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  • 1.
    Almér, Elin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Children's beliefs about bilingualism and language use as expressed in child-adult conversations2017In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 401-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to describe young children's beliefs about language and bilingualism as they are expressed in verbal utterances. The data is from Swedish-medium preschool units in three different sites in Finland. It was generated through ethnographic observations and recordings of the author's interactions with the children. The meaning constructions in the interactions were analyzed mainly by looking closely at the participants' turn taking and conversational roles. The results show that children's beliefs of bilingualism are that you should use one language when speaking to one person; that languages are learnt through using them; and that the advantage of knowing more than one language is being able to talk to (other) people. The results also show that this knowledge of languages is no different from other knowledge within their world. This will probably change over time as the children enter school, and it is something in which our presence as language researchers will have played a part.

  • 2.
    Bai, Gegentuul
    Linguistics Department, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
    Fighting COVID-19 with Mongolian fiddle stories2020In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 577-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the recontextualization of traditional Mongolian verbal art khuuriin ulger ('fiddle story') by Mongolian folk singers in the context of the spread of COVID-19 in Inner Mongolia, China. Drawing on the concept of intertextuality, I analyze the verbal and visual signs in 94 videos of Mongolian fiddle stories. The article argues that the minority Mongols participate in the dominant global and national discourses while at the same time creating a sense of Mongolian-ness by marrying Mongolian verbal art with public health messages related to COVID-19. The article also finds that the multivocal COVID-19 Mongolian fiddle stories are a medium to articulate the very heteroglot sense of the world in which minority Mongols dwell and to construct and reaffirm their multi-layered identities. The study contributes to our understanding of how traditional genres and symbols evolve in response to the pandemic.

  • 3.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Language ideology or language practice?: An analysis of language policy documents at Swedish universities2014In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 33, no 3-4, p. 335-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents an analysis and interpretation of language policy documents from eight Swedish universities with regard to intertextuality, authorship and content analysis of the notions of language practices and English as a lingua franca (ELF). The analysis is then linked to Spolsky's framework of language policy, namely language practices, language beliefs, values (and ideology), and language planning or management (Spolsky 2004). The results show that the language policy documents refer heavily to official documents that have as their primary aim to protect and promote the Swedish language (e. g., the Language Act 2009), which appears to have been the point of departure for the language policy work in these settings, reflecting their protectionist stance towards the local language, Swedish. Little focus is put on actual language practices in these policy documents. The description of language practices is often limited to the description of the existing situation, based on concerns about Swedish losing ground as a result of the widespread use of English. Similarly, the notion of ELF is used primarily for description of the existing situation without sufficient guidance as to how students and staff in these university settings are to use English in their everyday practices. These results bring to the fore the question of what the purpose of university language policy documents should be with reference to a speech community's everyday practices. It is suggested here that university language policy documents would benefit from taking research on actual language practices as their starting point and base their work on research on language practices, striving to provide guidance on local choices made for communicative effectiveness.

  • 4.
    Boyd, Sally
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Huss, Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Young children as language policy-makers: studies of interaction in preschools in Finland and Sweden2017In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 359-373Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Boyd, Sally
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Huss, Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Ottesjö, Cajsa
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Children’s agency in creating and maintaining language policy in practice in two “language profile” preschools in Sweden2017In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 501-531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents results from an ethnographic study of language policy as it is enacted in everyday interaction in two language profile preschools in Sweden with explicit monolingual language policies: English and Finnish, respectively. However, in both preschools, children are free to choose language or code alternate. The study shows how children through their interactive choices create and modify language policy-in-practice. We analyze extracts from typical free play interactions in each setting. We show how children use code alternation as a contextualization cue in both settings, but with somewhat different interac- tional consequences. Children in both preschools tend to follow the lead of the preceding speaker’s language choice. Code alternation is also a means to manage conversational roles, for example, to show alignment. While the staff give priority to the profile language, the children show through their interaction that skills in both the preschool’s profile language and in Swedish are valuable.

  • 6.
    Bull, Tove
    et al.
    Univ Tromso, Dept Languages & Culture, Arctic Univ Norway, Tromso, Norway..
    Huss, Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Lindgren, Anna-Riitta
    Univ Tromso, Dept Languages & Culture, Arctic Univ Norway, Tromso, Norway..
    Language shift and language (re)vitalisation: the roles played by women and men in Northern Fenno-Scandia2023In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 367-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The research question of the present paper is the following: to what degree (if any) is gender relevant as an explanatory factor in, firstly, the process of assimilation and later, the process of (re)vitalisation of indigenous and minority languages in northern Fenno-Scandia (the North Calotte)? The assimilation of the ethnic groups in question was a process initiated and lead by the authorities in the three different countries. Finland, Sweden and Norway. Nevertheless, members of the indigenous and minority groups also took part in practicing, though, not necessarily promoting, the official assimilation politics, for different reasons. (Re)vitalisation, on the other hand, was initially - and still is - mostly a process stemming from the minority groups themselves, though the authorities to a certain extent have embraced it. The paper thus addresses the question of whether gender played a role in the two different processes, assimilation and (re)vitalisation, and if that was the case, how and why.

