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  • 1. Abarca-Goméz, Leandra
    et al.
    Abdeen, Ziad A
    Abdul Hamid, Zargar
    Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen M
    Acosta-Cazares, Benjamin
    Acuin, Cecilia
    Adams, Robert J
    Aekplakorn, Wichai
    Forsner, Maria
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Ezzati, Majid
    Worldwide trends in body-mass index, underweight, overweight, and obesity from 1975 to 2016: a pooled analysis of 2416 population-based measurement studies in 128·9 million children, adolescents, and adults.2017In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 390, no 10113, p. 2627-2642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Underweight, overweight, and obesity in childhood and adolescence are associated with adverse health consequences throughout the life-course. Our aim was to estimate worldwide trends in mean body-mass index (BMI) and a comprehensive set of BMI categories that cover underweight to obesity in children and adolescents, and to compare trends with those of adults.

    METHODS: We pooled 2416 population-based studies with measurements of height and weight on 128·9 million participants aged 5 years and older, including 31·5 million aged 5-19 years. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate trends from 1975 to 2016 in 200 countries for mean BMI and for prevalence of BMI in the following categories for children and adolescents aged 5-19 years: more than 2 SD below the median of the WHO growth reference for children and adolescents (referred to as moderate and severe underweight hereafter), 2 SD to more than 1 SD below the median (mild underweight), 1 SD below the median to 1 SD above the median (healthy weight), more than 1 SD to 2 SD above the median (overweight but not obese), and more than 2 SD above the median (obesity).

    FINDINGS: Regional change in age-standardised mean BMI in girls from 1975 to 2016 ranged from virtually no change (-0·01 kg/m2 per decade; 95% credible interval -0·42 to 0·39, posterior probability [PP] of the observed decrease being a true decrease=0·5098) in eastern Europe to an increase of 1·00 kg/m2 per decade (0·69-1·35, PP>0·9999) in central Latin America and an increase of 0·95 kg/m2 per decade (0·64-1·25, PP>0·9999) in Polynesia and Micronesia. The range for boys was from a non-significant increase of 0·09 kg/m2 per decade (-0·33 to 0·49, PP=0·6926) in eastern Europe to an increase of 0·77 kg/m2 per decade (0·50-1·06, PP>0·9999) in Polynesia and Micronesia. Trends in mean BMI have recently flattened in northwestern Europe and the high-income English-speaking and Asia-Pacific regions for both sexes, southwestern Europe for boys, and central and Andean Latin America for girls. By contrast, the rise in BMI has accelerated in east and south Asia for both sexes, and southeast Asia for boys. Global age-standardised prevalence of obesity increased from 0·7% (0·4-1·2) in 1975 to 5·6% (4·8-6·5) in 2016 in girls, and from 0·9% (0·5-1·3) in 1975 to 7·8% (6·7-9·1) in 2016 in boys; the prevalence of moderate and severe underweight decreased from 9·2% (6·0-12·9) in 1975 to 8·4% (6·8-10·1) in 2016 in girls and from 14·8% (10·4-19·5) in 1975 to 12·4% (10·3-14·5) in 2016 in boys. Prevalence of moderate and severe underweight was highest in India, at 22·7% (16·7-29·6) among girls and 30·7% (23·5-38·0) among boys. Prevalence of obesity was more than 30% in girls in Nauru, the Cook Islands, and Palau; and boys in the Cook Islands, Nauru, Palau, Niue, and American Samoa in 2016. Prevalence of obesity was about 20% or more in several countries in Polynesia and Micronesia, the Middle East and north Africa, the Caribbean, and the USA. In 2016, 75 (44-117) million girls and 117 (70-178) million boys worldwide were moderately or severely underweight. In the same year, 50 (24-89) million girls and 74 (39-125) million boys worldwide were obese.

    INTERPRETATION: The rising trends in children's and adolescents' BMI have plateaued in many high-income countries, albeit at high levels, but have accelerated in parts of Asia, with trends no longer correlated with those of adults.

    FUNDING: Wellcome Trust, AstraZeneca Young Health Programme.

  • 2. Abarca-Gómez, L.
    et al.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Lytsy, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Ezzati, M
    Worldwide trends in body-mass index, underweight, overweight, and obesity from 1975 to 2016: a pooled analysis of 2416 population-based measurement studies in 128·9 million children, adolescents, and adults.2017In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 390, no 10113, p. 2627-2642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Underweight, overweight, and obesity in childhood and adolescence are associated with adverse health consequences throughout the life-course. Our aim was to estimate worldwide trends in mean body-mass index (BMI) and a comprehensive set of BMI categories that cover underweight to obesity in children and adolescents, and to compare trends with those of adults.

    METHODS: We pooled 2416 population-based studies with measurements of height and weight on 128·9 million participants aged 5 years and older, including 31·5 million aged 5-19 years. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate trends from 1975 to 2016 in 200 countries for mean BMI and for prevalence of BMI in the following categories for children and adolescents aged 5-19 years: more than 2 SD below the median of the WHO growth reference for children and adolescents (referred to as moderate and severe underweight hereafter), 2 SD to more than 1 SD below the median (mild underweight), 1 SD below the median to 1 SD above the median (healthy weight), more than 1 SD to 2 SD above the median (overweight but not obese), and more than 2 SD above the median (obesity).

    FINDINGS: Regional change in age-standardised mean BMI in girls from 1975 to 2016 ranged from virtually no change (-0·01 kg/m(2) per decade; 95% credible interval -0·42 to 0·39, posterior probability [PP] of the observed decrease being a true decrease=0·5098) in eastern Europe to an increase of 1·00 kg/m(2) per decade (0·69-1·35, PP>0·9999) in central Latin America and an increase of 0·95 kg/m(2) per decade (0·64-1·25, PP>0·9999) in Polynesia and Micronesia. The range for boys was from a non-significant increase of 0·09 kg/m(2) per decade (-0·33 to 0·49, PP=0·6926) in eastern Europe to an increase of 0·77 kg/m(2) per decade (0·50-1·06, PP>0·9999) in Polynesia and Micronesia. Trends in mean BMI have recently flattened in northwestern Europe and the high-income English-speaking and Asia-Pacific regions for both sexes, southwestern Europe for boys, and central and Andean Latin America for girls. By contrast, the rise in BMI has accelerated in east and south Asia for both sexes, and southeast Asia for boys. Global age-standardised prevalence of obesity increased from 0·7% (0·4-1·2) in 1975 to 5·6% (4·8-6·5) in 2016 in girls, and from 0·9% (0·5-1·3) in 1975 to 7·8% (6·7-9·1) in 2016 in boys; the prevalence of moderate and severe underweight decreased from 9·2% (6·0-12·9) in 1975 to 8·4% (6·8-10·1) in 2016 in girls and from 14·8% (10·4-19·5) in 1975 to 12·4% (10·3-14·5) in 2016 in boys. Prevalence of moderate and severe underweight was highest in India, at 22·7% (16·7-29·6) among girls and 30·7% (23·5-38·0) among boys. Prevalence of obesity was more than 30% in girls in Nauru, the Cook Islands, and Palau; and boys in the Cook Islands, Nauru, Palau, Niue, and American Samoa in 2016. Prevalence of obesity was about 20% or more in several countries in Polynesia and Micronesia, the Middle East and north Africa, the Caribbean, and the USA. In 2016, 75 (44-117) million girls and 117 (70-178) million boys worldwide were moderately or severely underweight. In the same year, 50 (24-89) million girls and 74 (39-125) million boys worldwide were obese.

    INTERPRETATION: The rising trends in children's and adolescents' BMI have plateaued in many high-income countries, albeit at high levels, but have accelerated in parts of Asia, with trends no longer correlated with those of adults.

  • 3.
    Abarca-Gómez, Leandra
    et al.
    Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social, Costa Rica.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ezzati, Majid
    School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Worldwide trends in body-mass index, underweight, overweight, and obesity from 1975 to 2016: a pooled analysis of 2416 population-based measurement studies in 128·9 million children, adolescents, and adults2017In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 390, no 10113, p. 2627-2642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Underweight, overweight, and obesity in childhood and adolescence are associated with adverse health consequences throughout the life-course. Our aim was to estimate worldwide trends in mean body-mass index (BMI) and a comprehensive set of BMI categories that cover underweight to obesity in children and adolescents, and to compare trends with those of adults.

    METHODS: We pooled 2416 population-based studies with measurements of height and weight on 128·9 million participants aged 5 years and older, including 31·5 million aged 5-19 years. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate trends from 1975 to 2016 in 200 countries for mean BMI and for prevalence of BMI in the following categories for children and adolescents aged 5-19 years: more than 2 SD below the median of the WHO growth reference for children and adolescents (referred to as moderate and severe underweight hereafter), 2 SD to more than 1 SD below the median (mild underweight), 1 SD below the median to 1 SD above the median (healthy weight), more than 1 SD to 2 SD above the median (overweight but not obese), and more than 2 SD above the median (obesity).

    FINDINGS: Regional change in age-standardised mean BMI in girls from 1975 to 2016 ranged from virtually no change (-0·01 kg/m(2) per decade; 95% credible interval -0·42 to 0·39, posterior probability [PP] of the observed decrease being a true decrease=0·5098) in eastern Europe to an increase of 1·00 kg/m(2) per decade (0·69-1·35, PP>0·9999) in central Latin America and an increase of 0·95 kg/m(2) per decade (0·64-1·25, PP>0·9999) in Polynesia and Micronesia. The range for boys was from a non-significant increase of 0·09 kg/m(2) per decade (-0·33 to 0·49, PP=0·6926) in eastern Europe to an increase of 0·77 kg/m(2) per decade (0·50-1·06, PP>0·9999) in Polynesia and Micronesia. Trends in mean BMI have recently flattened in northwestern Europe and the high-income English-speaking and Asia-Pacific regions for both sexes, southwestern Europe for boys, and central and Andean Latin America for girls. By contrast, the rise in BMI has accelerated in east and south Asia for both sexes, and southeast Asia for boys. Global age-standardised prevalence of obesity increased from 0·7% (0·4-1·2) in 1975 to 5·6% (4·8-6·5) in 2016 in girls, and from 0·9% (0·5-1·3) in 1975 to 7·8% (6·7-9·1) in 2016 in boys; the prevalence of moderate and severe underweight decreased from 9·2% (6·0-12·9) in 1975 to 8·4% (6·8-10·1) in 2016 in girls and from 14·8% (10·4-19·5) in 1975 to 12·4% (10·3-14·5) in 2016 in boys. Prevalence of moderate and severe underweight was highest in India, at 22·7% (16·7-29·6) among girls and 30·7% (23·5-38·0) among boys. Prevalence of obesity was more than 30% in girls in Nauru, the Cook Islands, and Palau; and boys in the Cook Islands, Nauru, Palau, Niue, and American Samoa in 2016. Prevalence of obesity was about 20% or more in several countries in Polynesia and Micronesia, the Middle East and north Africa, the Caribbean, and the USA. In 2016, 75 (44-117) million girls and 117 (70-178) million boys worldwide were moderately or severely underweight. In the same year, 50 (24-89) million girls and 74 (39-125) million boys worldwide were obese.

    INTERPRETATION: The rising trends in children's and adolescents' BMI have plateaued in many high-income countries, albeit at high levels, but have accelerated in parts of Asia, with trends no longer correlated with those of adults.

    FUNDING: Wellcome Trust, AstraZeneca Young Health Programme.

  • 4.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Editorial Material: Not all probiotic strains prevent necrotising enterocolitis in premature infants in LANCET, vol 387, issue 10019, pp 624-6252016In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 387, no 10019, p. 624-625Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 5. Alkema, Leontine
    et al.
    Chou, Doris
    Hogan, Daniel
    Zhang, Sanqian
    Moller, Ann-Beth
    Gemmill, Alison
    Fat, Doris Ma
    Boerma, Ties
    Temmerman, Marleen
    Mathers, Colin
    Say, Lale
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Global, regional, and national levels and trends in maternal mortality between 1990 and 2015, with scenario-based projections to 2030: a systematic analysis by the UN Maternal Mortality Estimation Inter-Agency Group2016In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 387, no 10017, p. 462-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Millennium Development Goal 5 calls for a 75% reduction in the maternal mortality ratio (MMR) between 1990 and 2015. We estimated levels and trends in maternal mortality for 183 countries to assess progress made. Based on MMR estimates for 2015, we constructed projections to show the requirements for the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) of less than 70 maternal deaths per 100,000 livebirths globally by 2030.

    METHODS: We updated the UN Maternal Mortality Estimation Inter-Agency Group (MMEIG) database with more than 200 additional records (vital statistics from civil registration systems, surveys, studies, or reports). We generated estimates of maternal mortality and related indicators with 80% uncertainty intervals (UIs) using a Bayesian model. The model combines the rate of change implied by a multilevel regression model with a time-series model to capture data-driven changes in country-specific MMRs, and includes a data model to adjust for systematic and random errors associated with different data sources.

    RESULTS: We had data for 171 of 183 countries. The global MMR fell from 385 deaths per 100,000 livebirths (80% UI 359-427) in 1990, to 216 (207-249) in 2015, corresponding to a relative decline of 43·9% (34·0-48·7), with 303,000 (291,000-349,000) maternal deaths worldwide in 2015. Regional progress in reducing the MMR since 1990 ranged from an annual rate of reduction of 1·8% (0·0-3·1) in the Caribbean to 5·0% (4·0-6·0) in eastern Asia. Regional MMRs for 2015 ranged from 12 deaths per 100,000 livebirths (11-14) for high-income regions to 546 (511-652) for sub-Saharan Africa. Accelerated progress will be needed to achieve the SDG goal; countries will need to reduce their MMRs at an annual rate of reduction of at least 7·5%.

    INTERPRETATION: Despite global progress in reducing maternal mortality, immediate action is needed to meet the ambitious SDG 2030 target, and ultimately eliminate preventable maternal mortality. Although the rates of reduction that are needed to achieve country-specific SDG targets are ambitious for most high mortality countries, countries that made a concerted effort to reduce maternal mortality between 2000 and 2010 provide inspiration and guidance on how to accomplish the acceleration necessary to substantially reduce preventable maternal deaths.

    FUNDING: National University of Singapore, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, USAID, and the UNDP/UNFPA/UNICEF/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction.

  • 6.
    Anand, K J S
    et al.
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA; Department of Anestheslogy, Neurobiology, and Pharmacology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA.
    Hall, R Whit
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA.
    Desai, Nirmala
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY.
    Shephard, Barbara
    Department of Pediatrics, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA.
    Bergqvist, Lena L
    Neonatal Research Unit, Karolinska Institute, Astrid Lindgren's Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Young, Thomas E
    Department of Pediatrics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Wake Medical Center, Raleigh, NC, USA.
    Boyle, Elaine M
    Simpson Memorial Maternity Pavilion, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
    Carbajal, Ricardo
    Service de Pédiatrie et Médecine Néonatale, Centre Hospitaller Poissy Saint Germain, Poissy, France.
    Bhutani, Vinod K
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania and Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
    Moore, Mary Beth
    Department of Radiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA.
    Kronsberg, Shari S
    Maryland Medical Research Institute, Baltimore, MD.
    Barton, Bruce A
    Maryland Medical Research Institute, Baltimore, MD.
    Effects of morphine analgesia in ventilated preterm neonates: primary outcomes from the NEOPAIN randomised trial2004In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 363, no 9422, p. 1673-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Opioid analgesia is commonly used during neonatal intensive care. We undertook the Neurologic Outcomes and Pre-emptive Analgesia in Neonates (NEOPAIN) trial to investigate whether pre-emptive morphine analgesia decreases the rate of a composite primary outcome of neonatal death, severe intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH), and periventricular leucomalacia (PVL) in preterm neonates.

    METHODS: Ventilated preterm neonates (n=898) from 16 centres were randomly assigned masked placebo (n=449) or morphine (n=449) infusions. After a loading dose (100 microg/kg), morphine infusions (23-26 weeks of gestation 10 microg kg(-1) h(-1); 27-29 weeks 20 microg kg(-1) h(-1); 30-32 weeks 30 microg kg(-1) h(-1)) were continued as long as clinically justified (maximum 14 days). Open-label morphine could be given on clinical judgment (placebo group 242/443 [54.6%], morphine group 202/446 [45.3%]). Analyses were by intention to treat.

    FINDINGS: Baseline variables were similar in the randomised groups. The placebo and morphine groups had similar rates of the composite outcome (105/408 [26%] vs 115/419 [27%]), neonatal death (47/449 [11%] vs 58/449 [13%]), severe IVH (46/429 [11%] vs 55/411 [13%]), and PVL (34/367 [9%] vs 27/367 [7%]). For neonates who were not given open-label morphine, rates of the composite outcome (53/225 [24%] vs 27/179 [15%], p=0.0338) and severe IVH (19/219 [9%] vs 6/189 [3%], p=0.0209) were higher in the morphine group than the placebo group. Placebo-group neonates receiving open-label morphine had worse rates of the composite outcome than those not receiving open-label morphine (78/228 [34%] vs 27/179 [15%], p<0.0001). Morphine-group neonates receiving open-label morphine were more likely to develop severe IVH (36/190 [19%] vs 19/219 [9%], p=0.0024).

