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  • 1.
    Airey, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    The ability of students to explain science concepts in two languages2010In: Hermes - Journal of Language and Communication Studies, ISSN 0904-1699, E-ISSN 1903-1785, Vol. 45, p. 35-49Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Airey, John
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    The ability of students to explain science concepts in two languages2010In: Hermes - Journal of Language and Communication Studies, ISSN 0904-1699, E-ISSN 1903-1785, Vol. 45, p. 35-49Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Björkman, Beyza
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    "So you think you can ELF?": English as a lingua franca as the medium of instruction2010In: Hermes - Journal of Language and Communication Studies, ISSN 0904-1699, E-ISSN 1903-1785, Vol. 45, p. 77-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports the findings of a study on spoken English as a lingua franca (ELF) in Swedish higher education. The aim has been to investigate the role pragmatic strategies play in content lectures where English is a lingua franca, i.e. a vehicular language. The findings show that lecturers in ELF settings make less frequent use of pragmatic strategies than students, who deploy these strategies frequently in group-work projects. Earlier stages of the present study showed that despite frequent non-standardness at the morphosyntax level, there is very little overt disturbance in student group-work (Björkman 2008 a and b/2009b), most likely owing to a variety of communicative strategies used during interaction and the questions raised (Björkman, 2009a). It seems reasonable to assume that, in the absence of appropriate strategies and questions that serve as real-time signals of disturbance, there is an increased risk for covert disturbance in lectures. This view complies with the findings of earlier studies on the importance of such strategies (Mauranen 2006, Airey 2009:79, Hellekjær 2010). The findings imply that the effectiveness of a speaker of English in academic ELF settings is determined primarily by the speaker’s pragmatic ability and less by his/her proficiency. There are important implications of these findings for lecturers who need to operate in ELF settings. First, increasing interactivity by using pragmatic strategies sufficiently frequently appears critical for those involved in English-medium education. It is also important that awareness is raised on target language usage in lecturing in English. Such awareness-raising can be achieved at the macro level by clearly-written language policies that include training for teachers and students who both need to be equipped with the skills needed to cope with the complexities of such settings, and at the micro level, by in-house training and courses that could be administered to both teachers and students.

  • 4.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    So You Think You Can ELF: English as a Lingua Franca as the Medium ofInstruction2010In: Hermes - Journal of Language and Communication Studies, ISSN 0904-1699, E-ISSN 1903-1785, Vol. 45, p. 77-99Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Karlsson, Monica
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Research on Education and Learning within the Department of Teacher Education (FULL).
    Quantitative and qualitative aspects of advanced learners' L1 and L2 mastery of polysemous words2013In: Hermes - Journal of Language and Communication Studies, ISSN 0904-1699, E-ISSN 1903-1785, no 51, p. 79-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present investigation, 15 fi rst-term university students were faced with forty decontextualised polysemous words in English (L2) and Swedish (L1) respectively and asked to indicate which, of a set of six meanings, adhered to the item in question (two to fi ve of the meanings were correct). The polysemous words were of varying frequency. The investigation thus addresses the following research question: In quantitative and qualitative terms, what knowledge do advanced students have of polysemous words in their L2 as compared to their L1? Results show that most students have a relatively poor knowledge of polysemous words in both languages, especially in their L2. Furthermore, while the frequencies of the test items have no impact on the students’ achievements, the relative frequencies of the meanings of the test items and the number of meanings of each test item stand in direct relation to whether the item is known or not in both languages.

  • 6.
    Shaw, Philip
    et al.
    English Department, Stockholm University.
    Irvine, Aileen
    Edinburgh University.
    Malmström, Hans
    Royal Institute of Technology.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Intertextual episodes in lectures: A classification from the perspective of incidental learning from reading2010In: Hermes - Journal of Language and Communication Studies, ISSN 0904-1699, E-ISSN 1903-1785, Vol. 45, p. 115-128Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Shaw, Philip
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Irvine, Aileen
    University of Edinburgh.
    Malmström, Hans
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Intertextual episodes in lectures: A  classification from the perspective of incidental learning from reading2010In: Hermes - Journal of Language and Communication Studies, ISSN 0904-1699, E-ISSN 1903-1785, Vol. 45, p. 115-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a parallel language environment it is important that teaching takes account of both the languages students areexpected to work in. Lectures in the mother tongue need to offer access to textbooks in English and encouragementto read. This paper describes a preliminary study for an investigation of the extent to which they actually do so.A corpus of lectures in English for mainly L1 English students (from BASE and MICASE) was examined for thetypes of reference to reading which occur, classifi ed by their potential usefulness for access and encouragement. Suchreferences were called ‘intertextual episodes’. Seven preliminary categories of intertextual episode were identifi ed. Insome disciplines the text is the topic of the lecture rather than a medium for information on the topic, and this categorywas not pursued further. In the remaining six the text was a medium for information about the topic. Three of theminvolved management, of texts by the lecturer her/himself, of student writing, or of student reading. The remainingthree involved reference to the content of the text either introducing it to students, reporting its content, or, really themost interesting category, relativizing it and thus potentially encouraging critical reading. Straightforward reportingthat certain content was in the text at a certain point was the most common type, followed by management of studentreading. Relativization was relatively infrequent. The exercise has provided us with categories which can be used for anexperimental phase where the effect of different types of reference can be tested, and for observation of the referencesactually used in L1 lectures in a parallel-language environment.

