPPB (0.47). With respect to maximal life-space, the correlations with the mobility-related variables were generally lower (below 0.5), probably since this aspect of life-space mobility is highly influenced by social support and is not so dependent on the individual's own physical function.

    CONCLUSION: LSA was shown to be a valid measure of mobility when using the LSA total, independent LS or assistive LSA.

  • 31.
    Ganda Mall, John-Peter
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Östlund-Lagerström, Lina
    Department of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Nutrition and Physical Activity Research Centre, Department of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Carl Mårten
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Algilani, Samal
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Rasoal, Dara
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Repsilber, Dirk
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Brummer, Robert Jan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    V. Keita, Åsa
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Schoultz, Ida
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Are self-reported gastrointestinal symptoms among older adults associated with increased intestinal permeability and psychological distress?2018In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Despite the substantial number of older adults suffering from gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms little is known regarding the character of these complaints and whether they are associated with an altered intestinal barrier function and psychological distress. Our aim was to explore the relationship between self-reported gut health, intestinal permeability and psychological distress among older adults.

    METHODS: Three study populations were included: 1) older adults with GI symptoms (n = 24), 2) a group of older adults representing the general elderly population in Sweden (n = 22) and 3) senior orienteering athletes as a potential model of healthy ageing (n = 27). Questionnaire data on gut-health, psychological distress and level of physical activity were collected. Intestinal permeability was measured by quantifying zonulin in plasma. The level of systemic and local inflammation was monitored by measuring C-reactive protein (CRP), hydrogen peroxide in plasma and calprotectin in stool samples. The relationship between biomarkers and questionnaire data in the different study populations was illustrated using a Principal Component Analysis (PCA).

    RESULTS: Older adults with GI symptoms displayed significantly higher levels of both zonulin and psychological distress than both general older adults and senior orienteering athletes. The PCA analysis revealed a separation between senior orienteering athletes and older adults with GI symptoms and showed an association between GI symptoms, psychological distress and zonulin.

    CONCLUSIONS: Older adults with GI symptoms express increased plasma levels of zonulin, which might reflect an augmented intestinal permeability. In addition, this group suffer from higher psychological distress compared to general older adults and senior orienteering athletes. This relationship was further confirmed by a PCA plot, which illustrated an association between GI symptoms, psychological distress and intestinal permeability.

  • 32.
    Ganda Mall, John-Peter
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Sweden.
    Östlund-Lagerström, Lina
    Örebro universitet, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Carl Mårten
    Örebro universitet, Sweden.
    Algilani, Samal
    Örebro universitet, Sweden.
    Rasoal, Dara
    Örebro universitet, Sweden.
    Repsilber, Dirk
    Örebro universitet, Sweden.
    Brummer, Robert Jan
    Örebro universitet, Sweden.
    V. Keita, Åsa
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Schoultz, Ida
    Örebro universitet, Sweden.
    Are self-reported gastrointestinal symptoms among older adults associated with increased intestinal permeability and psychological distress?2018In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Despite the substantial number of older adults suffering from gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms little is known regarding the character of these complaints and whether they are associated with an altered intestinal barrier function and psychological distress. Our aim was to explore the relationship between self-reported gut health, intestinal permeability and psychological distress among older adults.

    METHODS: Three study populations were included: 1) older adults with GI symptoms (n = 24), 2) a group of older adults representing the general elderly population in Sweden (n = 22) and 3) senior orienteering athletes as a potential model of healthy ageing (n = 27). Questionnaire data on gut-health, psychological distress and level of physical activity were collected. Intestinal permeability was measured by quantifying zonulin in plasma. The level of systemic and local inflammation was monitored by measuring C-reactive protein (CRP), hydrogen peroxide in plasma and calprotectin in stool samples. The relationship between biomarkers and questionnaire data in the different study populations was illustrated using a Principal Component Analysis (PCA).

    RESULTS: Older adults with GI symptoms displayed significantly higher levels of both zonulin and psychological distress than both general older adults and senior orienteering athletes. The PCA analysis revealed a separation between senior orienteering athletes and older adults with GI symptoms and showed an association between GI symptoms, psychological distress and zonulin.

    CONCLUSIONS: Older adults with GI symptoms express increased plasma levels of zonulin, which might reflect an augmented intestinal permeability. In addition, this group suffer from higher psychological distress compared to general older adults and senior orienteering athletes. This relationship was further confirmed by a PCA plot, which illustrated an association between GI symptoms, psychological distress and intestinal permeability.

  • 33.
    Gillsjö, Catharina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Schwartz-Barcott, Donna
    University of Rhode Island.
    von Post, Iréne
    Åbo Academy University, Vasa.
    Home: The place the older adult can not imagine living without2011In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 11, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rapidly aging populations with an increased desire to remain at home and changes in health policy that promote the transfer of health care from formal places, as hospitals and institutions, to the more informal setting of one's home support the need for   further research that is designed specifically to understand the experience of home among older adults. Yet, little is known among health care providers about the older adult's experience of home. The aim of this study was to understand the experience of home as experienced by older adults living in a rural community in Sweden.