    INTERPRETATION: Pre-emptive morphine infusions did not reduce the frequency of severe IVH, PVL, or death in ventilated preterm neonates, but intermittent boluses of open-label morphine were associated with an increased rate of the composite outcome. The morphine doses used in this study decrease clinical signs of pain but can cause significant adverse effects in ventilated preterm neonates.

  • 7. Anderson, Ian
    et al.
    Robson, Bridget
    Connolly, Michele
    Al-Yaman, Fadwa
    Bjertness, Espen
    King, Alexandra
    Tynan, Michael
    Madden, Richard
    Bang, Abhay
    Coimbra, Carlos E. A., Jr.
    Pesantes, Maria Amalia
    Amigo, Hugo
    Andronov, Sergei
    Armien, Blas
    Obando, Daniel Ayala
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Bhatti, Zaid Shakoor
    Bhutta, Zulfi Qar Ahmed
    Bjerregaard, Peter
    Bjertness, Marius B.
    Briceno-Leon, Roberto
    Broderstad, Ann Ragnhild
    Bustos, Patricia
    Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi
    Chu, Jiayou
    Deji, .
    Gouda, Jitendra
    Harikumar, Rachakulla
    Htay, Thein Thein
    Htet, Aung Soe
    Izugbara, Chimaraoke
    Kamaka, Martina
    King, Malcolm
    Kodavanti, Mallikharjuna Rao
    Lara, Macarena
    Laxmaiah, Avula
    Lema, Claudia
    Taborda, Ana Maria Leon
    Liabsuetrakul, Tippawan
    Lobanov, Andrey
    Melhus, Marita
    Meshram, Indrapal
    Miranda, J. Jaime
    Mu, Thet Thet
    Nagalla, Balkrishna
    Nimmathota, Arlappa
    Popov, Andrey Ivanovich
    Poveda, Ana Maria Penuela
    Ram, Faujdar
    Reich, Hannah
    Santos, Ricardo V.
    Sein, Aye Aye
    Shekhar, Chander
    Sherpa, Lhamo Y.
    Sköld, Peter
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Tano, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Tanywe, Asahngwa
    Ugwu, Chidi
    Ugwu, Fabian
    Vapattanawong, Patama
    Wan, Xia
    Welch, James R.
    Yang, Gonghuan
    Yang, Zhaoqing
    Yap, Leslie
    Indigenous and tribal peoples' health (The Lancet-Lowitja Institute Global Collaboration): a population study2016In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 388, no 10040, p. 131-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: International studies of the health of Indigenous and tribal peoples provide important public health insights. Reliable data are required for the development of policy and health services. Previous studies document poorer outcomes for Indigenous peoples compared with benchmark populations, but have been restricted in their coverage of countries or the range of health indicators. Our objective is to describe the health and social status of Indigenous and tribal peoples relative to benchmark populations from a sample of countries.

    Methods: Collaborators with expertise in Indigenous health data systems were identified for each country. Data were obtained for population, life expectancy at birth, infant mortality, low and high birthweight, maternal mortality, nutritional status, educational attainment, and economic status. Data sources consisted of governmental data, data from non-governmental organisations such as UNICEF, and other research. Absolute and relative differences were calculated.

    Findings: Our data (23 countries, 28 populations) provide evidence of poorer health and social outcomes for Indigenous peoples than for non-Indigenous populations. However, this is not uniformly the case, and the size of the rate difference varies. We document poorer outcomes for Indigenous populations for: life expectancy at birth for 16 of 18 populations with a difference greater than 1 year in 15 populations; infant mortality rate for 18 of 19 populations with a rate difference greater than one per 1000 livebirths in 16 populations; maternal mortality in ten populations; low birthweight with the rate difference greater than 2% in three populations; high birthweight with the rate difference greater than 2% in one population; child malnutrition for ten of 16 populations with a difference greater than 10% in five populations; child obesity for eight of 12 populations with a difference greater than 5% in four populations; adult obesity for seven of 13 populations with a difference greater than 10% in four populations; educational attainment for 26 of 27 populations with a difference greater than 1% in 24 populations; and economic status for 15 of 18 populations with a difference greater than 1% in 14 populations.

    Interpretation: We systematically collated data across a broader sample of countries and indicators than done in previous studies. Taking into account the UN Sustainable Development Goals, we recommend that national governments develop targeted policy responses to Indigenous health, improving access to health services, and Indigenous data within national surveillance systems.

  • 8.
    Anderson, Ian
    et al.
    The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
    Tano, Sofia
    School of Business and Economy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Yap, Leslie
    Native Hawaiian Center of Excellence, John A Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu HI, United States.
    Indigenous and tribal peoples' health (The Lancet-Lowitja Institute Global Collaboration): a population study2016In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 388, no 10040, p. 131-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: International studies of the health of Indigenous and tribal peoples provide important public health insights. Reliable data are required for the development of policy and health services. Previous studies document poorer outcomes for Indigenous peoples compared with benchmark populations, but have been restricted in their coverage of countries or the range of health indicators. Our objective is to describe the health and social status of Indigenous and tribal peoples relative to benchmark populations from a sample of countries.

    Methods: Collaborators with expertise in Indigenous health data systems were identified for each country. Data were obtained for population, life expectancy at birth, infant mortality, low and high birthweight, maternal mortality, nutritional status, educational attainment, and economic status. Data sources consisted of governmental data, data from non-governmental organisations such as UNICEF, and other research. Absolute and relative differences were calculated.

    Findings: Our data (23 countries, 28 populations) provide evidence of poorer health and social outcomes for Indigenous peoples than for non-Indigenous populations. However, this is not uniformly the case, and the size of the rate difference varies. We document poorer outcomes for Indigenous populations for: life expectancy at birth for 16 of 18 populations with a difference greater than 1 year in 15 populations; infant mortality rate for 18 of 19 populations with a rate difference greater than one per 1000 livebirths in 16 populations; maternal mortality in ten populations; low birthweight with the rate difference greater than 2% in three populations; high birthweight with the rate difference greater than 2% in one population; child malnutrition for ten of 16 populations with a difference greater than 10% in five populations; child obesity for eight of 12 populations with a difference greater than 5% in four populations; adult obesity for seven of 13 populations with a difference greater than 10% in four populations; educational attainment for 26 of 27 populations with a difference greater than 1% in 24 populations; and economic status for 15 of 18 populations with a difference greater than 1% in 14 populations.

    Interpretation: We systematically collated data across a broader sample of countries and indicators than done in previous studies. Taking into account the UN Sustainable Development Goals, we recommend that national governments develop targeted policy responses to Indigenous health, improving access to health services, and Indigenous data within national surveillance systems.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Antibiotics versus surgery for appendicitis2011In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 378, no 9796, p. 1067-1067Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 10.
    Appelros, Peter
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Neurology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Terent, Andreas
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Thrombolysis in acute stroke2015In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 385, no 9976, p. 1394-1394Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11. Appelros, Peter
    et al.
    Terént, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Thrombolysis in acute stroke2015In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 385, no 9976, p. 1394-1394Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Asplund, Kjell
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Hermerén, Göran
    The need to revise the Helsinki Declaration2017In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 389, no 10075, p. 1190-1191Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Baigent, C
    et al.
    Blackwell, L
    Emberson, J
    Holland, LE
    Reith, C
    Bhala, N
    Peto, R
    Barnes , EH
    Keech, A
    Simes, J
    Collins, R
    Efficacy and safety of more intensive lowering of LDL cholesterol: a meta-analysis of data from 170,000 participants in 26 randomized trials2010In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 376, no 9753, p. 1670-1681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Lowering of LDL cholesterol with standard statin regimens reduces the risk of occlusive vascular events in a wide range of individuals. We aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of more intensive lowering of LDL cholesterol with statin therapy.

    Methods

    We undertook meta-analyses of individual participant data from randomised trials involving at least 1000 participants and at least 2 years' treatment duration of more versus less intensive statin regimens (five trials; 39 612 individuals; median follow-up 5·1 years) and of statin versus control (21 trials; 129 526 individuals; median follow-up 4·8 years). For each type of trial, we calculated not only the average risk reduction, but also the average risk reduction per 1·0 mmol/L LDL cholesterol reduction at 1 year after randomisation.

    Findings

    In the trials of more versus less intensive statin therapy, the weighted mean further reduction in LDL cholesterol at 1 year was 0·51 mmol/L. Compared with less intensive regimens, more intensive regimens produced a highly significant 15% (95% CI 11–18; p<0·0001) further reduction in major vascular events, consisting of separately significant reductions in coronary death or non-fatal myocardial infarction of 13% (95% CI 7–19; p<0·0001), in coronary revascularisation of 19% (95% CI 15–24; p<0·0001), and in ischaemic stroke of 16% (95% CI 5–26; p=0·005). Per 1·0 mmol/L reduction in LDL cholesterol, these further reductions in risk were similar to the proportional reductions in the trials of statin versus control. When both types of trial were combined, similar proportional reductions in major vascular events per 1·0 mmol/L LDL cholesterol reduction were found in all types of patient studied (rate ratio [RR] 0·78, 95% CI 0·76–0·80; p<0·0001), including those with LDL cholesterol lower than 2 mmol/L on the less intensive or control regimen. Across all 26 trials, all-cause mortality was reduced by 10% per 1·0 mmol/L LDL reduction (RR 0·90, 95% CI 0·87–0·93; p<0·0001), largely reflecting significant reductions in deaths due to coronary heart disease (RR 0·80, 99% CI 0·74–0·87; p<0·0001) and other cardiac causes (RR 0·89, 99% CI 0·81–0·98; p=0·002), with no significant effect on deaths due to stroke (RR 0·96, 95% CI 0·84–1·09; p=0·5) or other vascular causes (RR 0·98, 99% CI 0·81–1·18; p=0·8). No significant effects were observed on deaths due to cancer or other non-vascular causes (RR 0·97, 95% CI 0·92–1·03; p=0·3) or on cancer incidence (RR 1·00, 95% CI 0·96–1·04; p=0·9), even at low LDL cholesterol concentrations.

    Interpretation

    Further reductions in LDL cholesterol safely produce definite further reductions in the incidence of heart attack, of revascularisation, and of ischaemic stroke, with each 1·0 mmol/L reduction reducing the annual rate of these major vascular events by just over a fifth. There was no evidence of any threshold within the cholesterol range studied, suggesting that reduction of LDL cholesterol by 2–3 mmol/L would reduce risk by about 40–50%.

    Funding

    UK Medical Research Council, British Heart Foundation, European Community Biomed Programme, Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, and National Heart Foundation.

  • 14. Baigent, Colin
    et al.
    Landray, Martin J.
    Reith, Christina
    Emberson, Jonathan
    Wheeler, David C.
    Tomson, Charles
    Wanner, Christoph
    Krane, Vera
    Cass, Alan
    Craig, Jonathan
    Neal, Bruce
    Jiang, Lixin
    Hooi, Lai Seong
    Levin, Adeera
    Agodoa, Lawrence
    Gaziano, Mike
    Kasiske, Bertram
    Walker, Robert
    Massy, Ziad A.
    Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo
    Krairittichai, Udom
    Ophascharoensuk, Vuddidhej
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Holdaas, Hallvard
    Tesar, Vladimir
    Wiecek, Andrzej
    Grobbee, Diederick
    de Zeeuw, Dick
    Gronhagen-Riska, Carola
    Dasgupta, Tanaji
    Lewis, David
    Herrington, William
    Mafham, Marion
    Majoni, William
    Wallendszus, Karl
    Grimm, Richard
    Pedersen, Terje
    Tobert, Jonathan
    Armitage, Jane
    Baxter, Alex
    Bray, Christopher
    Chen, Yiping
    Chen, Zhengming
    Hill, Michael
    Knott, Carol
    Parish, Sarah
    Simpson, David
    Sleight, Peter
    Young, Alan
    Collins, Rory
    The effects of lowering LDL cholesterol with simvastatin plus ezetimibe in patients with chronic kidney disease (Study of Heart and Renal Protection): a randomised placebo-controlled trial2011In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 377, no 9784, p. 2181-2192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Lowering LDL cholesterol with statin regimens reduces the risk of myocardial infarction, ischaemic stroke, and the need for coronary revascularisation in people without kidney disease, but its effects in people with moderate-to-severe kidney disease are uncertain. The SHARP trial aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of the combination of simvastatin plus ezetimibe in such patients. Methods This randomised double-blind trial included 9270 patients with chronic kidney disease (3023 on dialysis and 6247 not) with no known history of myocardial infarction or coronary revascularisation. Patients were randomly assigned to simvastatin 20 mg plus ezetimibe 10 mg daily versus matching placebo. The key prespecified outcome was first major atherosclerotic event (non-fatal myocardial infarction or coronary death, non-haemorrhagic stroke, or any arterial revascularisation procedure). All analyses were by intention to treat. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00125593, and I SRCTN54137607. Findings 4650 patients were assigned to receive simvastatin plus ezetimibe and 4620 to placebo. Allocation to simvastatin plus ezetimibe yielded an average LDL cholesterol difference of 0.85 mmol/L (SE 0.02; with about two-thirds compliance) during a median follow-up of 4.9 years and produced a 17% proportional reduction in major atherosclerotic events (526 [11.3%] simvastatin plus ezetimibe vs 619 [13.4%] placebo; rate ratio [RR] 0.83, 95% CI 0.74-0.94; log-rank p=0.0021). Non-significantly fewer patients allocated to simvastatin plus ezetimibe had a non-fatal myocardial infarction or died from coronary heart disease (213 [4.6%] vs 230 [5.0%]; RR 0.92,95% CI 0.76-1.11; p=0.37) and there were significant reductions in non-haemorrhagic stroke (131 [2.8%] vs 174 [3.8%]; RR 0.75,95% CI 0.60-0.94; p=0.01) and arterial revascularisation procedures (284 [6.1%] vs 352 [7.6%]; RR 0.79, 95% CI 0.68-0.93; p=0.0036). After weighting for subgroup-specific reductions in LDL cholesterol, there was no good evidence that the proportional effects on major atherosclerotic events differed from the summary rate ratio in any subgroup examined, and, in particular, they were similar in patients on dialysis and those who were not. The excess risk of myopathy was only two per 10 000 patients per year of treatment with this combination (9 [0.2%] vs 5 [0.1%]). There was no evidence of excess risks of hepatitis (21 [0.5%] vs 18 [0.4%]), gallstones (106 [2.3%] vs 106 [2.3%]), or cancer (438 [9.4%] vs 439 [9.5%], p=0.89) and there was no significant excess of death from any non-vascular cause (668 [14.4%] vs 612 [13.2%], p=0.13). Interpretation Reduction of LDL cholesterol with simvastatin 20 mg plus ezetimibe 10 mg daily safely reduced the incidence of major atherosclerotic events in a wide range of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease.

  • 15. Barber, RM
    et al.
    Fullman, N
    Sorensen, RJD
    Bollyky, T
    McKee, M
    Nolte, E
    Abajobir, AA
    Abate, KH
    Abbafati, C
    Abbas, KM
    Abd-Allah, F
    Abdulle, AM
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Younis, MZ
    Yu, C
    Zaidi, Z
    El Sayed Zaki, M
    Zambrana-Torrelio, C
    Zapata, T
    Zenebe, ZM
    Zodpey, S
    Zoeckler, L
    Zuhlke, LJ
    Murray, CJL
    Healthcare Access and Quality Index based on mortality from causes amenable to personal health care in 195 countries and territories, 1990-2015: a novel analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015.2017In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 390, no 10091, p. 231-266, article id S0140-6736(17)30818-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: National levels of personal health-care access and quality can be approximated by measuring mortality rates from causes that should not be fatal in the presence of effective medical care (ie, amenable mortality). Previous analyses of mortality amenable to health care only focused on high-income countries and faced several methodological challenges. In the present analysis, we use the highly standardised cause of death and risk factor estimates generated through the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD) to improve and expand the quantification of personal health-care access and quality for 195 countries and territories from 1990 to 2015.

    METHODS: We mapped the most widely used list of causes amenable to personal health care developed by Nolte and McKee to 32 GBD causes. We accounted for variations in cause of death certification and misclassifications through the extensive data standardisation processes and redistribution algorithms developed for GBD. To isolate the effects of personal health-care access and quality, we risk-standardised cause-specific mortality rates for each geography-year by removing the joint effects of local environmental and behavioural risks, and adding back the global levels of risk exposure as estimated for GBD 2015. We employed principal component analysis to create a single, interpretable summary measure-the Healthcare Quality and Access (HAQ) Index-on a scale of 0 to 100. The HAQ Index showed strong convergence validity as compared with other health-system indicators, including health expenditure per capita (r=0·88), an index of 11 universal health coverage interventions (r=0·83), and human resources for health per 1000 (r=0·77). We used free disposal hull analysis with bootstrapping to produce a frontier based on the relationship between the HAQ Index and the Socio-demographic Index (SDI), a measure of overall development consisting of income per capita, average years of education, and total fertility rates. This frontier allowed us to better quantify the maximum levels of personal health-care access and quality achieved across the development spectrum, and pinpoint geographies where gaps between observed and potential levels have narrowed or widened over time.

