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  • 1.
    Ahlberg [Alsarve], Jenny
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Roman, Christine
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Duncan, Simon
    Actualizing the 'democratic family'?: Swedish policy rhetoric versus family practices2008In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 79-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we examine empirically a key element of individualization theory—the democratic family. We do so using the “acid test” of family policy, and family practice, in Sweden. First, we review the progress of family policy in Sweden since the 1960s, which has expressly promoted an agenda of gender equality and democracy in families, with individual autonomy for both adults and children as one key element. We then turn to family practice, looking particularly at negotiation and adult equality, lifelong parenting after separation, and children's autonomy. While Swedish policy makers and shapers seem to have developed the idea of the democratic family long before the sociologist Anthony Giddens, the results in practice have been more ambivalent. While there has been change, there is more adaptation to pre-existing gender and generational norms.

  • 2.
    Bergqvist, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Bjarnegård, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Zetterberg, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    When Class Trumps Sex: The Social Democratic Intra-Party Struggle Over Extending Parental Leave Quotas in Sweden2016In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 169-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One challenge within gender and politics literature is understanding the circumstances under which gender equality policies are adopted. This article analyzes a “failed” case of adoption in a gender-progressive setting: the Swedish Social Democrats' failure in 2005 to reform parental leave legislation by extending the quota for each parent. The analysis builds on interviews with high-ranked party representatives—both advocates and opponents of the reform. We identify tensions between proponents' gender concerns and opponents' class-based interests and suggest that left-oriented parties are unlikely to adopt gender equality policies when competing class interests coincide with veto players' short-term electoral goals.

  • 3. Cooke, Lynn Prince
    et al.
    Erola, Jani
    Evertsson, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Gähler, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Härkönen, Juho
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Hewitt, Belinda
    Jolovaara, Marika
    Kan, Man-Yee
    Lyngstad, Torkild Hovde
    Mencarini, Letizia
    Mignot, Jean-Francois
    Mortelmans, Dimitri
    Poortman, Anne-Rigt
    Schmitt, Christian
    Trappe, Heike
    Labor and Love: Wives' Employment and Divorce Risk in its Socio-Political Context2013In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 482-509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We theorize how social policy affects marital stability vis-à-vis macro and micro effects of wives' employment on divorce risk in 11 Western countries. Correlations among 1990s aggregate data on marriage, divorce, and wives' employment rates, along with attitudinal and social policy information, seem to support specialization hypotheses that divorce rates are higher where more wives are employed and where policies support that employment. This is an ecological fallacy, however, because of the nature of the changes in specific countries. At the micro level, we harmonize national longitudinal data on the most recent       cohort of wives marrying for the first time and find that the stabilizing effects of a gendered division of labor have ebbed.  In the United States with its lack of policy support, a wife's employment still significantly increases the risk of divorce. A wife's employment has no significant effect on divorce risk in Australia, Flanders, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. In Finland, Norway, and Sweden, wives' employment predicts a significantly lower risk of divorce when compared with wives who are out of the labor force. The results indicate that greater policy support for equality reduces and may even reverse the relative divorce risk associated with a wife's employment.

  • 4.
    Eriksson Baaz, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Harriet, Gray
    Univ York, Dept Polit, Derwent Coll, York, N Yorkshire, England.
    Stern, Maria
    Gothenburg Univ, Sch Global Studies, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    What Can We/Do We Want to Know?: Reflections from Researching SGBV in Military Settings2018In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 521-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores methodological challenges that arose in two perpetrator-centered research projects on sexual and gender-based violence in two different armed forces contexts: the British Army and the Armed Forces of the Democratic Republic of Congo. We examine how the interplay between research subjects’, in this case perpetrators’, performances and our own desires and investments as researchers shape the knowledge we produce. Ultimately, we seek to encourage continuing (self)critical discussions on how various discursive framings and ethico-political desires shape the stories we hear as well as those that we tell.

  • 5. Estevez-Abe, Margarita
    et al.
    Hobson, Barbara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Outsourcing Domestic (Care) Work: The Politics, Policies, and Political Economy2015In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 133-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article introduces the theme of the special issue on Outsourcing Domestic (Care) Work. We conceptualize outsourcing of domestic work as a process by which both the state and family increase their reliance on private markets to carry out both care and non-care domestic services. We argue that this outsourcing is happening in response to three deficits that many wealthy European countries face- care deficit, time deficit, and job deficit.

  • 6.
    Evertsson, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Is Gender Inequality Greater at Lower or Higher Educational Levels? Common Patterns in the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United States.2009In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 210-241Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Finseraas, Henning
    et al.
    Jakobsson, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Kotsadam, Andreas
    The Gender Gap in Political Preferences: An Empirical Test of a Political Economy Explanation2012In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 219-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A woman's labor market participation and risk of divorce are argued to be important explanatory factors for the gender gap in political preferences. We utilize a Norwegian data set which allows a rigid test of these arguments because it includes information on vote choice, preferences regarding child and elder care spending, and extensive information on the relationship with the current partner. We find a gender gap in political preferences, but no evidence that it can be explained by women's risk of divorce, while the impact of labor market participation is not robust across specifications. To some extent, the gender gap in voting is driven by unmarried women voting left.