    Methods: Hermeneutical interpretation, as developed by von Post and Eriksson and based on Gadamer's philosophical hermeneutics, was used to interpret interviews with six older adults. The interpretation included a self examination of the researcher's experiences and   prejudices and proceeded through several readings which integrated the text with the   reader, allowed new questions to emerge, fused the horizons, summarized main and sub-themes and allowed a new understanding to emerge.

    Results: Two main and six sub-themes emerged. Home was experienced as the place the older adult could not imagine living without but also as the place one might be forced to leave. The older adult's thoughts vacillated between the well known present and all its comforts and the unknown future with all its questions and fears, including the underlying   threat of loosing one's home.

    Conclusions: Home has become so integral to life itself and such an intimate part of the older adult's being that when older adults lose their home, they also loose the place closest   to their heart, the place where they are at home and can maintain their identity, integrity and way of living. Additional effort needs to be made to understand the older adult's experience of home within home health care in order to minimize intrusion and maximize care. There is a need to more fully explore the older adult's experience with health care providers in the home and its impact on the older adult's sense of "being at home" and their health and overall well-being.

  • 34.
    Grönstedt, Helena
    et al.
    Stockholms Sjukhem R&D Unit, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Allied Hlth Profess, Funct Area Occupat Therapy & Physiotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vikström, Sofia
    Stockholms Sjukhem R&D Unit, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Uppsala Univ Hosp, Dept Geriatr Med, Uppsala, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Theme Aging, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Franzen, Erika
    Stockholms Sjukhem R&D Unit, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Allied Hlth Profess, Funct Area Occupat Therapy & Physiotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Div Physiotherapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Seiger, Åke
    Stockholms Sjukhem R&D Unit, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Div Clin Geriatr, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wimo, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Div Neurogeriatr, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Faxen-Irving, Gerd
    Stockholms Sjukhem R&D Unit, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Div Clin Geriatr, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Funct Area Clin Nutr, Allied Hlth Professionals, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Boström, Anne-Marie
    Stockholms Sjukhem R&D Unit, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Theme Aging, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Nursing, Stockholm, Sweden;Western Norway Univ Appl Sci, Haugesund, Norway.
    A study protocol of Older Person's Exercise and Nutrition Study (OPEN) - a sit-to-stand activity combined with oral protein supplement - effects on physical function and independence: a cluster randomized clinical trial2018In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 18, article id 138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Poor nutrition and age per see add to the development of sarcopenia, i.e. loss of muscle mass and strength, which contributes to increased risk of impaired activities of daily living (ADL) and reduced independence. Protein deficiency plays an important role in the development of sarcopenia. In order to increase the muscle mass protein intake should be combined with physical exercise. A daily physical activity, the sit-to-stand exercise, has been proven to decrease older persons' dependence in ADL. Our study aims to evaluate the effects of the sit-to-stand exercise in combination with a protein-rich nutritional supplement, on physical function and independence in frail nursing home residents. The resident's perceptions and experiences of the intervention and the staff's experiences of supporting the resident to complete the intervention will also be explored.

    Methods: The study is a two-arm cluster-randomized controlled trial which will be performed in nursing homes at two municipalities in Sweden. We will recruit 120 residents, age 75 or older and able to stand up from a seated position. Residents (n = 60) randomized to the intervention group will perform the sit-to-stand exercise at four occasions daily and will be offered a protein-rich oral supplement, twice a day. The intervention period will last for 12 weeks and measures of physical function, nutritional status, quality of life and health economy will be performed at baseline and at 12-weeks follow-up. The primary outcome will be the number of chair rises performed in 30 s. The control group will receive standard care. Data will be analysed by intention-to-treat analysis and with mixed effect models. During the last part of the intervention period individual interviews with the residents, on the topic of feasibility with the OPEN concept will be held. Likewise, focus-group-interviews with staff will be performed.

    Discussion: The residents' physical and mental health could be expected to improve. Even the work situation for staff could be positively affected. One innovative feature of the OPEN study is the simple intervention consisting of a basic daily activity that can be performed by several nursing home residents with the support of existing staff and available resources.