    FINDINGS: Between 1990 and 2015, nearly all countries and territories saw their HAQ Index values improve; nonetheless, the difference between the highest and lowest observed HAQ Index was larger in 2015 than in 1990, ranging from 28·6 to 94·6. Of 195 geographies, 167 had statistically significant increases in HAQ Index levels since 1990, with South Korea, Turkey, Peru, China, and the Maldives recording among the largest gains by 2015. Performance on the HAQ Index and individual causes showed distinct patterns by region and level of development, yet substantial heterogeneities emerged for several causes, including cancers in highest-SDI countries; chronic kidney disease, diabetes, diarrhoeal diseases, and lower respiratory infections among middle-SDI countries; and measles and tetanus among lowest-SDI countries. While the global HAQ Index average rose from 40·7 (95% uncertainty interval, 39·0-42·8) in 1990 to 53·7 (52·2-55·4) in 2015, far less progress occurred in narrowing the gap between observed HAQ Index values and maximum levels achieved; at the global level, the difference between the observed and frontier HAQ Index only decreased from 21·2 in 1990 to 20·1 in 2015. If every country and territory had achieved the highest observed HAQ Index by their corresponding level of SDI, the global average would have been 73·8 in 2015. Several countries, particularly in eastern and western sub-Saharan Africa, reached HAQ Index values similar to or beyond their development levels, whereas others, namely in southern sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, and south Asia, lagged behind what geographies of similar development attained between 1990 and 2015.

    INTERPRETATION: This novel extension of the GBD Study shows the untapped potential for personal health-care access and quality improvement across the development spectrum. Amid substantive advances in personal health care at the national level, heterogeneous patterns for individual causes in given countries or territories suggest that few places have consistently achieved optimal health-care access and quality across health-system functions and therapeutic areas. This is especially evident in middle-SDI countries, many of which have recently undergone or are currently experiencing epidemiological transitions. The HAQ Index, if paired with other measures of health-system characteristics such as intervention coverage, could provide a robust avenue for tracking progress on universal health coverage and identifying local priorities for strengthening personal health-care quality and access throughout the world.