  • 8.
    Shaw, Philip
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Irvine, Aileen
    University of Edinburgh.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Mälardalens Högskola.
    Malmström, Hans
    KTH.
    Intertextual episodes in lectures: a classification from the perspective of incidental learning from reading2010In: Hermes - Journal of Language and Communication Studies, ISSN 0904-1699, E-ISSN 1903-1785, no 45, p. 115-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a parallel language environment it is important that teaching takes account of both the languages students are expected to work in.  Lectures in the mother tongue need to offer access to textbooks in English and encouragement to read. This paper describes a preliminary study for an investigation of the extent to which they actually do so. A corpus of lectures in English for mainly L1 English students (from BASE and MICASE)  was examined for the types of reference to reading which occur, classified by their potential usefulness for access and encouragement. Such references were called ‘intertextual episodes’.

    Seven preliminary categories of intertextual episode were identified.  In some disciplines the text is the topic of the lecture rather than a medium for information on the topic, and this category was not pursued further. In the remaining six the text was a medium for information about the text. Three of them involved management, of texts by the lecturer her/him self, of student writing, or of student reading. The remaining three involved reference to the content of the text either introducing to students, reporting its content, or, really the most interesting category, relativizing it and thus potentially encouraging critical reading. Straightforward reporting that certain content was in the text at a certain point was the most common type, followed by management of student reading. Relativization was relatively infrequent.

    The exercise has provided us with categories which can be used for an experimental phase where the effect of different types of reference can be tested, and for observation of the references actually used in L1 lectures in a parallel-language environment.

  • 9.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies. Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Exploring cognitive aspects of competence in signed language interpreting: First impressions2018In: Hermes - Journal of Language and Communication Studies, ISSN 0904-1699, E-ISSN 1903-1785, no 57, p. 49-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sign language interpreting of dialogues shares many features with the interpreting of dialogues between non-signed languages. We argue that from a cognitive perspective in dialogue interpreting, despite some differences between the two types of interpreting, sign language interpreters use many of the same processes and handle similar challenges as interpreters between non-signed languages. We report on a first exploration of process differences in sign language interpreting between three novice and three experienced Swedish Sign Language interpreters. The informants all interpreted the same dialogue and made a retrospection of their interpreting immediately after the task. Retrospections were analyzed using tools for identifying reported processing problems, instances of monitoring, and strategy use (see Ivanova 1999). Furthermore, the interpreting products (both into Swedish Sign Language and into Swedish) and their differences were qualitatively analyzed. The results indicate that there are differences between the two groups, both in terms of the retrospective reports and in terms of the interpreting product. As expected, monitoring seems to be a factor determined by experience. The experienced interpreters seemed to have more efficient ways of handling turn taking and the internalization of new vocabulary. The study also concludes that to use instruments devised for simultaneous conference interpreting (Ivanova 1999; Tiselius 2013), the instruments need to be adapted to the dialogue setting, even though in the case of sign language interpreting the simultaneous interpreting technique is used even in dialogue interpreting.

  • 10. Vigsö, Orla
    [Recension av:] Fredrik Lindström, Världens dåligaste språk 2001In: Hermes - Journal of Language and Communication Studies, ISSN 0904-1699, E-ISSN 1903-1785, no 27, p. 213-214Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11. Vigsö, Orla
    [Recension av:] Jens Cramer & Erik Vive Larsen, Dansk som nabosprog: Dansk grammatik for svensktalende 2001In: Hermes - Journal of Language and Communication Studies, ISSN 0904-1699, E-ISSN 1903-1785, no 26, p. 168-169Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 12. Vigsö, Orla
    [Recension av:] Pia Jarvad, Nye ord: Ordbog over nye ord i dansk 1955-19982001In: Hermes - Journal of Language and Communication Studies, ISSN 0904-1699, E-ISSN 1903-1785, no 26, p. 173-175Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 13. Vigsö, Orla
    [Recension av:] Robert Zola Christensen, Dansk grammatik for svenskere2000In: Hermes - Journal of Language and Communication Studies, ISSN 0904-1699, E-ISSN 1903-1785, no 24, p. 184-185Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 14. Waara, Elin
    et al.
    Shaw, Philip
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    Male and Female Witnesses’ Speech in Swedish Criminal Trials2006In: Hermes - Journal of Language and Communication Studies, ISSN 0904-1699, E-ISSN 1903-1785, Vol. 36, p. 129-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present quantitative study focuses on witnesses’ speech in Swedish criminal trials,more specifi cally on potential differences between men’s and women’s language styles.Since the 1970s, research on language and gender has been divided into three mainapproaches towards the relationship between men’s and women’s language use: thedefi cit approach, the dominance approach and the cultural approach. The presentstudy uses the more recent dynamic approach to show how gender is acted out in eachsituation taking into account a number of factors, e.g. context. The aim of our workis fi rst and foremost to study the possible correlation between the witnesses’ genderand language in the courtroom context and then to investigate if income and/or levelof education provide better explanations for possible variation by looking at a broadrange of linguistic variables. The results show no statistically signifi cant gender orsocial status differences in the witnesses’ speech. However, when comparing the resultsof the testifying police offi cers accidentally included in the study with the rest of thewitnesses, the differences turned out to be signifi cant. This shows that, in this case,factors such as previous courtroom experience and familiarity with the context wereprobably more infl uential on the speech of the informants than gender, income andeducation, in conformity with the assumptions of the dynamic approach.

1 - 14 of 14
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