  • 8.
    Gavanas, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies.
    Domesticating masculinity and masculinizing domesticity in contemporary U.S. fatherhood politics2004In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Haas, Linda
    et al.
    Indiana University-Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA.
    Hwang, Philip
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    “It's About Time!”: Company Support for Fathers' Entitlement to Reduced Work Hours in Sweden2016In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 142-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fifteen nations offer fathers the right to reduce work hours to care for children. Incorporating a gender perspective, this study uses a mixed-methods approach to examine the implementation of this policy in the first nation to offer it, Sweden. It investigates whether the institutional and cultural environment exerts pressure on companies to facilitate fathers' hours reduction, companies' levels of support for fathers' use of this entitlement and correlates of company support. The persistence of the “male model of work” appears to be an important barrier to implementation of a policy that offers promise in offering fathers time to care.

  • 10.
    Halldén, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Levanon, Asaf
    Kricheli-Katz, Tamar
    Does the Motherhood Wage Penalty Differ by Individual Skill and Country Family Policy? A Longitudinal Study of Ten European Countries2016In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 363-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research shows considerable variation in the strength of the motherhood wage penalty across countries, which has partially been attributed to differences in policies supporting maternal employment. Although such policies are usually understood to be complementary, their effects on workers—and especially on employees in jobs of diverse skills levels—may differ. Using longitudinal data from the European Community Household Panel (ECHP) for ten countries, this article describes the associations of different maternal employment policies with the motherhood wage penalty by skill. Findings from Hausman–Taylor panel models indicate that both a high share of small children in publicly funded child care facilities and long paid maternity leave are associated with a decrease in the motherhood wage penalty regardless of skill level. The standardized total effects were larger for the latter policy.

  • 11.
    Hellgren, Zenia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Pompeu Fabra University, Spain.
    Markets, Regimes, and the Role of Stakeholders: Explaining Precariousness of Migrant Domestic/Care Workers in Different Institutional Frameworks2015In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 220-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spain and Sweden represent societies with very different welfare, migration, and employment regimes in a European context, but in both countries, female migrant workers in the private domestic/care sectors experience precarious job conditions. The purpose of this article is to explain the situation of migrant workers in these societies through an analysis of both structural components and the position of stakeholders involved in the private care/domestic services sector. Comparing the cases of Spain and Sweden, I argue that different characteristics of regimes and markets-rather paradoxically-produce similar results for the workers. In both countries, there is pressure to keep the wages low. Work hours are often unpredictable and adapted to the clients' demands. In Spain, these workers fill the care gap, representing a comparably affordable solution to the lack of public eldercare. In Sweden, the private domestic services market expanded after the so-called RUT tax subsidy was implemented in 2007. Here, cleaning companies play a key role as middlemen who receive a large share of the cost for these services. Few actors represent the workers, and those who do find themselves restrained by structural factors (as NGOs in Spain) or ambiguous in their support (as the Swedish trade unions). All in all, the female migrant domestic/care workers in Spain and Sweden apparently form part of the development towards a migrant precariat in European societies.

  • 12.
    Hobson, Barbara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The Agency  Gap in Work-life balance: Applying Sen's Capabilities Framework Within European Contexts2011In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 147-167Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Hobson, Barbara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Fahlén, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Takács, Judit
    The Institute of Sociology of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    Agency and Capabilities to Achieve a Work–Life Balance: A Comparison of Sweden and Hungary2011In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 168-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study develops a conceptual framework with a capabilities and agency approach for analyzing work–life balance (WLB) applied in two societies (Hungary and Sweden), which have different working time regimes, levels of precarious employment, and gender equality discourses and norms. Inspired by Amartya Sen, we present a model illustrating how agency freedom for WLB depends on multiple resources at the individual, work organizational, institutional, and normative/societal levels. Using a unique qualitative survey conducted in two cities, Budapest and Stockholm, we analyze how mothers and fathers subjectively experience the tensions between family and work demands, and their possibilities for alternative choices (agency freedom). We find similarities in these tensions involving time pressure and time poverty, cutting across gender and education. Our Hungarian parents, nevertheless, experience greater agency inequalities for WLB, which reflect weaker institutional resources (conversion factors) as well as cultural/societal norms that act as constraints for WLB claims in the workplace and household. Our study reveals that Swedish parents, both men and women, express a strong sense of entitlement to exercise rights to care.