    FUNDING: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

  • 16. Barber, Ryan M
    et al.
    Fullman, Nancy
    Sorensen, Reed J
    Bollyky, Thomas
    McKee, Martin
    Nolte, Ellen
    Abajobir, Amanuel Alemu
    Abete, Kalkidan Hassen
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Karolinska institutet.
    Murray, Christopher J L
    Healthcare Access and Quality Index based on mortality from causes amenable to personal health care in 195 countries and territories, 1990–2015: a novel analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 20152017In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 390, no 10091, p. 231-266Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Barber, Ryan M.
    et al.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Fullman, Nancy
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Sorensen, Reed J. D.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Bollyky, Thomas
    Council Foreign Relat, Washington, DC USA..
    McKee, Martin
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, London, England..
    Nolte, Ellen
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, European Observ Hlth Syst & Policies, London, England..
    Abajobir, Amanuel Alemu
    Univ Queensland, Sch Publ Hlth, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Abate, Kalkidan Hassen
    Jimma Univ, Jimma, Ethiopia..
    Abbafati, Cristiana
    Univ Roma La Sapienza, Rome, Italy..
    Abbas, Kaja M.
    Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA USA..
    Abd-Allah, Foad
    Cairo Univ, Dept Neurol, Cairo, Egypt..
    Abdulle, Abdishakur M.
    New York Univ Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, U Arab Emirates..
    Abdurahman, Ahmed Abdulahi
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Tehran, Iran..
    Abera, Semaw Ferede
    Mekelle Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Mekelle, Ethiopia.;Univ Hohenheim, Food Secur, Stuttgart, Germany.;Univ Hohenheim, Inst Biol Chem & Nutr, Stuttgart, Germany..
    Abraham, Biju
    NMSM Govt Coll Kalpetta, Kalpetta, Kerala, India..
    Abreha, Girmatsion Fisseha
    Mekelle Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Adane, Kelemework
    Mekelle Univ, Dept Med Microbiol & Immunol, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Adelekan, Ademola Lukman
    Publ Hlth Promot Alliance, Osogbo, Nigeria.;Univ Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria..
    Adetifa, Ifedayo Morayo O.
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, London, England.;KEMRI Wellcome Trust Res Programme, Kilifi, Kenya..
    Afshin, Ashkan
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Agarwal, Arnav
    Univ Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.;McMaster Univ, Hamilton, ON, Canada.;CSIR, Inst Genom & Integrat Biol, Delhi, India.;Baylor Coll Med, Dept Internal Med, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Agarwal, Sanjay Kumar
    All India Inst Med Sci, New Delhi, India..
    Agarwal, Sunilkumar
    Natl Inst Occupat Hlth ICMR, Ahmadabad, Gujarat, India..
    Agrawal, Anurag
    Kiadaliri, Aliasghar Ahmad
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Orthoped Clin Epidemiol Unit, Lund, Sweden..
    Ahmadi, Alireza
    Kermanshah Univ Med Sci, Kermanshah, Iran..
    Ahmed, Kedir Yimam
    Debre Markos Univ, Debre Markos, Ethiopia..
    Ahmed, Muktar Beshir
    Jimma Univ, Coll Hlth Sci, Dept Epidemiol, ICT & E Learning, Jimma, Ethiopia..
    Akinyemi, Rufus Olusola
    Univ Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.;Newcastle Univ, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Akinyemiju, Tomi F.
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Dept Epidemiol, Birmingham, AL USA..
    Akseer, Nadia
    Univ Toronto, Dalla Lana Sch Publ Hlth, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Hosp Sick Children, Ctr Global Child Hlth, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Al-Aly, Ziyad
    Washington Univ, St Louis, MO USA..
    Alam, Khurshid
    Univ Melbourne, Murdoch Childrens Res Inst, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;Univ Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;Univ Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;Univ Melbourne, Murdoch Childrens Res Inst, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;Univ Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Alam, Noore
    Dept Hlth, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Alam, Sayed Saidul
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res ICDDR, Dhaka, Bangladesh..
    Alemu, Zewdie Aderaw
    Debre Markos Univ, Debre Markos, Ethiopia..
    Alene, Kefyalew Addis
    Univ Gondar, Inst Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Gondar, Ethiopia..
    Alexander, Lily
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Ali, Raghib
    Univ Oxford, Oxford, England..
    Ali, Syed Danish
    Univ London, London, England.;SIR Management Consultants, Oxford, England.;Inst & Fac Actuaries, Oxford, England..
    Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza
    Mazandaran Univ Med Sci, Gastrointestinal Canc Res Ctr, Sari, Iran..
    Alkerwi, Ala'a
    Luxembourg Inst Hlth, Strassen, Luxembourg..
    Alla, Francois
    Univ Lorraine, Sch Publ Hlth, Nancy, France..
    Allebeck, Peter
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Allen, Christine
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Al-Raddadi, Rajaa
    Minist Hlth, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia..
    Alsharif, Ubai
    Charite, Ctr Internal Med & Dermatol, Dept Psychosomat Med, Berlin, Germany..
    Altirkawi, Khalid A.
    King Saud Univ, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Martin, Elena Alvarez
    Spanish Observ Drugs, Govt Delegat Natl Plan Drugs, Minist Hlth Social Policy & Equal, Madrid, Spain..
    Alvis-Guzman, Nelson
    Univ Cartagena, Cartagena De Indias, Colombia..
    Amare, Azmeraw T.
    Univ Adelaide, Sch Med, Adealaide, SA, Australia.;Bahir Dar Univ, Coll Med & Hlth Sci, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia.;Univ Salerno, Sch Med, Baronissi, Italy..
    Amini, Erfan
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Urooncol Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran.;Univ Tehran Med Sci, Res Inst, Endocrinol & Metab Populat Sci Inst, Tehran, Iran.;Univ Tehran Med Sci, Urooncol Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran..
    Ammar, Walid
    Minist Publ Hlth, Beirut, Lebanon..
    Amo-Adjei, Joshu
    African Populat & Hlth Res Ctr, Nairobi, Kenya.;Univ Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana..
    Amoako, Yaw Ampem
    Komfo Anokye Teaching Hosp, Dept Med, Kumasi, Ghana..
    Anderson, Benjamin O.
    Univ Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Androudi, Sofia
    Univ Thessaly, Larisa, Greece..
    Ansari, Hossein
    Zahedan Univ Med Sci, Hlth Promot Res Ctr, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Zahedan, Iran..
    Ansha, Mustafa Geleto
    West Hararghe Zonal Hlth Dept, Chiro, Ethiopia..
    Antonio, Carl Abelardo T.
    Univ Philippines, Coll Publ Hlth, Dept Hlth Policy & Adm, Manila, Philippines..
    Aernloev, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Family Med & Primary Care, Stockholm, Sweden.;Dalarna Univ, Sch Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden..
    Artaman, Al
    Univ Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada..
    Asayesh, Hamid
    Qom Univ Med Sci, Sch Paramed, Dept Emergency Med, Qom, Iran..
    Assadi, Reza
    Mashhad Univ Med Sci, Mashhad, Iran..
    Astatkie, Ayalew
    Hawassa Univ, Hawassa, Ethiopia..
    Atey, Tesfay Mehari
    Mekelle Univ, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Atique, Suleman
    Taipei Med Univ, Coll Med Sci & Technol, Grad Inst Biomed Informat, Taipei, Taiwan..
    Atnafu, Niguse Tadele
    Tepi Univ, Mizan Teferi, Ethiopia..
    Atre, Sachin R.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, BJ Med Coll, Clin Trials Unit, Pune, Maharashtra, India..
    Avila-Burgos, Leticia
    Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico..
    Avokpaho, Euripide Frinel G. Arthur
    Inst Rech Clin Benin IRCB, Cotonou, Benin.;LERAS Afr, Parakou, Benin..
    Quintanilla, Beatriz Paulina Ayala
    La Trobe Univ, Judith Lumley Ctr Mother Infant & Family Hlth Res, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;Peruvian Natl Inst Hlth, Lima, Peru..
    Awasthi, Ashish
    Sanjay Gandhi Postgrad Inst Med Sci, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India..
    Ayele, Nebiyu Negussu
    Minist Hlth, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia..
    Azzopardi, Peter
    Univ Melbourne, Dept Paediat, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;Univ Melbourne, Murdoch Childrens Res Inst, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Dept Paediat, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;South Australian Hlth & Med Res Inst, Wardliparingga Aboriginal Res Unit, Adelaide, SA, Australia.;Burnet Inst, Ctr Int Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Saleem, Huda Omer Ba
    Aden Univ, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Aden, Yemen..
    Baernighausen, Till
    Harvard Univ, Harvard Med Sch, Dept Global Hlth & Populat, Boston, MA USA.;Africa Hlth Res Inst, Mtubatuba, South Africa.;Heidelberg Univ, Inst Publ Hlth, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Bacha, Umar
    Univ Management & Technol, Sch Hlth Sci, Lahore, Pakistan..
    Badawi, Alaa
    Univ Toronto, Fac Med, Dept Nutr Sci, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Publ Hlth Agcy Canada, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Banerjee, Amitava
    UCL, Farr Inst Hlth Informat Res, London, England..
    Barac, Aleksandra
    Univ Belgrade, Fac Med, Belgrade, Serbia..
    Barboza, Miguel A.
    CCSS, Hosp Dr Rafael Calderon Guardia, San Jose, Costa Rica.;Univ Costa Rica, San Pedro, Costa Rica..
    Barker-Collo, Suzanne L.
    Univ Auckland, Sch Psychol, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Barrero, Lope H.
    Pontificia Univ Javeriana, Sch Engn, Dept Ind Engn, Bogota, Colombia..
    Basu, Sanjay
    Stanford Univ, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Baune, Bernhard T.
    Univ Adelaide, Sch Med, Adealaide, SA, Australia.;Univ Salerno, Sch Med, Baronissi, Italy..
    Baye, Kaleab
    Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia..
    Bayou, Yibeltal Tebekaw
    Jhpiego Ethiopia, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia..
    Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad
    Charles R Drew Univ Med & Sci, Coll Med, Los Angeles, CA 90059 USA.;Univ Calif Los Angeles, David Geffen Sch Med, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA..
    Bedi, Neeraj
    Coll Publ Hlth & Trop Med, Jazan, Saudi Arabia..
    Beghi, Ettore
    IRCCS, Ist Ric Farmacol Mario Negri, Milan, Italy..
    Bejot, Yannick
    Univ Burgundy, Univ Hosp & Med Sch Dijon, Dijon, France..
    Bello, Aminu K.
    Univ Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada..
    Bennett, Derrick A.
    Univ Oxford, Oxford, England..
    Bensenor, Isabela M.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Berhane, Adugnaw
    Debre Berhan Univ, Coll Hlth Sci, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia..
    Bernabe, Eduardo
    Kings Coll London, London, England..
    Bernal, Oscar Alberto
    Univ Andes, Bogota, Colombia..
    Beyene, Addisu Shunu
    Haramaya Univ, Coll Hlth & Med Sci, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.;Haramaya Univ, Coll Hlth & Med Sci, Harar, Ethiopia..
    Beyene, Tariku Jibat
    Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.;Wageningen Univ, Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.
    Hosp Sick Children, Ctr Global Child Hlth, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Aga Khan Univ, Ctr Excellence Women & Child Hlth, Karachi, Pakistan..
    Biadgilign, Sibhatu
    Independent Publ Hlth Consultants, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia..
    Bikbov, Boris
    IRCCS, Ist Ric Farmacol Mario Negri, Bergamo, Italy..
    Birlik, Sait Mentes
    GBS CIDP Int Fdn, Menemen, Turkey..
    Birungi, Charles
    UCL, London, England..
    Biryukov, Stan
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Bisanzio, Donal
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Oxford, England..
    Bizuayehu, Habtamu Mellie
    Debre Markos Univ, Debre Markos Town, Ethiopia..
    Bose, Dipan
    World Bank, Washington, DC 20433 USA..
    Brainin, Michael
    Danube Univ Krems, Krems, Austria..
    Brauer, Michael
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Brazinova, Alexandra
    Trnava Univ, Fac Hlth Sci & Social Work, Dept Publ Hlth, Trnava, Slovakia.;Int Neurotrauma Res Org, Vienna, Austria..
    Breitborde, Nicholas J. K.
    Ohio State Univ, Columbus, OH 43210 USA..
    Brenner, Hermann
    German Canc Res Ctr, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Butt, Zahid A.
    Al Shifa Trust Eye Hosp, Rawalpindi, Pakistan..
    Cardenas, Rosario
    Metropolitan Autonomous Univ, Mexico City, DF, Mexico..
    Cahuana-Hurtado, Lucero
    Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico..
    Campos-Nonato, Ismael Ricardo
    Harvard Univ, Harvard Med Sch, Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Boston, MA USA.;Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico..
    Car, Josip
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore, Singapore..
    Carrero, Juan Jesus
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Casey, Daniel
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Caso, Valeria
    Univ Perugia, Stroke Unit, Perugia, Italy..
    Castaneda-Orjuela, Carlos A.
    Inst Nacl Salud, Colombian Natl Hlth Observ, Bogota, Colombia.;Univ Nacl Colombia, Dept Publ Hlth, Epidemiol & Publ Hlth Evaluat Grp, Bogota, Colombia..
    Rivas, Jacqueline Castillo
    Caja Costarricense Seguro Social, San Jose, Costa Rica.;Univ Costa Rica, San Pedro, Montes De Oca, Costa Rica..
    Catala-Lopez, Ferran
    Univ Valencia, INCLIVA Hlth Res Inst, Dept Med, Valencia, Spain.;CIBERSAM, Valencia, Spain.;Ottawa Hosp Res Inst, Clin Epidemiol Program, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Cecilio, Pedro
    Cercy, Kelly
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Charlson, Fiona J.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Queensland, Sch Publ Hlth, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Queensland Ctr Mental Hlth Res, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Chen, Alan Z.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Chew, Adrienne
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Chibalabala, Mirriam
    Crowd Watch Africa, Lusaka, Zambia..
    Chibueze, Chioma Ezinne
    Natl Ctr Child Hlth & Dev, Setagaya Ku, Tokyo, Japan..
    Chisumpa, Vesper Hichilombwe
    Univ Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia.;Univ Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa..
    Chitheer, Abdulaal A.
    Minist Hlth, Baghdad, Iraq..
    Chowdhury, Rajiv
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England..
    Christensen, Hanne
    Bispebjerg Hosp, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Christopher, Devasahayam Jesudas
    Christian Med Coll & Hosp, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India..
    Ciobanu, Liliana G.
    Univ Adelaide, Adealaide, SA, Australia..
    Cirillo, Massimo
    Univ Salerno, Baronissi, Italy..
    Coggeshall, Megan S.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Cooper, Leslie Trumbull
    Mayo Clin, Jacksonville, FL 32224 USA..
    Cortinovis, Monica
    IRCCS, Ist Ric Farmacol Mario Negri, Bergamo, Italy..
    Crump, John A.
    Univ Otago, Dunedin Sch Med, Ctr Int Hlth, Dunedin, New Zealand..
    Dalal, Koustuv
    Univ Orebro, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, Ctr Injury Prevent & Safety Promot, Orebro, Sweden. Walden Univ, Minneapolis, MN USA..
    Dandona, Lalit
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Publ Hlth Fdn India, New Delhi, India..
    Dandona, Rakhi
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Publ Hlth Fdn India, New Delhi, India..
    Dargan, Paul I.
    Guys & St Thomas NHS Fdn Trust, London, England..
    das Neves, Jose
    Univ Porto, Fac Med, I3S Inst Invest Inovacao Saude, Oporto, Portugal.;Univ Porto, Fac Med, INEB Inst Engn Biomed, Oporto, Portugal..
    Davey, Gail
    Wellcome Trust Brighton & Sussex Ctr Global Hlth, Brighton, E Sussex, England..
    Davitoiu, Dragos V.
    Univ Med & Pharm Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania..
    Davletov, Kairat
    Republican Inst Cardiol & Internal Dis, Alma Ata, Kazakhstan.;Kazakh Natl Med Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Alma Ata, Kazakhstan..
    De Leo, Diego
    Griffith Univ, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Del Gobbo, Liana C.
    Stanford Univ, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    del Pozo-Cruz, Borja
    Univ Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Dellavalle, Robert P.
    Univ Colorado, Sch Med, Aurora, CO USA.;Univ Colorado, Colorado Sch Publ Hlth, Aurora, CO USA..
    Deribe, Kebede
    Univ Addis Ababa, Sch Publ Hlth, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.;Brighton & Sussex Med Sch, Brighton, E Sussex, England..
    Deribew, Amare
    KEMRI Wellcome Trust Res Programme, Kilifi, Kenya.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Oxford, England..
    Jarlais, Don C. Des
    Mt Sinai Beth Israel, New York, NY USA.;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, New York, NY 10029 USA..
    Dey, Subhojit
    Publ Hlth Fdn India, Indian Inst Publ Hlth Delhi, Gurgaon, India..
    Dharmaratne, Samath D.
    Univ Peradeniya, Fac Med, Dept Community Med, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka..
    Dicker, Daniel
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Ding, Eric L.
    Harvard Univ, Harvard Med Sch, Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Boston, MA USA..
    Dokova, Klara
    Med Univ Varna, Fac Publ Hlth, Dept Social Med, Varna, Bulgaria..
    Dorsey, E. Ray
    Univ Rochester, Med Ctr, Rochester, NY 14642 USA..
    Doyle, Kerrie E.
    RMIT Univ, Bundoora, Vic, Australia.;Australian Natl Univ, Canberra, ACT, Australia..
    Dubey, Manisha
    Int Inst Populat Sci, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India..
    Ehrenkranz, Rebecca
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Ellingsen, Christian Lycke
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Oslo, Norway..
    Elyazar, Iqbal
    Eijkman Oxford Clin Res Unit, Jakarta, Indonesia..
    Enayati, Ahmadali
    Sch Publ Hlth & Hlth Sci Res Ctr, Sari, Iran..
    Ermakov, Sergey Petrovich
    Russian Acad Sci, Inst Social & Econ Studies Populat, Moscow, Russia.;Minist Hlth Russian Federat, Fed Res Inst Hlth Org & Informat, Moscow, Russia..
    Eshrati, Babak
    Minist Hlth & Med Educ, Tehran, Iran.;Arak Univ Med Sci, Arak, Iran..
    Esteghamati, Alireza
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Res Inst, Endocrinol & Metab Populat Sci Inst, Tehran, Iran.;Univ Tehran Med Sci, Endocrinol & Metab Populat Sci Inst, Tehran, Iran..
    Estep, Kara
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Fuerst, Thomas
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Infect Dis Epidemiol, London, England.;Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Basel, Basel, Switzerland..
    Faghmous, Imad D. A.
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, London, England..
    Fanuel, Fanuel Belayneh Bekele
    Hawassa Univ, Hawassa, Ethiopia.;Wolaita Sodo Univ, Wolaita Sodo, Ethiopia..
    Faraon, Emerito Jose Aquino
    Univ Philippines, Coll Publ Hlth, Manila, Philippines.;Dept Hlth, Manila, Philippines..
    Farid, Talha A.
    Univ Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 USA..
    Farinha, Carla Sofia e Sa
    DGS Directorate Gen Hlth, Lisbon, Portugal.;Univ Aberta, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Faro, Andre
    Univ Fed Sergipe, Aracaju, Brazil..
    Farvid, Maryam S.
    Harvard Univ, Harvard Med Sch, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Mongan Inst Hlth Policy, Harvard MGH Ctr Gen Vulnerable Populat & Hlth Dis, Boston, MA 02114 USA..
    Farzadfar, Farshad
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Noncommunicable Dis Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran.;Univ Tehran Med Sci, Noncommunicable Dis Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran..
    Feigin, Valery L.
    Auckland Univ Technol, Natl Inst Stroke & Appl Neurosci, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Feigl, Andrea B.
    Harvard Univ, Harvard Med Sch, Dept Global Hlth & Populat, Boston, MA USA..
    Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc NVS, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fernandes, Jefferson G.
    German Hosp Oswaldo Cruz, Inst Educ & Sci, Sao Paulo, Brazil.;Catholic Univ Portugal, Fac Biotechnol, CBQF Ctr Biotechnol & Fine Chem, Associate Lab, Oporto, Portugal..
    Fernandes, Joao C.
    Feyissa, Tesfaye Regassa
    Wollega Univ, Nekemte, Ethiopia..
    Fischer, Florian
    Univ Bielefeld, Sch Publ Hlth, Bielefeld, Germany..
    Fitzmaurice, Christina
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Washington, Dept Med, Div Hematol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Seattle, WA 98104 USA..
    Fleming, Thomas D.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Foigt, Nataliya
    Acad Med Sci, Inst Gerontol, Kiev, Ukraine..
    Foreman, Kyle J.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Imperial Coll London, London, England..
    Forouzanfar, Mohammad H.
    Seattle Genet, Seattle, WA USA..
    Franklin, Richard C.
    James Cook Univ, Townsville, Qld, Australia..
    Frostad, Joseph
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    hiwot, Tsegaye Tewelde G.
    Gakidou, Emmanuela
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Gambashidze, Ketevan
    Natl Ctr Dis Control & Publ Hlth, Tbilisi, Rep of Georgia.;Natl Ctr Dis Control Publ Hlth, Tbilisi, Rep of Georgia..
    Gamkrelidze, Amiran
    Gao, Wayne
    Natl Hlth Res Inst, Taipei, Taiwan..
    Garcia-Basteiro, Alberto L.
    Manhica Hlth Res Ctr, Manhica, Mozambique.;Barcelona Inst Global Hlth, Barcelona, Spain..
    Gebre, Teshome
    Task Force Global Hlth, Decatur, GA USA..
    Gebremedhin, Amanuel Tesfay
    Jimma Univ, Jimma, Ethiopia.;Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Munich, Germany..
    Gebremichael, Mengistu Welday
    Mekelle Univ, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Gebru, Alemseged Aregay
    Mekelle Univ, Mekelle, Ethiopia.;Kilte Awlaelo Hlth & Demog Surveillance Syst, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Gelaye, Amha Admasie
    Wolaita Sodo Univ, Sodo, Ethiopia..
    Geleijnse, Johanna M.
    Wageningen Univ, Div Human Nutr, Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Genova-Maleras, Ricard
    Reg Hlth Council, Directorate Gen Publ Hlth, Madrid, Spain.;Natl Sch Publ Hlth, Madrid, Spain..
    Gibney, Katherine B.
    Univ Melbourne, Peter Doherty Inst Infect & Immun, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;Royal Melbourne Hosp, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Giref, Ababi Zergaw
    UCL, Farr Inst Hlth Informat Res, London, England.;Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.;Univ British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.;Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Gishu, Melkamu Dedefo
    Haramaya Univ, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.;Kersa Hlth & Demog Surveillance Syst, Harar, Ethiopia..
    Giussani, Giorgia
    IRCCS, Ist Ric Farmacol Mario Negri, Milan, Italy..
    Godwin, William W.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Gold, Audra
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Goldberg, Ellen M.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Gona, Philimon N.
    Univ Massachusetts Boston, Boston, MA 02125 USA..
    Goodridge, Amador
    Inst Invest Cient & Serv Alta Tecnol INDICASAT AI, Cuidad Del Saber, Panama..
    Gopalani, Sameer Vali
    Govt Federated States Micronesia, Dept Hlth & Social Affairs, Palikir, Micronesia..
    Goto, Atsushi
    Natl Canc Ctr, Ctr Publ Hlth Sci, Div Epidemiol, Tokyo, Japan..
    Graetz, Nicholas
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Greaves, Felix
    Imperial Coll London, London, England.;Publ Hlth England, London, England..
    Griswold, Max
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Guban, Peter Imre
    Stockholm Cty Council Surveillance & Anal Ctr Epi, Solna, Sweden..
    Gugnani, Harish Chander
    St James Sch Med, Dept Microbiol, Quarter, Anguilla.;St James Sch Med, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Quarter, Anguilla..
    Gupta, Prakash C.
    Sekhsaria Inst Publ Hlth, Navi Mumbai, India..
    Gupta, Rahul
    West Virginia Bur Publ Hlth, Charleston, WV USA.;Eternal Heart Care Ctr & Res Inst, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India..
    Gupta, Rajeev
    Gupta, Tanush
    Montefiore Med Ctr, Bronx, NY 10467 USA..
    Gupta, Vipin
    Univ Delhi, Dept Anthropol, Delhi, India..
    Habtewold, Tesfa Dejenie
    Debre Berhan Univ, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia.;Univ Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Hafezi-Nejad, Nima
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Res Inst, Endocrinol & Metab Populat Sci Inst, Tehran, Iran.;Univ Tehran Med Sci, Endocrinol & Metab Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran..
    Haile, Demewoz
    Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia..
    Hailu, Alemayehu Desalegne
    Univ Addis Ababa, Sch Publ Hlth, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.;Univ Bergen, Bergen, Norway..
    Hailu, Gessessew Bugssa
    Mekelle Univ, Mekelle, Ethiopia.;Kilte Awlaelo Hlth & Demog Surveillance Syst, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Hakuzimana, Alex
    Univ Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.;Euclid Univ, Banjul, Gambia..
    Hamadeh, Randah Ribhi
    Arabian Gulf Univ, Manama, Bahrain..
    Hambisa, Mitiku Teshome
    Haramaya Univ, Coll Hlth & Med Sci, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia..
    Hamidi, Samer
    Hamdan Bin Mohammed Smart Univ, Dubai, U Arab Emirates..
    Hammami, Mouhanad
    Wayne Cty Dept Hlth & Human Serv, Detroit, MI USA..
    Hankey, Graeme J.
    Univ Western Australia, Sch Med & Pharmacol, Perth, WA, Australia.;Harry Perkins Inst Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia.;Western Australian Neurosci Res Inst, Nedlands, WA, Australia..
    Hao, Yuantao
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Guangzhou, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Harb, Hilda L.
    Minist Publ Hlth, Beirut, Lebanon..
    Hareri, Habtamu Abera
    Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia..
    Haro, Josep Maria
    CIBERSAM, Res & Dev Unit, Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona, Spain..
    Hassanvand, Mohammad Sadegh
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Ctr Air Pollut Res, Tehran, Iran.;Univ Tehran Med Sci, Ctr Air Pollut Res Inst Environm Res, Tehran, Iran..
    Havmoeller, Rasmus
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hay, Roderick J.
    Univ Oxford, Li Ka Shing Ctr Hlth Informat & Discovery, Oxford Big Data Inst, Oxford, England.;Kings Coll London, London, England.;Int Fdn Dermatol, London, England..
    Hay, Simon I.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Hendrie, Delia
    Curtin Univ, Ctr Populat Hlth Res, Bentley, WA, Australia..
    Heredia-Pi, Ileana Beatriz
    Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico..
    Hoek, Hans W.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Psychiat, Groningen, Netherlands.;Columbia Univ, Mailman Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, New York, NY USA..
    Horino, Masako
    Nevada Div Publ & Behav Hlth, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, Carson City, NV USA..
    Horita, Nobuyuki
    Yokohama City Univ, Grad Sch Med, Dept Pulmonol, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan..
    Hosgood, H. Dean
    Albert Einstein Coll Med, Bronx, NY 10467 USA..
    Htet, Aung Soe
    Minist Hlth, Int Relat Div, Nay Pyi Taw, Myanmar.;Univ Oslo, Oslo, Norway..
    Hu, Guoqing
    Cent S Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Hlth Stat, Changsha, Hunan, Peoples R China..
    Huang, Hsiang
    Cambridge Hlth Alliance, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Huang, John J.
    Yale Univ, New Haven, CT USA..
    Huntley, Bethany M.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Huynh, Chantal
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Iburg, Kim Moesgaard
    Aarhus Univ, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Ileanu, Bogdan Vasile
    Bucharest Univ Econ Studies, Bucharest, Romania..
    Innos, Kaire
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Tallinn, Estonia..
    Irenso, Asnake Ararsa
    Haramaya Univ, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.;Haramaya Univ, Harar, Ethiopia..
    Jahanmehr, Nader
    Shahid Beheshti Univ Med Sci, Sch Publ Hlth, Tehran, Iran..
    Jakovljevic, Mihajlo B.
    Univ Kragujevac, Fac Med Sci, Kragujevac, Serbia..
    James, Peter
    Harvard Univ, Harvard Med Sch, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA..
    James, Spencer Lewis
    Univ Colorado, Denver Hlth, Denver, CO 80202 USA..
    Javanbakht, Mehdi
    Univ Aberdeen, Aberdeen, Scotland..
    Jayaraman, Sudha P.
    Virginia Commonwealth Univ, Dept Surg, Richmond, VA USA..
    Jayatilleke, Achala Upendra
    Postgrad Inst Med, Colombo 07, Sri Lanka.;Inst Violence & Injury Prevent, Colombo 08, Sri Lanka..
    Jeemon, Panniyammakal
    Publ Hlth Fdn India, Ctr Control Chron Condit, New Delhi, India.;Ctr Chron Dis Control, New Delhi, India.;Publ Hlth Fdn India, Ctr Control Chron Condit, Guragon, India.;Publ Hlth Fdn India, Ctr Control Chron Condit, Gurgaon, India..
    Jha, Vivekanand
    Univ Oxford, Oxford, England.;George Inst Global Hlth, New Delhi, India..
    John, Denny
    Int Ctr Res Women, New Delhi, India..
    Johnson, Catherine
    Johnson, Sarah C.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Jonas, Jost B.
    Heidelberg Univ, Med Fac Mannheim, Dept Ophthalmol, Mannheim, Germany..
    Juel, Knud
    Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Kabir, Zubair
    Univ Coll Cork, Cork, Ireland..
    Kalkonde, Yogeshwar
    Soc Educ Act & Res Community Hlth, Gadchiroli, India..
    Kamal, Ritul
    CSIR, Indian Inst Toxicol Res, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India..
    Kan, Haidong
    Fudan Univ, Shanghai, Peoples R China..
    Karch, Andre
    Helmholtz Ctr Infect Res, Epidemiol & Stat Methods Res Grp, Braunschweig, Germany.;German Ctr Infect Res, Hannover Braunschweig Site, Braunschweig, Germany..
    Karema, Corine Kakizi
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Basel, Switzerland.;Qual & Equity Hlth Care, Kigali, Rwanda..
    Karimi, Seyed M.
    Univ Washington Tacoma, Tacoma, WA USA..
    Kasaeian, Amir
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Res Inst, Endocrinol & Metab Populat Sci Inst, Tehran, Iran.;Univ Tehran Med Sci, Hematol Oncol & Stem Cell Transplantat Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran.;Univ Tehran Med Sci, Hematol Oncol & Stem Cell Transplantat Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran..
    Kassebaum, Nicholas J.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Seattle Childrens Hosp, Dept Anesthesiol & Pain Med, Seattle, WA USA..
    Kastor, Anshul
    Int Inst Populat Sci, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India..
    Katikireddi, Srinivasa Vittal
    Univ Glasgow, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Kazanjan, Konstantin
    Natl Ctr Dis Control & Publ Hlth, Tbilisi, Rep of Georgia..
    Keiyoro, Peter Njenga
    Inst Trop & Infect Dis, Nairobi, Kenya.;Sch Continuing & Distance Educ, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Kemmer, Laura
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Kemp, Andrew Haddon
    Swansea Univ, Swansea, W Glam, Wales.;Univ Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia..
    Kengne, Andre Pascal
    Univ Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.;South African Med Res Council, Cape Town, South Africa..
    Kerbo, Amene Abebe
    Wolaita Sodo Univ, Wolaita Sodo, Ethiopia..
    Kereselidze, Maia
    Natl Ctr Dis Control & Publ Hlth, Tbilisi, Rep of Georgia..
    Kesavachandran, Chandrasekharan Nair
    CSIR, Indian Inst Toxicol Res, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India..
    Khader, Yousef Saleh
    Jordan Univ Sci & Technol, Irbid, Jordan..
    Khalil, Ibrahim
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Khan, Abdur Rahman
    Univ Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 USA..
    Khan, Ejaz Ahmad
    Hlth Serv Acad, Islamabad, Pakistan..
    Khan, Gulfaraz
    United Arab Emirates Univ, Coll Med Hlth Sci, Dept Microbiol & Immunol, Al Ain, U Arab Emirates..
    Khang, Young-Ho
    Seoul Natl Univ, Coll Med, Seoul, South Korea..
    Khoja, Abdullah Tawfih Abdullah
    Mohammed Ibn Saudi Univ, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.;Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Khonelidze, Irma
    Natl Ctr Dis Control & Publ Hlth, Tbilisi, Rep of Georgia..
    Khubchandani, Jagdish
    Ball State Univ, Muncie, IN 47306 USA..
    Kibret, Getiye Dejenu
    Debre Markos Univ, Debre Markos, Ethiopia..
    Kim, Daniel
    Northeastern Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Kim, Pauline
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Kim, Yun Jin
    Southern Univ Coll, Skudai, Malaysia..
    Kimokoti, Ruth W.
    Simmons Coll, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Kinfu, Yohannes
    Univ Canberra, Fac Hlth, Ctr Res & Act Publ Hlth, Canberra, ACT, Australia..
    Kissoon, Niranjan
    Univ British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Kivipelto, Miia
    Karolinska Inst, Aging Res Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kokubo, Yoshihiro
    Natl Cerebral & Cardiovasc Ctr, Dept Prevent Cardiol, Suita, Osaka, Japan..
    Kolk, Anneli
    Univ Tartu, Fac Med, Dept Pediat, Tartu, Estonia..
    Kolte, Dhaval
    Brown Univ, Div Cardiol, Providence, RI 02912 USA..
    Kopec, Jacek A.
    Univ British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Kosen, Soewarta
    NIHRD, Ctr Community Empowerment Hlth Policy & Humanitie, Jakarta, Indonesia..
    Koul, Parvaiz A.
    Sher Kashmir Inst Med Sci, Srinagar, Jammu & Kashmir, India..
    Koyanagi, Ai
    CIBERSAM, Res & Dev Unit, Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona, Spain..
    Kravchenko, Michael
    Res Ctr Neurol, Moscow, Russia..
    Krishnaswami, Sanjay
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Portland, OR 97201 USA..
    Krohn, Kristopher J.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Defo, Barthelemy Kuate
    Univ Montreal, Dept Demog, Montreal, PQ, Canada.;Univ Montreal, Publ Hlth Res Inst, Montreal, PQ, Canada.;Univ Montreal, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Social & Prevent Med, Montreal, PQ, Canada..
    Bicer, Burcu Kucuk
    Hacettepe Univ, Inst Publ Hlth, Ankara, Turkey..
    Kuipers, Ernst J.
    Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Kulkarni, Veena S.
    Arkansas State Univ, State Univ, AR USA..
    Kumar, G. Anil
    Publ Hlth Fdn India, Guragon, India..
    Kumsa, Fekede Asefa
    Haramaya Univ, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.;Haramaya Univ, Harar, Ethiopia..
    Kutz, Michael
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Kyu, Hmwe H.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Lager, Anton Carl Jonas
    Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Epidemiol & Community Med, Solna, Sweden..
    Lal, Aparna
    Australian Natl Univ, Natl Ctr Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, Canberra, ACT, Australia.;Publ Hlth Fdn India, Gurgaon, India..
    Lal, Dharmesh Kumar
    Lalloo, Ratilal
    Univ Queensland, Sch Dent, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Lallukka, Tea
    Univ Helsinki, Fac Med, Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth Work Org, Dept Publ Hlth,Work Disabil Program, Helsinki, Finland..
    Lan, Qing
    NCI, Rockville, MD USA..
    Langan, Sinead M.
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, London, England..
    Lansingh, Van C.
    Help Me See Inc, New York, NY USA.;Inst Mexicano Oftalmol, Queretaro, Mexico..
    Larson, Heidi J.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Dept Infect Dis Epidemiol, London, England..
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Laryea, Dennis Odai
    Komfo Anokye Teaching Hosp, Kumasi, Ghana..
    Latif, Asma Abdul
    Lahore Coll Women Univ, Dept Zool, Lahore, Pakistan..
    Lawrynowicz, Alicia Elena Beatriz
    Inst Nacl Epidemiol Dr Juan H Jara, Mar Del Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina..
    Leasher, Janet L.
    Nova Southeastern Univ, Coll Optometry, Ft Lauderdale, FL 33314 USA..
    Leigh, James
    Univ Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute for Health Development, Tallin, Estonia.
    Leshargie, Cheru Tesema
    Debre Markos Univ, Debre Markos, Ethiopia..
    Leung, Janni
    Univ Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Queensland, Sch Publ Hlth, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Leung, Ricky
    SUNY Albany, Albany, NY 12222 USA..
    Levi, Miriam
    Tuscany Reg Ctr Occupat Injuries & Dis, Florence, Italy..
    Liang, Xiaofeng
    Chinese Ctr Dis Control & Prevent, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Lim, Stephen S.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Lind, Margaret
    Linn, Shai
    Univ Haifa, Haifa, Israel..
    Lipshultz, Steven E.
    Wayne State Univ, Sch Med, Detroit, MI USA.;Childrens Hosp Michigan, Detroit, MI 48201 USA..
    Liu, Patrick
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Liu, Yang
    Emory Univ, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA..
    Lo, Loon-Tzian
    UnionHealth Associates LLC, St Louis, MO USA.;Alton Mental Hlth Ctr, Alton, IL USA..
    Logroscino, Giancarlo
    Univ Bari, Bari, Italy..
    Lopez, Alan D.
    Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Lorch, Scott A.
    Univ Penn, Childrens Hosp Philadelphia, Sch Med, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Lotufo, Paulo A.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Lozano, Rafael
    Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico..
    Lunevicius, Raimundas