  • 35.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Lämås, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Isaksson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Constipation and laxative use among people living in nursing homes in 2007 and 20132019In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 19, article id 38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Constipation is a common condition among older people, particularly among people living in nursing homes, and the use of drugs such as opioids is one of many factors that contribute to its high prevalence. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of constipation and the use of laxatives between 2007 and 2013, to analyze constipation and laxative use among people who are prescribed opioids, and to identify factors associated with constipation. Methods: In 2007 and 2013, two surveys were performed in the county of Vasterbotten in Northern Sweden, comprising all those living in nursing homes. The Multi-Dimensional Dementia Assessment Scale was used to collect data regarding laxative, opioid and anticholinergic drug use, functioning in activities of daily living (ADL), cognition and symptoms of constipation. A comparison was made between 2820 people from 2007 and 1902 people from 2013. Results: The prevalence of symptoms of constipation among people living in nursing homes increased from 36% in 2007 to 40% in 2013. After controlling for age, sex, ADL, cognitive impairment and use of opioid and anticholinergic drugs, this difference was found to be statistically significant. When controlled for demographic changes, there was a statistically significant difference in the regular use of laxatives between the respective years, from 46% in 2007 to 59% in 2013. People prescribed opioids and anticholinergic drugs were at increased risk of constipation, while people with a higher ADL score were at decreased risk. Further, among people prescribed opioids and rated as constipated, 35% in 2007 and 20% in 2013 were not prescribed laxatives for regular use, a difference that was found to be statistically significant. Conclusions: The prevalence of symptoms of constipation increased between 2007 and 2013. Although there was a decrease between the years, there were still a number of people being prescribed with opioids and rated as constipated who were not treated with laxatives. This study therefore indicates that constipation remains a significant problem among people in nursing homes and also indicates that those prescribed opioids could benefit from an increased awareness of the risk of constipation and treatment, if required.

  • 36.
    Gwatidzo, Shingai Douglas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Stewart Williams, Jennifer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Research Centre for Gender, Health and Ageing, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, New Lambton Heights, Newcastle NSW 2305, New South Wales, Australia.
    Diabetes mellitus medication use and catastrophic healthcare expenditure among adults aged 50+ years in China and India: results from the WHO study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE)2017In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 17, article id 14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Expenditure on medications for highly prevalent chronic conditions such as diabetes mellitus (DM) can result in financial impoverishment. People in developing countries and in low socioeconomic status groups are particularly vulnerable. China and India currently hold the world's two largest DM populations. Both countries are ageing and undergoing rapid economic development, urbanisation and social change. This paper assesses the determinants of DM medication use and catastrophic expenditure on medications in older adults with DM in China and India.

    METHODS: Using national standardised data collected from adults aged 50 years and above with DM (self-reported) in China (N = 773) and India (N = 463), multivariable logistic regression describes: 1) association between respondents' socio-demographic and health behavioural characteristics and the dependent variable, DM medication use, and 2) association between DM medication use (independent variable) and household catastrophic expenditure on medications (dependent variable) (China: N = 630; India: N = 439). The data source is the World Health Organization (WHO) Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) Wave 1 (2007-2010).

    RESULTS: Prevalence of DM medication use was 87% in China and 71% in India. Multivariable analysis indicates that people reporting lifestyle modification were more likely to use DM medications in China (OR = 6.22) and India (OR = 8.45). Women were more likely to use DM medications in China (OR = 1.56). Respondents in poorer wealth quintiles in China were more likely to use DM medications whereas the reverse was true in India. Almost 17% of people with DM in China experienced catastrophic healthcare expenditure on medications compared with 7% in India. Diabetes medication use was not a statistically significant predictor of catastrophic healthcare expenditure on medications in either country, although the odds were 33% higher among DM medications users in China (OR = 1.33).

    CONCLUSIONS: The country comparison reflects major public policy differences underpinned by divergent political and ideological frameworks. The DM epidemic poses huge public health challenges for China and India. Ensuring equitable and affordable access to medications for DM is fundamental for healthy ageing cohorts, and is consistent with the global agenda for universal healthcare coverage.

