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  • 1.
    Adamic, M.
    et al.
    Dermatol Ctr Parmova, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Pavlovic, M. D.
    Dermatol Ctr Parmova, Ljubljana, Slovenia; Fac Med, Univ Maribor, Maribor, Slovenia.
    Rubin, A. Troilius
    Ctr Laser & Vasc Anomalies, Dept Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Malmö, Sweden.
    Palmetun-Ekback, M.
    Region Örebro län. Dept Dermatol, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Boixeda, P.
    Dept Dermatol, Laser Serv, Ramon & Cajal Hosp, Univ Alcala De Henares, Madrid, Spain.
    Guidelines of care for vascular lasers and intense pulse light sources from the European Society for Laser Dermatology2015Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 29, nr 9, s. 1661-1678Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    AimLasers and non-coherent intense pulse light sources (IPLS) are based on the principle of selective photothermolysis and can be used for the treatment of many vascular skin lesions. A variety of lasers has been developed for the treatment of congenital and acquired vascular lesions which incorporate these concepts into their design. Although laser and light sources are very popular due to their non-invasive nature, caution should be considered by practitioners and patients to avoid permanent side-effects. The aim of these guidelines is to give evidence-based recommendations for the use of lasers and IPLS in the treatment of vascular lesions. MethodsThese guidelines were produced by a Consensus Panel made up of experts in the field of vascular laser surgery under the auspices of the European Society of Laser Dermatology. Recommendations on the use of vascular lasers and IPLS were made based on the quality of evidence for efficacy, safety, tolerability, cosmetic outcome, patient satisfaction/preference and, where appropriate, on the experts' opinion. The recommendations of these guidelines are graded according to the American College of Chest Physicians Task Force recommendations on Grading Strength of Recommendations and Quality of Evidence in Clinical Guidelines. ResultsLasers and IPLS are very useful and sometimes the only available method to treat various vascular lesions. It is of a paramount importance that the type of laser or IPLS and their specific parameters are adapted to the indication but also that the treating physician is familiar with the device to be used. The crucial issue in treating vascular lesions is to recognize the immediate end-point after laser treatment. This is the single most important factor to ensure both the efficacy of the treatment and avoidance of serious side-effects.

  • 2.
    Antelmi, A.
    et al.
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Metsini, Alexandra
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Regnell, S. E.
    Sanofi AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carlberg, M.
    Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Svensson, Å.
    Department of Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    von Kobyletzki, L.
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Prevalence of prurigo nodularis in Sweden2024Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 3. Bein, D.
    et al.
    Kuehn, E.
    Meuth, A. M.
    Amler, S.
    Haust, M.
    Nyberg, Fred
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Farmaceutiska fakulteten, Institutionen för farmaceutisk biovetenskap.
    Sauerland, C.
    Luger, T. A.
    Bonsmann, G.
    Kuhn, A.
    Evaluation of disease activity and damage in different subtypes of cutaneous lupus erythematosus using the CLASI2011Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 25, nr 6, s. 652-659Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Disease Area and Severity Index (CLASI) is a scoring system for patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) to assess disease activity and damage. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the CLASI is a useful instrument which reflects the different subtypes of CLE comparably well in each parameter. Methods: A total of 50 patients (42 female, 8 male) with different subtypes of CLE, including acute CLE (ACLE), subacute CLE (SCLE), chronic CLE (CCLE) and LE tumidus (LET), from the Departments of Dermatology, University of Dusseldorf, Germany, and Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, were evaluated using the CLASI at one time point. Results: The total CLASI activity score was significantly lower in patients with LET compared with ACLE (P < 0.05) and CCLE (P < 0.001), and the total CLASI damage score was significantly lower in patients with LET than with ACLE (P < 0.05), SCLE (P < 0.001) and CCLE (P < 0.001). The erythema score and the scale/hypertrophy score were significantly lower in LET than in ACLE (P < 0.05, both) and CCLE (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively). The dyspigmentation score was lowest in patients with LET, differing significantly from ACLE (P < 0.05), SCLE (P < 0.05) and CCLE (P < 0.001). The scarring/atrophy/panniculitis score was significantly higher in patients with CCLE in contrast to SCLE and LET (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: These data characterize the CLASI as an overall useful instrument to analyse disease activity and damage in CLE. However, the CLASI does not give an accurate assessment of all disease subtypes; therefore, a revision of the CLASI with critical analysis of all parameters is recommended.

  • 4. Berg, M.
    et al.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Possible gender differences in the quality of life and choice of therapy in acne2011Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 25, nr 8, s. 969-972Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Acne is a very common skin disease that has major impact on the patients' quality of life. Although the disease has been extensively studied we still need more knowledge of factors influencing the decisions for choice of therapy. Objective To evaluate the relationships between clinical severity, patients' self-reported quality of life, treatment choice and the outcome of therapy in a structured out-patient acne clinic. Methods In total 211 consecutive patients (143 females, 68 males) at a structured acne clinic were included. At the first visit a clinical assessment was conducted, therapy was initiated and the patients answered a quality-of-life questionnaire (Dermatology Life Quality Index, DLQI). A follow up was performed after six months, when patients once again answered the DLQI questionnaire and the clinical outcome was assessed by the physician. Results The quality of life was improved after treatment at a group level. At the first visit, the quality of life showed a gender difference (females scoring worse) but did not correlate to the clinical grading nor to the choice of therapy. At six months the DLQI correlated with clinical outcome. Patients with isotretinoin therapy showed a significantly greater improvement in quality of life. There was a tendency to gender difference in the choice of therapy, as in females 32% of the patients were treated with isotretinoin although they were clinically graded as moderate. The corresponding figure for males was 23%. A correlation was found between the initial clinical grading and gender, age and the choice of therapy. Conclusion DLQI can be used to evaluate treatment effects in acne. However, the self-reported quality of life will depend on several factors including age, gender, psychosocial factors and clinical severity.

  • 5.
    Berg, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Dermatologi och venereologi. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Lindberg, Mikael
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Dermatologi och venereologi.
    Possible gender differences in the quality of life and choice of therapy in acne2011Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 25, nr 8, s. 969-972Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Acne is a very common skin disease that has major impact on the patients' quality of life. Although the disease has been extensively studied we still need more knowledge of factors influencing the decisions for choice of therapy. Objective To evaluate the relationships between clinical severity, patients' self-reported quality of life, treatment choice and the outcome of therapy in a structured out-patient acne clinic. Methods In total 211 consecutive patients (143 females, 68 males) at a structured acne clinic were included. At the first visit a clinical assessment was conducted, therapy was initiated and the patients answered a quality-of-life questionnaire (Dermatology Life Quality Index, DLQI). A follow up was performed after six months, when patients once again answered the DLQI questionnaire and the clinical outcome was assessed by the physician. Results The quality of life was improved after treatment at a group level. At the first visit, the quality of life showed a gender difference (females scoring worse) but did not correlate to the clinical grading nor to the choice of therapy. At six months the DLQI correlated with clinical outcome. Patients with isotretinoin therapy showed a significantly greater improvement in quality of life. There was a tendency to gender difference in the choice of therapy, as in females 32% of the patients were treated with isotretinoin although they were clinically graded as moderate. The corresponding figure for males was 23%. A correlation was found between the initial clinical grading and gender, age and the choice of therapy. Conclusion DLQI can be used to evaluate treatment effects in acne. However, the self-reported quality of life will depend on several factors including age, gender, psychosocial factors and clinical severity.

  • 6.
    Berg, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Svensson, M.
    Brandberg, M.
    Nordlind, K.
    Psoriasis and stress: A prospective study2008Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 22, nr 6, s. 670-674Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Psoriasis is generally thought to be worsened by stress. This presumption has been supported primarily by retrospective studies using questionnaires. No controlled prospective study on this issue has been performed. Methods Nine women with moderate plaque psoriasis were enrolled in the study. They all believed that their psoriasis was worsened by stress. They filled in a daily diary with estimations of actual stress levels and grades of psoriasis. The study of each patient started when her skin disease was in a stable phase and was concluded when her psoriasis was worsened by at least 25% from the starting level. Psoriasis area severity index scores were recorded at the start, as soon as possible after exacerbation and 2 weeks later. Stress-related blood samples were taken at the same visits. The study was analysed as a nine-case study. Results No clear pattern was found between stress levels and worsening of psoriasis in our nine patients. One patient had elevated stress levels 13 days before exacerbation of psoriasis, but for at least seven patients, there were no identifiable time relationships between stress and psoriasis appearance. For two patients, there were clear elevations of stress levels after psoriasis outbreak. Conclusion This limited study does not support the assumption that stress is a worsening factor in psoriasis.

  • 7.
    Bosma, A. L.
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Amsterdam UMC, location Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Public Health, Infection and Immunity, The Netherlands.
    Musters, A. H.
    Department of Dermatology, Amsterdam UMC, location Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Public Health, Infection and Immunity, The Netherlands.
    Bloem, M.
    Department of Dermatology, Amsterdam UMC, location Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Public Health, Infection and Immunity, The Netherlands.
    Gerbens, L. A. A.
    Department of Dermatology, Amsterdam UMC, location Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Public Health, Infection and Immunity, The Netherlands.
    Middelkamp-Hup, M. A.
    Department of Dermatology, Amsterdam UMC, location Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Public Health, Infection and Immunity, The Netherlands.
    Haufe, E.
    Center for Evidence-based Health Care (ZEGV), Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, TU Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
    Schmitt, J.
    Center for Evidence-based Health Care (ZEGV), Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, TU Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
    Barbarot, S.
    Nantes Université, Department of Dermatology, CHU Nantes, UMR 1280 PhAN, INRAE, Nantes, France.
    Seneschal, J.
    Department of Dermatology and Pediatric Dermatology, National Reference Center for Rare Skin Diseases, University Hospital of Bordeaux, France.
    Staumont-Sallé, D.
    Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Lille, INFINITE (Institute for Translational Research in Inflammation) Inserm, Lille, France.
    Johansson, E. K.
    Department of Dermatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bradley, M.
    Department of Dermatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    von Kobyletzki, Laura B.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Malmö, Lund University, Sweden; Centrum for clinical research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Vittrup, I.
    Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Copenhagen University Hospital - Herlev and Gentofte, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Copenhagen University Hospital - Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Ruge, I. Frier
    Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Copenhagen University Hospital - Herlev and Gentofte, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Copenhagen University Hospital - Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Thyssen, Jacob P.
    Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Vestergaard, C.
    Department of Dermatology Aarhus University hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    de Vega, M.
    Research Unit, Academia Española de Dermatologia y Venereologia, Madrid, Spain.
    García-Doval, I.
    Research Unit, Academia Española de Dermatologia y Venereologia, Madrid, Spain.
    Chiricozzi, A.
    Dermatologia, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy; Dermatologia, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy.
    Stingeni, Luca
    Dermatology Section, Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
    Calzavara-Pinton, Piergiacomo
    Department of Dermatology, ASST Spedali Civili of Brescia, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy.
    Ardern-Jones, M. R.
    Clinical Experimental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, UK; Department of Dermatology, University Hospitals Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK.
    Reynolds, N. J.
    Institute of Translational and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Framlington Place, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK; Department of Dermatology, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
    Flohr, C.
    Unit for Population-Based Dermatology Research, St John's Institute of Dermatology, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London, London, UK.
    Spuls, P. I.
    Department of Dermatology, Amsterdam UMC, location Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Public Health, Infection and Immunity, The Netherlands.
    Mapping exercise and status update of eight established registries within the TREatment of ATopic eczema (TREAT) Registry Taskforce2023Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 37, nr 1, s. 123-136Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: the TREatment of ATopic eczema (TREAT) Registry Taskforce is a collaborative international network of registries collecting data of atopic eczema (AE) patients receiving systemic and phototherapy with the common goal to provide long-term real-world data on the effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness of therapies. A core dataset, consisting of domains and domain items with corresponding measurement instruments, has been developed to harmonize data collection.