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  • 7.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Evaldsson, Ann-Carita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Language policies in play: Learning ecologies in multilingual preschool interactions among peers and teachers2017In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 451-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we argue that a focus on language learning ecologies, i.e., situations for participation in various communicative practices can shed light on the intricate processes through which minority children develop or are constrained from acquiring cultural and linguistic competencies (here of a majority language). The analysis draws on a language socialization approach to examine the micro-level contexts of an immigrant child’s preschool interactions with peers and teachers and the interplay between these and macro-level language and educational policies. It was found that the focal girl mainly participated in unstructured peer play due to the preschool educational and language policy. The girl’s limited Swedish (simple nouns, verbs, formulaic expressions) served as a resource for collusive peer language play (negatively keyed recyclings, mimicking, nonsensical words) portraying her language as incomprehensible. In interaction with teachers the child’s nonverbal acts were interpreted into verbal forms (repeating and expanding conversational, lexical and grammatical contributions). The fact that the girl did not align with the teacher’s conversational contributions created a negative affectively valorized language-learning ecology. Our study demonstrates how educational and language policies as they are managed on the micro-interactional level in everyday preschool activities may cast children’s peer group as the main language socialization agent for beginners.

  • 8.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Evaldsson, Ann-Carita
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Language policies in play: Learning ecologies in multilingual preschool interactions among peers and teachers2017In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 451-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we argue that a focus on language learning ecologies, that is, situations for participation in various communicative practices, can shed on the intricate processes through which minority children develop or are constrained from acquiring cultural and linguistic competencies (here, of a majority language). The analysis draws on a language socialization approach to examine the micro-level contexts of an immigrant childs preschool interactions with peers and teachers, and the interplay between these and macro-level language and educational policies. It was found that, in contrast to institutional and curricular policy aspirations concerning the positive potentials of childrens play as a site associated with core learning affordances, the language learning ecology created in the multilingual peer group interactions was limited. Social relations in the peer group, the novices marginal social position, and the childs rudimentary knowledge of the lingua franca, Swedish, precluded her from gaining access to shared peer play activities. The current study thus corroborates prior research showing that peer interactions in second language settings may pose a challenge to children who have not already achieved some competence in the majority language and that more support and interactions with the teachers can be useful.

  • 9. Erdocia, Iker
    et al.
    Soler, Josep
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    In pursuit of epistemic authority in public intellectual engagement: the case of language and gender2024In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 91-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public intellectual life is an area of inquiry that has not received a great deal of attention within the field of sociolinguistics. This article investigates the performative dimension of public intellectual engagement in the area of language and gender and, more specifically, how epistemic authority about gender-neutral language is constructed in public intellectual contributions in Catalonia, Spain. Adopting Arendt’s notion of truth claim and the Foucauldian concepts of regimes of truth and epistemic sovereignty, we empirically examine the mechanisms of reception and validation of the public engagements of one highly visible linguistic scholar. Our study shows the ways in which this intellectual figure strives to be recognised as having exclusive scientific authority about language. We argue that pursuing the allegedly impartial standpoint of epistemic authority about gender and language inevitably advances the interests of specific political actors and large media corporations of a conservative strand that fervently oppose gender-neutral language. 

  • 10.
    Erdocia, Iker
    et al.
    School of Applied Language and Intercultural Studies , Dublin City University , Dublin , Ireland.
    Soler, Josep
    Department of English , Stockholm University , Stockholm , Sweden.
    In pursuit of epistemic authority in public intellectual engagement: the case of language and gender2023In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 1-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public intellectual life is an area of inquiry that has not received a great deal of attention within the field of sociolinguistics. This article investigates the performative dimension of public intellectual engagement in the area of language and gender and, more specifically, how epistemic authority about gender-neutral language is constructed in public intellectual contributions in Catalonia, Spain. Adopting Arendt’s notion of truth claim and the Foucauldian concepts of regimes of truth and epistemic sovereignty, we empirically examine the mechanisms of reception and validation of the public engagements of one highly visible linguistic scholar. Our study shows the ways in which this intellectual figure strives to be recognised as having exclusive scientific authority about language. We argue that pursuing the allegedly impartial standpoint of epistemic authority about gender and language inevitably advances the interests of specific political actors and large media corporations of a conservative strand that fervently oppose gender-neutral language.

  • 11.
    Ericsson, Stina
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bitar, Dima
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Milani, Tommaso
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Knowledge negotiation and interactional power: epistemic stances in Arabic-Swedish antenatal care consultations2022In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 41, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article concerns knowledge negotiations as an aspect of interactional power in three-way interaction between Arabic-speaking women, Swedish-speaking midwives and interpreters in Swedish antenatal care. The notion of epistemic stance is used to investigate how all three participants negotiate knowledge, and how this affects the ongoing consultation. The data consist of audio recordings of 33 consultations, involving five midwives. Using an interaction analytical approach, the study focuses on sequences where the pregnant woman makes her voice heard, possibly challenging the midwife or the Swedish antenatal care programme. Three different ways in which the epistemic stances of the participants unfold interactionally are analysed: (1) the midwife and the pregnant woman mutually adjusting their knowledge claims, (2) the pregnant woman unsuccessfully attempting to claim knowledge and (3) participants jointly asserting the midwife's knowledge. Importantly, all three participants wield their interactional power through various ways of negotiating knowledge, which contrasts with the idea of the interpreter as fully neutral and detached. The knowledge claims of the pregnant women and the midwives in the data are also shown to be highly dependent on the interpreters' competence and performance.