  • 37.
    Hagglund, Patricia
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Fac Med, Dept Odontol, Oral & Maxillofacial Radiol, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Olai, Lena
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Sci, Falun, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Family Med & Prevent Med Sect, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Stahlnacke, Katri
    Publ Dent Hlth Serv, Orebro Cty Reg, Orebro, Sweden.;Orebro Univ, Fac Hlth & Med, Orebro, Sweden..
    Wentzel Persenius, Mona
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Hagg, Mary
    Cty Council Gavleborg, Hudiksvall Hosp, Speech & Swallowing Ctr, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, Hudiksvall, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Ctr Res & Dev, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Andersson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Koistinen, Susanne
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Sci, Falun, Sweden.;Orebro Univ, Fac Hlth & Med, Sch Hlth Sci, Orebro, Sweden..
    Carlsson, Eva
    Rebro Univ, Fac Hlth & Med, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Orebro, Sweden..
    Study protocol for the SOFIA project: Swallowing function, Oral health, and Food Intake in old Age: a descriptive study with a cluster randomized trial2017In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 17, article id 78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Extensive studies have shown that older people are negatively impacted by impaired eating and nutrition. The abilities to eat, enjoy food, and participate in social activities associated with meals are important aspects of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and recovery after illness. This project aims to (i) describe and analyze relationships between oral health and oral HRQoL, swallowing ability, eating ability, and nutritional risk among older individuals admitted to short-term care; (ii) compare the perceptions that older individuals and staff report on care quality related to oral hygiene and eating; and (iii) study the feasibility and effects of a training program for people with impaired swallowing (i.e., dysphagia). Methods/Design: This project consists of two parts, which will be performed in five Swedish counties. It will include approximately 400 older individuals and 200 healthcare professionals. Part 1 is a cross-sectional, descriptive study of older people admitted to short-term care. Subjects will be assessed by trained professionals regarding oral health status, oral HRQoL, eating and nutritional risk, and swallowing ability. Swallowing ability will be measured with a teaspoon test and a swallowing capacity test (SCT). Furthermore, subjects and staff will complete a questionnaire regarding their perceptions of care quality. Part 2 is a cluster randomized intervention trial with controls. Older participants with dysphagia (i.e., SCT < 10 ml/s, measured in part 1) will be recruited consecutively to either the intervention or control group, depending on where they were admitted for short-term care. At baseline, all subjects will be assessed for oral health status, oral HRQoL, eating and nutritional risk, swallowing ability, and swallowing-related QoL. Then, the intervention group will receive 5 weeks of training with an oral screen for neuromuscular training focused on orofacial and pharyngeal muscles. After completing the intervention, and at six months post-intervention, all assessments will be repeated in both study groups. Discussion: The results will make important contributions to rehabilitation knowledge, including approaches for improving swallowing function, oral health, and food intake and for improving the quality of oral care for older people.

  • 38.
    Harding, Andrew J. E.
    et al.
    Univ Lancaster, England.
    Morbey, Hazel
    Univ Lancaster, England.
    Ahmed, Faraz
    Univ Lancaster, England.
    Opdebeeck, Carol
    Manchester Metropolitan Univ, England.
    Lasrado, Reena
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Williamson, Paula R.
    Univ Liverpool, England; Med Res Council North West Hub Trials Methodol Re, England.
    Swarbrick, Caroline
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Leroi, Iracema
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Challis, David
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Burns, Alistair
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Keady, John
    Univ Manchester, England; Greater Manchester Mental Hlth NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Reilly, Siobhan T.
    Univ Lancaster, England.
    What is important to people living with dementia?: the "long-list of outcome items in the development of a core outcome set for use in the evaluation of non-pharmacological community-based health and social care interventions2019In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 19, article id 94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundCore outcome sets (COS) prioritise outcomes based on their importance to key stakeholders, reduce reporting bias and increase comparability across studies. The first phase of a COS study is to form a long-list of outcomes. Key stakeholders then decide on their importance. COS reporting is described as suboptimal and this first phase is often under-reported. Our objective was to develop a long-list of outcome items for non-pharmacological interventions for people with dementia living at home.MethodsThree iterative phases were conducted. First, people living with dementia, care partners, health and social care professionals, policymakers and researchers (n=55) took part in interviews or focus groups and were asked which outcomes were important. Second, existing dementia trials were identified from the ALOIS database. 248 of 1009 pharmacological studies met the inclusion criteria. Primary and secondary outcomes were extracted from a 50% random sample (n=124) along with eight key reviews/qualitative papers and 38 policy documents. Third, extracted outcome items were translated onto an existing qualitative framework and mapped into domains. The research team removed areas of duplication and refined the long-list in eight workshops.ResultsOne hundred seventy outcome items were extracted from the qualitative data and literature. The 170 outcome items were consolidated to 54 in four domains (Self-Managing Dementia Symptoms, Quality of Life, Friendly Neighbourhood amp; Home, Independence).ConclusionsThis paper presents a transparent blueprint for long-list development. Though a useful resource in their own right, the 54 outcome items will be distilled further in a modified Delphi survey and consensus meeting to identify core outcomes.

  • 39.
    Hedna, Khadidja
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Marine L.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Gyllensten, Hanna
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hägg, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Futurum, Sweden.
    Böttiger, Ylva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Clinical relevance of alerts from a decision support system, PHARAO, for drug safety assessment in the older adults2019In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 19, article id 164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundPHARAO is a decision support system developed to evaluate the risk for a set of either common or serious side-effects resulting from a combination of pharmacodynamic effects from a patients medications. The objective of this study was to investigate the validity of the risk scores for the common side-effects generated by PHARAO in older patients.MethodsSide-effects included were sedation, constipation, orthostatic symptoms, anticholinergic and serotonergic effects. The alerts generated by PHARAO were tested in 745 persons 65years old. Dispensed prescriptions retrieved from the Swedish prescribed drug register were used to generate the pharmacological risk scores of patients medications. Symptoms possibly related to side-effects were extracted from medical records data.ResultsThe PHARAO system generated 776 alerts, most often for the risk of anticholinergic symptoms. The total specificity estimates of the PHARAO system were 0.95, 0.89 and 0.78 for high, intermediate and low risk alerts, respectively. The corresponding sensitivity estimates were between 0.12 and 0.37. The negative predictive value was 0.90 and the positive predictive value ranged between 0.20-0.25.ConclusionsThe PHARAO system had a high specificity and negative predictive value to detect symptoms possibly associated with the of patients medications, while the sensitivity and positive predictive value were low. The PHARAO system has the potential to minimise the risk of over-alerts in combination with a drug-drug interaction alert system, but should be used in connection with a medical evaluation of the patient.