    Aintree Univ Hosp Natl Hlth Serv Fdn Trust, Liverpool, Merseyside, England.;Univ Liverpool, Sch Med, Liverpool, Merseyside, England..
    Lyons, Ronan A.
    Swansea Univ, Farr Inst, Swansea, W Glam, Wales..
    Macarayan, Erlyn Rachelle King
    Yale Univ, New Haven, CT USA..
    Mackay, Mark T.
    Royal Childrens Hosp, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    El Razek, Hassan Magdy Abd
    Mansoura Fac Med, Mansoura, Egypt..
    El Razek, Mohammed Magdy Abd
    Aswan Univ Hosp, Aswan Fac Med, Aswan, Egypt..
    Mahdavi, Mahdi
    Erasmus Univ, Inst Hlth Policy & Management, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Social Secur Org Res Inst, Tehran, Iran..
    Majeed, Azeem
    Imperial Coll London, London, England..
    Malekzadeh, Reza
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Digest Dis Res Inst, Tehran, Iran.;Univ Tehran Med Sci, Digest Dis Res Inst, Tehran, Iran..
    Malta, Deborah Carvalho
    Univ Fed Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil..
    Mantovani, Lorenzo G.
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Monza, Italy..
    Manyazewal, Tsegahun
    Ethiopian Publ Hlth Assoc, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia..
    Mapoma, Chabila C.
    Univ Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia..
    Marcenes, Wagner
    Kings Coll London, Dent Inst, Div Populat & Patient Hlth, London, England..
    Marks, Guy B.
    Univ Sydney, Woolcock Inst Med Res, Camperdown, NSW, Australia.;Univ Sydney, Woolcock Inst Med Res, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Marquez, Neal
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Martinez-Raga, Jose
    Hosp Univ Doctor Peset, Valencia, Spain.;CEU Cardinal Herrera Univ, Moncada, Spain..
    Marzan, Melvin Barrientos
    Univ East Ramon, Magsaysay Mem Med Ctr, Quezon City, Philippines..
    Massano, Joao
    Univ Porto, Fac Med, Oporto, Portugal.;ULS Matosinhos, Hosp Pedro Hispano, Matosinhos, Portugal..
    Mathur, Manu Raj
    Publ Hlth Fdn India, Gurgaon, India..
    Maulik, Pallab K.
    George Inst Global Hlth India, New Delhi, India..
    Mazidi, Mohsen
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Genet & Dev Biol, Key State Lab Mol Dev Biol, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    McAlinden, Colm
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Hosp Bristol NHS Fdn Trust, Bristol, Avon, England.;Publ Hlth Wales, Swansea, W Glam, Wales..
    McGrath, John J.
    Univ Queensland, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    McNellan, Claire
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Meaney, Peter A.
    Univ Penn, Perelman Sch Med, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.;Childrens Hosp Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Mehari, Alem
    Howard Univ, Coll Med, Washington, DC USA..
    Mehndiratta, Man Mohan
    Janakpuri Superspecialty Hosp, New Delhi, India..
    Meier, Toni
    Martin Luther Univ Halle Wittenberg, Halle, Saale, Germany..
    Mekonnen, Alemayehu B.
    Univ Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.;Univ Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Meles, Kidanu Gebremariam
    Mekelle Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Memish, Ziad A.
    Saudi Minist Hlth, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.;Alfaisal Univ, Coll Med, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Mengesha, Melkamu Merid
    Haramaya Univ, Coll Hlth & Med Sci, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia..
    Mengiste, Desalegn Tadese
    Mekelle Univ, Coll Hlth Sci, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Mengistie, Mubarek Abera
    Jimma Univ, Jimma, Ethiopia..
    Menota, Bereket Gebremichael
    Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia..
    Mensah, George A.
    NHLBI, NIH, Ctr Translat Res & Implementat Sci, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Mereta, Seid Tiku
    Jimma Univ, Jimma, Ethiopia..
    Meretoja, Atte
    Univ Melbourne, Dept Med, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Meretoja, Tuomo J.
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.;Helsinki Univ Hosp, Dept Neurol, Helsinki, Finland.;Helsinki Univ Hosp, Ctr Comprehens Canc, Breast Surg Unit, Helsinki, Finland..
    Mezgebe, Haftay Berhane
    Mekelle Univ, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Micha, Renata
    Tufts Univ, Friedman Sch Nutr Sci & Policy, Boston, MA 02111 USA..
    Millear, Anoushka
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Mills, Edward J.
    Univ Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Minnig, Shawn
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Mirarefin, Mojde
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Hunger Act Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Mirrakhimov, Erkin M.
    Kyrgyz State Med Acad, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan.;Natl Ctr Cardiol & Internal Dis, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan..
    Mock, Charles N.
    Univ Washington, Harborview Injury Prevent & Res Ctr, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Mohammad, Karzan Abdulmuhsin
    Univ Salahaddin, Erbil, Iraq..
    Mohammed, Shafiu
    Heidelberg Univ, Inst Publ Hlth, Heidelberg, Germany.;Ahmadu Bello Univ, Hlth Syst & Policy Res Unit, Zaria, Nigeria..
    Mohanty, Sanjay K.
    Int Inst Populat Sci, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India..
    Mokdad, Ali H.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Mola, Glen Liddell D.
    Univ Papua New Guinea, Sch Med & Hlth Sci, Reprod Hlth & ObGyn, Boroko, Papua N Guinea..
    Molokhia, Mariam
    Kings Coll London, London, England..
    Monasta, Lorenzo
    IRCCS Burlo Garofolo, Inst Maternal & Child Hlth, Trieste, Italy..
    Montico, Marcella
    IRCCS Burlo Garofolo, Inst Maternal & Child Hlth, Trieste, Italy..
    Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Iran Univ Med Sci, Preventat Med & Publ Hlth Res Ctr, Gastrointestinal & Liver Dis Res Ctr GILDRC, Dept Community Med, Tehran, Iran..
    Moraga, Paula
    Queensland Univ Technol, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Morawska, Lidia
    Queensland Univ Technol, Int Lab Air Qual & Hlth, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Mori, Rintaro
    Natl Ctr Child Hlth & Dev, Setagaya Ku, Tokyo, Japan..
    Moses, Mark
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Mueller, Ulrich O.
    Fed Inst Populat Res, Wiesbaden, Germany..
    Murthy, Srinivas
    Univ British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Musa, Kamarul Imran
    Univ Sci Malaysia, Sch Med Sci, Kubang Kerian, Malaysia..
    Nachega, Jean B.
    Univ Pittsburgh, Grad Sch Publ Hlth, Pittsburgh, PA USA.;Univ Stellenbosch, Cape Town, South Africa.;Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Nagata, Chie
    Natl Ctr Child Hlth & Dev, Setagaya Ku, Tokyo, Japan..
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Ulm Univ, Ulm, Germany..
    Naghavi, Mohsen
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Naheed, Aliya
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res ICDDR, Dhaka, Bangladesh..
    Naldi, Luigi
    Azienda Osped Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy..
    Nangia, Vinay
    Suraj Eye Inst, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India..
    Nascimento, Bruno Ramos
    Univ Fed Minas Gerais, Hosp Clin, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.;Hosp Univ Ciencias Med, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil..
    Negoi, Ionut
    Carol Davila Univ Med & Pharm Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania..
    Neupane, Sudan Prasad
    Univ Oslo, Oslo, Norway..
    Newton, Charles R.
    KEMRI Wellcome Trust, Kilifi, Kenya..
    Ng, Marie
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Ngalesoni, Frida Namnyak
    Minist Hlth & Social Welf, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Ngunjiri, Josephine Wanjiku
    Univ Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Nguyen, Grant
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Ningrum, Dina Nur Anggraini
    Taipei Med Univ, Coll Med Sci & Technol, Taipei, Taiwan.;Semarang State Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Semarang City, Indonesia..
    Nolte, Sandra
    Deakin Univ, Sch Hlth & Social Dev, Populat Hlth Strateg Res Ctr, Burwood, Vic, Australia.;Deakin Univ, Populat Hlth Strateg Res Ctr, Sch Hlth & Social Dev, Geelong, Vic, Australia..
    Nomura, Marika
    Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Saitama, Japan..
    Norheim, Ole F.
    Univ Bergen, Bergen, Norway..
    Norrving, Bo
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Neurol, Lund, Sweden..
    Noubiap, Jean Jacques N.
    Univ Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.;Med Diagnost Ctr, Yaounde, Cameroon..
    Obermeyer, Carla Makhlouf
    Amer Univ Beirut, Fac Hlth Sci, Ctr Res Populat & Hlth, Beirut, Lebanon..
    Ogbo, Felix Akpojene
    Univ Western Sydney, Ctr Hlth Res, Penrith, NSW, Australia..
    Oh, In-Hwan
    Kyung Hee Univ, Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Seoul, South Korea..
    Okoro, Anselm
    Soc Family Hlth, Abuja, Nigeria..
    Oladimeji, Olanrewaju
    HSRC, Durban, South Africa.;Univ KwaZulu Natal, Durban, South Africa..
    Olagunju, Andrew Toyin
    Univ Adelaide, Adealaide, SA, Australia..
    Olivares, Pedro R.
    Univ Autonoma Chile, Talca, Chile..
    Olsen, Helen E.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Olusanya, Bolajoko Olubukunola
    Ctr Healthy Start Initiat, Lagos, Nigeria..
    Olusanya, Jacob Olusegun
    Ctr Healthy Start Initiat, Lagos, Nigeria..
    Opio, John Nelson
    Lira Dist Local Govt, Lira Municipal Council, Lira, Uganda..
    Oren, Eyal
    Univ Arizona, Tucson, AZ USA..
    Ortiz, Alberto
    IIS Fdn Jimenez Diaz UAM, Madrid, Spain..
    Osborne, Richard H.
    Deakin Univ, Geelong, Vic, Australia..
    Osman, Majdi
    Harvard Univ, Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA.;YBank, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Owolabi, Mayowa O.
    Dept Med, Ibadan, Nigeria.;Blossom Specialist Med Ctr, Ibadan, Nigeria. JSS Univ, JSS Med Coll, Mysore, Karnataka, India..
    Mahesh, P. A.
    Pain, Amanda W.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Pakhale, Smita
    Ottawa Hosp, Res Inst, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Castillo, Elizabeth Palomares
    Minist Hlth, Mexico City, DF, Mexico.;Univ Nacl Autonoma Mexico, Mexico City, DF, Mexico..
    Pana, Adrian
    Bucharest Univ Econ Studies, Bucharest, Romania..
    Papachristou, Christina
    Charite, Ctr Internal Med & Dermatol, Dept Psychosomat Med, Berlin, Germany..
    Parsaeian, Mahboubeh
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Noncommunicable Dis Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran.;Univ Tehran Med Sci, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Tehran, Iran.;Univ Tehran Med Sci, Noncommunicable Dis Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran..
    Patel, Tejas
    Mt Sinai Hlth Syst, New York, NY USA..
    Patton, George C.
    Univ Melbourne, Murdoch Childrens Res Inst, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Paudel, Deepak
    UK Dept Int Dev, Lalitpur, Nepal..
    Paul, Vinod K.
    All India Inst Med Sci, New Delhi, India..
    Pearce, Neil
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, London, England..
    Pereira, David M.
    Univ Porto, Fac Farm, REQUIMTE LAQV, Lab Farmacognosia, Oporto, Portugal..
    Perez-Padilla, Rogelio
    Natl Inst Resp Dis, Mexico City, DF, Mexico..
    Perez-Ruiz, Fernando
    Hop Univ Cruces, OSI EE Cruces, Baracaldo, Spain.;Biocruces Hlth Res Inst, Baracaldo, Spain..
    Perico, Norberto
    Pesudovs, Konrad
    Flinders Univ S Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia..
    Petzold, Max
    Univ Gothenburg, Hlth Metr Unit, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa..
    Phillips, Michael Robert
    Emory Univ, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA.;Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Sch Med, Shanghai, Peoples R China..
    Pigott, David M.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Pillay, Julian David
    Durban Univ Technol, Durban, South Africa..
    Pinho, Christine
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Polinder, Suzanne
    Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Dept Publ Hlth, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Pond, Constance D.
    Univ Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia..
    Prakash, V.
    Charotar Univ Sci & Technol, Anand, Gujarat, India..
    Purwar, Manorama
    Intergrowth 21st Study Res Ctr, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India..
    Qorbani, Mostafa
    Alborz Univ Med Sci, Noncommunicable Dis Res Ctr, Karaj, Iran..
    Quistberg, D. Alex
    Univ Washington, Harborview Injury Prevent & Res Ctr, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Washington, Dept Anesthesiol & Pain Med, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Radfar, Amir
    AT Still Univ, Kirksville, MO USA..
    Rafay, Anwar
    Contech Int Hlth Consultants, Lahore, Pakistan.;Contech Sch Publ Hlth, Lahore, Pakistan..
    Rahimi, Kazem
    Univ Oxford, Oxford, England..
    Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Sina Trauma & Surg Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran.;Univ Tehran Med Sci, Sina Trauma & Surg Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran..
    Rahman, Mahfuzar
    Int Inst Populat Sci, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.;BRAC, Res & Evaluat Div, Dhaka, Bangladesh..
    Rahman, Mohammad Hifz Ur
    Rai, Rajesh Kumar
    Soc Hlth & Demog Surveillance, Suri, India..
    Ram, Usha
    Int Inst Populat Sci, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India..
    Rana, Saleem M.
    Contech Int Hlth Consultants, Lahore, Pakistan.;Contech Sch Publ Hlth, Lahore, Pakistan..
    Rankin, Zane
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Rao, Paturi Vishnupriya
    Diabet Res Soc, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India.;Diabet Res Ctr, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India..
    Rao, Puja C.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Rawaf, Salman
    Imperial Coll London, London, England..
    Rego, Maria Albertina Santiago
    Univ Fed Minas Gerais, Fac Med, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil..
    Reitsma, Marissa
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Remuzzi, Giuseppe
    IRCCS, Ist Ric Farmacol Mario Negri, Bergamo, Italy.;Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy.;Univ Milan, Dept Biomed & Clin Sci L Sacco, Milan, Italy..
    Renzaho, Andre M. N. N.
    Univ Western Sydney, Penrith, NSW, Australia..
    Resnikoff, Serge
    Univ New South Wales, Brien Holden Vision Inst, Randwick, NSW, Australia.;Univ New South Wales, Sch Optometry & Vis Sci, Randwick, NSW, Australia..
    Rezaei, Satar
    Kermanshah Univ Med Sci, Sch Publ Hlth, Kermanshah, Iran.;Mazandaran Univ Med Sci, Sari, Iran..
    Rezai, Mohammad Sadegh
    Ribeiro, Antonio L.
    Univ Fed Minas Gerais, Hosp Clin, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil..
    Roba, Hirbo Shore
    Haramaya Univ, Coll Hlth & Med Sci, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia..
    Rokni, Mohammad Bagher
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Tehran, Iran..
    Ronfani, Luca
    IRCCS Burlo Garofolo, Inst Maternal & Child Hlth, Trieste, Italy..
    Roshandel, Gholamreza
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Digest Dis Res Inst, Tehran, Iran.;Golestan Univ Med Sci, Golestan Res Ctr Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Gorgan, Iran.;Univ Tehran Med Sci, Digest Dis Res Inst, Tehran, Iran..
    Roth, Gregory A.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Rothenbacher, Dietrich
    Ulm Univ, Inst Epidemiol & Med Biometry, Ulm, Germany..
    Roy, Nawal K.
    Holmusk, Singapore, Singapore.;Duke NUS Med Sch, Singapore, Singapore..
    Sachdev, Perminder S.
    Univ New South Wales, Randwick, NSW, Australia.;Prince Wales Hosp, Randwick, NSW, Australia..
    Sackey, Ben Benasco
    World Hlth Org, Accra, Ghana..
    Saeedi, Mohammad Yahya
    Minist Hlth, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Safiri, Saeid
    Maragheh Univ Med Sci, Managerial Epidemiol Res Ctr, Maragheh, Iran..
    Sagar, Rajesh
    All India Inst Med Sci, New Delhi, India..
    Sahraian, Mohammad Ali
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, MS Res Ctr, Neurosci Inst, Tehran, Iran.;Univ Tehran Med Sci, MS Res Ctr, Neurosci Inst, Tehran, Iran..
    Saleh, Muhammad Muhammad
    Dev Res & Projects Ctr, Abuja, Nigeria..
    Salomon, Joshua A.
    Harvard Univ, Harvard Med Sch, Dept Global Hlth & Populat, Boston, MA USA..
    Samy, Abdallah M.
    Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Ain Shams Univ, Cairo, Egypt..
    Sanabria, Juan Ramon
    Marshall Univ, J Edwards Sch Med, Huntington, WV USA.;Case Western Reserve Univ, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA..
    Sanchez-Nino, Maria Dolores
    IIS Fdn Jimenez Diaz, Madrid, Spain..
    Sandar, Logan
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Santos, Itamar S.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Internal Med Dept, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Santos, Joao Vasco
    Univ Porto, Fac Med, Oporto, Portugal..
    Milicevic, Milena M. Santric
    Univ Belgrade, Inst Social Med, Belgrade, Serbia.;Univ Belgrade, Fac Med, Ctr Sch Publ Hlth & Hlth Management, Belgrade, Serbia..
    Sarmiento-Suarez, Rodrigo
    Univ Ciencias Aplicadas & Ambient, Bogota, Colombia..
    Sartorius, Benn
    Univ KwaZulu Natal, Sch Nursing & Publ Hlth, Publ Hlth Med, Durban, South Africa.;SAMRC, UKZN Gastrointestinal Canc Res Ctr, Cape Town, South Africa..
    Satpathy, Maheswar
    All India Inst Med Sci, New Delhi, India..
    Savic, Miloje
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Oslo, Norway..
    Sawhney, Monika
    Marshall Univ, Huntington, WV USA..
    Saylan, Mete I.
    Bayer Turkey, Istanbul, Turkey..
    Schoettker, Ben
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Ageing Res, Heidelberg, Germany.;FOM Univ, Inst Hlth Care & Social Sci, Essen, Germany..
    Schutte, Aletta E.
    North West Univ, Hypertens Africa Res Team HART, Potchefstroom, South Africa.;South African Med Res Council, Potchefstroom, South Africa..
    Schwebel, David C.
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL USA..
    Seedat, Soraya
    Univ Stellenbosch, Cape Town, South Africa..
    Seid, Abdulbasit Musa
    Haramaya Univ, Coll Hlth & Med Sci, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia..
    Seifu, Canaan Negash
    Wolaita Sodo Univ, Wolaita Sodo, Ethiopia..
    Sepanlou, Sadaf G.
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Digest Dis Res Inst, Tehran, Iran.;Univ Tehran Med Sci, Digest Dis Res Inst, Tehran, Iran..
    Serdar, Berrin
    Univ Colorado, Aurora, CO USA..
    Servan-Mori, Edson E.
    Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico..
    Setegn, Tesfaye
    Bahir Dar Univ, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia..
    Shackelford, Katya Anne
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Shaheen, Amira
    Najah Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Nablus, Palestine..
    Shahraz, Saeid
    Tufts Med Ctr, Boston, MA USA..
    Shaikh, Masood Ali
    Shakh-Nazarova, Marina
    Natl Ctr Dis Control & Publ Hlth, Tbilisi, Rep of Georgia..
    Shamsipour, Mansour
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Inst Environm Res, Tehran, Iran.;Univ Tehran Med Sci, Inst Environm Res, Tehran, Iran..
    Islam, Sheikh Mohammed Shariful
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res ICDDR, Dhaka, Bangladesh..
    Sharma, Jayendra
    Minist Hlth, Thimphu, Bhutan..
    Sharma, Rajesh
    Indian Inst Technol Ropar, Rupnagar, India..
    She, Jun
    Fudan Univ, Zhongshan Hosp, Dept Pulm Med, Shanghai, Peoples R China..
    Sheikhbahaei, Sara
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Res Inst, Endocrinol & Metab Populat Sci Inst, Tehran, Iran.;Univ Tehran Med Sci, Endocrinol & Metab Populat Sci Inst, Tehran, Iran..
    Shen, Jiabin
    Ohio State Univ, Coll Med, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.;Nationwide Childrens Hosp, Res Inst, Columbus, OH USA..
    Shi, Peilin
    Tufts Univ, Boston, MA 02111 USA..
    Shigematsu, Mika
    Natl Inst Infect Dis, Tokyo, Japan.;Sandia Natl Labs, Albuquerque, NM 87185 USA..
    Shin, Min-Jeong
    Korea Univ, Grad Sch, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Seoul, South Korea..
    Shiri, Rahman
    Univ Helsinki, Fac Med, Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth Work Org, Dept Publ Hlth,Work Disabil Program, Helsinki, Finland..
    Shoman, Haitham
    Imperial Coll London, London, England..
    Shrime, Mark G.
    Harvard Univ, Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA..
    Sibamo, Ephrem Lejore Sibamo
    Wolaita Sodo Univ, Wolaita Sodo, Ethiopia..
    Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora
    Reykjavik Univ, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Silva, Diego Augusto Santos
    Univ Fed Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC, Brazil..
    Silveira, Dayane Gabriele Alves
    Brasilia Univ, Brasilia, DF, Brazil..
    Sindi, Shireen
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Singh, Abhishek
    Int Inst Populat Sci, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India..
    Singh, Jasvinder A.
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL USA.;Birmingham Vet Affairs Med Ctr, Birmingham, AL USA..
    Singh, Om Prakash
    Banaras Hindu Univ, Inst Med Sci, Dept Med, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India..
    Singh, Prashant Kumar
    Inst Human Dev, New Delhi, India..
    Singh, Virendra
    Asthma Bhawan, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India..
    Sinke, Abiy Hiruye
    Ethiopian Med Assoc, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia..
    Sinshaw, Aklilu Endalamaw
    Univ Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia..
    Skirbekk, Vegard
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Oslo, Norway.;Columbia Univ, New York, NY USA..
    Sliwa, Karen
    Univ Cape Town, Fac Hlth Sci, Hatter Inst Cardiovasc Res Africa, Cape Town, South Africa..
    Smith, Alison
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Sobngwi, Eugene
    Univ Yaounde, Yaounde, Cameroon.;Yaounde Cent Hosp, Yaounde, Cameroon..
    Soneji, Samir
    Dartmouth Coll, Hanover, NH 03755 USA..
    Soriano, Joan B.
    Univ Autonoma Madrid, Inst Invest Hosp Univ Princesa, Madrid, Spain..
    Sousa, Tatiane Cristina Moraes
    Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Natl Sch Publ Hlth, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil..
    Sposato, Luciano A.
    Western Univ, Dept Clin Neurol Sci, London, ON, Canada..
    Sreeramareddy, Chandrashekhar T.
    Int Med Univ, Dept Community Med, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia..
    Stathopoulou, Vasiliki
    Attikon Univ Hosp, Athens, Greece..
    Steel, Nicholas
    Publ Hlth England, London, England.;Univ East Anglia, Norwich, Norfolk, England..
    Steiner, Caitlyn
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Steinke, Sabine
    Univ Hosp Muenster, Dept Dermatol, Munster, Germany..
    Stokes, Mark Andrew
    Deakin Univ, Burwood, Vic, Australia..
    Stranges, Saverio
    Luxembourg Inst Hlth, Strassen, Luxembourg..
    Strong, Mark
    Univ Sheffield, Sch Hlth & Related Res, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Stroumpoulis, Konstantinos
    Alexandra Gen Hosp Athens, Athens, Greece.;Ctr Hosp Publ Cotentin, Cherbourg, France..
    Sturua, Lela
    Natl Ctr Dis Control & Publ Hlth, Tbilisi, Rep of Georgia..
    Sufiyan, Muawiyyah Babale
    Ahmadu Bello Univ, Zaria, Nigeria..
    Suliankatchi, Rizwan Abdulkader
    Minist Hlth, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Sun, Jiandong
    Queensland Univ Technol, Sch Publ Hlth & Social Work, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Univ Southern Queensland, Inst Resilient Regions, Springfield, Qld, Australia..
    Sur, Patrick
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Swaminathan, Soumya
    Indian Council Med Res, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India..
    Sykes, Bryan L.
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Sociol, Irvine, CA USA.;Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Publ Hlth, Irvine, CA USA..
    Tabares-Seisdedos, Rafael
    Univ Valencia, INCLIVA Hlth Res Inst, Dept Med, Valencia, Spain.;CIBERSAM, Valencia, Spain..
    Tabb, Karen M.
    Univ Illinois, Sch Social Work, Champaign, IL USA..
    Taffere, Getachew Redae
    Mekelle Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Talongwa, Roberto Tchio
    Minist Hlth, MINSANTE, Yaounde, Cameroon..
    Tarajia, Musharaf
    Inst Conmemorativo Gorgas Estudios Salud, Panama City, Panama..
    Tavakkoli, Mohammad
    New York Med Ctr, Valhalla, NY USA..
    Taveira, Nuno
    Inst Super Ciencias Saude Egas Moniz, Almada, Portugal.;Univ Lisbon, Faulty Pharm, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Teeple, Stephanie
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Tegegne, Teketo Kassaw
    Debre Markos Univ, Debre Markos, Ethiopia..
    Tehrani-Banihashemi, Arash
    Iran Univ Med Sci, Prevent Med & Publ Hlth Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran..
    Tekelab, Tesfalidet
    Wollega Univ, Nekemte, Ethiopia.;Univ Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia..
    Tekle, Dejen Yemane
    Mekelle Univ, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Shifa, Girma Temam
    Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.;Arba Minch Univ, Arba Minch, Ethiopia..
    Terkawi, Abdullah Sulieman
    Univ Virginia, Dept Anesthesiol, Charlottesville, VA USA.;King Fahad Med City, Dept Anesthesiol, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.;Cleveland Clin, Outcomes Res Consortium, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA..
    Tesema, Azeb Gebresilassie
    Mekelle Univ, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Thakur, J. S.
    Post Grad Inst Med Educ & Res, Sch Publ Hlth, Chandigarh, India..
    Thomson, Alan J.
    Adapt Knowledge Management, Victoria, BC, Canada..
    Tillmann, Taavi
    UCL, Inst Epidemiol & Hlth, London, England..
    Tiruye, Tenaw Yimer
    Debre Markos Univ, Debre Markos, Ethiopia..
    Tobe-Gai, Ruoyan
    Natl Ctr Child Hlth & Dev, Tokyo, Japan..
    Tonelli, Marcello
    Univ Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada..
    Topor-Madry, Roman
    Jagiellonian Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Med Coll, Inst Publ Hlth, Krakow, Poland..
    Tortajada, Miguel
    Hosp Univ Dr Peset, Valencia, Spain..
    Troeger, Christopher
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Truelsen, Thomas
    Univ Copenhagen, Rigshosp, Dept Neurol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Tura, Abera Kenay
    Haramaya Univ, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.;Univ Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Uchendu, Uche S.
    Washington DC, Dept Vet Affairs, Washington, DC USA..
    Ukwaja, Kingsley N.
    Fed Teaching Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Abakaliki, Nigeria..
    Undurraga, Eduardo A.
    Brandeis Univ, Waltham, MA USA..
    Uneke, Chigozie Jesse
    Ebonyi State Univ, Abakaliki, Nigeria..
    Uthman, Olalekan A.
    Univ Warwick, Warwick Med Sch, Coventry, W Midlands, England..
    van Boven, Job F. M.
    Univ Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Van Dingenen, Rita
    Joint Res Ctr, European Commiss, Ispra, Italy..
    Varughese, Santosh
    Christian Med Coll & Hosp, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India..
    Vasankari, Tommi
    UKK Inst Hlth Promot Res, Tampere, Finland..
    Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy
    Raffles Hosp, Raffles Neurosci Ctr, Singapore, Singapore..
    Violante, Francesco S.
    Univ Bologna, Bologna, Italy..
    Vladimirov, Sergey K.
    Fed Res Inst Hlth Org & Informat, Moscow, Russia..
    Vlassov, Vasiliy Victorovich
    Natl Res Univ Higher Sch Econ, Moscow, Russia..
    Vollset, Stein Emil
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Ctr Dis Burden, Oslo, Norway.;Univ Bergen, Dept Global Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Bergen, Norway..
    Vos, Theo
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Wagner, Joseph A.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Wakayo, Tolassa
    Jimma Univ, Jimma, Ethiopia..
    Waller, Stephen G.
    Uniformed Serv Univ Hlth Sci, Bethesda, MD 20814 USA..
    Walson, Judd L.
    Univ Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Nat Hist Museum, London, England..
    Wang, Haidong
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Wang, Yuan-Pang
    Univ Sao Paulo, Med Sch, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Watkins, David A.
    Univ Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa..
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.;Canc Registry Norway, Inst Populat Based Canc Res, Dept Res, Oslo, Norway.;Univ Tromso, Arctic Univ Norway, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Community Med, Tromso, Norway.;Folkhalsan Res Ctr, Genet Epidemiol Grp, Helsinki, Finland..
    Weintraub, Robert G.
    Univ Melbourne, Murdoch Childrens Res Inst, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;Royal Childrens Hosp, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Wen, Chi-Pang
    Natl Hlth Res Inst, Hlth Policy, Taipei, Taiwan..
    Werdecker, Andrea
    Fed Inst Populat Res, Competence Ctr Mortality Follow Up German Natl Co, Wiesbaden, Germany..
    Wesana, Joshua
    Univ Ghent, Ghent, Belgium.;Mt Moon Univ, Ft Portal, Uganda..
    Westerman, Ronny
    Fed Inst Populat Res, Wiesbaden, Germany.;German Natl Cohort Consortium, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Whiteford, Harvey A.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Queensland, Sch Publ Hlth, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Queensland Ctr Mental Hlth Res, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Wilkinson, James D.
    Wayne State Univ, Sch Med, Detroit, MI USA..
    Wiysonge, Charles Shey
    Univ Stellenbosch, Cape Town, South Africa.;Cochrane South Africa, South African Med Res Council, Cape Town, South Africa..
    Woldeyes, Belete Getahun
    Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia..
    Wolfe, Charles D. A.
    Kings Coll London, Div Hlth & Social Care Res, London, England.;Guys & St Thomas NHS Fdn Trust, Comprehens Biomed Res Ctr, Natl Inst Hlth Res, London, England.;Kings Coll London, London, England..
    Won, Sungho
    Seoul Natl Univ, Grad Sch Publ Hlth, Seoul, South Korea..
    Workicho, Abdulhalik
    Jimma Univ, Jimma, Ethiopia.;Univ Ghent, Ghent, Belgium..
    Workie, Shimelash Bitew
    Wolaita Sodo Univ, Wolaita Sodo, Ethiopia. St Pauls Hosp, Millenium Med Coll, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Addis Continental Inst Publ Hlth, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia..
    Wubshet, Mamo
    Xavier, Denis
    St Johns Med Coll & Res Inst, Bangalore, Karnataka, India..
    Xu, Gelin
    Nanjing Univ, Jinling Hosp, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Nanjing, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Yadav, Ajit Kumar
    Int Inst Populat Sci, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India..
    Yaghoubi, Mohsen
    Univ Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada..
    Yakob, Bereket
    Univ KwaZulu Natal, Sch Nursing & Publ Hlth, Discipline Publ Hlth Med, Durban, South Africa..
    Yan, Lijing L.
    Duke Kunshan Univ, Global Hlth Res Ctr, Kunshan, Peoples R China..
    Yano, Yuichiro
    Northwestern Univ, Dept Prevent Med, Chicago, IL 60611 USA..
    Yaseri, Mehdi
    Shahid Beheshti Univ Med Sci, Ophthalm Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran.;Univ Tehran Med Sci, Tehran, Iran..
    Yimam, Hassen Hamid
    Tepi Univ, Mizan Teferi, Ethiopia..
    Yip, Paul
    Univ Hong Kong, Social Work & Social Adm Dept, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.;Univ Hong Kong, Hong Kong Jockey Club Ctr Suicide Res & Prevent, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Yonemoto, Naohiro
    Kyoto Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Kyoto, Japan..
    Yoon, Seok-Jun
    Korea Univ, Coll Med, Dept Prevent Med, Seoul, South Korea..
    Younis, Mustafa Z.
    Jackson State Univ, Jackson, MS USA..
    Yu, Chuanhua
    Wuhan Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Wuhan, Peoples R China.;Wuhan Univ, Global Hlth Inst, Wuhan, Peoples R China..
    Zaidi, Zoubida
    Univ Hosp, Setif, Algeria..
    Zaki, Maysaa El Sayed
    Mansoura Univ, Fac Med, Mansoura, Egypt..
    Zambrana-Torrelio, Carlos
    EcoHlth Alliance, New York, NY USA.;Inst Ecol Bolivia, La Paz, Bolivia..
    Zapata, Tomas
    World Hlth Org, Windhoek, Namibia..
    Zenebe, Zerihun Menlkalew
    Mekelle Univ, Mekelle, Ethiopia..
    Zodpey, Sanjay
    Publ Hlth Fdn India, Indian Inst Publ Hlth Delhi, Gurgaon, India..
    Zoeckler, Leo
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Zuhlke, Liesl Joanna
    Red Cross War Mem Childrens Hosp, Cape Town, South Africa..
    Murray, Christopher J. L.
    Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, 2301 5th Ave,Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Healthcare Access and Quality Index based on mortality from causes amenable to personal health care in 195 countries and territories, 1990-2015: a novel analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 20152017In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 390, no 10091, p. 231-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background National levels of personal health-care access and quality can be approximated by measuring mortality rates from causes that should not be fatal in the presence of effective medical care (ie, amenable mortality). Previous analyses of mortality amenable to health care only focused on high-income countries and faced several methodological challenges. In the present analysis, we use the highly standardised cause of death and risk factor estimates generated through the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD) to improve and expand the quantification of personal health-care access and quality for 195 countries and territories from 1990 to 2015. Methods We mapped the most widely used list of causes amenable to personal health care developed by Nolte and McKee to 32 GBD causes. We accounted for variations in cause of death certification and misclassifications through the extensive data standardisation processes and redistribution algorithms developed for GBD. To isolate the effects of personal health-care access and quality, we risk-standardised cause-specific mortality rates for each geography-year by removing the joint effects of local environmental and behavioural risks, and adding back the global levels of risk exposure as estimated for GBD 2015. We employed principal component analysis to create a single, interpretable summary measure-the Healthcare Quality and Access (HAQ) Index-on a scale of 0 to 100. The HAQ Index showed strong convergence validity as compared with other health-system indicators, including health expenditure per capita (r= 0.88), an index of 11 universal health coverage interventions (r= 0.83), and human resources for health per 1000 (r= 0.77). We used free disposal hull analysis with bootstrapping to produce a frontier based on the relationship between the HAQ Index and the Socio-demographic Index (SDI), a measure of overall development consisting of income per capita, average years of education, and total fertility rates. This frontier allowed us to better quantify the maximum levels of personal health-care access and quality achieved across the development spectrum, and pinpoint geographies where gaps between observed and potential levels have narrowed or widened over time. Findings Between 1990 and 2015, nearly all countries and territories saw their HAQ Index values improve; nonetheless, the difference between the highest and lowest observed HAQ Index was larger in 2015 than in 1990, ranging from 28.6 to 94.6. Of 195 geographies, 167 had statistically significant increases in HAQ Index levels since 1990, with South Korea, Turkey, Peru, China, and the Maldives recording among the largest gains by 2015. Performance on the HAQ Index and individual causes showed distinct patterns by region and level of development, yet substantial heterogeneities emerged for several causes, including cancers in highest-SDI countries; chronic kidney disease, diabetes, diarrhoeal diseases, and lower respiratory infections among middle-SDI countries; and measles and tetanus among lowest-SDI countries. While the global HAQ Index average rose from 40.7 (95% uncertainty interval, 39.0-42.8) in 1990 to 53.7 (52.2-55.4) in 2015, far less progress occurred in narrowing the gap between observed HAQ Index values and maximum levels achieved; at the global level, the difference between the observed and frontier HAQ Index only decreased from 21.2 in 1990 to 20.1 in 2015. If every country and territory had achieved the highest observed HAQ Index by their corresponding level of SDI, the global average would have been 73.8 in 2015. Several countries, particularly in eastern and western sub-Saharan Africa, reached HAQ Index values similar to or beyond their development levels, whereas others, namely in southern sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, and south Asia, lagged behind what geographies of similar development attained between 1990 and 2015. Interpretation This novel extension of the GBD Study shows the untapped potential for personal health-care access and quality improvement across the development spectrum. Amid substantive advances in personal health care at the national level, heterogeneous patterns for individual causes in given countries or territories suggest that few places have consistently achieved optimal health-care access and quality across health-system functions and therapeutic areas. This is especially evident in middle-SDI countries, many of which have recently undergone or are currently experiencing epidemiological transitions. The HAQ Index, if paired with other measures of health-systemcharacteristics such as intervention coverage, could provide a robust avenue for tracking progress on universal health coverage and identifying local priorities for strengthening personal health-care quality and access throughout the world.