  • 12.
    Ganuza, Natalia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Karlander, David
    Society of Fellows in the Humanities, School of English, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Salö, Linus
    Division of History of Science, Technology and Environment, KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    A weave of symbolic violence: dominance and complicity in sociolinguistic research on multilingualism2020In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 451-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses symbolic violence in sociolinguistic research on multilingualism. It revisits an archived recording of a group discussion betweenfour boys about their chances of having sex with a female researcher. The data is rife with symbolic violence. Most obviously, the conversation enacted a heterosexist form of symbolic violence. This was, however, not the only direction in which violence was exerted. As argued by (Bourdieu & Wacquant. 1992. An invitation to reflexive sociology. Cambridge: Polity), symbolic violence involves two fundamental elements – domination and complicity. In the case at hand, the boys’ sexist banter conformed to dominant expectations about their linguistic behavior, imbued in the research event. This is symbolic complicity of the kind that the Bourdieusian notion foresees. Yet another subordination to the dominant vision occurred when the researchers captured the conversation on tape, but decided to exempt it from publication. Here, we argue that giving deepened attention to sociolinguists’ own run-ins with symbolic violence during research is valuable, because it provides an opportunity to reflexively consider the social conditions of the research practices, in relation to the data produced and analyzed. Ultimately, this reflexive exercise may help sociolinguists sharpen their tools for understanding the give and take of dominance and complicity unfolding in their data.

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  • 13.
    Ganuza, Natalia
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Karlander, David
    University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Salö, Linus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    A weave of symbolic violence: Dominance and complicity in sociolinguistic research on multilingualism2020In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 451-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses symbolic violence in sociolinguistic research on multilingualism. It revisits an archived recording of a group discussion between four boys about their chances of having sex with a female researcher. The data is rife with symbolic violence. Most obviously, the conversation enacted a heterosexist form of symbolic violence. This was, however, not the only direction in which violence was exerted. As argued by (Bourdieu & Wacquant. 1992. An invitation to reflexive sociology. Cambridge: Polity), symbolic violence involves two fundamental elements – domination and complicity. In the case at hand, the boys’ sexist banter conformed to dominant expectations about their linguistic behavior, imbued in the research event. This is symbolic complicity of the kind that the Bourdieusian notion foresees. Yet another subordination to the dominant vision occurred when the researchers captured the conversation on tape, but decided to exempt it from publication. Here, we argue that giving deepened attention to sociolinguists’ own run-ins with symbolic violence during research is valuable, because it provides an opportunity to reflexively consider the social conditions of the research practices, in relation to the data produced and analyzed. Ultimately, this reflexive exercise may help sociolinguists sharpen their tools for understanding the give and take of dominance and complicity unfolding in their data.

  • 14.
    Gunnarsson, Britt-Louise
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Multilingualism in European workplaces2014In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 33, no 1-2, p. 11-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This state-of-the-art article includes a review of past and recent studies on multilingualism at work in European environments. One aim is to provide the reader with a cross-cultural picture of workplace studies on various languages in Europe, another to discuss both positive and problem-based accounts of multilingualism at work. The overview covers studies on workplace interaction in multilingual regions in Europe, on English as a lingua franca workplaces, on cross-cultural encounters in global businesses, and on workplaces with workforce diversity. The conditions for workplace discourse in Europe have been influenced by a series of changes taking place in recent decades. Globalization and technological advances have created new types of cross-cultural networks, at the same time as political changes and turmoil have led to migration and new and more complex multilingual workplaces throughout Europe. In the discussion section, the scope is enlarged and workplace discourse is related to various contextual frameworks. Finally, some key topics for future studies are sketched.

  • 15.
    Hedman, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Magnusson, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Adjusting to linguistic diversity in a primary school through relational agency and expertise: a mother-tongue teacher team’s perspective2023In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 139-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the role of collaborative teacher agency in facilitating translingual adjustments in a linguistically diverse primary school in Sweden. We focus on three multicompetent language teachers, who taught minoritized languages in the marginalized Mother Tongue (MT) subject, Modern Languages, and offered Multilingual Study Mentoring. Drawing from ethnographic fieldwork, including teacher interviews and fieldnotes from everyday MT practices and preparations for an annual musical performance, we investigated how the teachers adjusted to the students’ multilingual repertoires through relational agency and distributed expertise (Edwards, A. 2011. Building common knowledge at the boundaries between professional practices: Relational agency and relational expertise in systems of distributed expertise. International Journal of Educational Research 50(1). 33–39). These adjustments affected the offered language provisions beyond what was required, based on students’ linguistic competencies and parental involvement. Didactic adjustments also afforded migrant students literary experiences that starkly contrasted with the limited literacy content in beginner courses in Swedish. These “responsive professional actions” (Edwards, A. 2011. Building common knowledge at the boundaries between professional practices: Relational agency and relational expertise in systems of distributed expertise. International Journal of Educational Research 50(1). 33–39, p. 39) thus impacted on the students’ opportunities for multilingual development, expanded language registers, including verbal art, and linguistic inclusion. Through these actions, language was reformulated as asset, and we find that an ethics of care (Watkins, M. 2011. Teachers’ tears and the affective geography of the classroom. Emotion, Space and Society 4(3). 137–143) was closely intertwined with this relational agency. The findings contribute new knowledge on the role of collaborative teacher agency in diverse settings also of relevance to other national contexts.