  • 40. Hellström, A.
    et al.
    Nilsson, C.
    Nilsson, A.
    Fagerström, Cecilia
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Leg ulcers in older people: A national study addressing variation in diagnosis, pain and sleep disturbance2016In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 16, article id 25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Leg ulcers commonly emerge as a symptom of other comorbidities, often in older people. As a consequence of the ulcer, pain and sleep disturbances might occur. Due to the complex illness, the responsibility of treatment is unclear between health caregivers. The interaction between ulcer type, sleep and pain has not previously been investigated. This study aimed to explore pain in older men and women (65 years and older) with different diagnoses of leg ulcers and to investigate the associations of sleep disturbances and pain in people with leg ulcer diagnosis. Methods: The study used a cross-sectional design and data from the Swedish Registry of Ulcer Treatment, collected between May 2009 and December 2013. One thousand and eight hundred and twenty four people were included, and 62.9 % were women. The mean age was 83.4 years (SD 8.8). For the analyses, the chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U-test, t-test, one-way ANOVA and logistic regression was performed. Pain was measured by the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), and sleep disturbances was assessed dichotomously. Results: We found the prevalence of pain intensity ≥ 5 on the NRS to be 34.8 % in those reporting pain. Additionally, the pain intensity was associated with the number of ulcers (p = 0.003). Sleep disturbances were associated with pain (p < 0.001) and were found in 34.8 % of the total sample. Although more women than men reported pain and scored higher on the NRS, no significant gender difference in sleep disturbances was found (p = 0.606). The mean NRS scores did not differ significantly between the ulcer types; however, arterial and venous-arterial ulcers increased the risk of sleep disturbances, as did higher pain scores. Conclusions: The majority of the participants were of advanced age (>80 years) and frequently suffered from pain and sleep disturbances. Further research is needed regarding pain, sleep and wound healing in the oldest old with leg ulcers. Ulcer pain sometimes appears to receive less attention in ulcer management, as do sleep disturbances, implying that individual needs might not be satisfactorily met. National guidelines in managing leg ulcers, which also consider consequences such as sleep disturbances, pain and discomfort, are needed. © 2016 Hellström et al.

  • 41. Hellström, Amanda
    et al.
    Hagell, Peter
    Fagerström, Cecilia
    Willman, Ania
    Measurement properties of the Minimal Insomnia Symptom Scale (MISS) in an elderly population in Sweden.2010In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 10:84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Insomnia is common among elderly people and associated with poor health. The Minimal Insomnia Symptom Scale (MISS) is a three item screening instrument that has been found to be psychometrically sound and capable of identifying insomnia in the general population (20-64 years). However, its measurement properties have not been studied in an elderly population. Our aim was to test the measurement properties of the MISS among people aged 65 + in Sweden, by replicating the original study in an elderly sample. Methods: Data from a cross-sectional survey of 548 elderly individuals were analysed in terms of assumptions of summation of items, floor/ceiling effects, reliability and optimal cut-off score by means of ROC-curve analysis and compared with self-reported insomnia criteria. Results: Corrected item-total correlations ranged between 0.64-0.70, floor/ceiling effects were 6.6/0.6% and reliability was 0.81. ROC analysis identified the optimal cut-off score as ≥7 (sensitivity, 0.93; specificity, 0.84; positive/negative predictive values, 0.256/0.995). Using this cut-off score, the prevalence of insomnia in the study sample was 21.7% and most frequent among women and the oldest old. Conclusions: Data support the measurement properties of the MISS as a possible insomnia screening instrument for elderly persons. This study make evident that the MISS is useful for identifying elderly people with insomnia-like sleep problems. Further studies are needed to assess its usefulness in identifying clinically defined insomnia.

  • 42.
    Hellström, Amanda
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Hagell, Peter
    Lund University.
    Fagerström, Cecilia
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Willman, Ania
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Measurement properties of the Minimal Insomnia Symptom Scale (MISS) in an elderly population in Sweden2010In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 10, article id 84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Insomnia is common among elderly people and associated with poor health. The Minimal Insomnia Symptom Scale (MISS) is a three item screening instrument that has been found to be psychometrically sound and capable of identifying insomnia in the general population (20-64 years). However, its measurement properties have not been studied in an elderly population. Our aim was to test the measurement properties of the MISS among people aged 65 + in Sweden, by replicating the original study in an elderly sample.