  • 18. Bath, Philip M W
    et al.
    Lindenstrom, Ewa
    Boysen, Gudrom
    De Deyn, Peter
    Friis, Pal
    Leys, Didier
    Marttila, Reijo
    Olsson, Jan-Edvin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    O´Neill, Desmond
    Orgagozo, Jean-Marc
    Ringelstein, Bernd
    van der Sande, Jan-Jacob
    Turpie, Alexander G G
    Tinzaparin in acute ischaemic stroke (TAIST): A randomised aspirin-controlled trial2001In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 358, no 9283, p. 702-710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Low-molecular-weight heparins and heparinoids are superior to unfractionated heparin in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism, but their safety and efficacy in acute ischaemic stroke are inadequately defined. Methods: This randomised, double-blind, aspirin-controlled trial tested the safety and efficacy of treatment with high-dose tinzaparin (175 anti-Xa IU/kg daily, 487 patients), medium-dose tinzaparin (100 anti-Xa IU/kg daily, 508 patients), or aspirin (300 mg daily, 491 patients) started within 48 h of acute ischaemic stroke and given for up to 10 days. Primary intracerebral haemorrhage was excluded by computed tomography. Outcome was assessed, with treatment allocation concealed, by the modified Rankin scale at 6 months (independence [scores 0-2] vs dependence or death [scores 3-6]). Findings: Of 1486 randomised patients, two did not receive treatment and 46 were lost to follow-up. The proportions independent at 6 months were similar in the groups assigned high-dose tinzaparin (194/468 [41.5%]), medium-dose tinzaparin (206/486 [42.4%]), or aspirin (205/482 [42.5%]). There was no difference in effect in any predefined subgroup, including patients with presumed cardioembolic stroke. Other outcome measures were similar between the treatment groups (disability, case-fatality, and neurological deterioration rates). During the in-hospital treatment period no patient assigned high-dose tinzaparin developed a symptomatic deep-vein thrombosis compared with nine assigned aspirin. Conversely, seven patients assigned high-dose tinzaparin developed symptomatic intracerebral haemorrhage compared with one in the aspirin group. Interpretation: Treatment with tinzaparin, at high or medium dose, within 48 h of acute ischaemic stroke did not improve functional outcome compared with aspirin. Although high-dose tinzaparin was superior in preventing deep-vein thrombosis, it was associated with a higher rate of symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage.

