Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 78
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Gabriella
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy.
    Björck, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy.
    Anisotropy Tuning in Tetragonal FeCo Alloys2010In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 10, no 9, p. 6186-6189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We review our previous work on magnetocrystalline anisotropy tuning of superlattices based on tetragonally distorted FeCo-alloys. In addition we present new experimental results on the effect of changing the composition of the FeCo alloy. The discussion is based on the separation of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy into contributions from the interfaces and strain, as well as from the composition.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Mikael Svante
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management. Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Chem & Chem Engn, SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nanoparticle Magnetism: Superspin Glasses2019In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 19, no 8, p. 4903-4910Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the magnetic super-phase, which occurs in strongly interacting magnetic nanoparticle systems. The phase is a nanoparticle analog to the atomic magnetic spin glass phase and is therefore called a superspin glass. Experimental data for a dense maghemite nanoparticle compact is presented and it is shown that this system forms a superspin glass phase by undergoing a second order phase transition. Below its transition temperature the system exhibits non-equilibrium dynamical properties similar to those of atomic spin glasses. It was shown that it is possible to tune the transition temperature by choosing the size of the particles used to make the compact. By mixing two sizes of particles (9 and 11.5 nm) and making compacts of different relative concentration of these sizes it was shown that it is the average dipolar interaction which determines the transition temperature.

  • 3. Battiston, S.
    et al.
    Boldrini, S.
    Saleemi, Mohsin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Famengo, A.
    Fiameni, S.
    Toprak, M. S.
    Fabrizio, M.
    Influence of Al and Mg Addition on Thermoelectric Properties of Higher Manganese Silicides Obtained by Reactive Sintering2017In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 1668-1673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher manganese silicides (HMS), represented by MnSix (x = 1.71-1.75), are promising p-type candidates for thermoelectric (TE) energy harvesting systems at intermediate temperature range. The materials are very attractive as they may replace lead based compounds due to their nontoxicity, low cost of starting materials, and high thermal and chemical stability. Dense pellets were obtained through fast reactive sintering by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The addition -or nanoinclusion, of Al and Mg permitted the figure of merit enhancement of the material obtained with this technique, reaching the highest value of 0.40 at 600 degrees C. Morphology, composition and crystal structure of the samples were characterized by electron microscopies, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analyses, respectively.

  • 4. Battiston, S.
    et al.
    Boldrini, S.
    Saleemi, Mohsin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Famengo, A.
    Fiameni, S.
    Toprak, Muhammet
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Fabrizio, M.
    Influence of Al and Mg addition on thermoelectric properties of higher manganese silicides obtained by reactive sintering2017In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 1668-1673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher manganese silicides (HMS), represented by MnSix (x = 1.71-1.75), are promising p-type candidates for thermoelectric (TE) energy harvesting systems at intermediate temperature range. The materials are very attractive as they may replace lead based compounds due to their non-toxicity, low cost of starting materials, and high thermal and chemical stability. Dense pellets were obtained through fast reactive sintering by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The addition -or nanoinclusion, of Al and Mg permitted the figure of merit enhancement of the material obtained with this technique, reaching the highest value of 0.40 at 600°C. Morphology, composition and crystal structure of the samples were characterized by electron microscopies, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analyses, respectively.

  • 5. Bora, Tanujjal
    et al.
    Dutta, Joydeep
    Water Research Center, Nanotechnology, Sultan Qaboos University, Oman.
    Applications of nanotechnology in wastewater treatment-A review2014In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 613-626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water on Earth is a precious and finite resource, which is endlessly recycled in the water cycle. Water, whose physical, chemical, or biological properties have been altered due to the addition of contaminants such as organic/inorganic materials, pathogens, heavy metals or other toxins making it unsafe for the ecosystem, can be termed as wastewater. Various schemes have been adopted by industries across the world to treat wastewater prior to its release to the ecosystem, and several new concepts and technologies are fast replacing the traditional methods. This article briefly reviews the recent advances and application of nanotechnology for wastewater treatment. Nanomaterials typically have high reactivity and a high degree of functionalization, large specific surface area, size-dependent properties etc., which makes them suitable for applications in wastewater treatment and for water purification. In this article, the application of various nanomaterials such as metal nanoparticles, metal oxides, carbon compounds, zeolite, filtration membranes, etc., in the field of wastewater treatment is discussed.