    OBJECTIVES: we aimed to give an overview of the status and characteristics of the eight established TREAT registries, and to perform a mapping exercise to examine the degree of overlap and pooling ability between the national registry datasets. This will allow us to determine which research questions can be answered in the future by pooling data.

    METHODS: all eight registries were asked to share their dataset and information on the current status and characteristics. The overlap between the core dataset and each registry dataset was identified (according to the domains, domain items and measurement instruments of the TREAT core dataset).

    RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: a total of 4,702 participants have been recruited in the 8 registries as of 1st of May 2022. Of the 69 core dataset domain items, data pooling was possible for 69 domain item outcomes in TREAT NL (the Netherlands), 61 items in A-STAR (UK and Ireland), 38 items in TREATgermany (Germany), 36 items in FIRST (France), 33 items in AtopyReg (Italy), 29 items in Biobadatop (Spain), 28 items in SCRATCH (Denmark) and 20 items in SwedAD (Sweden). Pooled analyses across all registries can be performed on multiple important domain items, covering the main aims of analyzing data on the (cost-)effectiveness and safety of AE therapies. These results will facilitate future comparative or joint analyses.

  • 8.
    Carlsen, K H
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen.
    Carlsen, K M
    University of Copenhagen.
    Serup, Jörgen
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Dermatologi och venerologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Hudkliniken i Östergötland.
    Non-attendance rate in a Danish University Clinic of Dermatology2011Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 25, nr 11, s. 1269-1274Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To clarify the rate of non-attendance (NA) in an out-patient clinic. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods Attendance lists of 3592 patients were collected daily from 21 July-21 August and 21 October-21 November, 2009. NA patients were contacted to determine extenuations. To study NA in relation to diagnosis and age, a control group of patients who attended before or after a NA was established. Furthermore, two time periods from 8:00-11:30 AM and 11:30 AM-3:00 PM were compared. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults In total, 13% NA gave no cancellation (54.2% females and 45.8% males). Divided into age groups, 496 patients 0-25 years old had appointments, but 87 (18.6%) showed NA. In the 26-65 years old, 2188 patients were planned, but 313 (14.1%) showed NA. Over 65 years old, 878 patients were planned, but 69 patients (7.9%) showed NA. NA was higher (P andlt; 0.05) in patients 0-25 years old in comparison with the other age groups. Diagnoses had no influence on the rate of NA (P andgt; 0.05), neither had seasons nor time of the day. The main explanations reported by the NA were: forgetfulness (34.3%), erroneous scheduling (27.7%) and various reasons (38.0%). However, 18.5% had shown NA before while 17.1% were NA first timers. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion The NA rate 13% of 3592 patients was mostly patient-related. Erroneous scheduling was estimated to be 3.6%. NA was more frequent among young patients. NA rate is small in comparison with non-adherence to medicines, however, of major practical and economic consequence for the health system. SMS or e-mail notification and improved scheduling are potential actions to improve NA in the routine.

  • 9.
    Dahlen Gyllencreutz, J.
    et al.
    Skaraborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Paoli, J.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bjellerup, M.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Bucharbajeva, Z.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Gonzalez, H.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nielsen, K.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Sandberg, C.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Synnerstad, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Dermatologi och venerologi. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Hudkliniken i Östergötland. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Terstappen, K.
    Skaraborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Wennberg Larko, A. -M.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Diagnostic agreement and interobserver concordance with teledermoscopy referrals2017Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 31, nr 5, s. 898-903Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundMalignant melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers are among the fastest increasing malignancies in many countries. With the help of new tools, such as teledermoscopy referrals between primary health care and dermatology clinics, the management of these patients could be made more efficient. ObjectiveTo evaluate the diagnostic agreement and interobserver concordance achieved when assessing referrals sent through a mobile teledermoscopic referral system as compared to referrals sent via the current paper-based system without images. MethodsThe referral information from 80 teledermoscopy referrals and 77 paper referrals were evaluated by six Swedish dermatologists. They were asked to answer questions about the probable diagnosis, the priority, and a management decision. ResultsTeledermoscopy generally resulted in higher diagnostic agreement, better triaging and more malignant tumours being booked directly to surgery. The largest difference between the referral methods was seen for invasive melanomas. Referrals for benign lesions were significantly more often correctly resent to primary health care with teledermoscopy. However, referrals for cases of melanoma in situ were also incorrectly resent five times. The interobserver concordance was moderate with both methods. ConclusionBy adding clinical and dermoscopic images to referrals, the triage process for both benign and dangerous skin tumours can be improved. With teledermoscopy, patients with melanoma especially can receive treatment more swiftly.

  • 10.
    Danielsson, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap.
    Boldrup, Linda
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap.
    Rentoft, Matilda
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap.
    Coates, Philip
    Tayside Tissue Bank/Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, UK.
    Ebrahimi, Majid
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Nylander, Elisabet
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Dermatologi och venereologi.
    Wahlin, Ylva Britt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap.
    Autoantibodies and decreased expression of the transcription factor ELF-3 together with increased chemokine pathways support an autoimmune phenotype and altered differentiation in lichen planus located in oral mucosa2013Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 27, nr 11, s. 1410-1416Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background  The pathogenesis of oral lichen planus (OLP), a chronic inflammatory disease, is not fully understood. It is known that OLP has autoimmune features, and it is suggested to be an autoimmune disease. ELF-3 is involved in differentiation of keratinocytes and deregulated in different tumours and inflammatory diseases. CXCR-3 and its ligands CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 are increased in autoimmune diseases and linked to Th-1 immune response. Objectives  To analyse and compare expression of ELF-3, CXCR-3, CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 in OLP lesions and controls in whole and microdissected epithelium. Methods  Tissue biopsies from 20 patients clinically and histologically diagnosed with OLP and 20 healthy controls were studied using whole tissues or microdissected epithelium. By the use of qRT-PCR, mRNA levels of ELF-3, CXCR-3, CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 were studied. Western blot was used for analysis of ELF-3 protein expression. Sera from 19 OLP patients and 20 controls were analysed with ELISA in search for autoantibodies. Results  The upregulation of CXCR-3, CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 found in OLP is similar to previous findings showing an autoimmune phenotype in lichen planus (LP) and lichen sclerosus. Decreased expression of the differentiation-related transcription factor ELF-3 was also seen in OLP lesions, and we further demonstrate presence of circulating autoantibodies against the ELF-3 protein in sera from 3 of 19 (16%) LP patients tested. Conclusions  On the basis of these findings, we confirm that OLP shows features of an autoimmune disease and suggest deregulated differentiation of keratinocytes to be one of the causes of the disease phenotype.

  • 11.
    Danielsson, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Ebrahimi, Maijd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Wahlin, Ylva-Britt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap.
    Boldrup, Linda
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap.
    Increased levels of COX-2 in oral lichen planus supports an autoimmune cause of the disease2012Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 26, nr 11, s. 1415-1419Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory disease for which the pathogenesis is not fully understood. OLP has autoimmune features and auto immunity has been suggested as a potential cause, whereas WHO has classified OLP as a premalignant condition. Association between chronic inflammation and cancer is known and chronic inflammation is one of the characteristics of OLP. A protein connected to inflammation and suggested to be involved in cancer development is cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) which can be inhibited by microRNA-26b (miR-26b).

    Objective: The aim was to map levels of COX-2 and miR-26b in OLP lesions to see if there was any correlation between expression of COX-2 and its regulator miR-26b in OLP.

    Methods: In biopsies from 20 OLP patients and 20 age and gender-matched controls laser- micro dissection of epithelium was performed. Quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blot were used in the analysis.

    Results: Levels of COX-2 mRNA were significantly higher while levels of miR-26b were significantly lower in OLP lesions compared to controls. Using immunohistochemistry normal oral mucosa samples did not show any expression of COX-2 while OLP samples expressed the protein. No COX-2 protein was detectable with Western blot.

    Conclusion: Increased expression of COX-2 and decreased expression of miR-26b in OLP suggests both to play a role in OLP. COX-2 has been connected to both malignant development and autoimmunity but as malignant development of OLP is quite rare we suggest that the increased levels of COX-2 seen here support an autoimmune cause of the disease.

  • 12.
    Danielsson, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Oral diagnostik.
    Ebrahimi, Majid
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Oral diagnostik. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Endodonti.
    Wahlin, Ylva-Britt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Oral diagnostik. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Protetik.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Boldrup, Linda
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Reply to increased levels of COX-2 and oral lichen planus by P.D. Pigatto, F. Spaderi, G.P. Bombeccari, G. Guzzi by Danielsson et al2013Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 27, nr 3, s. 395-396Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 13.
    de Vries, H. J. C.
    et al.
    STI Outpatient Clinic, Infectious Diseases Department, Public Health Service Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Dermatology, Amsterdam Institute for Infection and Immunity (AI&II), Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    de Barbeyrac, B.
    Mycoplasmal and Chlamydial Infections in Humans, University of Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France; Mycoplasmal and Chlamydial Infections in Humans, INRA, Bordeaux, France; Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Bordeaux, Laboratoire de Bacteriologie, French National Reference Center for Bacterial STIs, Bordeaux, France.
    de Vrieze, N. H. N.
    Department of Dermatology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Viset, J. D.
    Department of Dermatology, Amsterdam Institute for Infection and Immunity (AI&II), Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    White, J. A.
    Department of Genitourinary Medicine, Western Health & Social Care Trust, Londonderry, UK.
    Vall-Mayans, M.
    STI Unit Vall d'Hebron-Drassanes, Department of Infectious Diseases, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and Other Sexually Transmitted Infections.
    2019 European guideline on the management of lymphogranuloma venereum2019Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 33, nr 10, s. 1821-1828Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    New or important issues in this updated version of the 2013 European guideline on the management of lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV):

    EPIDEMIOLOGY: Lymphogranuloma venereum continues to be endemic among European men who have sex with men (MSM) since 2003. Lymphogranuloma venereum infections in heterosexuals are extremely rare in Europe, and there is no evidence of transmission of LGV in the European heterosexual population.

    AETIOLOGY AND TRANSMISSION: Chlamydia trachomatis serovars/genovars L2b and L2 are the causative strains in the majority of cases in Europe.

    CLINICAL FEATURES: Among MSM, about 25% of the anorectal LGV infections are asymptomatic. Genital infections among MSM are rare; the ratio of genital vs. anorectal LGV infections is 1 in 15.

    DIAGNOSIS: To diagnose LGV, a sample tested C. trachomatis positive with a commercial nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) platform should be confirmed with an LGV discriminatory NAAT.

    TREATMENT: Doxycycline 100 mg twice a day orally for 21 days is the recommended treatment for LGV. This same treatment is recommended also in asymptomatic patients and contacts of LGV patients. If another regimen is used, a test of cure (TOC) must be performed.