  • 16.
    Jansson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Bridging language barriers in multilingual care encounters2014In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 33, no 1-2, p. 201-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present case study demonstrates how the multilingual practicesof a linguistically diverse workforce contribute to the functioning of a modernworkplace. Based on ethnographic fieldwork and recordings in a residentialhome for elderly people with dementia in Sweden, the article explores howmultilingual immigrant care workers creatively use their language skills toovercome linguistic boundaries and communicate with an elderly Kurdish resident.It is shown that despite the fact that the participants do not, or only to alimited extent, share a common language, the care workers manage to createmultilingual encounters that allow them to perform care tasks in an activitycontext where empathy and efficiency are of great importance. Although thedata in this study manifest the struggle of multilingual care workers to bridgelanguage barriers, the study also highlights the complexity of providingadequate and well-functioning care in today’s diverse society, where linguisticand cultural matching of clients and caregivers cannot always be obtained.These results are discussed in the light of new demands on Swedish (and morebroadly Western) care systems to adapt to the increasing number of multilingualolder people, who will become residents in care facilities.

  • 17.
    Jansson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Wadensjo, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Department Swedish Language and Multilingualism.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Managing complaints in multilingual care encounters2017In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 313-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Troubles-telling and complaints are common in contexts of care for older people and need to be managed by care staff in a respectful manner. This paper examines the handling of an older persons complaints in multilingual care encounters that involve participants who do not share a common language. The data consist of video-recordings and ethnographic fieldwork in a residential home for older people in Sweden that is characterised by a variety of languages and backgrounds. The findings are based on analyses of multi-party interactions involving an Arabic-speaking resident and caregivers with different levels of knowledge in different languages. We focus on complaint sequences when the resident expresses a negative stance (displeasure, anger, etc.) towards some difficult circumstance. Using the methodology of conversation analysis, we analyse the affect-regulating work through which the caregivers attempt to turn a pressing situation into a moment of cheerfulness and intimacy. The analyses bring to light the multilingual practices that the caregivers draw upon in pursuing this work, such as translating and giving voice to the residents complaining.

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  • 18.
    Jansson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Wadensjö, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Managing complaints in multilingual care encounters2017In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 313-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Troubles-telling and complaints are common in contexts of care for older people and need to be managed by care staff in a respectful manner. This paper examines the handling of an older person’s complaints in multilingual care encounters that involve participants who do not share a common language. The data consist of video-recordings and ethnographic fieldwork in a residential home for older people in Sweden that is characterised by a variety of languages and backgrounds. The findings are based on analyses of multi-party interactions involving an Arabic-speaking resident and caregivers with different levels of knowledge in different languages. We focus on complaint sequences when the resident expresses a negative stance (displeasure, anger, etc.) towards some difficult circumstance. Using the methodology of conversation analysis, we analyse the affect-regulating work through which the caregivers attempt to turn a pressing situation into a moment of cheerfulness and intimacy. The analyses bring to light the multilingual practices that the caregivers draw upon in pursuing this work, such as translating and giving voice to the resident’s complaining.

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    fulltext
  • 19.
    Jeong, Hyeseung
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Lindemann, Stephanie
    Facilitating or compromising inclusion? Language policies at Swedish higher education institutions as workplaces2024In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, p. 1-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has suggested that Swedish higher education institutions’ (HEIs’) language policies may exclude some academic staff from work-related activities due to (dual) monolingual ideologies requiring one language at a time. This study, based on the analysis of twenty-one language policy texts, investigates HEIs’ policies using a lens of inclusion at workplaces with linguistic diversity, drawing on concepts from diversity management and language policy for democracy of inclusion. All documents examined began with statements of HEIs’ values relevant to the policies. Inclusion was seldom explicitly emphasized, although policies suggested ways to facilitate it. We argue that some of the approaches – namely, taking a top-down monolinguistic approach to language choice, requiring staff to be highly proficient in both Swedish and English, and offering unspecified language support – reinforce language-based in-groups and out-groups, likely compromising rather than facilitating inclusion. Another approach, emphasizing individuals’ rights to choose what language they use, facilitates inclusion only if support is provided for everyone’s understanding. Providing immediate language support and encouraging bottom-up, flexible language choice were less common approaches but seem particularly likely to facilitate inclusion. Our analysis suggests that policies prioritizing successful communication, not specific languages, facilitate inclusion and help employees develop job-related language and intercultural communicative competence.

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    Jeong and Lindemann (2024)
  • 20.
    Kahlin, Linda
    et al.
    Sodertorn Univ, Sweden.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Language, Culture and Interaction. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Soderlundh, Hedda
    Sodertorn Univ, Sweden.
    Weidner, Matylda
    Kazimierz Wielki Univ, Poland.
    Translanguaging as a resource for meaning-making at multilingual construction sites2022In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 261-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we investigate spoken professional interaction at construction sites in Sweden, where workers from Poland, Ukraine and Estonia are temporarily employed as carpenters, ground workers and kitchen installers. We study how the workers use resources associated with different languages and how these resources are mobilized along with embodied resources for meaning-making. The analysis aims at investigating what social space the workers construct by going between or beyond different linguistic structures, as defined in the theory of translanguaging. The study is based on Linguistic Ethnography and Conversation Analysis is used for close analysis. We focus on instances of translanguaging, such as Swedish-sounding institutionalized keywords, practices of receptive multilingualism and the search for communicative overlaps in repertoires. The findings from busy construction sites show that the stratifying aspect gives some workers a voice in the organization, while others remain silent. Hence, it is primarily professionals functioning as team leaders, who talk to different occupational categories and use resources associated with different languages. The data provide an opportunity to investigate the theory of translanguaging and its transformative power in relation to professional settings that are linguistically diverse, but also strictly hierarchical.