    METHODS: Data from a cross-sectional survey of 548 elderly individuals were analysed in terms of assumptions of summation of items, floor/ceiling effects, reliability and optimal cut-off score by means of ROC-curve analysis and compared with self-reported insomnia criteria.

    RESULTS: Corrected item-total correlations ranged between 0.64-0.70, floor/ceiling effects were 6.6/0.6% and reliability was 0.81. ROC analysis identified the optimal cut-off score as ≥ 7 (sensitivity, 0.93; specificity, 0.84; positive/negative predictive values, 0.256/0.995). Using this cut-off score, the prevalence of insomnia in the study sample was 21.7% and most frequent among women and the oldest old.

    CONCLUSIONS: Data support the measurement properties of the MISS as a possible insomnia screening instrument for elderly persons. This study make evident that the MISS is useful for identifying elderly people with insomnia-like sleep problems. Further studies are needed to assess its usefulness in identifying clinically defined insomnia.

  • 43.
    Hellström, Amanda
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden ; Lund University, Sweden.
    Hagell, Peter
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Fagerström, Cecilia
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Willman, Ania
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Measurement properties of the Minimal Insomnia Symptom Scale (MISS) in an elderly population in Sweden2010In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 10, article id 84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Insomnia is common among elderly people and associated with poor health. The Minimal Insomnia Symptom Scale (MISS) is a three item screening instrument that has been found to be psychometrically sound and capable of identifying insomnia in the general population (20-64 years). However, its measurement properties have not been studied in an elderly population. Our aim was to test the measurement properties of the MISS among people aged 65 + in Sweden, by replicating the original study in an elderly sample.

    Methods

    Data from a cross-sectional survey of 548 elderly individuals were analysed in terms of assumptions of summation of items, floor/ceiling effects, reliability and optimal cut-off score by means of ROC-curve analysis and compared with self-reported insomnia criteria.

    Results

    Corrected item-total correlations ranged between 0.64-0.70, floor/ceiling effects were 6.6/0.6% and reliability was 0.81. ROC analysis identified the optimal cut-off score as ≥7 (sensitivity, 0.93; specificity, 0.84; positive/negative predictive values, 0.256/0.995). Using this cut-off score, the prevalence of insomnia in the study sample was 21.7% and most frequent among women and the oldest old.

    Conclusions

    Data support the measurement properties of the MISS as a possible insomnia screening instrument for elderly persons. This study make evident that the MISS is useful for identifying elderly people with insomnia-like sleep problems. Further studies are needed to assess its usefulness in identifying clinically defined insomnia.

  • 44.
    Hellström, Amanda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nilsson, Camilla
    County Council Värmland.
    Nilsson, Annina
    County Council Blekinge.
    Fagerström, Cecilia
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Leg ulcers in older people: a national study addressing variation in diagnosis, pain and sleep disturbance2016In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 16, article id 25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Leg ulcers commonly emerge as a symptom of other comorbidities, often in older people. As a consequence of the ulcer, pain and sleep disturbances might occur. Due to the complex illness, the responsibility of treatment is unclear between health caregivers. The interaction between ulcer type, sleep and pain has not previously been investigated. This study aimed to explore pain in older men and women (65 years and older) with different diagnoses of leg ulcers and to investigate the associations of sleep disturbances and pain in people with leg ulcer diagnosis. Methods: The study used a cross-sectional design and data from the Swedish Registry of Ulcer Treatment, collected between May 2009 and December 2013. One thousand and eight hundred and twenty four people were included, and 62.9 % were women. The mean age was 83.4 years (SD 8.8). For the analyses, the chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U-test, t-test, one-way ANOVA and logistic regression was performed. Pain was measured by the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), and sleep disturbances was assessed dichotomously. Results: We found the prevalence of pain intensity >= 5 on the NRS to be 34.8 % in those reporting pain. Additionally, the pain intensity was associated with the number of ulcers (p = 0.003). Sleep disturbances were associated with pain (p < 0.001) and were found in 34.8 % of the total sample. Although more women than men reported pain and scored higher on the NRS, no significant gender difference in sleep disturbances was found (p = 0.606). The mean NRS scores did not differ significantly between the ulcer types; however, arterial and venousarterial ulcers increased the risk of sleep disturbances, as did higher pain scores. Conclusions: The majority of the participants were of advanced age (>80 years) and frequently suffered from pain and sleep disturbances. Further research is needed regarding pain, sleep and wound healing in the oldest old with leg ulcers. Ulcer pain sometimes appears to receive less attention in ulcer management, as do sleep disturbances, implying that individual needs might not be satisfactorily met. National guidelines in managing leg ulcers, which also consider consequences such as sleep disturbances, pain and discomfort, are needed.

