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  • 1.
    Aarsand, Pål Andre
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Barn och ungdomsvetenskap, Stockholms universitet.
    Response cries and other gaming moves-Building intersubjectivity in gaming2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 41, no 8, p. 1557-1575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study focuses on the ways in which response cries (Goffman, 1981) are deployed as interactional resources in computer gaming in everyday life. It draws on a large-scale data set of video recordings of the everyday lives of middleclass families. The recordings of gaming between children and between children and parents show that response cries were not arbitrarily located within different phases of gaming (planning, gaming or commenting on gaming). Response cries were primarily used as interactional resources for securing and sustaining joint attention (cf. Goodwin, 1996) during the gaming as such, that is, during periods when the gaming activity was characterized by a relatively high tempo. In gaming between children, response cries co-occurred with their animations of game characters and with sound making, singing along, and code switching in ways that formed something of an action aesthetic, a type of aesthetic that was most clearly seen in gaming between game equals (here: between children). In contrast, response cries were rare during the planning phases and during phases in which the participants primarily engaged in setting up or adjusting the game.

  • 2.
    Allwood, Jens
    et al.
    Department of Linguistics, University of Göteborg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Ahlsén, E.
    Learning how to manage communication, with special reference to the acquisition of linguistic feedback1999In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 31, no 10, p. 1353-1389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study has two parts. The first part gives a theoretical overview of what a child has to learn in order to manage communication, whereas the second part provides a longitudinal case study. The case study shows how a child, from the age of 1 year and 8 months to the age of 3 years and 3 months, learns how to use different means for interacting in order to make contextually relevant communicative contributions. We can see how such aspects of his communication as mean length of utterances (MLU), use of onomatopoeia, communicative gestures, and informative actions develop in interaction with each other. A more specific study of linguistic feedback (feedback morphemes and repetitions) shows the development in different activities of the use of feedback. The role of the linguistic feedback system in language acquisition is also discussed. ©1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 3. Andersson, Marta
    ‘I know that women don’t like me!’.: Presuppositions in therapeutic discourse.2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 721-737Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Andrén, Mats
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Sanne, Johan M.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linell, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Striking the Balance between Formality and Informality in Safety-Critical Communication: The Case of Train Traffic Control Calls2010In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 220-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Talk in safety-critical activities displays features that distinguish it from both ordinaryconversations as well as from other institutional talk, but it also shares some features with these.Formality and informality are both interactionally accomplished phenomena, but they are shapedthrough different sources. Safety rules and pre-printed forms constitute two sources offormalization, dictating how to carry out communicative exchanges in certain types of situations,irrespective of the more specific circumstances in individual cases. Sources of informalization arethe participants’ need to adapt to situation-specific communicative needs, but also, ironicallyenough, routinization itself.In contemporary literature, safety-critical talk tends to be treated either in terms of strictadherence to a formal code, where all informalities are seen as potential sources of accidents, orinformalization is treated as natural and inevitable, focusing on routine conditions where they areapparently harmless. In this paper, based upon detailed analysis of telephone calls between traindrivers and dispatchers on the Swedish railway network, we propose a middle ground. We suggest acontingent theory of formalization, identifying four main types of informalizations, as well asdiscussing when and why they may be harmless and when they may be detrimental.

  • 5.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Negative interrogatives and adversarial uptake: Building hostility in child custody examinations2018In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 136, p. 39-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study documents the adversarial role of negative interrogatives in courtroom talk. It involves a large set of audio-recordings of child custody proceedings. The focus is on sequences where different attorneys examined conflicting parents in two contexts: their own client versus the other side parent. Overwhelmingly, negative interrogatives were located, not in the first round of questions (same side), but during the cross-examination of the other side. The analytical focus is on parents' uptake to the attorneys' questions (in a collection of 289 negative interrogatives; from 156 examinations). All negative interrogatives, such as 'So the children won't see their grandma?', were cast in a polar format, projecting minimal yes-/no-responses. Yet, the parents' uptake featured expanded responses defensive accounts and counter-blame beyond minimal responses. Hostility was built up sequentially through the parents' uptake in the form of counter-blame and other re-allocations of blame. The blame accounts were highlighted through extreme case formulations, rhetorical comments and other discursive devices. In this courtroom context, the parents were to answer, not to ask questions. Yet, they at times confronted the court, through metapragmatic questions, disrupting the interaction order of the courtroom. In numerous ways, negative interrogatives were related to adversarial features and escalation.

  • 6.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Linköpings universitet.
    Review of Family dinner talk by Shoshana Blum-Kulka1999In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 287-292Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Aarsand, Pål
    Response cries and other gaming moves: Toward an intersubjectivity of gaming2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 41, p. 1557-1575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study focuses on the ways in which response cries (Goffman, 1981) are deployed as interactional resources in computer gaming in everyday life. It draws on a large-scale data set of video recordings of the everyday lives of middleclass families. The recordings of gaming between children and between children and parents show that response cries were not arbitrarily located within different phases of gaming (planning, gaming or commenting on gaming). Response cries were primarily used as interactional resources for securing and sustaining joint attention (cf. Goodwin, 1996) during the gaming as such, that is, during periods when the gaming activity was characterized by a relatively high tempo. In gaming between children, response cries co- occurred with their animations of game characters and with sound making, singing along, and code switching in ways that formed something of an action aesthetic, a type of aesthetic that was most clearly seen in gaming between game equals (here: between children). In contrast, response cries were rare during the planning phases and during phases in which the participants primarily engaged in setting up or adjusting the game.