  • 14.
    Hudson, Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Hell's Grannies and Crazy Ladies: Challenging the Precarization of Older Women2019In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older women are often portrayed as particularly vulnerable and in need of protection, producing processes of ageist “othering” that deny agency, foster “appropriate” behaviors, and work to exclude them from everyday life. While not denying many women face a precarious situation in later life, some older women resist their subjectivation as vulnerable. Drawing on a concept of precarity as governmentality, older women’s acceptance and resistance to being characterized as “vulnerable” and in need of protection are explored in relation to focus group interviews with female pensioners in four Swedish municipalities.

  • 15.
    Kornrich, Sabino
    et al.
    Emory University, Department of Sociology.
    Eger, Maureen A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Family Life in Context: Men and Women’s Perceptions of Fairness and Satisfaction Across Thirty Countries2016In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 40-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Existing scholarship contends that satisfaction with family life is relative: that what individuals expect out of their marriages in terms of housework and possibly more generally depends on what is typical in that country. These expectations are derived from a relative deprivation framework, which claims that individuals engage in social comparison with similar others and experience dissatisfaction or other forms of psychological distress if these comparisons indicate that they are relatively worse off. In this article, we extend existing research on women’s satisfaction with family life by asking two primary questions. First, can research which suggests that relative deprivation structures women’s perceptions of fairness in and satisfaction with family life be extended to understand men’s experiences? Second, what other individual-level features and country policies interact to influence satisfaction with family life? To answer these questions, we rely on individual-level data (N=14,351) from the International Social Survey Programme (2002) and country-level data (N=30) from the OECD Family Database, the World Economic Forum, and other sources. Using multilevel models, we find that relative deprivation does not explain men’s experiences, suggesting the importance of the salience of egalitarian norms rather than relative deprivation for men and possibly for women. In addition, we find other significant individual- and country-level variables, broadening understandings of satisfaction with family life across a variety of institutional contexts.

  • 16.
    Korpi, Walter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Englund, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Women's Opportunities under Different Family Policy Constellations: Gender, Class, and Inequality Tradeoffs in Western Countries Re-examined2013In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores tradeoffs reflecting interaction effects between socioeconomic class and different types of family policies on gender inequalities in terms of agency and economic inequality in eighteen Organization for Economic and Cultural Development countries. We identify multiple dimensions in family policies, reflecting the extent to which legislation involves claim rights supporting mothers' paid work or supporting traditional homemaking. We use constellations of multidimensional policies in combination with multilevel analysis to examine effects on class selectivity of women into employment and glass ceilings with respect to women's access to top wages and managerial positions. Our results indicate that while major negative family policy effects for women with tertiary education are difficult to find in countries with well-developed policies supporting women's employment and work-family reconciliation, family policies clearly differ in the extent to which they improve opportunities for women without university education.

  • 17.
    Lindvert, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    The rules of the game: Organizing gender policies in Australia and Sweden2007In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 238-257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This comparative analysis examines how policy issues central to the feminist agenda were introduced and eventually established in Swedish and Australian politics from the early 1960s to late 1980s. The theoretical discussion revolves around the analytical concept gender policy logics and its relevance in empirical analyses of gender policy-making. Focus is specifically set on the role of administrative structures in the processes of policy formation and on how certain institutional mechanisms accelerate certain gender policy paths and depoliticize others. The analysis indicates that different mechanisms stand out as decisive for gender policy-making in Sweden and Australia. Australian gender politics was to a great extent maintained by the actors' organizational skills: by their ability to reconfigure, change arenas, and find alternative coalitions. In Sweden, the crucial capacity for continuation rather concerned a discursive competence: how to conceptualize the demands and to stretch or revise the policies in order to meet approval. Four policy issues were examined over time: childcare, job training, sex discrimination, and violence against women.

  • 18.
    Saxonberg, Steven
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Szelewa, Dorota
    The continuing legacy of the communist legacy?: The development of family policies in Poland and the Czech Republic2007In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 351-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article compares family policies in Poland and the Czech Republic in order to explain why the two countries have different policies. Previous studies are right to claim that post-communist family policies are basically going in a refamilialist direction that gives mothers a greater incentive to return to the home, but they tend to neglect the important differences that exist between countries. Although previous studies were correct to emphasize the role of the anti-feminist communist legacy in explaining this trend toward re-famialilization, it is a country's economic-institutional legacy that goes the farthest in explaining the differences in policies.

  • 19. Saxonberg, Steven
    et al.
    Szelewa, Dorota
    The continuing legacy of the communist legacy?: The development of family policies in Poland and the Czech Republic2007In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 351-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article compares family policies in Poland and the Czech Republic in order to explain why the two countries have different policies. Previous studies are right to claim that post-communist family policies are basically going in a refamilialist direction that gives mothers a greater incentive to return to the home, but they tend to neglect the important differences that exist between countries. Although previous studies were correct to emphasize the role of the anti-feminist communist legacy in explaining this trend toward re-famialilization, it is a country's economic-institutional legacy that goes the farthest in explaining the differences in policies.