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  • 21.
    Kahlin, Linda
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Swedish Language.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Söderlundh, Hedda
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Swedish Language.
    Weidner, Matylda
    Kazimierz Wielki University, Poland.
    Translanguaging as a resource for meaning-making at multilingual construction sites2022In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 261-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we investigate spoken professional interaction at construction sites in Sweden, where workers from Poland, Ukraine and Estonia are temporarily employed as carpenters, ground workers and kitchen installers. We study how the workers use resources associated with different languages and how these resources are mobilized along with embodied resources for meaning-making. The analysis aims at investigating what social space the workers construct by going between or beyond different linguistic structures, as defined in the theory of translanguaging. The study is based on Linguistic Ethnography and Conversation Analysis is used for close analysis. We focus on instances of translanguaging, such as Swedish-sounding institutionalized keywords, practices of receptive multilingualism and the search for communicative overlaps in repertoires. The findings from busy construction sites show that the stratifying aspect gives some workers a voice in the organization, while others remain silent. Hence, it is primarily professionals functioning as team leaders, who talk to different occupational categories and use resources associated with different languages. The data provide an opportunity to investigate the theory of translanguaging and its transformative power in relation to professional settings that are linguistically diverse, but also strictly hierarchical.

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  • 22.
    Kheirkhah, Mina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Language Maintenance in a Multilingual Family: Informal Heritage Language Lessons in Parent-Child Interactions2015In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 319-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study explores language socialization patterns in a Persian-Kurdish family in Sweden and examines how "one-parent, one-language" family language policies are instantiated and negotiated in parent-child interactions. The data consist of video-recordings and ethnographic observations of family interactions, as well as interviews. Detailed interactional analysis is employed to investigate parental language maintenance efforts and the childs agentive orientation in relation to the recurrent interactional practices through which parents attempt to enforce a monolingual, heritage language "context" for parent-child interaction. We examine the interactional trajectories that develop in parents requests for translation that target the focus childs (a 7-year-old girls) lexical mixings. These practices resembled formal language instruction: The parents suspended the ongoing conversational activity, requested that the child translate the problematic item, modeled and assessed her language use. The instructional exchanges were asymmetrically organized: the parents positioned themselves as "experts", insisting on the childs active participation, whereas the childs (affectively aggravated) resistance was frequent, and the parents recurrently accommodated the child by terminating the language instruction. The study argues that an examination of childrens agency, and the social dynamics characterizing parental attempts to shape childrens heritage language use, can provide significant insights into the conditions for language maintenance

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  • 23.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    McGrath, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Taming Tyrannosaurus rex: English use in the research and publication practices of humanities scholars in Sweden2014In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 33, no 3/4, p. 365-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the current position of English in the language ecology8 of Swedish academia, with a special focus on the humanities. Semi-structured interviews with 15 informants from the fields of Anthropology, General Linguistics and History were carried out to explore how non-native speakers of English experience using academic English in their research. In contrast to other recent findings, our study shows that while some differences along disciplinary lines emerged, on the whole, English does not pose a significant challenge for scholars when writing for publication. Furthermore, our informants do not perceive themselves to be disadvantaged by their non-native status. The study casts some doubt on Swales’ well-known dinosaur metaphor; while English does in deed dominate in the sphere of international publication in terms of production, multilingual research practices are evident within the research and publication process.

  • 24.
    Löfdahl, Maria
    et al.
    Institute for Language and Folklore, Avdelningen för arkiv och forskning i Göteborg. Department of Archives and Research , Institute for Language and Folklore , Arkivgatan 9A , 411 34 Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Järlehed, Johan
    Department of Swedish, Multilingualism, Language Technology , University of Gothenburg , Box 200 , 40530 Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Wojahn, Daniel
    Department of Culture and Education , Södertörn University , 141 89 , Stockholm , Sweden.
    Milani, Tommaso M.
    Department of Swedish, Multilingualism, Language Technology , University of Gothenburg , Box 200 , 40530 Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Rosendal, Tove
    Department of Languages and Literatures , University of Gothenburg , Box 200 , 40530 Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Nielsen, Helle Lykke
    Department of Language, Culture, History and Communication , University of Southern Denmark , Campusvej 55 , 5230 Odense M , Denmark.
    Navigating whiteness from the margins: Finnish, Somali, and Arabic speakers’ experiences of racialization, (in)visibility, and (im)mobility in Gothenburg, Sweden2023In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 0, no 0Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the relationship between language, (in)visibility, and (im)mobility in racialized spaces, focusing on Finnish, Somali, and Arabic speakers in Sweden. Using a theoretical framework based on hegemonic whiteness and intersectionality, the study explores how multilingual practices and subjectivities intersect with race, religion, gender, and class to shape social visibility and mobility. The research draws on linguistic ethnographic data, including interviews, linguistic landscape documentation, and an analysis of the media discourse. The study finds that while Finnish speakers have become invisible due to assimilation policies, Somali and Arabic speakers are hypervisible in Swedish public spaces and discourse, although Arabic speakers are sometimes, and in relation to other migrants, nearing Swedish whiteness. However, all three languages and their speakers are constrained by a white normativity that reproduces inequality. The paper challenges simplistic notions of mobility/immobility and visibility/invisibility in the context of a changing racial order in Sweden, where whiteness serves as a binary sorting mechanism that perpetuates inequality. Overall, this research sheds light on the complex entanglement of language, visibility, and mobility in white spaces and contributes to a more nuanced understanding of the intersectional dynamics of race and language.