  • 8. Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Thorell, Mia
    Family politics in children's play directives1999In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 25-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study focuses on children's role play directives as displays of gender stereotypes and power hierarchies in family life. Studies on politeness have primarily focused on directives at the mitigation end of a politeness continuum. The present study has particularly addressed the aggravation end of the continuum and, as predicted, family role play was rich in aggravations. A specific type of escalation, called threat-tell sequences, showed how the children successively moved from a metapragmatic level to a pragmatic level, and at times ultimately to a level of embodied action. Focusing in depth on children's embodied role play directives in face-to-face interaction, this study shows how politeness models need to be expanded in order to account for aggravated moves and paradoxical communication.

  • 9.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies.
    Thorell, Mia
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies.
    Family politics in children's play directives1999In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 31, p. 25-47Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Balaman, Ufuk
    et al.
    Hacettepe Üniversitesi, Ankara, Turkey.
    Sert, Olcay
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Hacettepe Üniversitesi, Ankara, Turkey.
    The coordination of online L2 interaction and orientations to task interface for epistemic progression2017In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 115, p. 115-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of knowledge in social interaction has been a recent research concern across several fields and the emergence of epistemics as a concept to understand information exchanges has been facilitated mainly through conservation analytic investigations (Heritage, 2012a,b). Relative epistemic status of speakers (Heritage, 2012a) has appeared to be a layer in the multidimensional body of action and knowledge co-construction (Goodwin, 2013). Although the nature of knowledge exchange processes in mundane talk and learning settings has been described in a number of studies, such an understanding has been explored to a lesser extent in technology-mediated and online interactional environments. With this in mind,, we draw on multimodal conversation analysis to describe online video-based interactions based on a single case analysis that represents a larger corpus of 70 h of screen recordings. The findings reveal the incorporation of online interaction, screen orientations, and knowledge co-construction for task accomplishment purposes. The participants coordinate their interactions with their orientations to the task interface to enact epistemic progression, which consequently turns the interface into a layer, a semiotic field, and a screen-based resource in the course of knowledge co-construction. The results have important implications for research on online interaction and epistemics as well as for an understanding of coordination of multiple actions in geographically dispersed settings.

  • 11.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    English-language swearing as humor in Swedish comic strips2017In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 121, p. 175-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, I investigate the Swedish, non-native use of English swear words in Swedish-language comic strips. I first consider the established relationships between both swearing and humor, and comics and humor. I propose that swear word usage and the comic strip framework contribute to a mutual feedback loop, whereby the comic strip derives its humor from the use of English swear words, while at the same time the comic strip context, by invoking a play frame, primes the swear word usage for humorous interpretation. Modeling Siegel (1995), I then consider how a code-switch to English serves as a framing device or contextualization cue for humor in Swedish-language contexts. The analysis of a selection of Swedish comic strips draws from the Encryption Theory of Humor (Flamson and Barrett, 2008), and suggests that humor created via the Swedish practice of swearing in English is a function of shared background knowledge that capitalizes on the fundamental incongruity of two discourse systems operating under different norms of appropriateness.

  • 12.
    Bjorkman, Beyza
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Language and communication.
    Pragmatic strategies in English as an academic lingua franca: Ways of achieving communicative effectiveness?2011In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 950-964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper will report the findings of a study that has investigated spoken English as a lingua franca (ELF) usage in Swedish higher education. The material comprises digital recordings of lectures and student group-work sessions, all being naturally occurring, authentic high-stakes spoken exchange, i.e. from non-language-teaching contexts. The aim of the present paper, which constitutes a part of a larger study, has been to investigate the role pragmatic strategies play in the communicative effectiveness of English as a lingua franca. The paper will document types of pragmatic strategies as well as point to important differences between the two speech event types and the implications of these differences for English-medium education. The findings show that lecturers in ELF settings make less frequent use of pragmatic strategies than students who deploy these strategies frequently in group-work sessions. Earlier stages of the present study (Bjorkman, 2008a, 2008b, 2009) showed that despite frequent non-standardness in the morphosyntax level, there is little overt disturbance in student group-work, and it is highly likely that a variety of pragmatic strategies that students deploy prevents some disturbance. It is reasonable to assume that, in the absence of appropriate pragmatic strategies used often in lectures, there is an increased risk for covert disturbance.