  • 19. Beelen, Rob
    et al.
    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole
    Stafoggia, Massimo
    Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic
    Weinmayr, Gudrun
    Hoffmann, Barbara
    Wolf, Kathrin
    Samoli, Evangelia
    Fischer, Paul
    Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark
    Vineis, Paolo
    Xun, Wei W
    Katsouyanni, Klea
    Dimakopoulou, Konstantina
    Oudin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Modig, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Havulinna, Aki S
    Lanki, Timo
    Turunen, Anu
    Oftedal, Bente
    Nystad, Wenche
    Nafstad, Per
    De Faire, Ulf
    Pedersen, Nancy L
    Ostenson, Claes-Göran
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Penell, Johanna
    Korek, Michal
    Pershagen, Göran
    Eriksen, Kirsten Thorup
    Overvad, Kim
    Ellermann, Thomas
    Eeftens, Marloes
    Peeters, Petra H
    Meliefste, Kees
    Wang, Meng
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Sugiri, Dorothea
    Krämer, Ursula
    Heinrich, Joachim
    de Hoogh, Kees
    Key, Timothy
    Peters, Annette
    Hampel, Regina
    Concin, Hans
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Ineichen, Alex
    Schaffner, Emmanuel
    Probst-Hensch, Nicole
    Künzli, Nino
    Schindler, Christian
    Schikowski, Tamara
    Adam, Martin
    Phuleria, Harish
    Vilier, Alice
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Declercq, Christophe
    Grioni, Sara
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Tsai, Ming-Yi
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Galassi, Claudia
    Migliore, Enrica
    Ranzi, Andrea
    Cesaroni, Giulia
    Badaloni, Chiara
    Forastiere, Francesco
    Tamayo, Ibon
    Amiano, Pilar
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Katsoulis, Michail
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Brunekreef, Bert
    Hoek, Gerard
    Effects of long-term exposure to air pollution on natural-cause mortality: an analysis of 22 European cohorts within the multicentre ESCAPE project2014In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 383, no 9919, p. 785-795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Few studies on long-term exposure to air pollution and mortality have been reported from Europe. Within the multicentre European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE), we aimed to investigate the association between natural-cause mortality and long-term exposure to several air pollutants.

    METHODS: We used data from 22 European cohort studies, which created a total study population of 367 251 participants. All cohorts were general population samples, although some were restricted to one sex only. With a strictly standardised protocol, we assessed residential exposure to air pollutants as annual average concentrations of particulate matter (PM) with diameters of less than 2·5 μm (PM2·5), less than 10 μm (PM10), and between 10 μm and 2·5 μm (PMcoarse), PM2.5 absorbance, and annual average concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx), with land use regression models. We also investigated two traffic intensity variables-traffic intensity on the nearest road (vehicles per day) and total traffic load on all major roads within a 100 m buffer. We did cohort-specific statistical analyses using confounder models with increasing adjustment for confounder variables, and Cox proportional hazards models with a common protocol. We obtained pooled effect estimates through a random-effects meta-analysis.

    FINDINGS: The total study population consisted of 367 251 participants who contributed 5 118 039 person-years at risk (average follow-up 13·9 years), of whom 29 076 died from a natural cause during follow-up. A significantly increased hazard ratio (HR) for PM2·5 of 1·07 (95% CI 1·02-1·13) per 5 μg/m(3) was recorded. No heterogeneity was noted between individual cohort effect estimates (I(2) p value=0·95). HRs for PM2·5 remained significantly raised even when we included only participants exposed to pollutant concentrations lower than the European annual mean limit value of 25 μg/m(3) (HR 1·06, 95% CI 1·00-1·12) or below 20 μg/m(3) (1·07, 1·01-1·13).

    INTERPRETATION: Long-term exposure to fine particulate air pollution was associated with natural-cause mortality, even within concentration ranges well below the present European annual mean limit value.

    FUNDING: European Community's Seventh Framework Program (FP7/2007-2011).

  • 20. Beelen, Rob
    et al.
    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole
    Stafoggia, Massimo
    Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic
    Weinmayr, Gudrun
    Hoffmann, Barbara
    Wolf, Kathrin
    Samoli, Evangelia
    Fischer, Paul
    Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark
    Vineis, Paolo
    Xun, Wei W.
    Katsouyanni, Klea
    Dimakopoulou, Konstantina
    Oudin, Anna
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Modig, Lars
    Havulinna, Aki S.
    Lanki, Timo
    Turunen, Anu
    Oftedal, Bente
    Nystad, Wenche
    Nafstad, Per
    De Faire, Ulf
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Östenson, Claes-Göran
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Penell, Johanna
    Korek, Michal
    Pershagen, Göran
    Eriksen, Kirsten Thorup
    Overvad, Kim
    Ellermann, Thomas
    Eeftens, Marloes
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Meliefste, Kees
    Wang, Meng
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Sugiri, Dorothea
    Kraemer, Ursula
    Heinrich, Joachim
    de Hoogh, Kees
    Key, Timothy
    Peters, Annette
    Hampel, Regina
    Concin, Hans
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Ineichen, Alex
    Schaffner, Emmanuel
    Probst-Hensch, Nicole
    Kuenzli, Nino
    Schindler, Christian
    Schikowski, Tamara
    Adam, Martin
    Phuleria, Harish
    Vilier, Alice
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Declercq, Christophe
    Grioni, Sara
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Tsai, Ming-Yi
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Galassi, Claudia
    Migliore, Enrica
    Ranzi, Andrea
    Cesaroni, Giulia
    Badaloni, Chiara
    Forastiere, Francesco
    Tamayo, Ibon
    Amiano, Pilar
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Katsoulis, Michail
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Brunekreef, Bert
    Hoek, Gerard
    Effects of long-term exposure to air pollution on natural-cause mortality: an analysis of 22 European cohorts within the multicentre ESCAPE project2014In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 383, no 9919, p. 785-795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Few studies on long-term exposure to air pollution and mortality have been reported from Europe. Within the multicentre European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE), we aimed to investigate the association between natural-cause mortality and long-term exposure to several air pollutants. Methods We used data from 22 European cohort studies, which created a total study population of 367 251 participants. All cohorts were general population samples, although some were restricted to one sex only. With a strictly standardised protocol, we assessed residential exposure to air pollutants as annual average concentrations of particulate matter (PM) with diameters of less than 2.5 mu m (PM2.5), less than 10 mu m (PM10), and between 10 mu m and 2.5 mu m (PMcoarse), PM2.5 absorbance, and annual average concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx), with land use regression models. We also investigated two traffic intensity variables-traffic intensity on the nearest road (vehicles per day) and total traffic load on all major roads within a 100 m buff er. We did cohort-specific statistical analyses using confounder models with increasing adjustment for confounder variables, and Cox proportional hazards models with a common protocol. We obtained pooled effect estimates through a random-effects meta-analysis. Findings The total study population consisted of 367 251 participants who contributed 5 118 039 person-years at risk (average follow-up 13.9 years), of whom 29 076 died from a natural cause during follow-up. A significantly increased hazard ratio (HR) for PM2.5 of 1.07 (95% CI 1.02-1.13) per 5 mu g/m(3) was recorded. No heterogeneity was noted between individual cohort effect estimates (I-2 p value=0.95). HRs for PM2.5 remained significantly raised even when we included only participants exposed to pollutant concentrations lower than the European annual mean limit value of 25 mu g/m(3) (HR 1.06, 95% CI 1.00-1.12) or below 20 mu g/m(3) (1.07, 1.01-1.13). Interpretation Long-term exposure to fine particulate air pollution was associated with natural-cause mortality, even within concentration ranges well below the present European annual mean limit value.