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  • 25.
    Löfdahl, Maria
    et al.
    Institute for Language and Folklore, Sweden.
    Järlehed, Johan
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wojahn, Daniel
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Swedish Language.
    Milani, Tommaso M.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rosendal, Tove
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nielsen, Helle Lykke
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Navigating whiteness from the margins: Finnish, Somali, and Arabic speakers' experiences of racialization, (in)visibility, and (im)mobility in Gothenburg, Sweden2024In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 119-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the relationship between language, (in)visibility, and (im)mobility in racialized spaces, focusing on Finnish, Somali, and Arabic speakers in Sweden. Using a theoretical framework based on hegemonic whiteness and intersectionality, the study explores how multilingual practices and subjectivities intersect with race, religion, gender, and class to shape social visibility and mobility. The research draws on linguistic ethnographic data, including interviews, linguistic landscape documentation, and an analysis of the media discourse. The study finds that while Finnish speakers have become invisible due to assimilation policies, Somali and Arabic speakers are hypervisible in Swedish public spaces and discourse, although Arabic speakers are sometimes, and in relation to other migrants, nearing Swedish whiteness. However, all three languages and their speakers are constrained by a white normativity that reproduces inequality. The paper challenges simplistic notions of mobility/immobility and visibility/invisibility in the context of a changing racial order in Sweden, where whiteness serves as a binary sorting mechanism that perpetuates inequality. Overall, this research sheds light on the complex entanglement of language, visibility, and mobility in white spaces and contributes to a more nuanced understanding of the intersectional dynamics of race and language. 

  • 26.
    Martín-Bylund, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Department of Social and Welfare Studies (ISV), Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Playing the game and speaking the right language: Language policy and materiality in a bilingual preschool activity2017In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 23p. 477-499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What are the material-semiotic relationships between a language policy and a table game activity in a bilingual preschool? Using Actor-Network Theory (ANT), the aim of this article is to explore this question, working with both human and nonhuman aspects of the activity, symmetrically, at the same level. The game playing activity takes place at a bilingual, Spanish-Swedish preschool in Sweden, which adopts a 50-50 approach in daily interaction. In interplay with video recordings, field notes and Actor-Network Theory, four different actor-network scenes of the activity are produced. Children, teacher, game pieces, die, cards, linguistic and other elements are described in the same language, as well as symmetrically drawn together in material-semiotic relations. The results indicate that the activity revolves mainly around two different, multilayered, and sometimes conflicting interests: to play the game and to speak the right language. The article describes the interrelatedness between these interests and how bilingualism emerges, transforms and becomes temporarily different in the relations of the actor-network. The approach opens up new avenues for understanding different constructions of bilingualism not in terms of a flexible-separate dichotomy but as entangled with one another in material-semiotic relations, which may illuminate creative potentials in the relations of policy and practice rather than implementation.

  • 27.
    Negretti, Raffaella
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Garcia-Yeste, Miguel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Lunch Keeps People Apart: The Role of English for Social Interaction in a Multilingual Academic Workplace2015In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 93-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on the role of language in multilingual workplaces, where English is often adopted as a lingua franca (ELF), shows that language practices influence socialization and interpersonal communication, frequently creating issues such as asymmetrical sharing of information, language clusters, or thin communication. Similarly to other organizations, academic workplaces are undergoing a process of internationalization. However, academia as a workplace has been largely ignored, particularly in terms of language practices in social situations. We address this gap by investigating multilingualism in an academic workplace; departing from the concepts of language clustering and thin communication, we focus on how language practices affect social interaction and the establishment of rapport. We report the experiences of five academics with various backgrounds and status in a science university department in Sweden. In-depth interviews and grand/mini tour elicitation techniques reveal how language practices - English and other languages - are experienced from different points of view. We identify lunch as the primary activity associated with social interaction and exchange of information: people and places connected with this activity seem to determine language practices. In the final section we discuss the presence of language clustering and thin communication in this academic workplace.

  • 28.
    Nelson, Marie
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    'You need help as usual, do you?': Joking and swearing for collegiality in a Swedish workplace2014In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 33, no 1-2, p. 173-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper draws on the KINSA project (The Communicative Situation of Immigrants at Swedish Workplaces), which aimed to identify communicative factors that have a positive impact on the integration of second language speakers in the workplace and in their immediate work team. The focus here is on humour and swearing as strategies for doing collegiality and for building and maintaining good relations between co-workers. The article presents data from five second language speakers, permanently employed industrial or office workers in a major Swedish company. Theoretically and methodologically, the paper has its basis in discourse analysis, interactional sociolinguistics and the ethnography of communication. By means of fieldwork, a large body of empirical data was collected, comprising detailed field notes, audio and video recordings of naturally occurring talk, and texts processed and produced by participants. The analysis of the data shows that metalinguistic and metacultural awareness and performance of relational communicative acts among the participants appear to have helped to facilitate and consolidate integration in the workplace and the immediate work team. To foster good relations at work, the five participants make strategic use of jokes, compliments, narratives, swearing and greetings. In this article the use of jokes and swearing is highlighted. It closes by making a case for future research in the area of integration in the workplace through relational communication, especially among second language speakers.