  • 13.
    Björkman, Beyza
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Language and communication.
    An analysis of polyadic English as a lingua franca (ELF) speech: A communicative strategies framework2014In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 66, p. 122-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on an analysis of the communicative strategies (CSs) used by speakers in spoken lingua franca English (ELF) in an academic setting. The purpose of the work has primarily been to outline the CSs used in polyadic ELF speech which are used to ensure communication effectiveness in consequential situations and to present a framework that shows the different communicative functions of a number of CSs. The data comprise fifteen group sessions of naturally occurring student group-work talk in content courses at a technical university. Detailed qualitative analyses have been carried out, resulting in a framework of the communication strategies used by the speakers. The methodology here provides us with a taxonomy of CSs in natural ELF interactions. The results show that other than explicitness strategies, comprehension checks, confirmation checks and clarification requests were frequently employed CSs in the data. There were very few instances of self and other-initiated word replacement, most likely owing to the nature of the high-stakes interactions where the focus is on the task and not the language. The results overall also show that the speakers in these ELF interactions employed other-initiated strategies as frequently as self-initiated communicative strategies.

  • 14.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    An analysis of polyadic lingua franca speech: A communicative strategies framework2014In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 66, p. 122-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on an analysis of the communicative strategies (CSs) used by speakers in spoken lingua franca English (ELF) in an academic setting. The purpose of the work has primarily been to outline the CSs used in polyadic ELF speech which are used to ensure communication effectiveness in consequential situations and to present a framework that shows the different communicative functions of a number of CSs. The data comprise fifteen group sessions of naturally occurring student group-work talk in content courses at a technical university. Detailed qualitative analyses have been carried out, resulting in a framework of the communication strategies used by the speakers. The methodology here provides us with a taxonomy of CSs in natural ELF interactions. The results show that other than explicitness strategies, comprehension checks, confirmation checks and clarification requests were frequently employed CSs in the data. There were very few instances of self and other-initiated word replacement, most likely owing to the nature of the high-stakes interactions where the focus is on the task and not the language. The results overall also show that the speakers in these ELF interactions employed other-initiated strategies as frequently as self-initiated communicative strategies.

  • 15.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Pragmatic strategies in English as an academic lingua franca:  Ways of achieving communicative effectiveness2011In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 950-964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper will report the findings of a study that has investigated spoken English as a lingua franca (ELF) usage in Swedish higher education. The material comprises digital recordings of lectures and student group-work sessions, all being naturally occurring, authentic high-stakes spoken exchange, i.e. from non-language-teaching contexts. The aim of the present paper, which constitutes a part of a larger study, has been to investigate the role pragmatic strategies play in the communicative effectiveness of English as a lingua franca. The paper will document types of pragmatic strategies as well as point to important differences between the two speech event types and the implications of these differences for English-medium education. The findings show that lecturers in ELF settings make less frequent use of pragmatic strategies than students who deploy these strategies frequently in group-work sessions. Earlier stages of the present study (Björkman, 2008a, Björkman, 2008b and Björkman, 2009) showed that despite frequent non-standardness in the morphosyntax level, there is little overt disturbance in student group-work, and it is highly likely that a variety of pragmatic strategies that students deploy prevents some disturbance. It is reasonable to assume that, in the absence of appropriate pragmatic strategies used often in lectures, there is an increased risk for covert disturbance

  • 16.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The pragmatics of English as a lingua franca in the international university: Introduction2011In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 923-925Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Björkman, Beyza
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Language and communication.
    The pragmatics of English as a lingua franca in the international university: Introduction2011In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 923-925Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Björk-Willén, Polly
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Participation in multilingual preschool play: Shadowing and crossing as interactional resources2007In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 39, no 12, p. 2133-2158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper explores how children participate in peer play activities in a multilingual preschool setting. Participation is understood as a practical achievement in social interaction. Through in-depth analyses of video recordings of peer play, the study demonstrates how the children artfully exploit a range of multimodal resources in play activities. Of special interest are: the children's coordination of nonvocal actions with talk, and: how such complex action types are produced to accomplish and sustain participation in multi-party play. The analyses highlight two interactional phenomena of interest for our understanding of the children's conduct, namely 'shadowing' and 'crossing'. Shadowing refers to the carefully tailored delivery of an action, which repeats an immediately preceding move of another participant. Crossing (Rampton, 1995) relates to a specific instance of language alternation, through which participants align with and make use of their interlocutors' linguistic and ethnic backgrounds. It is shown how these different types of verbal as well as nonvocal resources are intertwined, sequentially organized and collaboratively deployed in children's construction of locally accountable actions. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 19.
    Björk-Willén, Polly
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    When education seeps into 'free play': How preschool children accomplish multilingual education2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 41, no 8, p. 1493-1518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we examine how bilingual preschoolers enact, in the course of ‘free play’, previous experiences from secondlanguage instructional activities. In so doing, the participants transform a set of educational routines for their own purposes withinthe current activity. Hence, apart from merely drawing on multilingual interactional resources, participation in such activities allowschildren to exploit some normative features of educational practice. The interactional organization of these events is explicatedsequentially, examining in some analytic detail the children’s methods for invoking, repairing and acting upon educational routinesand practices within non-instructional activities. The analyses are discussed in terms of children’s understanding and production ofinstitutional order(s) in and through mundane interaction.# 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 20.
    Broth, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Seeing through screens, hearing through speakers: Managing distant studio space in television control room interaction2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 41, no 10, p. 1998-2016Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how an only partially visible and audible television studio space can be accountably understood from the perspective of a television control room. A proper grasp of the studio space is necessary for understanding, for example, who is talking to whom in the studio, and the position of camera operators relative to both one another and the people they are filming. Such an understanding is crucial for the on-line collaborative editing of the studio interaction, in a way that is intelligible for the audience of viewers. Based on video-recordings of the control room and the studio interaction during the live production of the French interview program Rideau Rouge, this study describes some of the multi-modal resources and practices that the personnel in the control room mobilize for resolving, in interaction, practical problems pertaining to the studio space, e.g. how they manage to show relevant participants, show participants from complementary angles, and direct camera operators to produce specific shots.