  • 45.
    Hjelm, Markus
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Holst, Göran
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Willman, Ania
    Bohman, Doris
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Kristensson, Jimmie
    The work of case managers as experienced by older persons (75+) with multi-morbidity – a focused ethnography2015In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 15, article id 168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Complex health systems make it difficult for older persons (75+) with multi-morbidity to achieve continuity of care. Case management could be one way to address this difficulty. Currently, there is a need to extend the knowledge regarding case management as experienced by those utilising the services, namely older persons (75+) with multi-morbidity. The study aimed to explore older persons’ (75+) with multi-morbidity experiences of case managers.

    Methods

    The study design was qualitative and used a focused ethnographic approach. Data was collected through individual interviews with 13 older persons and by participant observations with accompanying field notes, all conducted in 2012–2013.

    Results

    The data revealed four themes illustrating the older persons’ experiences of case managers:

    1) Someone providing me with a trusting relationship; 2) Someone assisting me; 3) Someone who is on my side; and 4) Someone I do not need at present.

    Conclusions

    This study illustrates the importance of establishing trusting relationships between older persons and their case managers in order to truly provide assistance. The older persons valued the case managers acting as informed but unbiased facilitators. The findings could be of help in the development of case management interventions better designed for older persons with multi-morbidity.

  • 46.
    Hjelm, Markus
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola.
    Holst, Göran
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola.
    Willman, Ania
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola / Malmö högskola.
    Bohman, Doris
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola.
    Kristensson, Jimmie
    Lunds universitet.
    The work of case managers as experienced by older persons (75+) with multi-morbidity – a focused ethnography2015In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 15, article id 168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Complex health systems make it difficult for older persons (75+) with multi-morbidity to achieve continuity of care. Case management could be one way to address this difficulty. Currently, there is a need to extend the knowledge regarding case management as experienced by those utilising the services, namely older persons (75+) with multi-morbidity. The study aimed to explore older persons’ (75+) with multi-morbidity experiences of case managers.

    Methods

    The study design was qualitative and used a focused ethnographic approach. Data was collected through individual interviews with 13 older persons and by participant observations with accompanying field notes, all conducted in 2012–2013.

    Results

    The data revealed four themes illustrating the older persons’ experiences of case managers:

    1) Someone providing me with a trusting relationship; 2) Someone assisting me; 3) Someone who is on my side; and 4) Someone I do not need at present.

    Conclusions

    This study illustrates the importance of establishing trusting relationships between older persons and their case managers in order to truly provide assistance. The older persons valued the case managers acting as informed but unbiased facilitators. The findings could be of help in the development of case management interventions better designed for older persons with multi-morbidity.

  • 47. Hjelm, Markus
    et al.
    Holst, Göran
    Willman, Ania
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Bohman, Doris
    Kristensson, Jimmie
    The work of case managers as experienced by older persons (+75) with multi-morbidity: a focused ethnography2015In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 15, article id 168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Complex health systems make it difficult for older persons (75+) with multi-morbidity to achieve continuity of care. Case management could be one way to address this difficulty. Currently, there is a need to extend the knowledge regarding case management as experienced by those utilising the services, namely older persons (75+) with multi-morbidity. The study aimed to explore older persons’ (75+) with multi-morbidity experiences of case managers. Methods The study design was qualitative and used a focused ethnographic approach. Data was collected through individual interviews with 13 older persons and by participant observations with accompanying field notes, all conducted in 2012–2013. Results The data revealed four themes illustrating the older persons’ experiences of case managers: 1) Someone providing me with a trusting relationship; 2) Someone assisting me; 3) Someone who is on my side; and 4) Someone I do not need at present. Conclusions This study illustrates the importance of establishing trusting relationships between older persons and their case managers in order to truly provide assistance. The older persons valued the case managers acting as informed but unbiased facilitators. The findings could be of help in the development of case management interventions better designed for older persons with multi-morbidity.

  • 48. Hoang, Van Minh
    et al.
    Dao, Lan Huong
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Nguyen, Thi Kim Chuc
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Multilevel analysis of covariation in socioeconomic predictors of physical functioning and psychological well-being among older people in rural Vietnam2010In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 10, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background There remains a lack of research on co-variation of multiple health outcomes and their socio-economic co-patterning, especially among the elderly. This papers aims to 1) examine the effects of different socio-economic factors on physical functioning and psychological well-being among older adults in a rural community in northern Vietnam; and 2) investigate the extent to which the two outcomes variables co-vary within individuals.

    Methods We analyzed the data from the WHO/INDEPTH study on global ageing and adult health conducted on 8535 people aged 50 years old and over in Bavi district of Vietnam in 2006. A multivariate response model was constructed to answer our research questions. The model treats the individual as a level two unit and the multiple measurements observed within an individual as a level one unit.