  • 6.
    Bora, Tanujjal
    et al.
    Asian Inst Technol, Sch Engn & Technol, Ind Syst Engn, Nanotechnol, POB 4, Klongluang 12120, Pathumthani, Thailand..
    Dutta, Joydeep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Plasmonic Photocatalyst Design: Metal-Semiconductor Junction Affecting Photocatalytic Efficiency2019In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 383-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Silver-zinc oxide nanorods (Ag-ZnO NRs) and gold-zinc oxide nanorods (Au-ZnO NRs) plasmonic photocatalysts were fabricated by the deposition of Ag and Au nanoparticles on ZnO NRs. The photocatalysts were studied with electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), UV-vis optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The effect of type of metals on the ZnO surface on its photocatalytic activity under ultra violet (UV) as well as visible light excitation are investigated and their contribution towards enhanced photo-generated charge separation in terms of the type of junction (Ohmic or Schottky) the metal forms with the semiconductor are explained.

  • 7.
    Carvalho, Alexandra T.G.
    et al.
    Department of Physics, I3N, University of Aveiro, Campus Santiago.
    Öberg, Sven
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mathematical Science.
    Rayson, Mark
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mathematical Science.
    Briddon, Patrick R.
    School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, University of Newcastle upon Tyne.
    Electronic and optical properties of chlorinated silicon nanoparticles2013In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 1039-1042Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    First-principles calculations are used to investigate the structure, electronic and optical properties of silicon nanocystals with chlorine-passivated surface. The nanocrystals considered were approximately spherical, with diameters between 1.5 and 3.0 nm. We show that the nanocrystals with chlorinated surface have a smaller bandgap, lower optical absorption threshold, and greater ionization energy and electron affinity than hydrogenated silicon nanocrystals of the same size

  • 8.
    Carvalho, Alexandra T.G.
    et al.
    Department of Physics, I3N, University of Aveiro, Campus Santiago.
    Öberg, Sven
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mathematical Science.
    Rayson, Mark
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mathematical Science.
    Briddon, Patrick R.
    School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, University of Newcastle upon Tyne.
    Increased electronic coupling in silicon nanocrystal networks doped with F4-TCNQ2013In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 1035-1038Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The modification of the electronic structure of silicon nanocrystals using an organic dopant, 2,3,5,6- tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F 4-TCNQ), is investigated using first-principles calculations. It is shown that physisorbed F4-TCNQ molecules have the effect of oxidizing the nanocrystal, attracting the charge density towards the F 4-TCNQ-nanocrystal interface, and decreasing the excitation energy of the system. In periodic F4-TCNQ/nanocrystal superlattices, F 4-TCNQ is suggested to enhance exciton separation, and in the presence of free holes, to serve as a bridge for electron/hole transfer between adjacent nanocrystals.

  • 9.
    Coelho, Margarida
    et al.
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro.
    Torrao, Guilhermina
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro.
    Emami, Nazanin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Gracio, Jose
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro.
    Nanotechnology in automotive industry: research strategy and trends for the future – small objects, big impacts2012In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 12, no 8, p. 6621-6630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of this paper is to emphasize and present briefly the nanotechnology science and its potential impact on the automotive industry in order to improve the production of recent models with an optimization of the safety performance and a reduction in the environmental impacts. Nanomaterials can be applied in car bodies as light weight constructions without compromising the stiffness and crashwortiness, which means less material and less fuel consumption. This paper outlines the progress of nanotechnology applications into the safety features of more recent vehicle models and fuel efficiency, but also emphasis the importance of sustainable development on the application of these technologies and life cycle analysis of the considered materials, in order to meet the society trends and customers demands to improve ecology, safety and comfort.