  • 14. Domeika, M.
    et al.
    Litvinenko, I.
    Smirnova, T.
    Gaivaronskaya, O.
    Savicheva, A.
    Sokolovskiy, E.
    Ballard, R. C.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Laboratory diagnostics for non-viral sexually transmitted infections in St. Petersburg, Russia: current situation and hallmarks for improvements2008Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 22, nr 9, s. 1094-1100Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The numbers and performance characteristics of laboratories providing sexually transmitted infection (STI) diagnostic services, as well as the rates of morbidity due to STIs in St. Petersburg, Russia, remain largely unknown.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the range, quality and availability of diagnostic services for several non-viral STIs (Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Treponema pallidum and Trichomonas vaginalis) in St. Petersburg during the period September 2005 to June 2006.

    METHODS: Survey data focusing on organization and performance characteristics of STI diagnostic services were assessed using questionnaires, telephone interviews and site visits.

    RESULTS: A total of 118 laboratories providing STI diagnostic services were identified. Of the surveyed laboratories, 54% (64 of 118) diagnosed syphilis, 81% (96 of 118) gonorrhoea, 80% (94 of 118) trichomoniasis and 49% (58 of 118) chlamydial infections. Although most of the laboratories could provide a presumptive diagnosis for syphilis, most of the N. gonorrhoeae and T. vaginalis testing of women did not adhere to international recommendations. Of the laboratories with the capacity to diagnose C. trachomatis infection, 69% still used serological testing (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) to detect antibodies to C. trachomatis.

    CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the diagnostic methods used to establish a laboratory diagnosis, the system of case reporting, the training of laboratory personnel and the level of interlaboratory communication clearly require improvement. This study represents the first step in a process of evaluation of the laboratory support for STI services and the establishment of an interlaboratory network in St. Petersburg.

  • 15.
    Domeika, Marius
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk bakteriologi.
    Litvinenko, I.
    Smirnova, T.
    Gaivaronskaya, O.
    Savicheva, A.
    Sokolovskiy, E.
    Ballard, R. C.
    Unemo, M.
    Laboratory diagnostics for non-viral sexually transmitted infections in St. Petersburg, Russia: current situation and hallmarks for improvements2008Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 22, nr 9, s. 1094-100Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The numbers and performance characteristics of laboratories providing sexually transmitted infection (STI) diagnostic services, as well as the rates of morbidity due to STIs in St. Petersburg, Russia, remain largely unknown. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the range, quality and availability of diagnostic services for several non-viral STIs (Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Treponema pallidum and Trichomonas vaginalis) in St. Petersburg during the period September 2005 to June 2006. METHODS: Survey data focusing on organization and performance characteristics of STI diagnostic services were assessed using questionnaires, telephone interviews and site visits. RESULTS: A total of 118 laboratories providing STI diagnostic services were identified. Of the surveyed laboratories, 54% (64 of 118) diagnosed syphilis, 81% (96 of 118) gonorrhoea, 80% (94 of 118) trichomoniasis and 49% (58 of 118) chlamydial infections. Although most of the laboratories could provide a presumptive diagnosis for syphilis, most of the N. gonorrhoeae and T. vaginalis testing of women did not adhere to international recommendations. Of the laboratories with the capacity to diagnose C. trachomatis infection, 69% still used serological testing (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) to detect antibodies to C. trachomatis. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the diagnostic methods used to establish a laboratory diagnosis, the system of case reporting, the training of laboratory personnel and the level of interlaboratory communication clearly require improvement. This study represents the first step in a process of evaluation of the laboratory support for STI services and the establishment of an interlaboratory network in St. Petersburg.

  • 16.
    Domeika, Marius
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Oscarsson, Linda
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Hallén, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Hjelm, Eva
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Sylwan, Staffan
    Department of Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Uppsala County, Sweden.
    Mailed urine samples are not an effective screening approach for Chlamydia trachomatis case finding among young men2007Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 21, nr 6, s. 789-794Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Frequency of testing is known to be low for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in men aged 20–24 years. The use of mailed, home-obtained urine specimens could increase the uptake of young men and facilitate screening programmes for the detection of asymptomatic Chlamydia trachomatis.

    Objective The aim of the present study is to evaluate the home screening approach as a tool for recruitment of asymptomatic men for screening of genital C. trachomatis infections.

    Methods Men aged 19–24 years old (n = 1936) were invited to participate in home-based testing for genital C. trachomatis infection. Persons who agreed to be tested were provided with a testing kit. Self-collected first void urine was sent for testing to the microbiology laboratory. The test result was accessible on the study's web-page 1 week after testing. Individuals with a diagnosed infection were instructed to contact the venereal disease department.

    Results The response rate was 24% (462/1936). The responders' main reason for not participating was a feeling of being safe regarding STIs (87%; 159/182). The primary reason for this feeling of safety was that the responders were in a steady relationship (59%; 107/159). Having sex outside a steady relationship was reported by 36% (90/250) of the responders. The prevalence of C. trachomatis infection among the responders was 2.02% and the reported history of chlamydial infection was 36% (34/95). Out of the responders, 92% (229/249) were, to varying degrees, concerned about getting STIs; however, the majority (72%; 174/242) estimated the risk to be low.

    Conclusion Home screening using web-based answer management is a feasible tool for STI screening, which lowers the threshold for people at risk. In this particular population, however, the response rate was too low to be routinely introduced.

  • 17.
    Domeika, Marius
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk bakteriologi.
    Savicheva, A.
    Sokolovskiy, E.
    Frigo, N.
    Brilene, T.
    Hallén, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Dermatologi och venereologi.
    Unemo, M.
    Ballard, R. C.
    Ward, M.
    Guidelines for the laboratory diagnosis of Chlamydia trachomatis infections in East European countries2009Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 23, nr 12, s. 1353-1363Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The present guidelines aim to provide comprehensive information regarding the laboratory diagnosis of infections caused by Chlamydia trachomatis in East European countries. These recommendations contain important information for laboratory staff working with sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and/or STI-related issues. Individual East European countries may be required to make minor national adjustments to these guidelines as a result of lack of accessibility to some reagents or equipment, or laws in a specific country.

  • 18.
    Domeika, Marius
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk bakteriologi.
    Zhurauskaya, L.
    Savicheva, A.
    Frigo, N.
    Sokolovskiy, E.
    Hallén, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Dermatologi och venereologi.
    Unemo, M.
    Ballard, R. C.
    Guidelines for the laboratory diagnosis of trichomoniasis in East European countries2010Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 24, nr 10, s. 1125-1134Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The laboratory diagnosis of sexually transmitted infections in many Eastern European countries remains suboptimal. The main objective of the present evidence-based guidelines is to provide comprehensive information regarding the laboratory diagnosis of infections caused by Trichomonas vaginalis in East European countries. In particular, the present guidelines recommend: (i) to encourage examination of the wet mounts of vaginal exudates, instead of stained smears, at all clinical settings; (ii) nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) or culture could be employed if no trichomonads are detected on microscopic examination of the wet preparation and there is a strong indication of infection and (iii) the use of NAATs is encouraged in screening, using non-invasive specimens, or high volume testing situations. In the absence of internationally recognized commercial NAAT systems, tests developed in-house should be validated using obtainable international standards and quality assured strictly. Individual East European countries may be required to make minor national adjustments to these guidelines as a result of lack of accessibility to some reagents or equipment, or laws in a specific country.

  • 19. El-Nour, H.
    et al.
    Santos, A.
    Nordin, M.
    Jonsson, P.
    Svensson, M.
    Nordlind, K.
    Berg, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Neuronal changes in psoriasis exacerbation2009Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 23, nr 11, s. 1240-1245Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The nervous system contributes to inflammatory skin diseases. Objective The aim of this investigation was to study the neuronal contribution to psoriasis at the remission and exacerbation phases. Methods We examined the expression of the neuronal markers protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5), growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) and substance P, in addition to its receptor (R), neurokinin-1R (NK-1R) in psoriatic skin from seven female patients at remission and exacerbation, using immunohistochemistry. Results The number of epidermal PGP 9.5 immunoreactive nerve fibres in the involved skin during exacerbation was decreased (P < 0.01) compared to involved skin at remission and non-involved skin at the exacerbation phase. GAP-43-positive nerve fibres were decreased (P < 0.05) in the involved skin in contrast to non-involved skin, during exacerbation. Substance P expression was seen on both immunoreactive nerve fibres and cells with a down-regulation (P < 0.01) in the number of positive nerve fibres in the involved skin compared to non-involved skin, at the exacerbation phase. The number of substance P-positive cells was slightly lower in the involved skin at exacerbation than at remission. The number of NK-1R immunoreactive cells was increased (P < 0.01) in the involved skin in contrast to non-involved skin, at the exacerbation phase. Conclusion Our findings suggest a crosstalk between the nervous system and inflammation during psoriasis exacerbation in the form of an altered expression of nerve fibres, substance P and its NK-1R.

  • 20. Finlay, A
    et al.
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicin och kirurgi, Dermatologi. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Medicincentrum, Hudkliniken i Östergötland.
    Editorial. Training inspection visits - pushing up quality of training in Europe.2001Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 15, s. 193-193Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 21.
    Grip, L
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Lonne-Rahm, S-B
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Holst, M
    Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hospital, Sweden .
    Johansson, B
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Nordlind, K
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Klinisk kemi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk kemi.
    El-Nour, H
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Substance P alterations in skin and brain of chronically stressed atopic-like mice2013Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 27, nr 2, s. 199-205Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Stress is known to worsen the symptoms of atopic eczema (AE). Substance P is likely to play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of AE. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanObjective To examine a possible connection between chronic mild stress and changes in the expression of substance P and its receptor (R) neurokinin (NK) 1 in the skin and stress-related brain regions in NC/Nga atopic-like mice. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods The mice were divided into three groups (eight animals per group): SE (stressed eczematous), NSE (non-stressed eczematous) and SC (stressed control). Ears and brains of the mice were investigated using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults In the skin, there was a decrease in the number of substance P immunoreactive nerve fibres in SE compared with SC group. RT-PCR showed a strong tendency to an increase in mRNA for NK1R in the skin of SE compared with NSE mice. There was an increase in the number of mast cells and the degree of their degranulation in the SE compared with both other groups. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanA decrease in substance P immunoreactivity in medial hippocampus was found in SE compared with NSE animals. In prefrontal cortex and central amygdala, there were no significant differences in substance P immunoreactivity between the three groups. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion Exposure to chronic mild stress in NC/Nga atopic-like mice may result in altered expression patterns of substance P in the skin and hippocampus.