  • 21.
    Broth, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture.
    The studio interaction as a contextual resource for TV-production2008In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 904-926Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present text focuses on the complex context of TV-production. The study shows how the dynamics of the studio interaction can be made relevant as a crucial contextual resource for the production crew filming and broadcasting the very same interaction. The mutual intelligibility of the crew’s indexical practices (e.g. talk, switches and camera movement) is shown to be grounded in a state of mutual attention to the unfolding studio interaction. Based on a number of recordings made in the control room during the live production of the French TV-show Rideau Rouge (January 20, 2004) the study describes in particular the crew’s orientations towards three dimensions of the endogenous organization of the studio interaction: turn construction, sequence organization, and activity constitution. The analysis confirms the general relevance of these orders of organization for talk-in-interaction, and shows how each can be used for the practical purposes of the production of the show. The study also reflects upon possible mediating effects when perceiving the studio interaction at a distance. In the control room, the studio interaction can only be observed through the technological system at hand, which is shown to be of some importance for the way in which it can be understood.

  • 22.
    Broth, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Literature. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mondada, Lorenza
    Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Delaying moving away: Place, mobility, and the multimodal organization of activities2019In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 148, p. 44-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In mobile activities alternating between staying at a place and walking to the next place, such as guided visits, the initiation of walking awayis a powerful practice to achieve closing of conversational sequences and courses of action. This was demonstrated in a previous paper (Broth amp; Mondada, 2013): in this follow-up paper, we elaborate on the options that can be responsive to walking away, by focusing on actions that co-participants make in order to momentarily stopit, occasioning a delayed departure/closing. Delying walking awaymay be done, accountably, either as a continuation of the previous course of action, or as an initiation of a new course of action related to the present local position of the participants. The study is based on a large corpus of visits to different places and for diverse purposes, in French, Swedish and English. It also shows how trajectories of walking, their projections and their obstacles, are exemplary embodied practices revealing fundamental features of sequential organization - crucially related to the progressivity of talk, actions, and activities. (C) 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 23.
    Broth, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mondada, Lorenza
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Walking away: The embodied achievement of activity closings in mobile interaction2013In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 41-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we describe in detail the coordinated practices of walking away as reflexively contributing to the organization of activity closings. The paper contributes to conversation analytic studies interested in multimodality, space and mobility, by showing the relevance of walking for the systematic and situated organization of talk-in-interaction. More particularly, the paper deals with sequential environments in which activity closings are projected, and achieved by the participants; it shows that in this position, initiating walking away is a resource that makes closing publicly projectable and recognizable. Moreover, the study shows how walking away is a negotiated matter, being initiated by some, aligned or disaligned by others, possibly retracted and revised. Finally, the study demonstrates that walking away as a coordinated and negotiated practice raises normative expectations among the participants: a deviant case is discussed in which participants orient to the absence of such a coordination. In sum, the paper offers a detailed analysis of a particular multimodal practice walking as a conduct systematically coordinated with talk-in-interaction.

  • 24.
    Brumark, Åsa
    Södertörn University, School of Discourse Studies, Swedish language.
    Non-observance of Gricean maxims in family dinner table conversation2006In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 38, no 8, p. 1206-1238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study addresses the issue of indirect speech and implication in family dinner conversations, viewed from a Gricean perspective. Dinner conversations in 19 families were video recorded and analysed with regard to acts of non-observance (i.e. flouting or violating) of Gricean maxims. The recordings were divided into two groups in terms of the age of participating children (6-10 or 10-14 years respectively). The results gave no evidence that the degree of non-observance differed between the two age groups or between mothers and fathers totally, thus not confirming findings of previous studies [Rundquist, S., 1992. Indirectness: a gender study of flouting Grice's maxims. Journal of Pragmatics 18, 431-449]. But quantitative data showed variations regarding the distribution of different contexts and types of non-observance between the two groups of fathers and between the two groups of mothers, as well as between the groups of children and between the parents and children of the two groups. Furthermore, qualitative analyses suggest that fathers more often than mothers use hints for socializing purposes whereas the children, especially in the older group, seem to break against the maxims primarily for social purposes, e.g. joking.