  • 10. Ding, Zong-Ling
    et al.
    Jiang, Jun
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Shu, Hai-Bo
    Chen, Xiao-Shuang
    Lu, Wei
    Effect of Electrodes on Geometric and Transport Properties of the Graphene-Based Nanomolecular Devices2011In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 11, no 12, p. 10778-10781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Graphene-based nanomolecular devices are formed by connecting one of the prototype molecular materials of graphene nanoribbons to two Au electrodes. The geometric structure and electronic properties are calculated by using density functional theory. Basing on the optimized structure and the electronic distributions, we obtain the transport properties of the devices by using the Green's functional method. It is found that that the geometry structures of the molecule and the transport properties are sensitive to the distance between source and drain electrodes. With increasing the distances, the curvature radius of the atomic plane is increased, and the deformation energy is decreased. The current versus voltage curves have almost same threshold voltage with different distances between the electrodes. The transmission probability, the density of states and the external bias voltage play important role in determining the transport properties of the molecular devices.

  • 11. Dispenza, Clelia
    et al.
    Grimaldi, Natascia
    Sabatino, Maria Antonietta
    Soroka, Inna L.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Jonsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Radiation-Engineered Functional Nanoparticles in Aqueous Systems2015In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 3445-3467Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Controlled synthesis of nanoscalar and nanostructured materials enables the development of novel functional materials with fine-tuned optical, mechanical, electronic, magnetic, conductive and catalytic properties that are of use in numerous applications. These materials have also found their potential use in medicine as vehicles for drug delivery, in diagnostics or in combinations thereof. In principle, nanoparticles can be divided into two broad categories, organic and inorganic nanoparticles. For both types of nanoparticles there are numerous possible synthetic routes. Considering the large difference in nature of these materials and the elementary reactions involved in the synthetic routes, most manufacturing techniques are complex and only suitable for one type of particle. Interestingly, radiation chemistry, i.e., the use of ionizing radiation from radioisotopes and accelerators to induce nanomaterials or chemical changes in materials, has proven to be a versatile tool for controlled manufacturing of both organic and inorganic nanoparticles. The advantages of using radiation chemistry for this purpose are many, such as low energy consumption, minimal use of potentially harmful chemicals and simple production schemes. For medical applications one more advantage is that the material can be sterile as manufactured. Radiation-induced synthesis can be carried out in aqueous systems, which minimizes the use of organic solvents and the need for separation and purification of the final product. The radiation chemistry of water is well known, as are the various ways of fine-tuning the reactivity of the system towards a desired target by adding different solutes. This, in combination with the controllable and adjustable irradiation process parameters, makes the technique superior to most other chemical methods. In this review, we discuss the fundamentals of radiation chemistry and radiation-induced synthesis of nanoparticles in aqueous solutions. The impact of dose and dose rate as well as of controlled addition of various solutes on the final particle composition, size and size distribution are described in detail and discussed in terms of reaction mechanism and kinetics.

  • 12. Duan, Haiming
    et al.
    Rosén, Arne
    Harutyunyan, Avetik
    Curtarolo, Stefano
    Bolton, Kim
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Computational studies of small carbon and iron-carbon systems relevant to carbon nanotube growth2008In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 8, no 11, p. 6170-6177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that dimers and longer carbon strings are more stable than individual atoms on Fe(111) surfaces. It is therefore necessary to consider the formation of these species on the metal surfaces and their effect on the mechanism of single-walled nanotube (SWNT) growth. The good agreement between the trends (energies and structures) obtained using DFT and those based on the Brenner and AIREBO models indicate that these analytic models provide adequate descriptions of the supported carbon systems needed for valid molecular dynamics simulations of SWNT growth. In contrast, the AIREBO model provides a better description of the relative energies for isolated carbon species, and this model is preferred over the Brenner potential when simulating SWNT growth in the absence of metal particles. However, the PM3 semiempirical model appears to provide an even better description for these systems and, given sufficient computer resources, direct dynamics methods based on this model may be preferred.