  • 21. Bergh, Jonas
    et al.
    Wiklund, Tom
    Erikstein, Björn
    Lidbrink, Elisabet
    Lindman, Henrik
    Malmström, Per
    Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko
    Bengtsson, Nils-Olof
    Söderlund, Gustaf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Anker, Gun
    Wist, Erik
    Ottosson, Susanne
    Salminen, Eeva
    Ljungman, Per
    Holte, Harald
    Nilsson, Jonas
    Blomqvist, Carl
    Wilking, Nils
    Tailored fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide compared with marrow-supported high-dose chemotherapy as adjuvant treatment for high-risk breast cancer: A randomised trial2000In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 356, no 9239, p. 1384-1391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chemotherapy drug distribution varies greatly among individual patients. Therefore, we developed an individualised fluorouracil, epirubicin, cyclophosphamide (FEC) regimen to improve outcomes in patients with high-risk early breast cancer. We then did a randomised trial to compare this individually tailored FEC regimen with conventional adjuvant chemotherapy followed by consolidation with high-dose chemotherapy with stem-cell support. Methods: 525 women younger than 60 years of age with high-risk primary breast cancer were randomised after surgery to receive nine cycles of tailored FEC to haematological equitoxicity with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support (n=251), or three cycles of FEC at standard doses followed by high-dose chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, thiotepa, and carboplatin (CTCb), and peripheral-blood stem-cell or bone-marrow support (n=274). Both groups received locoregional radiation therapy and tamoxifen for 5 years. The primary outcome measure was relapse-free survival, and analysis was by intention to treat. Findings: At a median follow-up of 34.3 months, there were 81 breast-cancer relapses in the tailored FEC group versus 113 in the CTCb group (double triangular method p=0.04). 60 deaths occurred in the tailored FEC group and 82 in the CTCb group (log-rank p=0.12). Patients in the CTCb group experienced more grade 3 or 4 acute toxicity compared with the tailored FEC group (p<0.0001). Two treatment-related deaths (0.7%) occurred in the CTCb group. Six patients in the tailored FEC group developed acute myeloid leukaemia and three developed myelodysplastic syndrome. Interpretation: Tailored FEC with G-CSF support resulted in a significantly improved relapse-free survival and fewer grade 3 and 4 toxicities compared with marrow-supported high-dose chemotherapy with CTCb as adjuvant therapy of women with high-risk primary breast cancer.

  • 22. Berney, Thierry
    et al.
    Benhamou, Pierre
    Brendel, Mathias
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy.
    Pipeleers, Daniel
    Pattou, Francois
    Secci, Antonio
    Beta-cell transplantation for diabetes therapy.2008In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 372, no 9632, p. 28-9; author reply 29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    The role of international bench-marking to improve outcome in treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.2014In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. march 15, no 383, p. 933-934Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Björck, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Mani, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Improving outcomes for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm2014In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 383, no 9921, p. 933-934Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Björkstén, B
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Barn.
    Allergy priming early in life. 1999In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 353, p. 167-168Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Blonde, Lawrence
    et al.
    Department of Endocrinology, Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans LA, USA.
    Jendle, Johan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Endocrine and Diabetes Center, Karlstad Hospital, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Gross, Jorge
    Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Woo, Vincent
    Section of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg MB, Canada.
    Jiang, Honghua
    Lilly Diabetes, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis IN, USA.
    Fahrbach, Jessie L.
    Diabetes, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis IN, USA.
    Milicevic, Zvonko
    Lilly Research Laboratories, Vienna, Austria.
    Once-weekly dulaglutide versus bedtime insulin glargine, both in combination with prandial insulin lispro, in patients with type 2 diabetes (AWARD-4): a randomised, open-label, phase 3, non-inferiority study2015In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 385, no 9982, p. 2057-2066Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: For patients with type 2 diabetes who do not achieve target glycaemic control with conventional insulin treatment, advancing to a basal-bolus insulin regimen is often recommended. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist dulaglutide with that of insulin glargine, both combined with prandial insulin lispro, in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Methods: We did this 52 week, randomised, open-label, phase 3, non-inferiority trial at 105 study sites in 15 countries. Patients (aged ≥18 years) with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with conventional insulin treatment were randomly assigned (1:1:1), via a computer-generated randomisation sequence with an interactive voice-response system, to receive once-weekly dulaglutide 1·5 mg, dulaglutide 0·75 mg, or daily bedtime glargine. Randomisation was stratified by country and metformin use. Participants and study investigators were not masked to treatment allocation, but were unaware of dulaglutide dose assignment. The primary outcome was a change in glycated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) from baseline to week 26, with a 0·4% non-inferiority margin. Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01191268.

    Findings: Between Dec 9, 2010, and Sept 21, 2012, we randomly assigned 884 patients to receive dulaglutide 1·5 mg (n=295), dulaglutide 0·75 mg (n=293), or glargine (n=296). At 26 weeks, the adjusted mean change in HbA1c was greater in patients receiving dulaglutide 1·5 mg (-1·64% [95% CI -1·78 to -1·50], -17·93 mmol/mol [-19·44 to -16·42]) and dulaglutide 0·75 mg (-1·59% [-1·73 to -1·45], -17·38 mmol/mol [-18·89 to -15·87]) than in those receiving glargine (-1·41% [-1·55 to -1·27], -15·41 mmol/mol [-16·92 to -13·90]). The adjusted mean difference versus glargine was -0·22% (95% CI -0·38 to -0·07, -2·40 mmol/mol [-4·15 to -0·77]; p=0·005) for dulaglutide 1·5 mg and -0·17% (-0·33 to -0·02, -1·86 mmol/mol [-3·61 to -0·22]; p=0·015) for dulaglutide 0·75 mg. Five (<1%) patients died after randomisation because of septicaemia (n=1 in the dulaglutide 1·5 mg group); pneumonia (n=1 in the dulaglutide 0·75 mg group); cardiogenic shock; ventricular fibrillation; and an unknown cause (n=3 in the glargine group). We recorded serious adverse events in 27 (9%) patients in the dulaglutide 1·5 mg group, 44 (15%) patients in the dulaglutide 0·75 mg group, and 54 (18%) patients in the glargine group. The most frequent adverse events, arising more often with dulaglutide than glargine, were nausea, diarrhoea, and vomiting.

    Iinterpretation: Dulaglutide in combination with lispro resulted in a significantly greater improvement in glycaemic control than did glargine and represents a new treatment option for patients unable to achieve glycaemic targets with conventional insulin treatment.

    FUNDING: Eli Lilly and Company.

  • 27.
    Bogg, Lennart
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Health insurance in rural Africa1995In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 345, no 8948, p. 521-522Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Bogg, Lennart
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Diwan, Vinod
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tuberculosis control in China1996In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 347, no 9016, p. 1702-1702Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29. Boggia, José
    et al.
    Li, Yan
    Thijs, Lutgarde
    Hansen, Tine W
    Kikuya, Masahiro
    Björklund-Bodegård, Kristina
    Richart, Tom
    Ohkubo, Takayoshi
    Kuznetsova, Tatiana
    Torp-Pedersen, Christian
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ibsen, Hans
    Imai, Yutaka
    Wang, Jiguang
    Sandoya, Edgardo
    O'Brien, Eoin
    Staessen, Jan A
    Prognostic accuracy of day versus night ambulatory blood pressure: a cohort study2007In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 370, no 9594, p. 1219-1229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Few studies have formally compared the predictive value of the blood pressure at night over and beyond the daytime value. We investigated the prognostic significance of the ambulatory blood pressure during night and day and of the night-to-day blood pressure ratio. Methods We did 24-h blood pressure monitoring in 7458 people (mean age 56.8 years [SD 13.9]) enrolled in prospective population studies in Denmark, Belgium, Japan, Sweden, Uruguay, and China. We calculated multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios for daytime and night-time blood pressure and the systolic night-to-day ratio, while adjusting for cohort and cardiovascular risk factors. Findings Median follow-up was 9.6 years (5th to 95th percentile 2.5-13.7). Adjusted for daytime blood pressure, night-time blood pressure predicted total (n=983; p<0.0001), cardiovascular (n=387; p<0.01), and non-cardiovascular (n=560; p<0.001) mortality. Conversely, adjusted for night-time blood pressure, daytime blood pressure predicted only non-cardiovascular mortality (p<0.05), with lower blood pressure levels being associated with increased risk. Both daytime and night-time blood pressure consistently predicted all cardiovascular events (n=943; p<0.05) and stroke (n=420; p<0.01). Adjusted for night-time blood pressure, daytime blood pressure lost prognostic significance only for cardiac events (n=525; p >= 0.07). Adjusted for the 24-h blood pressure, night-to-day ratio predicted mortality, but not fatal combined with non-fatal events. Antohypertensive drug treatment removed the significant association between cardiovascular events and the daytime blood pressure. Participants with systolic night-to-day ratio value of 1 or more were older, at higher risk of death, and died at an older age than those whose night-to-day ratio was normal (>= 0.80 to <0.90). Interpretation In contrast to commonly held views, daytime blood pressure adjusted for night-time blood pressure predicts fatal combined with non-fatal cardiovascular events, except in treated patients, in whom antihypertensive drugs might reduce blood pressure during the day, but not at night. The increased mortality in patients with higher night-time than daytime blood pressure probably indicates reverse causality. Our findings support recording the ambulatory blood pressure during the whole day.

  • 30. Booth, Malcolm G
    et al.
    Hood, John
    Brooks, Timothy J G
    Hart, Andrew
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK; Centre for Cell Engineering, Faculty for Biological & Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Hillhead, Glasgow, UK.
    Anthrax infection in drug users2010In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 375, no 9723, p. 1345-1346Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Bruhn, Jan G.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    De Smet, Peter A. G. M.
    El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Beck, Olof
    Mescaline use for 5700 years2002In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 359, no 9320, p. 1866-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeological investigations in northeast Mexico and Trans-Pecos, Texas have shown that the use of psychotropic drugs in this region goes back to around 8500 BC. The aboriginal inhabitants of this region used the mescal bean, Sophora secundiflora, and buttons from the peyote cactus, Lophophora williamsii1.

    From an archaeological site in Coahuila, Mexico, several peyote buttons were retrieved and radiocarbon-dated to AD 810–1070. Alkaloid analysis revealed the presence of mescaline and four related tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloids2. We have, however, analysed two much older samples of peyote buttons. These samples are thought to have been found in Shumla Cave number five on the Rio Grande, TX, USA, and are in the collection of the Witte Museum in San Antonio3. Radiocarbon dating showed a mean age of 5700 years.

    Standard alkaloid extraction procedures done on the samples gave residues that were analysed by thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We were able to identify mescaline in both samples, based on identical retention times and Rf values, and similar mass-to-charge ratios and fragmentation pattern. The detection of mescaline in two different samples, both analysed by two methods based on different principles, is reliable evidence for the presence of this psychotropic drug.

    Freshly prepared peyote buttons can contain up to 8% of total alkaloids. The previously studied 1000-year-old sample had a lower content, around 2·25%. In our analysis, alkaloid content had fallen to 2%, and mescaline was the only peyote alkaloid we could identify. There was no trace of any of the other tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloids typical for peyote.

    Earlier, nicotine and caffeine had been identified in plant remains from a medicine man's tomb in Bolivia, aged 1600 years4. Morphine has been found in a 3500 year old ceramic container from Cyprus5.

    From a scientific perspective, the studied peyote material seems to be the oldest plant drug that yielded a major bioactive compound on chemical analysis. From a cultural point of view, our identification of mescaline strengthens the evidence that Native Americans already recognised and valued the psychotropic properties of peyote as long as 5700 years ago.

  • 32.
    Brunström, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lower blood pressure targets: to whom do they apply?2016In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 387, no 10017, p. 405-406Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Brunström, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Thrombolysis in acute stroke2015In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 385, no 9976, p. 1394-1395Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Brännström, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Does it matter how epilepsy is considered and classified?2002In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 359, no 9315, p. 1439-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Buchbinder, Rachelle
    et al.
    Monash Univ, Australia.
    van Tulder, Maurits
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Costa, Luciola Menezes
    Univ Cidade Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Woolf, Anthony
    Univ Exeter, England.
    Schoene, Mark
    The Back Letter, Newburyport MA, USA.
    Croft, Peter
    Keele Univ, England.
    Low back pain: a call for action2018In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 391, no 10137, p. 2384-2388Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 36. Buitendijk, Simone
    et al.
    Corda, Daniela
    Flodström, Anders
    KTH.
    Holdcroft, Anita
    Hunter, Jackie
    Pollitzer, Elizabeth
    Rees, Teresa
    Rice, Curt
    Schiebinger, Lando
    Schraudner, Martina
    Sjørup, Karen
    Tarrach, Rolf
    Women in science and medicine2011In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 377, no 9768, p. 811-811Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    A transition towards a healthier global population?2015In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 386, no 10009, p. 2121-2122Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Causes of child death estimates: making use of the InterVA model2015In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 386, no 9997, p. 953-953Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study (STIAS), Wallenberg Research Centre at Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa.
    Child mortality is (estimated to be) falling2016In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 388, no 10063, p. 2965-2967Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus is the best candidate for WHO DG2017In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 389, no 10084, p. E6-E7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    The UN needs joined-up thinking on vital registration2012In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 380, no 9854, p. 1643-1643Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Uncounted causes of death2016In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 387, no 10013, p. 26-27Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Byass, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    D'Ambruoso, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Cellular telephone networks in developing countries2008In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 371, no 9613, p. 650-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Byass, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå Centre for Global Health Research, Umeå University.
    Friberg, Peter
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    A proposal to add patient safety to the Stockholm Declaration - Authors'reply2013In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 382, no 9894, p. 765-766Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Byass, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Friberg, Peter
    Swedish Society of Medicine and Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    A proposal to add patient safety to the Stockholm Declaration Reply2013In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 382, no 9894, p. 765-766Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Byass, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Graham, Wendy J.
    Grappling with uncertainties along the MDG trail2011In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 378, no 9797, p. 1119-1120Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Byass, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Wilder-Smith, Annelies
    Umeå University. Nanyang Technol Univ, Lee Kong Chian Sch Med, Singapore .
    Utilising additional sources of information on microcephaly2016In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 387, no 10022, p. 940-941Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48. Cannon, Christopher P.
    et al.
    Harrington, Robert A.
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Ardissino, Diego
    Becker, Richard C.
    Emanuelsson, Håkan
    Husted, Steen
    Katus, Hugo
    Keltai, Matyas
    Khurmi, Nardev S.
    Kontny, Frederic
    Lewis, Basil S.
    Steg, Philippe Gabriel
    Storey, Robert F.
    Wojdyla, Daniel
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Comparison of ticagrelor with clopidogrel in patients with a planned invasive strategy for acute coronary syndromes (PLATO): a randomised double-blind study2010In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 375, no 9711, p. 283-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Variation in and irreversibility of platelet inhibition with clopidogrel has led to controversy about its optimum dose and timing of administration in patients with acute coronary syndromes. We compared ticagrelor, a more potent reversible P2Y12 inhibitor with clopidogrel in such patients. METHODS: At randomisation, an invasive strategy was planned for 13 408 (72.0%) of 18 624 patients hospitalised for acute coronary syndromes (with or without ST elevation). In a double-blind, double-dummy study, patients were randomly assigned in a one-to-one ratio to ticagrelor and placebo (180 mg loading dose followed by 90 mg twice a day), or to clopidogrel and placebo (300-600 mg loading dose or continuation with maintenance dose followed by 75 mg per day) for 6-12 months. All patients were given aspirin. The primary composite endpoint was cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. Analyses were by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00391872. FINDINGS: 6732 patients were assigned to ticagrelor and 6676 to clopidogrel. The primary composite endpoint occurred in fewer patients in the ticagrelor group than in the clopidogrel group (569 [event rate at 360 days 9.0%] vs 668 [10.7%], hazard ratio 0.84, 95% CI 0.75-0.94; p=0.0025). There was no difference between clopidogrel and ticagrelor groups in the rates of total major bleeding (691 [11.6%] vs 689 [11.5%], 0.99 [0.89-1.10]; p=0.8803) or severe bleeding, as defined according to the Global Use of Strategies To Open occluded coronary arteries, (198 [3.2%] vs 185 [2.9%], 0.91 [0.74-1.12]; p=0.3785). INTERPRETATION: Ticagrelor seems to be a better option than clopidogrel for patients with acute coronary syndromes for whom an early invasive strategy is planned.

  • 49.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Time to lower treatment BP targets for hypertension?2009In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 374, no 9689, p. 503-504Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Carlberg, Bo
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lindholm, Lars Hjalmar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Comment: Stroke and blood-pressure variation: new permutations on an old theme.2010In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 375, no 9718, p. 867-869Article in journal (Refereed)
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