  • 25.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Touch as social control: Haptic organization of attention in adult-child interactions2016In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 92, p. 30-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the interactional organization of sustained (temporally extended) control touch, deployed in adult child encounters in Swedish primary school and family settings. The detailed analysis shows that sustained touches are employed by adults to manage and monitor childrens participation, usually calling for appropriate displays of attention to particular activities. Sustained touch sets the evolving limits on the childs postural orientation and movements by establishing a sensorial, corporeal contact and is instrumental in arranging the childs bodily positioning into a particular participation framework. Retrospectively, it orients to the child recipients inattentiveness and inappropriate participation. Prospectively, it solicits and sustains the childs coordinated and attentive participation in activities that constitute a state of talk, e.g. interactionally big packages (Sacks, 1995), i.e., adults extended instructions or disciplining. In multi-tasking situations, sustained touch works to manage the multiple overlapping participation frameworks. The adult, already engaged in a talk-based activity, constrains the touch recipients conversational contribution, or puts it on hold, using sustained touch as a prosthetic resource to signal her/his prospective attention. In all, the interactional analysis of interpersonal touch shows how the situational conditions, social roles and relations inform and shape body behavior. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 26.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Themat Res, Child Studies, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Evaldsson, Ann-Carita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Stance and footing in multilingual play: Rescaling practices and heritage language use in a Swedish preschool2019In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 144, p. 127-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines how young immigrant children in multilingual playful activities with peers and adults engage with and explore heritage language forms (e.g., their features, social values and pragmatic uses), as well as transgress boundaries between different language varieties. It is argued that such ludic language practices located and enacted within micro-interactional processes in turn link to and contribute to macro-level socio-cultural values and tensions of languages. The selected data constitute a case study based on a video-ethnography of multilingual language practices in a preschool (for 3- to 6-year-olds) with a Swedish monolingual policy. It is found that the children's multilingual play involve the exploitation of heritage language and linguistic incongruities: it takes the shape of exaggerated repetitions, transformations of language forms (phonetic, morphological and syntactic features), various keying resources, i.e., affective (serious or ludic) and metalinguistic stances. The findings underscore the importance of taking into account young immigrant children's agency in creating new spaces (e.g., ludic or instructional activities) for heritage language forms and varieties as they are used for entertaining, rather than educational purposes. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 27.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Bilingual order in collaborative word processing: On creating an English text in Swedish2005In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 37, no 3 SPEC.ISS., p. 329-353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the mutually oriented work involved in collaborative, computer-aided text production taking place in a bilingual 4th grade classroom at an English school in Sweden. It reports on an in-depth analysis of a 55-min videotaped session in which two students engage in the production of a written report of the past weeks' project work. The analysis focuses on the students' language alternation, showing how a specific bilingual conversational order is produced by their extensive use of the co-available languages. Specifically, the analysis highlights a distinct division of labor between the two languages in which English is used exclusively for the purpose of producing the text proper, while Swedish is used for other forms of interaction. The results are discussed in terms of the relation between social structure and local bilingual practices of meaning construction. More generally, the paper argues for an approach to social interaction that treats the issue of social order as, above all, a matter of participants' situated concerns. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 28.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Can I be with?: Negotiating play entry in a bilingual school2001In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 515-543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines children's procedures for entering play activities in a bilingual school context. While most previous research has focused on individual `access strategies' and their outcomes for peer group participation, the present study argues for a dialogic approach, particularly stressing the collaborative work involved in such interactions. In-depth analyses of entry episodes highlight a number of interactive resources, some of them closely related to the bilingual setting. These resources are discussed in terms of their local anchoring in the discourse structure, as well as in terms of participants' orientations to their functions. On this view, bilingualism is cast as a socially distributed phenomenon, managed in the local organization of play entry negotiations.

  • 29.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Childhood and social interaction in everyday life: Introduction to the special issue2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 41, p. 1473-1476Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Childhood and social interaction in everyday life: Introduction to the special issue2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 41, no 8, p. 1473-1476Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Osvaldsson, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Persson-Thunqvist, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Sociology . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Context that matters: Producing “thick-enough descriptions” in initial emergency reports2008In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 40, p. 927-959Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how troublesome events are described in children’s emergency calls. In focus forthe analysis are the procedures through which participants methodically deal with contextual informationconcerning the reported emergency event during the early phases of the call, i.e., up to the point where theoperator is able to set emergency priority. This choice is motivated by a set of institutional concerns thatsurface in the interaction typically, but not solely, through the operator’s ways of receiving and managing thecaller’s unfolding report. The initial phase of emergency calls thus offers a locus of order, a phenomenon initself, in addition to offering access to some of the finer details of sequential and categorical organisation ofinteraction in emergency calls. Applying Ryle’s (1968) distinction between ‘thin’ vs. ‘thick’ description(roughly, the description of an observed event vs. description of the meaning of an observed event) to thereporting of emergencies, we argue that determining the relevant level of ‘thickness’ is, above all, a task forthe participants themselves. Hence, our analysis shows that interaction during the early phases of emergencycalls is distinctively geared towards producing a ‘thick-enough’ description of the reported event. Thesefindings are discussed in terms of the methodological problem of how features of the context can enterinteraction analytic accounts of institutional exchanges. Specifically, we argue that relevant features ofcontext ‘brought along’ to emergency calls (to do, for instance, with operators’ institutional agendas orcallers’ situations) are also ‘brought about’ by the participants as part of the interactional work throughwhich one party’s observations are jointly transformed into descriptions that form accountable reports ofemergency events.