  • 22.
    Guenther, L.
    et al.
    Guenther Res Inc, Canada; Western Univ, Canada.
    Takhar, A.
    Wansford & Kings Cliffe Practice, England.
    Megna, M.
    Univ Federico II, Italy.
    Sebastian, M.
    Ctr Dermatol & Clin Trials, Germany.
    Nyholm, N.
    LEO Pharma AS, Denmark.
    Thoning, H.
    LEO Pharma AS, Denmark.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för samhälle och hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Impact of fixed-dose combination Cal/BD foam on the work productivity of patients with psoriasis: results from the 52-week randomized, double-blind, PSO-LONG trial2022Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 36, nr 7, s. 1054-1063Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Psoriasis contributes to unemployment, work impairment, missed workdays and substantial indirect costs due to lost productivity. Combination Cal/BD foam is the only topical that is approved for long-term maintenance treatment of plaque psoriasis for 52 weeks. This is the first known investigation of the effect of topical psoriasis therapy on productivity. Objective To examine the change in work productivity and activity impairment after 4 weeks of treatment with fixed-dose combination calcipotriol 50 mu g/g/betamethasone dipropionate 0.5 mg/g (Cal/BD) foam and observe long-term changes after 52 weeks of long-term management (proactive or reactive treatment). Methods This is a post-hoc analysis of the PSO-LONG trial - a phase 3, randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled, parallel group, international multi-centre trial of treatment with combination Cal/BD foam. Work and activity impairment due to psoriasis were assessed by the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Psoriasis (WPAI:PSO) questionnaire at baseline, week 4, week 28 and week 56. The improvement in hours of work productivity was translated into monthly and annual indirect cost savings estimates for patients in Italy, Sweden, United Kingdom, Canada and Germany. Results Using fixed-dose combination Cal/BD foam for four weeks significantly reduced psoriasis-related work presenteeism, total work productivity impairment (TWPI) and total activity impairment (TAI) over 56 weeks, with significant improvements observed as early as 4 weeks after the baseline visit. The proportion of patients reporting impact on work productivity (as measured by presenteeism and TWPI) and activity impairment (as measured by both DLQI-Q7b and TAI) also decreased. Conclusion Fixed-dose combination Cal/BD foam used for long-term management of psoriasis significantly reduces psoriasis-related work productivity and activity impairment which may result in substantial indirect cost savings.

  • 23. Gyllencreutz, J. Dahlen
    et al.
    Paoli, J.
    Bjellerup, M.
    Bucharbajeva, Zinaida
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Dermatologi och venereologi.
    Gonzalez, H.
    Nielsen, K.
    Sandberg, C.
    Synnerstad, I.
    Terstappen, K.
    Wennberg Larko, A. -M
    Diagnostic agreement and interobserver concordance with teledermoscopy referrals2017Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 31, nr 5, s. 898-903Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundMalignant melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers are among the fastest increasing malignancies in many countries. With the help of new tools, such as teledermoscopy referrals between primary health care and dermatology clinics, the management of these patients could be made more efficient. ObjectiveTo evaluate the diagnostic agreement and interobserver concordance achieved when assessing referrals sent through a mobile teledermoscopic referral system as compared to referrals sent via the current paper-based system without images. MethodsThe referral information from 80 teledermoscopy referrals and 77 paper referrals were evaluated by six Swedish dermatologists. They were asked to answer questions about the probable diagnosis, the priority, and a management decision. ResultsTeledermoscopy generally resulted in higher diagnostic agreement, better triaging and more malignant tumours being booked directly to surgery. The largest difference between the referral methods was seen for invasive melanomas. Referrals for benign lesions were significantly more often correctly resent to primary health care with teledermoscopy. However, referrals for cases of melanoma in situ were also incorrectly resent five times. The interobserver concordance was moderate with both methods. ConclusionBy adding clinical and dermoscopic images to referrals, the triage process for both benign and dangerous skin tumours can be improved. With teledermoscopy, patients with melanoma especially can receive treatment more swiftly.

  • 24. Harjama, L.
    et al.
    Karvonen, V.
    Kettunen, K.
    Elomaa, O.
    Einarsdottir, Elisabet
    KTH, Skolan för kemi, bioteknologi och hälsa (CBH), Genteknologi. Univ Helsinki, Metab Res Program, Helsinki, Finland ; Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Heikkilä, H.
    Kivirikko, S.
    Ellonen, P.
    Saarela, J.
    Ranki, A.
    Kere, J.
    Hannula-Jouppi, K.
    Hereditary palmoplantar keratoderma – phenotypes and mutations in 64 patients2021Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 35, nr 9, s. 1874-1880Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hereditary palmoplantar keratodermas (PPK) represent a heterogeneous group of rare skin disorders with epidermal hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles, with occasional additional manifestations in other tissues. Mutations in at least 69 genes have been implicated in PPK, but further novel candidate genes and mutations are still to be found. Objectives: To identify mutations underlying PPK in a cohort of 64 patients. Methods: DNA of 48 patients was analysed on a custom-designed in-house panel for 35 PPK genes, and 16 patients were investigated by a diagnostic genetic laboratory either by whole-exome sequencing, gene panels or targeted single-gene sequencing. Results: Of the 64 PPK patients, 32 had diffuse (50%), 19 focal (30%) and 13 punctate (20%) PPK. None had striate PPK. Pathogenic mutations in altogether five genes were identified in 31 of 64 (48%) patients, the majority (22/31) with diffuse PPK. Of them, 11 had a mutation in AQP5, five in SERPINB7, four in KRT9 and two in SLURP1. AAGAB mutations were found in nine punctate PPK patients. New mutations were identified in KRT9 and AAGAB. No pathogenic mutations were detected in focal PPK. Variants of uncertain significance (VUS) in PPK-associated and other genes were observed in 21 patients that might explain their PPK. No suggestive pathogenic variants were found for 12 patients. Conclusions: Diffuse PPK was the most common (50%) and striate PPK was not observed. We identified pathogenic mutations in 48% of our PPK patients, mainly in five genes: AQP5, AAGAB, KRT9, SERPINB7 and SLURP1. 

  • 25.
    Hoppe, Torborg
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Dermatologi och venereologi.
    Winge, Mårten C G
    Karolinska Institutet, Solna.
    Bradley, Maria
    Karolinska Institutet, Solna.
    Nordenskjöld, Magnus
    Karolinska Institutet, Solna.
    Vahlquist, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Dermatologi och venereologi.
    Törmä, Hans
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Dermatologi och venereologi.
    Berne, Berit
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Dermatologi och venereologi.
    Moisturizing treatment of patients with atopic dermatitis and ichthyosis vulgaris improves dry skin, but has a modest effect on gene expression regardless of FLG genotype2015Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 29, nr 1, s. 174-177Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Loss-of-function mutations in FLG (encoding filaggrin) are a predisposing factor for atopic dermatitis (AD) and cause ichthyosis vulgaris (IV). Patients with AD and IV display impaired skin barrier and dry skin, and altered epidermal expression of genes in pro-inflammatory and lipid metabolic pathways are often evident.

    Objectives

    To evaluate the effect of three different moisturizers on skin barrier function and epidermal gene expression in patients with AD/IV in relation to FLG mutation status.

    Methods

    Patients (n = 43) were classified according to their FLG status: AD with FLG+/+ (n = 14), AD with FLG+/− (n = 14), and AD/IV with FLG−/− (n = 15). Dryness score and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were monitored on volar forearms, and punch biopsies were taken for analysis of gene expression. Measurements were repeated after 4 weeks of treatment with either of two moisturizers on each forearm.

    Results

    Treatment with any of the three moisturizers significantly reduced dryness score and TEWL in the group as a whole. FLG−/− patients displayed the largest reduction in dryness score. Only minute changes occurred in the mRNA expression of 15 selected epidermal genes.

    Conclusions

    Moisturizing treatment improves dry skin and certain aspects of abnormal skin barrier function, especially in patients with AD/IV and dual FLG mutations, but does not normalize the epidermal gene expression profile.

  • 26.
    Horner, P.
    et al.
    Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom; National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit in Evaluation of Interventions, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Donders, G.
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital Antwerp, Edegem, Belgium.
    Cusini, M.
    Department of Dermatology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Policlinico, Milano, Italy.
    Gomberg, M.
    Moscow Scientific and Practical Center of Dermatovenereology and Cosmetology, Moscow, Russia.
    Jensen, J. S.
    Infection Preparedness, Research Unit for Reproductive Tract Microbiology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and Other STIs, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Microbiology.
    Should we be testing for urogenital Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma parvum and U. urealyticum in men and women?: a Position Statement from the European STI Guidelines Editorial Board2018Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 32, nr 11, s. 1845-1851Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    At present, we have no evidence that we are doing more good than harm detecting and subsequently treating Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma parvum and Ureaplasma urealyticum colonisations/infections. Consequently, routine testing and treatment of asymptomatic or symptomatic men and women for M. hominis, U. urealyticum, and U. parvum is not recommended. Asymptomatic carriage of these bacteria is common and the majority of individuals do not develop disease. Although U. urealyticum has been associated with urethritis in men, it is probably not causal unless a high load is present (likely carriage in 40-80% of detected cases). The extensive testing, detection and subsequent antimicrobial treatment of these bacteria performed in some settings may result in selection of antimicrobial resistance, in these bacteria, "true" STI agents, as well as in the general microbiota, and substantial economic cost for society and individuals, particularly women. The commercialisation of many particularly multiplex PCR assays detecting traditional non-viral STIs together with M. hominis, U. parvum and/or U. urealyticum have worsened this situation. Thus, routine screening of asymptomatic men and women or routine testing of symptomatic individuals for M. hominis, U. urealyticum, and U. parvum is not recommended. If testing of men with symptomatic urethritis is undertaken, traditional STI urethritis agents such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, M. genitalium and, in settings where relevant, Trichomonas vaginalis should be excluded prior to U. urealyticum testing and quantitative species-specific molecular diagnostic tests should be used. Only men with high U. urealyticum load should be considered for treatment, however, appropriate evidence for effective treatment regimens is lacking. In symptomatic women, bacterial vaginosis (BV) should always be tested for and treated if detected.

  • 27.
    Howells, L.
    et al.
    University of Nottingham, UK.
    Thomas, K.S.
    University of Nottingham, UK.
    Sears, A.V.
    St John’s Institute of Dermatology, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, UK; King’s College London, UK.
    Nasr, I.
    Gloucester, UK.
    Wollenberg, A.
    Ludwig Maximilian University, Germany; Klinik Thalkirchner Straße, Germany.
    Schuttelaar, M.L.A.
    University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Romeijn, G.L.E.
    University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Paller, A.S.
    Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, USA.
    Mueller, K.
    Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, USA.
    Doytcheva, K.
    Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, USA.
    Kataoka, Y.
    Osaka Habikino Medical Center, Japan.
    Daguze, J.
    CHU Nantes, France.
    Barbarot, S.
    CHU Nantes, Nantes, France.
    von Kobyletzki, Laura B.
    Lunds universitet.
    Beckman, Linda
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa, natur- och teknikvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper (from 2013).
    Ratib, S.
    niversity of Nottingham, UK.
    Cowdell, F.
    Birmingham City University, UK.
    Santer, M.
    University of Southampton, UK.
    Chalmers, J.R.
    University of Nottingham, UK.
    Defining and measuring 'eczema control': an international qualitative study to explore the views of those living with and treating atopic eczema2019Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 33, nr 6, s. 1124-1132Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Atopic eczema (also known as eczema) is a chronic, inflammatory skin condition that often afflicts patients' health and well-being. The Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) initiative recommends that 'long-term control of eczema' is measured in all clinical trials 3 months or longer in duration. However, little has been published on what eczema control means to those living with or treating atopic eczema. Objectives To (i) develop understanding of what eczema control means to patients, carers and clinicians and (ii) explore the feasibility and acceptability of different ways of measuring eczema control in the long term. Methods Online focus groups explored patients/carers experiences in the UK, the United States, the Netherlands, France, Sweden and Japan, and an international online survey gathered views of clinicians. The framework method was used to analyse the focus groups, and thematic analysis was used to analyse survey data. All findings were integrated into a theoretical framework to create overarching themes that cut across these diverse groups. Results Eight focus groups with patients (16 years+) and eight groups with carers of children took place (N = 97). Sixty-two people took part in the survey. Eczema control was described as a multifaceted construct involving changes in disease activity, the treatment and management of the condition and psychological, social and physical functioning. Patient/carer measurement allows personal accounts and frequent measurement, whilst clinician measurement was deemed less subjective. The burden on patients/carers and issues for analysing and interpreting data should be considered. Conclusions This study formed the basis of judging the content validity and feasibility of measurement instruments/methods to assess control of eczema in clinical trials. This online approach to an international qualitative study is an example of how core outcome set developers with limited resources can engage with multiple stakeholder groups on an international basis to inform consensus meeting discussions.