  • 13.
    Fan, Liangdong
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Wang, Chengyang
    Chemical engineering and technology.
    Di, Jin
    Tianjin University, China.
    Chen, Mingming
    Chemical engineering and technology.
    Zhen, Jiaming
    Zhu, Bin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Study of Ceria-Carbonate Nanocomposite Electrolytes for Low-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells2012In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 4941-4945Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Composite and nanocomposite samarium doped ceria-carbonates powders were prepared by solidstatereaction, citric acid-nitrate combustion and modified nanocomposite approaches and used aselectrolytes for low temperature solid oxide fuel cells. X-ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscope,low-temperature Nitrogen Adsorption/desorption Experiments, Electrochemical ImpedanceSpectroscopy and fuel cell performance test were employed in characterization of these materials.All powders are nano-size particles with slight aggregation and carbonates are amorphous incomposites. Nanocomposite electrolyte exhibits much lower impedance resistance and higher ionicconductivity than those of the other electrolytes at lower temperature. Fuel cell using the electrolyteprepared by modified nanocomposite approach exhibits the best performance in the whole operationtemperature range and achieves a maximum power density of 839 mW cm−2 at 600 C withH2 as fuel. The excellent physical and electrochemical performances of nanocomposite electrolytemake it a promising candidate for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

  • 14.
    Farrell, Leo
    et al.
    IMEC.
    Verdonck, Patrick
    IMEC.
    Van Besien, Els
    IMEC.
    Ciofi, Ivan
    IMEC.
    Borrello, Gianpaolo
    IMEC.
    Vanstreels, Kris
    IMEC.
    Mardani, Shabnam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Baklanov, Mikhail R
    IMEC.
    Influence of varying porogen loads and different UV cures on low-kappa film characteristics2011In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 11, no 9, p. 8363-8367Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Hoess, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Thormann, Annika
    Heilmann, Andreas
    Shen, Jinhui
    Tang, Liping
    Karlsson Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Role of Alumina Nanoporosity in Acute Cell Response2011In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 11, no 8, p. 6698-6704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work studied the effect of nanoporous alumina in acute cellular response in an in vivo model. Nanoporous alumina membranes, with pore size diameters of 20 and 200 nm, were fabricated by anodic oxidation of aluminium. The membranes were thereafter characterized in terms of pore size distribution and chemical composition. To evaluate acute inflammatory response, the membranes were implanted in the peritoneal cavity of mice. Cell recruitment to the implant site was determined by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis. Cell adhesion to material surfaces was studied in terms of cell number, type, and morphology using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and immunocytochemical staining followed by fluorescence microscopy. The fabricated nanoporous alumina membranes were found to have narrow pore size distribution. The in vivo study showed that 200 nm alumina membranes induced stronger inflammatory response than 20 nm membranes. This was reflected by the number of implant-associated phagocytes and the number of cells recruited to the implantation site. Since both pore-size membranes possess similar chemical composition, we believe that the observed difference in cell recruitment and adhesion is an effect of the material nanotopography. Our results suggest that nanotopography can be used to subtly control the recruitment and adherence of phagocytic cells during the acute inflammatory response to alumina membranes.

  • 16. Fu, T.
    et al.
    Qin, Hai Yan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Zhejiang-KTH Joint Research Center of Photonics, JORCEP.
    Hu, H. J.
    Hong, Z.
    He, Sailing
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electromagnetic Engineering. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Zhejiang-KTH Joint Research Center of Photonics, JORCEP.
    Aqueous Synthesis and Fluorescence-Imaging Application of CdTe/ZnSe Core/Shell Quantum Dots with High Stability and Low Cytotoxicity2010In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 1741-1746Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CdTe/ZnSe core/shell quantum dots were directly synthesized in an aqueous condition by heating a mixed solution of ZnCl2, NaHSe and CdTe QDs in the presence of mercaptosuccinic acid as a stabilizer. By controlling the size and composition, the CdTe/ZnSe QDs with emission wavelength ranging from 540 to 630 nm, high quantum yield (44%) and narrow full width at half maximum (FWHM) could be obtained. Characterization results with HRTEM, XRD and EDX have shown that the synthesized CdTe/ZnSe ON have good monodispersity and a nice crystal structure, and exhibited better stability and less cytotoxicity as compared with CdTe QDs. Furthermore, luminescent QD-IgG bioprobes were produced to detect the breast cancer marker Her2 on the surface of fixed MCF-7 cancer cells for their optical imaging.