  • 32.
    De Geer, Boel
    Södertörn University, School of Discourse Studies, Swedish language.
    "Don't say it's disgusting!" Comments on socio-moral behavior in Swedish families2004In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 36, no 9, p. 1705-1725Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    De Geer, Boel
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Avdelning 3, Swedish language.
    Tulviste, Tiia
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Mizera, Luule
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Tryggvason, Marja
    Södertörn University.
    Socialization in communication: Pragmatic socialization during dinnertime in Estonian, Finnish and Swedish families2002In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 34, no 12, p. 1757-1786Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Eriksson, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Follow-up questions in political press conferences2011In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 43, no 14, p. 3331-3344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to deepen the understanding of how journalists use follow-up questions in political press conferences. This ambition also involves a critical examination of the previous research on follow-up questions in this context. For the journalists, a press conference is a time when they have the opportunity to hold politicians accountable for their words and actions, which is a task often seen as a core democratic function of journalism. By asking a follow-up, a journalist can pursue an evasive answer and perform this watchdog role. In total, 6 press conferences from 2009 with the Swedish Government have been analyzed, comprising 29 sequences with follow-up questions. The analysis is organized around the following questions: How are follow-up turns related to initial questions and preceding answers? In what kind of situations do journalists perform adversarial actions and pursue the politician with their follow-up turn? What other kinds of actions are performed through follow-up questions? An essential conclusion is that follow-ups are not necessarily such prominent indicators of adversarialness as previous research suggests. Instead, a clear majority, 18 of 29, of follow-up uestions are nonadversarial in character and used for other purposes than challenging the politicians’ answers.

  • 35.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages, Advanced Studies in Modern Swedish.
    Referring as interaction: On the interplay between linguistic and bodily practices2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 240-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study targets the interface of linguistic and bodily activities in referring to physically present objects in face-to-face interaction. Oil the basis of examples from a multi-party encounter between four speakers of Swedish, cases of referring sequences are analyzed, especially those involving demonstrative expressions. Referring to present objects constitutes an embedded action sequence, in which different practices provide solutions to the task of achieving a satisfactory identification of the referent. The larger matrix action sequence involves several interactional steps, such as guaranteeing a common visual focus in order to carry out the reference, as well as the Subsequent confirmation by the other participants. The bodily displays used to make the referent salient involve a variety of forms, including pointing, touching, holding, picking up, shaking, and even fetching the object. Nevertheless, the combination of demonstratives and bodily practices may not be sufficient to establish the referent in a way that the participants find satisfactory. Repairs may be initiated and completed with the same type of means as the ones by which referring had been done in the first place, i.e. demonstratives and bodily practices.

  • 36.
    Fernandes, Olga Abreu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Language workout in bilingual mother-child interaction: A case study of heritage language practices in Russian-Swedish family talk2019In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 140, p. 88-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines heritage language practices embedded in mundane family activities in a context of Russian-Swedish mother-child interaction. The analysis focuses on the organization and accomplishments of a variety of so-called home language lessons, here termed language workout. In mobilizing a teacher-talk register (e.g., corrections, questions with known answers, hyper-articulation), this practice resembles common language socialization practices in middle-class families. Its sequential organization (e.g. talk turns are coordinated with task turns; repetitions and expansion of the target linguistic item in the following turn) and consistent employment of a parent-talk register (e.g. diminutives) dialectically invoke educational and intimate, task- and language-oriented dimensions. The findings reveal that the realization of language policy in bilingual families relies not only on parental input and language choice, but also on the position of the child as a speaker and learner vis-à-vis the parent and ways in which the child is invited to put the target language into use. While family language policy research primarily uncovered how children challenge family language norms, this study highlights a format that allows for educational, affective and engaging exploration of bilingual language use with young children at home.

  • 37.
    Forsberg, Fanny Lundell
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages.
    Erman, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    High level requests: a study of long residency l2 users of English and French and native speakers2012In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 44, no 6-7, p. 756-775Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With few exceptions the field of L2 pragmatics has focussed on intermediate and advanced learners and there is little knowledge to date regarding highly proficient, immersed L2 speakers' pragmatic performance. This study concerns L2 speakers having been immersed culturally and professionally for a considerable length of time. Our focus is on-line production of the request sequence by Swedish speakers of L2 English and L2 French having lived and worked approximately 10 years in the L2 country against matched native controls. The task is a role play between an employee and her/his boss implying high demands on the pragmatic knowledge of the participants. Our main results indicate that both groups of L2 users significantly underuse lexical and syntactic downgraders. It is argued in this paper that this underuse is not due to a lack of pragmalinguistic resources, i.e., they use the same types as the native speakers, but is of a socio-pragmatic nature, i.e., they do not downgrade to the same extent. Furthermore, L2 users significantly underuse 'situation-bound' routinized formulaic sequences for expressing the Head act. This result, in contrast, points to a lack of pragmalinguistic resources.