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  • 28.
    Hägg, David
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Dermatologi och venereologi.
    Sundström, A
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet, Statistik.
    Schmitt-Egenolf, Marcus
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Dermatologi och venereologi.
    Decision for biological treatment in real life is more strongly associated with the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) than with the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI)2015Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 29, nr 3, s. 452-456Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Following the establishment of the National Quality Registry for systemic psoriasis treatment (PsoReg), the two psoriasis outcome measurements, Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), are now integrated in clinical practice in Sweden. According to current guidelines, the initiation of a biological treatment should depend on a combination of the physician's (PASI) and the patients' assessment of the disease impact on a health-related quality of life measure (DLQI).

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate if either of the two measures, PASI or DLQI, is more strongly associated with initiation of biological therapy.

    METHODS: The study is based on 2216 patients suffering from moderate to severe psoriasis who were biological naïve at enrolment to PsoReg. The relationship between the two measures PASI and DLQI and initiation of biological treatment (as outcome) were estimated by a logistic regression and a Cox proportional hazard's model with combinations of PASI and DLQI as independent variables.

    RESULTS: The adjusted regression models showed that patients with high PASI score and low DLQI score had a higher chance to receive biological treatment compared to patients with low PASI score and high DLQI score.

    CONCLUSION: The decision to initiate biological treatment is more strongly associated with PASI than with DLQI. However, since the DLQI reflects both socio-economic costs and patient suffering better than PASI, the relevance of the DLQI may be underestimated in clinical practice.

  • 29.
    Jacques, C.
    et al.
    Pierre Fabre Dermo‐cosmétique Centre R&amp;D Pierre Fabre Innovation et Développement Pharmacologie Toulouse France.
    Rattier, S.
    Pierre Fabre Dermo‐cosmétique Centre R&amp;D Pierre Fabre Innovation et Développement Pharmacologie Toulouse France.
    Bianchi, P.
    Pierre Fabre Dermo‐cosmétique Centre R&amp;D Pierre Fabre Innovation et Développement Pharmacologie Toulouse France.
    Angerer, T.B.
    Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology (LIST) Advanced Characterization platform Materials Research and Technology Belvaux Luxembourg.
    Frache, G.
    Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology (LIST) Advanced Characterization platform Materials Research and Technology Belvaux Luxembourg.
    Cattuzzato, L.
    Pierre Fabre Dermo‐cosmétique Centre R&amp;D Pierre Fabre Innovation et Développement Pharmacologie Toulouse France.
    Perrin, L.
    Pierre Fabre Dermo‐cosmétique Centre R&amp;D Pierre Fabre Innovation et Développement Pharmacologie Toulouse France.
    Villaret, A.
    Pierre Fabre Dermo‐cosmétique Centre R&amp;D Pierre Fabre Innovation et Développement Pharmacologie Toulouse France.
    Duran, V.
    Pierre Fabre Dermo‐cosmétique Centre R&amp;D Pierre Fabre Innovation et Développement Pharmacologie Toulouse France.
    Noharet, J.
    Pierre Fabre Dermo‐cosmétique Centre R&amp;D Pierre Fabre Innovation et Développement Pharmacologie Toulouse France.
    Rouquier, A.
    Pierre Fabre Dermo‐cosmétique Centre R&amp;D Pierre Fabre Innovation et Développement Pharmacologie Toulouse France.
    Bessou‐Touya, S.
    Pierre Fabre Dermo‐cosmétique Centre R&amp;D Pierre Fabre Innovation et Développement Pharmacologie Toulouse France.
    Bidan, C.
    Pierre Fabre Dermo‐cosmétique Centre R&amp;D Pierre Fabre Innovation et Développement Pharmacologie Toulouse France.
    Duplan, H.
    Pierre Fabre Dermo‐cosmétique Centre R&amp;D Pierre Fabre Innovation et Développement Pharmacologie Toulouse France.
    In vitro characterization and clinical evaluation of skin hydration by two formulations mimicking the skin’s natural components2022Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 36, nr S5, s. 21-29Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 30.
    Jahns, Anika C.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Lundskog, Bertil
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Nosek, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Dermatologi och venereologi.
    Killasli, H.
    Emtestam, L.
    Alexeyev, Oleg A.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Microbiology of folliculitis decalvans: a histological study of 37 patients2015Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 29, nr 5, s. 1025-1026Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 31.
    Janier, M.
    et al.
    STD Clinic, Hôpital Saint-Louis AP-HP and Hôpital Saint-Joseph, Paris, France.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other Sexually Transmitted Infections, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Microbiology.
    Dupin, N.
    Syphilis National Reference Center, Hôpital Tarnier-Cochin, AP-HP, Paris, France.
    Tiplica, G. S.
    2nd Dermatological Clinic, Carol Davila University, Colentina Clinical Hospital, Bucharest, Romania.
    Potočnik, M.
    Department of Dermatovenereology, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Patel, R.
    Department of Genitourinary Medicine, the Royal South Hants Hospital, Southampton, UK.
    2020 European guideline on the management of syphilis2021Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 35, nr 1, s. 574-588Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The 2020 edition of the European guideline on the management of syphilis is an update of the 2014 edition.

    Main modifications and updates include:

    • The ongoing epidemics of early syphilis in Europe, particularly in men who have sex with men (MSM)
    • The development of dual treponemal and non-treponemal point-of-care (POC) tests
    • The progress in non-treponemal test (NTT) automatization
    • The regular episodic shortage of benzathine penicillin G (BPG) in some European countries
    • The exclusion of azithromycin as an alternative treatment at any stage of syphilis
    • The pre-exposure or immediate post-exposure prophylaxis with doxycycline in populations at high risk of acquiring syphilis.
  • 32.
    Jensen, J. S.
    et al.
    Microbiology and Infection Control, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cusini, M.
    Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy.
    Gomberg, M.
    Moscow Scientific and Practical Centre of Dermatovenereology and Cosmetology, Moscow, Russia.
    Moi, H.
    Olafia Clinic, Oslo University Hospital, Institute of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Wilson, J.
    Genitourinary Medicine and HIV, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other STIs, Department of Laboratory Medicine.
    2021 European guideline on the management of Mycoplasma genitalium infections2022Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 36, nr 5, s. 641-650Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Mycoplasma genitalium infection contributes to 10-35% of non-chlamydial non-gonococcal urethritis in men. In women, M. genitalium is associated with cervicitis and pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) in 10-25%. Transmission of M. genitalium occurs through direct mucosal contact.

    CLINICAL FEATURES AND DIAGNOSTIC TESTS: Asymptomatic infections are frequent. In men, urethritis, dysuria and discharge predominate. In women, symptoms include vaginal discharge, dysuria or symptoms of PID - abdominal pain and dyspareunia. Symptoms are the main indication for diagnostic testing. Diagnosis is achievable only through nucleic acid amplification testing and must include investigation for macrolide resistance mutations.

    THERAPY: Therapy for M .genitalium is indicated if M. genitalium is detected. Doxycycline has a cure rate of 30-40%, but resistance is not increasing. Azithromycin has a cure rate of 85-95% in macrolide-susceptible infections. An extended course of azithromycin appears to have a higher cure rate, and pre-treatment with doxycycline may decrease organism load and the risk of macrolide resistance selection. Moxifloxacin can be used as second-line therapy but resistance is increasing.

    RECOMMENDED TREATMENT: Uncomplicated M. genitalium infection without macrolide resistance mutations or resistance testing: Azithromycin 500 mg on day one, then 250 mg on days 2-5 (oral). Second-line treatment and treatment for uncomplicated macrolide-resistant M. genitalium infection: Moxifloxacin 400 mg od for 7 days (oral). Third-line treatment for persistent M. genitalium infection after azithromycin and moxifloxacin: Doxycycline or minocycline 100 mg bid for 14 days (oral) may cure 40-70%. Pristinamycin 1 g qid for 10 days (oral) has a cure rate of around 75%. Complicated M. genitalium infection (PID, epididymitis): Moxifloxacin 400 mg od for 14 days. MAIN CHANGES FROM THE 2016 EUROPEAN M.

    GENITALIUM GUIDELINE: Due to increasing antimicrobial resistance and warnings against moxifloxacin use, indications for testing and treatment have been narrowed to primarily involve symptomatic patients. The importance of macrolide resistance-guided therapy is emphasised.

  • 33. Kallas, M
    et al.
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicin och kirurgi, Avdelningen för dermatologi och venereologi. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Medicincentrum, Hudkliniken i Östergötland.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för molekylär och klinisk medicin, Yrkes- och miljömedicin.
    Synnerstad, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicin och kirurgi, Avdelningen för dermatologi och venereologi. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Medicincentrum, Hudkliniken i Östergötland.
    Frequency and distribution pattern of melanocytic naevi in Estonian children and the influence of atopic dermatitis2006Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 20, nr 2, s. 143-148Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is a strong correlation between naevus number and prospective melanoma risk. Melanoma is one of the most rapidly increasing cancers in Estonia and primary prevention programmes for melanoma that target risk behaviour in the sun have so far not been launched. Methods: The naevus profile was examined in 549/700 9-year-old Estonian children (282 boys and 267 girls) and the presence of active atopic dermatitis (AD) was registered. Results: There was a wide range of naevi (4-121) and a median total body count of 26. There was no difference in naevus count between boys and girls. No dysplastic naevi were found. Thirty-nine of 549 children (7%) had at least one lesion clinically diagnosed as a congenital naevus. Boys had more naevi on the face (median 4) and trunk (median 12) than girls (median 3 and 9, respectively, P < 0.001). Girls had more naevi on the legs compared with boys (median 4 and 3, respectively, P < 0.01). Fifty-four out of 549 (9.8%) had naevi on the palms and 18/549 (3.3%) on the soles. Children with fair skin, freckles and light hair and eye colours had significantly more naevi than those with darker colours. Thirty-one of 549 (6%) children had AD diagnosed on the examination day and they had a lower total naevus count (median 20) compared with children with no AD (median 27,n = 518, P < 0.05). Conclusions: The naevus situation in Estonian children today might constitute a starting point for evaluating the efficiency of coming preventive measures as a change of naevus number in children might serve as an early marker for a change in melanoma incidence. © 2006 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  • 34.
    Karlqvist, Mattias
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Dermatologi och venereologi. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Gävleborg.
    Rosell, K.
    Rystedt, A.
    Hymnelius, K.
    Swartling, Carl
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Dermatologi och venereologi.
    Botulinum toxin B in the treatment of craniofacial hyperhidrosis2014Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 28, nr 10, s. 1313-1317Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Hyperhidrosis affects up to 3% of the population and negatively affects patients' quality of life. Craniofacial hyperhidrosis is a common complaint which has been successfully treated with botulinum toxin B (Btx B) since 2004 at our hidrosis clinics. Objective To evaluate the safety and clinical effect of Btx B in craniofacial hyperhidrosis. Methods The dermatology life quality index (DLQI) was monitored before and after treatment in 38 patients with craniofacial hyperhidrosis. Sweating before and after treatment was monitored by measuring trans epidermal water loss and by collecting gravimetric data. Global Assessment of Therapy in a 5-grade scale was captured. Results DLQI scores were significantly improved at follow-up 2-4 weeks posttreatment and sweating was significantly reduced. DLQI scores before treatment were 13 +/- 1 (mean +/- SD) and posttreatment 5 +/- 1 which was highly statistically significant (P < 0.001). Sweating before treatment monitored with trans epidermal water loss was 52 +/- 31 g/m(2)/h which decreased to 18 +/- 7 g/m(2)/h (P < 0.001) posttreatment. Gravimetric data yielded a sweat rate of 0.07 +/- 0.08 mg/min at baseline, which consequently dropped to 0.02 +/- 0.05 mg/min (P < 0.05) posttreatment. Regarding the Global Assessment of Therapy 87% of the patients were satisfied (score 4-5) with the treatment result. In a 2-year follow-up, 74% returned for further treatments after a median time of 5 months. Side-effects were mild and most commonly reported was stiffness of the forehead and the eyebrows. Conclusions In this prospective, uncontrolled study Btx B seems to be both a safe and effective treatment in craniofacial hyperhidrosis improving quality of life and reducing extreme sweating.