  • 17.
    Fu, Y
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Hu, QH
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Willander, Magnus
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Wave packet transmission in a ZnO nanorod under the influence of repulsive/attractive scattering center2004In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 4, no 02-Jan, p. 91-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study electron wave packet propagation and scattering in ZnO nanorods. By solving the time-dependent three-dimensional Schrodinger equation, we were able to describe propagation and dynamics of the scattering process of the wave packet by ionized impurities. Scattering behavior of the wave packet by an attractive/repulsive scattering center is clearly demonstrated.

  • 18.
    Gao, Zhan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Raza, Rizwan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Zhu, Bin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Mao, Zongqiang
    Electrochemical Characterization on SDC/Na2CO3 Nanocomposite Electrolyte for Low Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells2011In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 5413-5417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our previous work has demonstrated that novel core-shell SDC/Na2CO3 nanocomposite electrolyte possesses great potential for the development of low temperature (300-600 degrees C) solid oxide fuel cells. This work further characterizes the nanocomposite SDC/Na2CO3 electrochemical properties and conduction mechanism. The microstructure of the nanocomposite sintered at different temperatures was analyzed through scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The electrical and electrochemical properties were studied. Significant conductivity enhancement was observed in the H-2 atmosphere compared with that of air atmosphere. The ratiocination of proton conduction rather than electronic conduction has been proposed consequently based on the observation of fuel cell performance. The fuel cell performance with peak power density of 375 mW cm(-2) at 550 degrees C has been achieved. A.C. impedance for the fuel cell under open circuit voltage (OCV) conditions illustrates the electrode polarization process is predominant in rate determination.

  • 19.
    Ghassemali, Ehsan
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Nanoporous Titania-Coated Alumina Membranes: Sol–Gel Synthesis and Characterisation2010In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 10, no 9, p. 6222-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, nanoporous titania top layers were deposited by dip-coating process on microporous α-alumina substrates using the sol–gel process. The alumina substrates were synthesized by slip casting method using Taguchi optimising approach. The microporous substrate was then used to coat nanoporous titania layers by the sol–gel method. The thickness, pore size, structure and permeability of the membranes were characterised using SEM, XRD, STA and Hg-Porosimetry. The process conditions to achieve defect-free nanoporous titania layers with the average pore size of about 4 nm coated on the microporous alumina substrates with the average pore size of about 270 nm were determined.

  • 20.
    Ghassemali, Ehsan
    et al.
    Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology.
    Kermanpur, A.
    Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology.
    Najafizadeh, A.
    Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology.
    Microstructural Evolution in a Low Carbon Steel During Cold Rolling and Subsequent Annealing2010In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 10, no 9, p. 6177-6181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cold rolling with subsequent annealing of lath martensite structure could lead to the formation of nanostructures in low carbon steels. In the present work, the microstructural evolution of a 0.13% C steel during this process was studied. The specimens were austenitized at 950 °C followed by quenching in ice-brine to get martensitic structure. The quenched samples were aged at 200 °C for 30 min. These specimens were cold rolled up to 90% reduction in thickness without any intermediate annealing and then annealed at the temperatures from 400 to 600 °C. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy and color metallography was used to investigate the microstructure. Microscopic investigations showed that a multiphase nanostructure composed of equiaxed ferrite grains with the mean grain size of about 188 nm and small blocks of tempered martensite can be achieved under annealing at 400 °C for 90 min. Formation of the nanostructure was discussed from the viewpoint of characteristics of the martensite starting structure. Fragmentation of martensite lathes in cold rolling stage play an important role on recrystallization at annealing stage to get the ultrafine structure.