  • 38.
    Frumuselu, Mihai Daniel
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ilie, Cornelia
    Malmo Univ, Malmo, Sweden.
    Pseudo-parliamentary discourse in a communist dictatorship: dissenter Parvulescu vs. dictator Ceausescu2010In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 924-942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a case study of an unprecedented political event that occurred in Romania during the Communist dictatorship. In 1979, at the 12th Congress of the Romanian Communist Party, Constantin Parvulescu, a high-ranking party official, took the floor unexpectedly and attacked the dictator Nicolae Ceausescu. We examine the contrasting interaction patterns displayed during the open confrontation that occurred between Parvulescu's accusatory anti-Ceausescu discourse and the subsequent anti-Parvulescu discourses of three of Ceausescu's close political allies glorifying Ceausescu and the Communist party. In order to enable it better understanding of the political and socio-cultural setting of the Communist party congress proceedings, as well as of the concrete implications of sequencing and simultaneity of speech, interpersonal behaviour and shifts in speech targeting, a multimodal approach has been integrated with a discourse-analytical approach. These two combined approaches were used to examine the videotaped event and to account for the overall picture of the interaction, which consists of verbal interaction, kinesic behaviour (such as gestures, facial expressions, body posture), as well as the use of space. The analytical focus has been on the challenging and aggressive uses of multiple audience-targeted illocutionary acts and perlocutionary effects, the strategic uses of personal pronouns and the manipulative uses of semiotic metaphors, (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 39.
    Frumuselu, Mihai Daniel
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ilie, Cornelia
    Malmo Univ, Malmo, Sweden.
    Pseudo-parliamentary discourse in a Communist dictatorship: Dissenter Parvulescu vs. dictator Ceausescu (vol 42, pg 924, 2010)2010In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 2347-2347Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Frumuselu, Mihai Daniel
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ilie, Cornelia
    Malmo Univ, Malmo, Sweden.
    Strategic uses of parliamentary forms of address: The case of the U.K. Parliament and the Swedish Riksdag (vol 42, pg 885, 2010)2010In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 2347-2347Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Gabarró-López, Sílvia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Are discourse markers related to age and educational background? A comparative account between two sign languagesIn: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a pilot investigation of two discourse markers, namely PALM-UP and SAME, in French Belgian Sign Language and Catalan Sign Language. The two discourse markers are studied from a cross-linguistic and a cross-generational perspective using two comparable samples of argumentative productions. The analysis shows that the two discourse markers are highly polyfunctional. Although they have language-specific functions, most of these functions are shared between the two languages. Furthermore, the use of the two discourse markers is idiosyncratic in both sign language datasets. In the small-scale pilot study described in this article, factors such as age or level of education do not seem to influence the usage of the two discourse markers in question.

  • 42.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Children's development of facework practices - An emotional endeavor2011In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 43, no 13, p. 3099-3110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the origin and development of facework practices in young children by focusing on two kinds of practices in child–parent interaction: (1) situations in which a child’s verbal and nonverbal emotive expressions indicate a need to save face; and (2) situations in which a child uses various strategies in order to save face. Through illustrations from a longitudinal material of child–adult interaction it is argued that emotive reactions constitute the base for face awareness in children. This awareness in time turns to child facework practices, a process aided and shaped by the interactional routines with parents. The central aim of the article is to highlight these two aspects of facework, one internal, emotional and related to face; the other external and interactional. As a second aim the article will enforce that the way we analyze interaction must be transparent in that it can be understood, reviewed and contested by others.

  • 43.
    Goodwin, Marjorie
    et al.
    Department of anthropology, University of California, Los Angeles, United States of America.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Calibration in directive/response sequences in family interaction2013In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 46, p. 122-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the context of parent–child interaction we examine the syntactic, prosodic and embodied shape of directive response sequences used to launch, choreograph, monitor, and stall the ongoing progress of a routine communicative project (Linell, 1998) occurring across temporal and spatial dimensions. We explore directive/response usage in the goal-oriented routine activity (Weisner, 1998) of getting children ready for bed, a temporally anchored project that involves the movement of bodies through social space and transitions from one activity to another (Cekaite, 2010; M.H. Goodwin, 2006a and Goodwin, 2006b). Dialogic and embodied characteristics of social action and accountability are demonstrated (1) through alternative grammatical formats for directives (declaratives, imperatives, interrogatives (formatted as noun phrases produced with rising intonation)) (2) as well as through the systematic ways in which participants overlay action within directive sequences with alternative forms of affect, touch, and mobility.