  • 35.
    Knobler, R.
    et al.
    Med Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Arenberger, P.
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic.
    Arun, A.
    Rotherham NHA Fdn Trust, England.
    Assaf, C.
    Helios Klinikum Krefeld, Germany.
    Bagot, M.
    Univ Paris, France.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för inflammation och infektion. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    Bohbot, A.
    Hautepierre Hosp, France.
    Calzavara-Pinton, P.
    Univ Brescia Italy, Italy.
    Child, F.
    Guys & St Thomas NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Cho, A.
    Univ Hosp, Germany.
    French, L. E.
    Univ Hosp, Germany.
    Gennery, A. R.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Gniadecki, R.
    Univ Alberta, Canada.
    Gollnick, H. P. M.
    Otto von Guericke Univ, Germany.
    Guenova, E.
    Univ Lausanne, Switzerland; Lausanne Univ Hosp CHUV, Switzerland.
    Jaksch, P.
    Med Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Jantschitsch, C.
    Med Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Klemke, C.
    Hautklin Stadt Klinikum Karlsruhe, Germany.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för barns och kvinnors hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Papadavid, E.
    Natl & Kapodistrian Univ Athens, Greece.
    Scarisbrick, J.
    Univ Hosp Birmingham, England.
    Schwarz, T.
    Univ Clin Schleswig Holstein, Germany.
    Stadler, R.
    Univ Bochum, Germany.
    Wolf, P.
    Med Univ Graz, Austria.
    Zic, J.
    Vanderbilt Univ, TN USA.
    Zouboulis, C.
    Brandenburg Med Sch Theodor Fontane, Germany.
    Zuckermann, A.
    Med Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Greinix, H.
    Med Univ Graz, Austria.
    European dermatology forum - updated guidelines on the use of extracorporeal photopheresis 2020-part 12020Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 34, nr 12, s. 2693-2716Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Following the first investigational study on the use of extracorporeal photopheresis for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma published in 1983, this technology has received continued use and further recognition for additional earlier as well as refractory forms. After the publication of the first guidelines for this technology in the JEADV in 2014, this technology has maintained additional promise in the treatment of other severe and refractory conditions in a multi-disciplinary setting. It has confirmed recognition in well-known documented conditions such as graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, systemic sclerosis, solid organ transplant rejection including lung, heart and liver and to a lesser extent inflammatory bowel disease. Materials and methods In order to further provide recognized expert practical guidelines for the use of this technology for all indications, the European Dermatology Forum (EDF) again proceeded to address these questions in the hands of the recognized experts within and outside the field of dermatology. This was done using the recognized and approved guidelines of EDF for this task. All authors had the opportunity to review each contribution as it was added. Results and conclusion These updated 2020 guidelines provide at present the most comprehensive available expert recommendations for the use of extracorporeal photopheresis based on the available published literature and expert consensus opinion. The guidelines are divided in two parts: PART I covers cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, chronic graft-versus-host disease and acute graft-versus-host disease while PART II will cover scleroderma, solid organ transplantation, Crohns disease, use of ECP in paediatrics practice, atopic dermatitis, type 1 diabetes, pemphigus, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita and erosive oral lichen planus.

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  • 36.
    Knobler, R.
    et al.
    Med Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Arenberger, P.
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic.
    Arun, A.
    Rotherham NHA Fdn Trust, England.
    Assaf, C.
    Helios Klinikum Krefeld, Germany.
    Bagot, M.
    Univ Paris, France.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för inflammation och infektion. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    Bohbot, A.
    Hautepierre Hosp, France.
    Calzavara-Pinton, P.
    Univ Brescia Italy, Italy.
    Child, F.
    Guys & St Thomas NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Cho, A.
    Med Univ Vienna, Austria.
    French, L. E.
    Univ Hosp, Germany; Newcastle Univ, England.
    Gennery, A. R.
    Translational and Clinical Research Institute Newcastle University Great North Children's Hospital Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.
    Gniadecki, R.
    Univ Alberta, Canada.
    Gollnick, H. P. M.
    Otto von Guericke Univ, Germany.
    Guenova, E.
    Univ Lausanne, Switzerland; Lausanne Univ Hosp CHUV, Switzerland.
    Jaksch, P.
    Med Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Jantschitsch, C.
    Med Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Klemke, C.
    Hautklin Stadt Klinikum Karlsruhe, Germany.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för barns och kvinnors hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Papadavid, E.
    Natl & Kapodistrian Univ Athens, Greece.
    Scarisbrick, J.
    Univ Hosp Birmingham, England.
    Schwarz, T.
    Univ Clin Schleswig Holstein, Germany.
    Stadler, R.
    Univ Bochum, Germany.
    Wolf, P.
    Med Univ Graz, Austria.
    Zic, J.
    Vanderbilt Univ, TN USA.
    Zouboulis, C.
    Brandenburg Med Sch Theodor Fontane, Germany; Brandenburg Med Sch Theodor Fontane, Germany; Brandenburg Med Sch Theodor Fontane, Germany; Brandenburg Med Sch Theodor Fontane, Germany.
    Zuckermann, A.
    Med Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Greinix, H.
    Med Univ Graz, Austria.
    European dermatology forum: Updated guidelines on the use of extracorporeal photopheresis 2020 - Part 22021Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 35, nr 1, s. 27-49Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Following the first investigational study on the use of extracorporeal photopheresis for the treatment of cutaneous T‐cell lymphoma published in 1983, this technology has received continued use and further recognition for additional earlier as well as refractory forms. After the publication of the first guidelines for this technology in the JEADV in 2014, this technology has maintained additional promise in the treatment of other severe and refractory conditions in a multidisciplinary setting. It has confirmed recognition in well‐known documented conditions such as graft‐vs.‐host disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, systemic sclerosis, solid organ transplant rejection including lung, heart and liver and to a lesser extent inflammatory bowel disease.

    Materials and methods

    In order to further provide recognized expert practical guidelines for the use of this technology for all indications, the European Dermatology Forum (EDF) again proceeded to address these questions in the hands of the recognized experts within and outside the field of dermatology. This was done using the recognized and approved guidelines of EDF for this task. All authors had the opportunity to review each contribution as it was added.

    Results and conclusion

    These updated 2020 guidelines provide at present the most comprehensive available expert recommendations for the use of extracorporeal photopheresis based on the available published literature and expert consensus opinion. The guidelines were divided into two parts: PART I covers Cutaneous T‐cell lymphoma, chronic graft‐vs.‐host disease and acute graft‐vs.‐host disease, while PART II will cover scleroderma, solid organ transplantation, Crohn’s disease, use of ECP in paediatric patients, atopic dermatitis, type 1 diabetes, pemphigus, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita and erosive oral lichen planus.

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  • 37.
    Knobler, R.
    et al.
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria .
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för inflammationsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin.
    Calzavara-Pinton, P.
    University Hospital Spedali Civili, Italy .
    Greinix, H.
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria .
    Jaksch, P.
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria .
    Laroche, L.
    Avicenne Hospital, France .
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Quaglino, P.
    University of Turin, Italy .
    Reinisch, W.
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria .
    Scarisbrick, J.
    University Hospital, England .
    Schwarz, T.
    University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Germany .
    Wolf, P.
    Medical University of Graz, Austria .
    Arenberger, P.
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic .
    Assaf, C.
    HELIOS Klinikum Krefeld, Germany .
    Bagot, M.
    University of Paris 07, France .
    Barr, M.
    University of So Calif, CA USA .
    Bohbot, A.
    University of Strasbourg, France .
    Bruckner-Tuderman, L.
    University of Medical Centre Freiburg, Germany .
    Dreno, B.
    Nantes University Hospital, France .
    Enk, A.
    Heidelberg University, Germany .
    French, L.
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland .
    Gniadecki, R.
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark .
    Gollnick, H.
    Otto Von Guericke University, Germany .
    Hertl, M.
    University Hospital Marburg, Germany .
    Jantschitsch, C.
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria .
    Jung, A.
    Dessau Medical Centre, Germany .
    Just, U.
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria .
    -D. Klemke, C.
    Heidelberg University, Germany .
    Lippert, U.
    Dessau Medical Centre, Germany .
    Luger, T.
    University of Munster, Germany .
    Papadavid, E.
    University of Athens, Greece .
    Pehamberger, H.
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria .
    Ranki, A.
    University of Helsinki, Finland University of Helsinki, Finland .
    Stadler, R.
    Johannes Wesling Medical Centre, Germany .
    Sterry, W.
    Charite, Germany .
    H. Wolf, I.
    Medical University of Graz, Austria .
    Worm, M.
    Charite, Germany .
    Zic, J.
    Vanderbilt University, TN 37212 USA .
    C. Zouboulis, C.
    Dessau Medical Centre, Germany .
    Hillen, U.
    University of Duisburg Essen, Germany .
    Guidelines on the use of extracorporeal photopheresis2014Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 28, nr s1, s. 1-37Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundAfter the first investigational study on the use of extracorporeal photopheresis for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma was published in 1983 with its subsequent recognition by the FDA for its refractory forms, the technology has shown significant promise in the treatment of other severe and refractory conditions in a multi-disciplinary setting. Among the major studied conditions are graft versus host disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, systemic sclerosis, solid organ transplant rejection and inflammatory bowel disease. Materials and methodsIn order to provide recognized expert practical guidelines for the use of this technology for all indications the European Dermatology Forum (EDF) proceeded to address these questions in the hands of the recognized experts within and outside the field of dermatology. This was done using the recognized and approved guidelines of EDF for this task. Results and conclusionThese guidelines provide at present the most comprehensive available expert recommendations for the use of extracorporeal photopheresis based on the available published literature and expert consensus opinion.