  • 21. Gómez de la Torre, Teresa Zardán
    et al.
    Herthnek, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Strømme, Maria
    A Magnetic Nanobead-Based Read-Out Procedure for Rapid Detection of DNA Molecules2017In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 2861-2864Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presented measurement and data analysis procedure reduces the read-out time for the volumeamplified magnetic nanobead detection assay from similar to 30 min to only 2 min, providing fast, sensitive detection of DNA molecules. The molecular detection and amplification protocol was verified using samples containing rolling circle-amplified DNA products formed from synthetic Vibrio cholerae target DNA, with a limit of detection of 5 pM. The developed read-out method could be used to rapidly identify pathogens in a variety of applications including target screening in hospitals with limited resources, in out-patient settings and in the field.

  • 22. Hemmaragala, Nanjundaswamy M
    et al.
    Arvidsson, Per I
    Maguire, Glenn E M
    Kruger, Hendrik G
    Govender, Thavendran
    Interaction of beta-amyloid interactions with peptide functionalized gold nanoparticles.2012In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 2179-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The physicochemical properties of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) functionalized with peptides and N-methylated peptides were studied with respect to their interaction with beta-amyloid (1-42). Peptides with sequences of CGGIGLMVG and CGGGGGIGLMVG linked with GNPs of an average diameter of 13 nm were employed for this study. The peptide-GNPs were found to be soluble and dispersed at pH 7.4 in a sodium phosphate aqueous buffer solution. The resonance spectra of each peptide coated GNP was measured in the absence and presence of beta-amyloid (1-42). The difference in the intensity of the lambda(max) of the resonance absorption bands was attributed to the interaction of the functionalized GNPs with the protein. Particles bearing the CGGGGGIGLMVG sequence exhibited the largest change in lambda(max) intensity; the prevention of fibril formation and inhibition of cytotoxicity was also examined.

  • 23. Hemmaragala, Nanjundaswamy M.
    et al.
    Arvidsson, Per I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Maguire, Glenn E. M.
    Kruger, Hendrik G.
    Govender, Thavendran
    Interaction of beta-Amyloid Interactions with Peptide Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles2012In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 2179-2184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The physicochemical properties of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) functionalized with peptides and N-methylated peptides were studied with respect to their interaction with beta-amyloid (1-42). Peptides with sequences of CGGIGLMVG and CGGGGGIGLMVG linked with GNPs of an average diameter of 13 nm were employed for this study. The peptide-GNPs were found to be soluble and dispersed at pH 7.4 in a sodium phosphate aqueous buffer solution. The resonance spectra of each peptide coated GNP was measured in the absence and presence of beta-amyloid (1-42). The difference in the intensity of the lambda(max) of the resonance absorption bands was attributed to the interaction of the functionalized GNPs with the protein. Particles bearing the CGGGGGIGLMVG sequence exhibited the largest change in lambda(max) intensity; the prevention of fibril formation and inhibition of cytotoxicity was also examined.

  • 24.
    Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Khun, Kimleang
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Potentiometric Biosensor for the Detection of Notch 3 Using Functionalized ZnO Nanorods2014In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 14, no 9, p. 6704-6710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notch signalling plays a vital and radical role for the activity of cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In this study, for the first time a particular biosensor is developed for the detection of notch 3. ZnO nanorods were fabricated on the gold coated glass substrate by hydrothermal method and afterwards were decorated with the gold nanoparticles by electrodepositing technique. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has shown the perpendicular to the substrate growth pattern of ZnO nanorods. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies showed the c-axis oriented growth direction with wurtzite crystal structure of ZnO nanorods. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) techniques have shown the presence of Zn, O and Au atoms in the prepared functional material. Furthermore, the anti-notch 3 was physically adsorbed on the gold nanoparticles functionalized ZnO nanorods. The developed potentiometric immunosensor has shown response to the wide range of notch 3 molecules. The detected range included 1.00 x 10(-5)-1.50 x 10(0) mu g/mL with a sensitivity of 23.15 +/- 0.31 mV/decade. The analytical parameters including reproducibility, stability, and selectivity were also investigated and the observed results indicate the acceptable performance of the notch 3 biosensor. Moreover, the proposed notch 3 biosensor exhibited a fast response time of 10 s.