  • 29.
    Norlund Shaswar, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Language norms in L2 education for adult migrants: translanguaging pedagogy in the age of mobility2021In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 341-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    International mobility has caused a need for language education where adults can learn the language(s) used in their new country. In Sweden, the language programme SFI (Swedish for immigrants) provides basic second language education for adult immigrants. For those learners who are not yet functionally literate, basic literacy education is included. This article aims to explore the concept translanguaging pedagogy in relation to the articulated and embodied language norms of one SFI teacher. The empirical data, produced by ethnographic methodology, consists of classroom observations and semi-structural interviews.The method of analysis comprises a set of sociolinguistic questions, three categories of language norms (double monolingualism, integrated bilingualism andpolylingualism) and discourse analysis, centering on deictics, indexical signs andreported speech. Findings show that although the teacher does engage in translanguaging practices, her teaching practices cannot be referred to as translanguaging pedagogy because she has made no deliberate decision to include the students’ full linguistic repertoires and there are contradictions both within and between her articulated and embodied language norms. It is concluded that it is crucial for educational development in contexts characterised by mobility that teachers in linguistically heterogeneous classrooms increase their awareness of their language norms and the students' linguistic resources

  • 30.
    Nuottaniemi, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    The slowness of language, the speed of capital: Conflicting temporalities of the “green transition” in the Swedish north2024In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following substantial investments in battery production and fossil-free steel, a few select places in northern Sweden are currently undergoing rapid economic and cultural changes. The aim of this article is to explore the role language education plays for three different groups of (im)mobile subjects – refugees, labor migrants, and cosmopolitan elites – in the ongoing social transformations. By using the time-consuming and ideologically charged social practice of teaching and learning languages as a lens, it is argued that although framed as a sustainability project, the pace of the transformation is set by the accelerating logic of capitalism, posing a challenge to the democratic planning of inclusive local communities, as well as to societal subsystems characterized by much slower temporal regimes. Hence, although Sweden is committed to a “just transition” as part of the Paris Agreement, some are obviously benefiting much more than others from this transition. This paper further highlights the potentially high costs for the local communities that “win” the bids for the new green industries. Apart from considerable economic costs in the present, another result might also be increased social stratification and weakening social cohesion in the long term.

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  • 31.
    Puskás, Tünde
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Björk-Willén, Polly
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dilemmatic aspects of language policiesin a trilingual preschool group2017In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 425-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores dilemmatic aspects of language policies in apreschool group in which three languages (Swedish, Romani and Arabic) arespoken on an everyday basis. The article highlights the interplay between policydecisions on the societal level, the teachers’interpretations of these policies, aswell as language practices on the micro level. The preschool group is seen as acomplex context for negotiating language policies and expectations regardinglanguage use. The theoretical framework builds on Billig’s work on ideologicaland everyday dilemmas that we argue are detectable at both levels of theanalysis. The analysis of the ethnographic material shows that the explicitlanguage policy formulated in the Swedish preschool curriculum leads, inpractice, to ideological, pedagogical and everyday dilemmas. Moreover, anunwillingness to set rules for children’s language choice combined with thecentral position of free play in Swedish preschool practice has led to a situationin which children fall short of their potential to develop bilingual competence.

  • 32.
    Straszer, Boglárka
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Language, Literatures and Learning, Swedish as Second Language.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    Dalarna University, School of Language, Literatures and Learning, English.
    Rosén, Jenny
    Dalarna University, School of Language, Literatures and Learning, Swedish as Second Language.
    Introduction to the special issue on translanguaging in the age of mobility2022In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 253-259Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 33.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Framing Bourdieu socioculturally: Alternative forms of linguistic legitimacy in postcolonial Mozambique2002In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 21, no 2-3, p. 247-273Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34. Tryggvason, Marja
    et al.
    De Geer, Boel
    Södertörn University College, Avdelning 3, Swedish language.
    Eliciting talk as language socialization in Finnish, SwedishFinnish and Swedish families: a look at syntactic structures2002In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 345-369Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35. Tryggvason, Marja
    et al.
    Tulviste, Tiia
    Södertörn University, School of Discourse Studies, Swedish language.
    De Geer, Boel
    Södertörn University, School of Discourse Studies, Swedish language.
    How do preschool children engage each other in dialogue in Finland, Estonia and Sweden?2008In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 389-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study compares preschool children in Finland, Estonia and Sweden regarding linguistic structures with which children in dyads elicited talk from each other in a naturalistic play activity Nineteen Finnish (mean age 5.1), 19 Estonian (mean age 5.4) and 17 Swedish (mean age 5.1) same-sex pairs were video-recorded by a native researcher Analyses of the results showed that children in different groups produced quite a similar number of utterances and eliciting talk structures. The Swedish and Finnish children used most yes-no questions, whereas the Estonian children had the highest occurrence of open questions. Imperative as well as elliptic structures were used by the Finnish children to a significantly higher extent than by the Swedish children. In summary, the groups differed less from each than was predicted on the basis of adult-child interaction. The results suggested that the symmetrical child-child free play context affected the choice of eliciting talk structures.