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  • 38.
    Lyth, Johan
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för kliniska vetenskaper. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centrum för hälso- och vårdutveckling, Regionalt cancercentrum. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Synnerstad, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för inflammationsmedicin. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Hudkliniken i Östergötland. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Lindholm, Christer
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centrum för hälso- och vårdutveckling, Regionalt cancercentrum.
    Stage-specific direct healthcare costs in patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma2016Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 30, nr 5, s. 789-793Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Clinical stage at diagnosis is a strong prognostic factor for death in cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM), with worse prognosis at higher stages. However, few studies have investigated how direct healthcare cost per patient varies with clinical stage.

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine the stage-specific direct healthcare costs for CMM patients compared to the healthcare costs in the general population in the County of Östergötland, Sweden.

    Methods CMM patients in the County of Östergötland diagnosed 2005-2012 were identified from the Swedish cancer registry. Information on clinical stage was collected from the Swedish Melanoma Register (SMR) and cost data from the Cost per Patient database (CPP) for 1 075 CMM patients in Östergötland. CPP contains costs associated with all healthcare contacts per patient including inpatient, outpatient, and primary care. The CMM-related costs were defined as the difference in mean healthcare costs between CMM patients and general population.

    Results The first year after CMM diagnosis, the average healthcare costs for CMM patients was 2.8 times higher than in the general population. The healthcare cost ratio varied from 2.0 (stage I) to 10.1 (stage IV) and the CMM-related costs per patient-year varied from €2 670 (stage I) to €29 291 (stage IV). The mean healthcare costs decreased over time but remained significantly higher than in the general population for all clinical stages. During the first year after diagnosis, patients in clinical stage III-IV (7% of CMM patients) accounted for 27% of the total CMM-related healthcare costs.

    Conclusions The direct healthcare costs for CMM patients were significantly higher than in the general population independent of clinical stage. CMM patients diagnosed in clinical stage III-IV were associated with particularly high costs and the healthcare system may save resources by finding CMM patients in earlier stages.

  • 39.
    Lyth, Johan
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för Kirurgi, Ortopedi och Onkologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Forsknings- och utvecklingsenheten för Närsjukvården i Östergötland.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Primärvårdscentrum, Vårdcentralen Kärna, Linköping.
    Maroti, M.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Eriksson, H.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ingvar, C.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Prognostic risk factors of first recurrence in patients with primary stages I-II cutaneous malignant melanoma - from the population-based Swedish melanoma register2017Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 31, nr 9, s. 1468-1474Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Prognostic factors in patients with localized primary cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) are well described. However, prognostic factors for recurrence are less documented. Objectives The aim of this study was to identify prognostic risk factors for first recurrence in patients with localized stages I-II CMM using population-based data. Methods This study included 1437 CMM patients registered in one region of Sweden during 1999-2012 follow-up through 31 December 2012. To identify first recurrence of CMM disease, data from a care data warehouse, the pathology and radiology department registries were used. Patients were also followed through a census register and the national Cause of Death Register. Results The 5- and 10-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) were 85.7% and 81.2%, respectively. The most common site of first recurrence was regional lymph node metastasis closely followed by distant metastasis. After adjusting for all prognostic factors, women had 50% lower risk of recurrence than men (HR = 0.5, 95% CI 0.4-0.7) and patients = 70 had higher risk compared to patients 55-69 years (HR = 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.5). Other significant prognostic factors for risk of recurrence were tumour thickness, presence of ulceration, Clarks level of invasion and histogenetic type. Conclusion Tumour thickness was found to be the predominant risk factor for recurrence. The prognostic factors for recurrence coincided with prognostic factors for CMM death. The most common site of first recurrence in stages I-II CMM is regional lymph node (42.8%) closely followed by distant metastases (37.6%), a fact which has to be taken into consideration when choosing follow-up strategies.

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  • 40.
    Malm, Kerstin
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Andersson, Sören
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fredlund, Hans
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Norrgren, Hans
    Division of Infection Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Biague, Antonio
    National Public Health Laboratory (LNSP), Bissau, Guinea-Bissau.
    Månsson, Fredrik
    Division of Infection Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ballard, R.
    Center for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Protection, Atlanta GA, USA.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Analytical evaluation of nine serological assays for diagnosis of syphilis2015Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 29, nr 12, s. 2369-2376Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The diagnosis of syphilis is most frequently dependent on antibody detection with serological assays. Assays for both treponemal and non-treponemal antibodies are needed to provide a sensitive and specific diagnosis. For decades, a first screening has been done with non-treponemal assays, followed by treponemal. However, in recent years, following laboratory automation, the reverse sequence screening algorithms have been developed, using a treponemal assay as the initial screening test.

    Objective: To evaluate serological assays for treponemal and non-treponemal antibodies, to use in reverse algorithm screening of syphilis.

    Material and methods: Six treponemal assays (one IgM-specific assay), two non-treponemal assays and one novel dual point-of-care (POC) assay for serological diagnosis of syphilis were evaluated. Serum samples from Guinea-Bissau and Sweden were examined, as well as two performance panels and samples from blood donors. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each assay, using different assays as gold standard test.

    Results: The Macro-Vue RPR Card test was the most sensitive non-treponemal test and the TrepSure Anti-Treponema EIA Screen and the SeroDia TP-PA were the most sensitive and specific treponemal assays. Among the automated assays, both the Liaison Treponema Screen and Architect Syphilis TP showed high sensitivity, however, the former had clearly higher specificity.

    Conclusions: In resourced settings, where the reverse sequence algorithm is preferred for screening, an automated treponemal immunoassay for initial screening subsequently followed by the TrepSure test or TP-PA assay as a second treponemal assay appear highly effective. Finally, a quantitative highly sensitive non-treponemal assay, e.g. the Macro-Vue RPR Card test, could then be used as a supplementary test to evaluate activity of the syphilis infection.

  • 41.
    Maroti, Marianne
    et al.
    Jönköping.
    Ulff, Eva
    Jönköping.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för molekylär och klinisk medicin, Genus och medicin. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Kvinnokliniken i Linköping.
    Quality of life before and 6 weeks after treatment in a dermatological outpatient treatment unit2006Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 20, nr 9, s. 1081-1085Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Dermatological disease affects quality of life to a great extent. Treatments are time-consuming and many patients have problems adhering to treatment. Attending an outpatient unit regularly during an intensive treatment period may enable patients to cope with their illness, adhere to treatment and thus improve their quality of life. Objective: To study the effect on quality of life of 6 weeks of regular treatment in the outpatient unit in the County Hospital of Jönköping, by means of a questionnaire and interviews. Methods: The Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) was distributed to 50 consecutive patients with psoriasis, atopic dermatitis or pruritus attending our outpatient treatment unit. Nine of the patients were interviewed during treatment about factors that might influence their quality of life. Results: The DLQI scores before treatment indicated a low quality of life. Women were more affected than men. After 6 weeks of treatment there was a clear improvement, with a 57% reduction in the scores. The answers from the interviews indicated important areas of concern such as withdrawal from public places, adoption of special clothing habits and concern about personal relationships. Conclusion: Dermatological diseases have an important influence on patients' quality of life. Attending an outpatient treatment unit was in this series of cases associated with improved quality of life as measured with the DLQI. © 2006 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  • 42. Nast, A.
    et al.
    Smith, C.
    Spuls, P. I.
    Valle, G. Avila
    Bata-Csorgo, Z.
    Boonen, H.
    De Jong, E.
    Garcia-Doval, I.
    Gisondi, P.
    Kaur-Knudsen, D.
    Mahil, S.
    Malkonen, T.
    Maul, J. T.
    Mburu, S.
    Mrowietz, U.
    Reich, K.
    Remenyik, E.
    Ronholt, K. M.
    Sator, P. G.
    Schmitt-Egenolf, Marcus
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Dermatologi och venereologi.
    Sikora, M.
    Stroemer, K.
    Sundnes, O.
    Trigos, D.
    Van der Kraaij, G.
    Yawalkar, N.
    Dressler, C.
    EuroGuiDerm Guideline on the systemic treatment of Psoriasis vulgaris – Part 1: treatment and monitoring recommendations2020Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 34, nr 11, s. 2461-2498Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This evidence‐ and consensus‐based guideline on the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris was developed following the EuroGuiDerm Guideline and Consensus Statement Development Manual. The first part of the guideline includes general information on the scope and purpose, health questions covered, target users and strength/limitations of the guideline. Suggestions for disease severity grading and treatment goals are provided. It presents the general treatment recommendations as well as detailed management and monitoring recommendations for the individual drugs. The treatment options discussed in this guideline are as follows: acitretin, ciclosporin, fumarates, methotrexate, adalimumab, apremilast, brodalumab, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, guselkumab, infliximab, ixekizumab, risankizumab, secukinumab, tildrakizumab and ustekinumab.

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  • 43.
    Nast, A.
    et al.
    Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Corporate Member of Freie Universität Berlin, Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, Berlin, Germany.
    Smith, C.
    St John's Institute of Dermatology, London, United Kingdom.
    Spuls, P.I.
    Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Avila Valle, G.
    Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Corporate Member of Freie Universität Berlin, Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, Berlin, Germany.
    Bata-Csörgö, Z.
    University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary.
    Boonen, H.
    Office-Based Dermatology Practice, Geel, Belgium.
    De Jong, E.
    Radboud University Medical Centre Nijmegen, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Garcia-Doval, I.
    Unidad de Investigación. Fundación Piel Sana AEDV, Madrid, Spain.
    Gisondi, P.
    University of Verona, Verona, Italy.
    Kaur-Knudsen, D.
    University Hospital Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Mahil, S.
    Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.
    Mälkönen, T.
    Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Maul, J.T.
    Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland.
    Mburu, S.
    International Federation of Psoriasis Associations (IFPA), Germany.
    Mrowietz, U.
    Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany.
    Reich, K.
    Translational Research in Inflammatory Skin Diseases, Institute for Health Services Research in Dermatology and Nursing, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
    Remenyik, E.
    University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary.
    Rønholt, K.M.
    Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Sator, P.G.
    Municipal Hospital Hietzing, Vienna, Austria.
    Schmitt-Egenolf, Marcus
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Dermatologi och venereologi.
    Sikora, M.
    Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.
    Strömer, K.
    Office-Based Dermatology Practice, Mönchengladbach, Germany.
    Sundnes, O.
    Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Trigos, D.
    International Federation of Psoriasis Associations (IFPA), Germany.
    Van Der Kraaij, G.
    Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Yawalkar, N.
    Department of Dermatology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Dressler, C.
    Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Corporate Member of Freie Universität Berlin, Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, Berlin, Germany.
    EuroGuiDerm Guideline on the systemic treatment of Psoriasis vulgaris – Part 2: specific clinical and comorbid situations2021Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 35, nr 2, s. 281-317Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This evidence- and consensus-based guideline on the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris was developed following the EuroGuiDerm Guideline and Consensus Statement Development Manual. The second part of the guideline provides guidance for specific clinical and comorbid situations such as treating psoriasis vulgaris patient with concomitant psoriatic arthritis, concomitant inflammatory bowel disease, a history of malignancies or a history of depression or suicidal ideation. It further holds recommendations for concomitant diabetes, viral hepatitis, disease affecting the heart or the kidneys as well as concomitant neurological disease. Advice on how to screen for tuberculosis and recommendations on how to manage patients with a positive tuberculosis test result are given. It further covers treatment for pregnant women or patients with a wish for a child in the near future. Information on vaccination, immunogenicity and systemic treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic is also provided.