    Results Lower physical functioning and psychological well-being were found in 1) women; 2) older people; 3) people with lower education level; 4) people who were currently single; 5) respondents from poorer household; and 6) mountainous dwellers compared to that in those of other category(ies) of the same variable. Socioeconomic factors accounted for about 24% and 7% of variation in physical functioning and psychological well-being scores, respectively. The adjusted correlation coefficient (0.35) indicates that physical functioning and psychological well-being did not strongly co-vary.

    Conclusions The present study shows that there exist problems of inequality in health among older adults in the study setting. This finding highlights the importance of analyzing multiple dimensions of health status simultaneously in inequality investigations.

  • 49.
    Hoi, Le Van
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Thang, Pham
    Lindholm, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Elderly care in daily living in rural Vietnam: Need and its socioeconomic determinants2011In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, no 11, p. 81-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The proportion of older people is increasing rapidly in Vietnam. The majority of the elderly live in rural areas. Their health status is generally improving but this is less pronounced among the most vulnerable groups. The movement of young people for employment and the impact of other socioeconomic changes leave more elderly on their own and with less family support. This study aims to assess the daily care needs and their socioeconomic determinants among older people in a rural setting.

    Methods

    In 2007, people aged 60 years and older, living in 2,240 households, were randomly selected from the FilaBavi Demographic Surveillance System (DSS). They were interviewed using structured questionnaires to assess needed support in activities of daily living (ADLs). Individuals were interviewed about the presence of chronic illnesses that had been diagnosed by a physician. Participant socioeconomic characteristics were extracted from the FilaBavi repeat census. The repeat census used a repeat of the same survey methods and questions as the original FilaBavi DSS. Distributions of study participants by socioeconomic group, supports needed, levels of support received, types of caregivers, and the ADL index were described. Multivariate analyses were performed to identify socioeconomic determinants of the ADL index.

    Results

    The majority of older people do not need of support for each specific ADL item. Dependence in instrumental or intellectual ADLs was more common than for basic ADLs. People who need total help were less common than those who need some help in most ADLs. Over three-fifths of those who need help receive enough support in all ADL dimensions. Children and grandchildren are the main caregivers. Age group, sex, educational level, marital status, household membership, working status, household size, living arrangement, residential area, household wealth, poverty status, and chronic illnesses were determinants of daily care needs in old age.

    Conclusions

    Although majority of older people who needed help received enough support in daily care, the need of care is more demanded in disadvantaged groups. Future community-based, long-term elderly care should focus on instrumental and intellectual ADLs among the general population of older people, and on basic ADLs among those with chronic illnesses. Socioeconomic determinants of care needs should be addressed in future interventions.

  • 50.
    Hägglund, Patricia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Olai, Lena
    Ståhlnacke, Katri
    Persenius, Mona
    Hagg, Mary
    Andersson, Maria
    Koistinen, Susanne
    Carlsson, Eva
    Study protocol for the SOFIA project: Swallowing function, Oral health, and Food Intake in old Age: a descriptive study with a cluster randomized trial2017In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 17, article id 78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Extensive studies have shown that older people are negatively impacted by impaired eating and nutrition. The abilities to eat, enjoy food, and participate in social activities associated with meals are important aspects of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and recovery after illness. This project aims to (i) describe and analyze relationships between oral health and oral HRQoL, swallowing ability, eating ability, and nutritional risk among older individuals admitted to short-term care; (ii) compare the perceptions that older individuals and staff report on care quality related to oral hygiene and eating; and (iii) study the feasibility and effects of a training program for people with impaired swallowing (i.e., dysphagia).

    Methods/Design: This project consists of two parts, which will be performed in five Swedish counties. It will include approximately 400 older individuals and 200 healthcare professionals. Part 1 is a cross-sectional, descriptive study of older people admitted to short-term care. Subjects will be assessed by trained professionals regarding oral health status, oral HRQoL, eating and nutritional risk, and swallowing ability. Swallowing ability will be measured with a teaspoon test and a swallowing capacity test (SCT). Furthermore, subjects and staff will complete a questionnaire regarding their perceptions of care quality.

    Part 2 is a cluster randomized intervention trial with controls. Older participants with dysphagia (i.e., SCT <10 ml/s, measured in part 1) will be recruited consecutively to either the intervention or control group, depending on where they were admitted for short-term care. At baseline, all subjects will be assessed for oral health status, oral HRQoL, eating and nutritional risk, swallowing ability, and swallowing-related QoL. Then, the intervention group will receive 5 weeks of training with an oral screen for neuromuscular training focused on orofacial and pharyngeal muscles. After completing the intervention, and at six months post-intervention, all assessments will be repeated in both study groups.

    Discussion: The results will make important contributions to rehabilitation knowledge, including approaches for improving swallowing function, oral health, and food intake and for improving the quality of oral care for older people.

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