  • 44.
    Hartman, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies. Centre for Languages and Literature, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Conditionals in therapy and counseling sessions: therapists' and clients' uses of what-if constructions2019In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 140, p. 112-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on transcribed spoken data, this study explores therapists’ and clients’ uses of what-if constructions in therapy and counseling sessions. It seeks to establish how these constructions are used, whether there are usage differences between these two groups of speakers, and, if so, how such differences can be explained. The study concludes that both therapists and clients use what if, but they do so to satisfy different communicative needs. Clients primarily use what if to convey worry and doubt (What if don’t like it there?), whereas therapists use what if to summarize and reconstrue their clients' worries and to present alternative perspectives and entertain potential consequences (What if you gave up your guilt?). Both groups of speakers use what if to prompt (re)enactment of scenarios, often in connection with metarepresented speech and thought (I was like, “What if he is here?”). The study offers linguistic support for clinical observations concerning the prevalence of what-if reasoning in anxiety disorders, and additionally illustrates how therapists use language to trigger reality-distancing in their clients. Through a systematic application of Chilton’s Deictic Space Theory, the study demonstrates the utility of a cognitive linguistic approach to the consideration of interactive spoken data.

  • 45.
    Heinemann, Trine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Participation and exclusion in third party complaints2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 41, no 12, p. 2435-2451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on I he relationship between third party complaints (i.e. complaints that target someone other than the recipient) and social exclusion. I demonstrate how participants, by engaging in complaining about someone who is physically present, exclude that person from participating in the interaction and from defending herself against the accusations entailed in the complaint. Focusing on video-recorded data from Danish home help visits, I show how the institutional roles of the participants affect the way in which Such complaints develop. When a caregiver initiates a complaint about the care recipient other caregivers immediately affiliate with the complaint. Such complaints are successful because the caregivers agree to treat the target of the complaint, the care recipient, as it non-ratified participant. By contrast, when the care recipient initiates complaints about a caregiver the caregiver's colleague rejects the complaint. Such complaints are unsuccessful because the exclusion of the target of the complaint fails. These results suggest that participation is constituted through and influenced by the social roles we have and the social activities we engage in as members of society.

  • 46. Henricson, Sofie
    et al.
    Nelson, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Giving and receiving advice in higher education. Comparing Sweden-Swedish and Finland-Swedish supervision meetings2017In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 109, p. 105-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we compare advice-giving in academic supervision meetings at Swedish-speaking university departments in Sweden and Finland. Working within the field of variational pragmatics and analyzing interaction in detail we show how Sweden-Swedish and Finland-Swedish supervisors and students, as experts and non-experts in an institutional setting, initiate and respond to advice. The data consist of video and/or audio recordings of eight naturally occurring supervision meetings. All meetings show a similar pattern regarding the frequency and sequential structure of advice initiation and reception. The main differences between the two data sets occur in how advice is formulated and acknowledged. In the Sweden-Swedish data, advice is often given with strong mitigation and responded to by upgraded acknowledgements. In the Finland-Swedish data, advice delivery is more succinct and acknowledgements are often neutral.

  • 47.
    Jonsson, Carla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Functions of code-switching in bilingual theater: An analysis of three Chicano plays2010In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 1296-1310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines functions of code-switching in Chicano theater, i.e. in writing intended for performance. The investigation focuses on local functions of code-switching. These are functions that can be seen in the text and, as a consequence, can be regarded as meaningful for the audience of the plays. In the study these functions are examined, focusing on five loci in which code-switching is frequent, namely quotations, interjections, reiterations, 'gaps' and word/language play. The data of the study consists of three published plays by a Chicana playwright. The study concludes that code-switching fills creative, artistic and stylistic functions in the plays and that it can be used to add emphasis to a certain word or passage, to add another level of meaning, to deepen/intensify a meaning, to clarify, to evoke richer images and to instruct the audience about a particular concept. Code-switching is also used to mark closeness, familiarity, to emphasize bonds, and to include or, on the contrary, to mark distance, break bonds and exclude. Complex identities of the characters as well as the plots of the plays are constructed and developed by means of language. Code-switching is thus used to enhance and support the representation of the characters.

  • 48.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Accomplishing continuity across sequences and encounters: No(h)-prefaced initiations in Estonian2013In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 57, p. 274-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Initiating actions, such as the introduction of a topic or the initiation of a sequence in a conversation, are social accomplishments. The study focuses on the Estonian no(h)-preface in turns that initiate action sequences and often also a locally new topic in a human encounter. It argues that these no(h)-prefaced turns accomplish continuity beyond the current event and thereby index a long-term involvement between the participants. By marking the turn as warranted by an earlier action trajectory, the no(h)-preface contributes to achieving continuity of action across intervening sequences and encounters. The data come from 70 hours of recordings primarily of phone calls.

  • 49.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Finno-Ugric Languages.
    Collaborating towards Coherence: Lexical Cohesion in English Discourse. Sanna-Kaisa Tanskanen2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 1071-1073Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Finsk-ugriska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Collaborating towards Coherence: Lexical Cohesion in English DiscourseSanna-Kaisa Tanskanen, John Benjamins, Amsterdam/Philadelphia, 2006, 192 pp., $1582009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 1071-1073Article, book review (Other academic)
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