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  • 44.
    Nilsson, H-J.
    et al.
    Section for Neurophysiology, Department of Physiological Sciences, University of Lund.
    Psouni, Elia
    Section for Neurophysiology, Department of Physiological Sciences, University of Lund.
    Carstam, R.
    Department of Dermatology and Venerology, University of Lund.
    Schouenborg, J.
    Section for Neurophysiology, Department of Physiological Sciences, University of Lund.
    Profound inhibition of chronic itch induced by stimulation of thin cutaneous nerve fibres2004Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 18, nr 1, s. 37-43Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Despite the fact that severe itch is common in many dermatological diseases, the therapeutic arsenal against itching is limited. From neurophysiological experiments, using a new technique termed cutaneous field stimulation, it is known that acute itch can be effectively relieved by stimulation of cutaneous nociceptors.

    METHODS: We tested the effects of cutaneous field stimulation (25 min, 16 electrodes, 4 Hz per electrode, up to 0.8 mA) on chronic itch due to atopic dermatitis. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (100 Hz, up to 26 mA) was used for comparison. In 27 patients, itch was measured just prior to, during and at regular intervals up to 12 h after either type of treatment.

    RESULTS: Both treatments augmented the itch sensation during ongoing stimulation, presumably reflecting an altered sensory processing in the somatosensory pathways of chronic itch patients. However, after cessation of cutaneous field stimulation, but not transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, the itch sensation was significantly depressed for up to 7 h. The peak inhibitory effect (about 25% of control) was reached between 1 and 5 h poststimulation. Neither treatment had any significant effect on alloknesis, as measured before and 10 min after stimulation.

    CONCLUSION: It is concluded that cutaneous field stimulation strongly depresses chronic itch, and is a potentially useful symptomatic treatment of itch.

  • 45.
    Nylander Lundqvist, Elisabet
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Dermatologi och venereologi.
    Wahlin, Ylva-Britt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Oral diagnostisk radiologi.
    Bergdahl, M
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi.
    Bergdahl, Jan
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskaplig fakultet, Psykologi.
    Psychological health in patients with genital and oral erosive lichen planus2006Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 20, nr 6, s. 661-666Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Erosive lichen planus is a severe, recurrent and recalcitrant disease that affects several mucosal areas, mostly the genital area and the mouth, but also, for example, the oesophagus and perianal area. The disease causes serious symptoms, because of the raw, de-epithelialized mucosa and healing with scars/adhesions, which affect the patient's life in many ways. It causes, for example, difficulties in eating, drinking and going to the bathroom. Treatment is complicated and, so far, few therapeutic drugs other than steroids have been reported. OBJECTIVES: As the disease has severe implications on the patient's life it is important to investigate the psychological health of the patients, as well as the influence of stress on their health and wellbeing, in order to improve treatment. STUDY DESIGN, SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Forty-nine consecutive patients with erosive lichen planus were included during a 1-year period. The study was carried out as 'state-of-the-last-month', and stress, state anxiety, depression and 'erosive lichen planus factors', i.e. symptoms affecting daily life, were assessed. RESULTS: Eighty-seven per cent of the patients had symptoms, severely affecting daily life. Unexpectedly, oral symptoms seemed to be the most prominent. Our results showed that depression, anxiety and stress were more common in patients with erosive lichen planus than in a control group. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: Erosive lichen planus is a severe disease with symptoms and complications affecting the patient's life. Our results indicate that their psychological health is also affected and emphasize the need for close collaboration between physicians, dentists with special knowledge in oral medicine and counsellors/psychologists to optimize handling of these patients.

  • 46.
    Olsen, Birgitta
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Lan, Pham T.
    Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia
    Khang, T. H.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Population-based assessment of Mycoplasma genitalium in Vietnam: low prevalence among married women of reproductive age in a rural area2009Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 23, nr 5, s. 533-537Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To analyse the prevalence of Mycoplasma genitalium infection in a population-based study among married women from a demographic surveillance site in a rural geographical area of Vietnam.

    Materials and Methods Women, 18-49 years of age, were randomly selected to participate. DNA was isolated from endocervical swabs sampled from 990 participating women. The M. genitalium MgPa adhesion gene was detected using a real-time PCR with TaqMan probe.

    Results Eight (0.8% [95% confidence interval, 0.25-1.35%]) of the included women were infected with M. genitalium .Two of these positive women reported clinical symptoms. One additional M. genitalium positive but symptom-free woman, however, showed clinical signs of vaginitis. None of the M. genitalium positive women was concomitantly infected with Chlamydia trachomatis , Neisseria gonorrhoeae , syphilis or HIV. Furthermore, there was no obvious association between M. genitalium infectionand vaginal douching, use of intra-uterine device (IUD), or occurrence of bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis, or Trichomonas vaginalis .

    Conclusions The prevalence of M. genitalium among married women in Vietnam was relatively low. However, more large, well-designed and appropriately performed studies in other population groups including unmarried women and men, and in other geographical areas, rural as well as urban, are crucial in order to extract any evidence-based conclusions regarding the overall prevalence of STIs, including M. genitalium infections, in the Vietnamese society. The present study compiled with such future studies may form the basis for a national sexual health strategy for prevention, diagnosis, and surveillance of STIs, including M. genitalium infections, in Vietnam.

  • 47.
    Ozolins, D.
    et al.
    Univ Latvia, Riga, Latvia..
    D'Elios, M. M.
    Univ Florence, Florence, Italy..
    Lowndes, C. M.
    HPA, London, England..
    Unemo, Magnus
    Region Örebro län.
    Diagnostics, surveillance and management of sexually transmitted infections in Europe have to be improved: lessons from the European Conference of National Strategies for Chlamydia Trachomatis and Human Papillomavirus (NSCP conference) in Latvia, 20112013Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 27, nr 10, s. 1308-1311Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background There is an urgent need for the recognition of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) as a serious public health problem in Europe. The lack of standardization in testing, along with poor reporting and surveillance mechanisms, have resulted in low reported rates of STIs in many European Union (EU) countries, reinforcing the erroneous assumption that STIs are not a major problem. Testing and diagnosis of STIs must therefore be improved and enhanced. Recommendations Reporting of Chlamydia trachomatis infection, gonorrhoea and syphilis should be mandatory, and an integrated surveillance system for C. trachomatis implemented in all European countries. Implementation of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) surveillance mechanisms for STIs in all EU countries is highly recommended. A necessary component for successful introduction of the HPV vaccine, as with any vaccination programme is a well-planned and organized information campaign.

  • 48. Papp, K.
    et al.
    Poulin, Y.
    Barber, K.
    Lynde, C.
    Prinz, J. C.
    Berg, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Dermatologi och venereologi. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Kerrouche, N.
    Rives, V. P.
    Cost-effectiveness evaluation of clobetasol propionate shampoo (CPS) maintenance in patients with moderate scalp psoriasis: A Pan-European analysis2012Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 26, nr 11, s. 1407-1414Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Scalp psoriasis is a difficult to treat and usually chronic manifestation of psoriasis. The CalePso study showed that CPS (Clobex ® Shampoo) in maintenance therapy of scalp psoriasis (twice weekly) significantly increases the probability of keeping patient under remission during 6 months, compared with vehicle (40.3% relapses vs. 11.6% relapses, ITT). Objective The objective of the study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of a maintenance therapy with CPS vs. its vehicle in nine European countries. Methods A 24-week decision tree model was developed with 4-weekly time steps. The considered population has moderate scalp psoriasis successfully treated with a daily application of CPS up to 4 weeks. Data were taken from the CalePso study and from national experts' recommendations for alternative treatment choices, with their probabilities of success taken from literature to develop country-specific models. Health benefits are measured in disease-free days (DFD). The economic analysis includes drug and physician costs. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PrSA) assesses the uncertainty of the model. Results Depending on the country, the mean total number of DFDs per patient is 21-42% higher with CPS compared with vehicle, and the mean total cost is 11-31% lower. The mean costs per DFD are 30-46% lower with CPS compared with the vehicle. The PrSA showed in 1000 simulations that CPS is more effective vs. vehicle in 100% of the cases and less expensive than its vehicle in 80-99% of the cases. Conclusion This model suggests that CPS is cost-effective in maintaining the success achieved in moderate scalp psoriasis patients.

  • 49.
    Pasquali, L
    et al.
    Dermatology and Venereology Division, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden;Center for Molecular Medicine (CMM), Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svedbom, A
    Dermatology and Venereology Division, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Srivastava, A
    Dermatology and Venereology Division, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden;Center for Molecular Medicine (CMM), Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rosén, E
    Dermatology and Venereology Division, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Ulla
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Reumatologi.
    Ståhle, M
    Dermatology and Venereology Division, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden;Center for Molecular Medicine (CMM), Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden;Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pivarcsi, A
    Dermatology and Venereology Division, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden;Center for Molecular Medicine (CMM), Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden;Research Institute of Translational Biomedicine, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary.
    Sonkoly, E
    Dermatology and Venereology Division, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden;Center for Molecular Medicine (CMM), Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden;Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Circulating microRNAs in extracellular vesicles as potential biomarkers for psoriatic arthritis in patients with psoriasis2020Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 34, nr 6, s. 1248-1256Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) develops in ~30% of patients with psoriasis. The diagnosis of PsA is challenging, and there are no reliable molecular markers in clinical use. MicroRNAs are short non-coding regulatory RNAs, which can be actively packaged into extracellular vesicles (EVs) and secreted to the circulation.

    OBJECTIVES: To explore whether plasma-derived EV microRNAs may serve as biomarkers for PsA in patients with psoriasis.

    METHODS: Plasma samples were obtained from patients with cutaneous-only psoriasis (PsC) and patients with psoriasis and PsA. Plasma EVs were isolated using miRCURY™ Exosome Isolation Kit. RNA sequencing was used to identify differentially expressed EV miRNAs in the discovery phase (PsC, n = 15; PsA, n = 14). In the validation phase (PsC, n = 29; PsA, n = 28), 41 selected miRNAs were analysed in plasma EVs by qPCR. The association of the identified miRNAs with PsA was assessed by logistic regression analysis.

    RESULTS: RNA sequencing identified 19 plasma EV miRNAs with significantly different levels between PsA and PsC in the discovery cohort. Significantly lower levels of plasma EV let-7b-5p and miR-30e-5p in PsA vs. PsC were confirmed in the validation cohort, and their decreased levels were found to be associated with the presence of PsA. ROC analysis revealed an AUC of 0.68 (95% CI 0.53-0.83) for let-7b-5p and 0.69 (95% CI 0.55-0.84) for miR-30e-5p.

    CONCLUSIONS: Circulating EV microRNA levels are altered in patients with PsA as compared with PsC. Findings of this exploratory study suggest that circulating EV microRNAs may serve as biomarkers for arthritis in psoriasis patients.

  • 50.
    Philipova, I.
    et al.
    Department of Microbiology, National Center of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Hadad, Ronza
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other Sexually Transmitted Infections, National Reference Laboratory for Sexually Transmitted Infections, Department of Laboratory Medicine.
    Levterova, V.
    Department of Microbiology, National Center of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Kantardjiev, T.
    Department of Microbiology, National Center of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other Sexually Transmitted Infections, National Reference Laboratory for Sexually Transmitted Infections, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; University College London (UCL), London, UK.
    Mycoplasma genitalium antimicrobial (azithromycin and moxifloxacin) resistance and treatment outcome in Sofia, Bulgaria, 2018-20212023Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 37, nr 8, s. e994-e995Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
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