  • 36.
    Tryggvason, Marja-Terttu
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Tulviste, Tiia
    De Geer, Boel
    How do preschool children engage each other in dialogue in Finland, Estonia and Sweden?2008In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 389-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study compares preschool children in Finland, Estonia and Sweden regarding linguistic structures with which children in dyads elicited talk from each other in a naturalistic play activity Nineteen Finnish (mean age 5.1), 19 Estonian (mean age 5.4) and 17 Swedish (mean age 5.1) same-sex pairs were video-recorded by a native researcher Analyses of the results showed that children in different groups produced quite a similar number of utterances and eliciting talk structures. The Swedish and Finnish children used most yes-no questions, whereas the Estonian children had the highest occurrence of open questions. Imperative as well as elliptic structures were used by the Finnish children to a significantly higher extent than by the Swedish children. In summary, the groups differed less from each than was predicted on the basis of adult-child interaction. The results suggested that the symmetrical child-child free play context affected the choice of eliciting talk structures

  • 37.
    Wadensjö, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Rehnberg, Hanna Sofia
    Nikolaidou, Zoe
    Managing a discourse of reporting: the complex composing of an asylum narrative2023In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 191-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate how the presence of an emerging written record may affect the content of an asylum narrative, based on which a decision concerning the asylum claimant’s right to receive protection eventually is taken. The lion’s share of studies on interpreter-mediated asylum interviews to date focus on risks involved with assigning non-professionals to perform the interpreting. This study draws specifically on a 3.5 min-long sequence taken from an asylum interview involving a professional interpreter, working between Russian and Swedish, and the corresponding paragraph of the Swedish-language written minutes, produced in parallel by the caseworker at a Migration Agency office. The study demonstrates something that hasn’t been highlighted much in the literature on asylum interviews, namely the mutual impact of the interpreter-mediated communicative format—the specific turn taking order and the restricted linguistic transparency—and the parallel record keeping; the intricate passage from two spoken languages to an asylum narrative in the form of a text written in one of these languages.

  • 38.
    Wadensjö, Cecilia
    et al.
    Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies, Stockholm University.
    Rehnberg, Hanna Sofia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Nikolaidou, Zoe
    School of Culture and Education, Södertörn University.
    Managing a discourse of reporting: the complex composing of an asylum narrative2023In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 191-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate how the presence of an emerging written record may affect the content of an asylum narrative, based on which a decision concerning the asylum claimant’s right to receive protection eventually is taken. The lion’s share of studies on interpreter-mediated asylum interviews to date focus on risks involved with assigning non-professionals to perform the interpreting. This study draws specifically on a 3.5 min-long sequence taken from an asylum interview involving a professional interpreter, working between Russian and Swedish, and the corresponding paragraph of the Swedish-language written minutes, produced in parallel by the caseworker at a Migration Agency office. The study demonstrates something that hasn’t been highlighted much in the literature on asylum interviews, namely the mutual impact of the interpreter-mediated communicative format—the specific turn taking order and the restricted linguistic transparency—and the parallel record keeping; the intricate passage from two spoken languages to an asylum narrative in the form of a text written in one of these languages.

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    Managing a discourse of reporting
  • 39.
    Wadensjö, Cecilia
    et al.
    Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rehnberg, Hanna Sofia
    Department of Scandinavian Languages, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nikolaidou, Zoe
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Swedish Language.
    Managing a discourse of reporting: the complex composing of an asylum narrative2023In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 191-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate how the presence of an emerging written record may affect the content of an asylum narrative, based on which a decision concerning the asylum claimant's right to receive protection eventually is taken. The lion's share of studies on interpreter-mediated asylum interviews to date focus on risks involved with assigning non-professionals to perform the interpreting. This study draws specifically on a 3.5 min-long sequence taken from an asylum interview involving a professional interpreter, working between Russian and Swedish, and the corresponding paragraph of the Swedish-language written minutes, produced in parallel by the caseworker at a Migration Agency office. The study demonstrates something that hasn't been highlighted much in the literature on asylum interviews, namely the mutual impact of the interpreter-mediated communicative format-the specific turn taking order and the restricted linguistic transparency-and the parallel record keeping; the intricate passage from two spoken languages to an asylum narrative in the form of a text written in one of these languages.

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    fulltext
  • 40.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Language, Literatures and Learning, Swedish as Second Language.
    Ideological and implementational spaces for translanguaging in the language introduction programme in Swedish Upper Secondary School2022In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 359-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates to what extent spaces created in the Language Introduction Programme (LIP) in Upper Secondary School in Sweden close or open up for students’ varied linguistic resources, to create an understanding of the implementational spaces of the educational environments that the school represents, and of the ideological underpinnings that these imply. In the analysis, schoolscaping is used based on displayed language on the school premises in combination with language practices in classrooms. The material analyzed consists of photographs, both from classrooms and shared spaces, together with field notes from observations. The analysis made conflicting ideologies visible. Although students were invited to use their languages in classrooms, these were rarely made visible in written form, which is remarkable as written language is given great value in school. The relative invisibility of the LIP students’ languages in the schoolscape, except for in their own classrooms, together with the physical separation from other students at the school, paints a picture of expectations of assimilation and of a monolingual ideology, where the goal is that students become Swedish-speaking. Thus, the conclusion is that there are implementational spaces in the partly closed space that constructs LIP, while ideological spaces are rather closed.

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