  • 20.
    Stensöta Olofsdotter, Helena
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Engster, Daniel
    University of Texas, San Antonio, US.
    Do Family Policies Matter for Children Well Being?2011In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 82-124Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Strid, Sofia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Dept Sociology, University of Lancaster, Lancaster, England.
    Walby, Sylvia
    Dept Sociology, University of Lancaster, Lancaster, England.
    Armstrong, Jo
    Dept Sociology, University of Lancaster, Lancaster, England.
    Intersectionality and Multiple Inequalities: Visibility in British Policy on Violence Against Women2013In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 558-581Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intersectionalities have long been theorised. It is time to move on to empirical testing of intersectionality theory in order to develop it further. The paper analyses visibility of multiple intersecting inequalities in policy on violence against women in Britain. It finds and develops a continuum of inclusion of multiple inequalities to analyse visibility in policy, ranging from the simple naming of inequalities, the intersection of inequalities, and fields of violence and policy domains, to the inclusion of the voices of minoritised women. It is proposed that while recognition of intersectionality is required for good quality policy, it is the way in which this is achieved that is particularly important. We argue that the implications of previous research that finds silencing of groups positioned at the point of intersection of two or more inequalities and invisibility of multiple inequalities in policy need to be re-thought. Previous research showing silencing and invisibility is based on a too narrow understanding of the concept of intersectionality and has not taken sufficiently into account the implications of the politico-discursive process of degendering.

  • 22.
    Strid, Sofia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Dept Sociology, University of Lancaster, Lancaster, England.
    Walby, Sylvia
    Dept Sociology, University of Lancaster, Lancaster, England.
    Armstrong, Jo, E.
    Dept Sociology, University of Lancaster, Lancaster, England.
    Intersectionality and the quality of the gender equality architecture2012In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 446-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The restructuring of the equality architecture in Britain is analyzed for its implications for the theory and practice of intersectionality. Going beyond McCall and Hancock, different approaches to the intersection of multiple inequalities are identified and investigated for their utility in the theory and practice of equality in the context of multiple intersecting equalities. In particular, the preference for “mutual constitution” rather than “mutual shaping” is interrogated. Several definitions of and several criteria of quality of the equality architecture are identified, drawing on a discussion of the literature. It is found that while restructuring of the British equality architecture increased its quality in some aspects, by widening its coverage of multiple inequalities and policy domains, in other aspects it reduced it, notably in its resources. The findings vary according to the definition of the equality architecture deployed. Conclusions for the theory and practice of intersectionality are drawn. The prioritization of “mutual constitution” in theory and practice is found to be flawed; “mutual shaping” is offered as a more successful approach.

  • 23. Tervola, Jussi
    et al.
    Duvander, Ann-Zofie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Mussino, Eleonora
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Promoting Parental Leave for Immigrant Fathers-What Role Does Policy Play?2017In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 269-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The gender differences in labor force participation and take-up of parental leave are accentuated in immigrant populations. This study examines whether certain policy features of parental leave are effective in leveling out the gendered differences among immigrants. We compare two distinct policy contexts, Finland and Sweden, and analyze the impacts of three policy reforms. Our results imply that policy features such as the earmarking of days and flexibility are the reason why immigrant fathers' take-up of leave is higher in Sweden. However, analysis of policy reforms suggests that other contextual factors also play a role.

  • 24.
    Ulmanen, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Working Daughters: A Blind Spot in Swedish Eldercare Policy2013In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 65-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Care services help women who are mothers or daughters to combine caregiving and gainful employment. While Swedish childcare policy expanded services to meet the needs of children and working mothers, this discourse analysis of Swedish eldercare policy shows that the expansion of eldercare services from the 1950s to the end of 1970s was justified solely on the basis of older people's needs. The lack of connection in policy documents between the needs of working daughters and the provision of eldercare services made it easier to cut services beginning in the 1980s, without considering the consequences for family members.

  • 25. Valarino, Isabel
    et al.
    Duvander, Ann-Zofie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Haas, Linda L.
    Neyer, Gerda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Exploring Leave Policy Preferences: A Comparison of Austria, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States2018In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 118-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses preferences regarding leave length, gender division of leave,and leave financing in four countries with different welfare-state and leaveregimes. Embedded in a gender perspective, institutional, self-interest, and ideationaltheoretical approaches are used to explore the factors shaping individuals’preferences (ISSP 2012 data). Findings show dramatic cross-country differences,suggesting the institutional dimension is most strongly related to leave policy preferences.Self-interest and values concerning gender relations and state responsibilityare also important correlates. The study identifies mismatches between leavepreferences, entitlements, and uptake, with implications for policy reform and thegendered division of parenting.

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