  • 25.
    Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Khun, Kimleang
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Development of a pH Sensor Using Nanoporous Nanostructures of NiO2014In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 14, no 9, p. 6699-6703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glass is the conventional material used in pH electrodes to monitor pH in various applications. However, the glass-based pH electrode has some limitations for particular applications. The glass sensor is limited in the use of in vivo biomedical, clinical or food applications because of the brittleness of glass, its large size, the difficulty in measuring small volumes and the absence of deformation (inflexibility). Nanostructure-based pH sensors are very sensitive, reliable, fast and applicable towards in vivo measurements. In this study, nanoporous NiO nanostructures are synthesized on a gold-coated glass substrate by a hydrothermal route using poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as a stabilizer. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were used for the morphological and crystalline studies. The grown NiO nanostructures are uniform and dense, and they possess good crystallinity. A pH sensor based on these NiO nanostructures was developed by testing the different pH values from 2-12 of phosphate buffered saline solution. The proposed pH sensor showed robust sensitivity of -43.74 +/- 0.80 mV/pH and a quick response time of less than 10 s. Moreover, the repeatability, reproducibility and stability of the presented pH sensor were also studied.

  • 26.
    Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Khun, Kimleang
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hydrothermal Growth of CuO Nanoleaf Structures, and Their Mercuric Ion Detection Application2014In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 14, no 9, p. 6711-6717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mercury is the hazardous heavy metal ion for the environment and the humanbeing therefore its determination is very important and herein we describe the development of mercury ion sensor on the CuO nanoleaf like nanostructures using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant as template for the growth by hydrothermal growth method. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction study has shown high density and good crystal quality of the fabricated CuO nanostructures respectively. The presented mercury ion sensor has detected the wide range of 1.0 x 10(-7) to 1.0 x 10(-1) M mercury ion concentrations with an acceptable Nernstian behaviour and a sensitivity of 30.1 +/- 0.6 mV/decade. The proposed mercury ion sensor exhibited low detection limit of 1.0 x 10(-8) M and also a fast response time of less than 5 s. In addition, the presented mercury ion sensor has shown an excellent repeatability, reproducibility, stability and selectivity. Moreover, the mercury ion selective electrode based on CuO nanoleaves was tested as an indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration.

  • 27. Jayakumar, Onattu Damodharan
    et al.
    Vinu, Ajayan
    Guduru, K. Veerendra
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Sakuntala, Tyagaraja
    Tyagi, Avesh Kumar
    Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Ce1-xFexO2-delta (x=0.0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15 and 0.20) Nanoparticles Synthesised by Combustion Method2010In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 2299-2303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocrystalline Ce1-xFexO2-delta particles with different Fe concentrations (x = 0.0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, and 0.20) have been prepared by a gel-combustion method. X-ray diffraction data revealed the formation of an impurity free Ce1-xFexO2-delta products up to x = 0.15. This observation is further confirmed from the detailed studies conducted on 10 at.% Fe doped CeO2 using High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) imaging, Selected-Area Electron Diffraction (SAED) and Raman spectroscopy. DC magnetization studies as a function of field and temperature indicate that they are ferromagnetic with Curie temperature (T-c) well above room temperature.

  • 28.
    Jing, Yifu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Qin, Haiying
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Liu, Qinghua
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Singh, Manish
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Zhu, Bin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Synthesis and electrochemical performances of linicuzn oxides as anode and cathode catalyst for low temperature solid oxide fuel cell2012In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 5102-5105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low temperature solid oxide fuel cell (LTSOFC, 300-600 °C) is developed with advantages compared to conventional SOFC (800-1000 °C). The electrodes with good catalytic activity, high electronic and ionic conductivity are required to achieve high power output. In this work, a LiNiCuZn oxides as anode and cathode catalyst is prepared by slurry method. The structure and morphology of the prepared LiNiCuZn oxides are characterized by X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The LiNiCuZn oxides prepared by slurry method are nano Li 0.28Ni 0.72O, ZnO and CuO compound. The nano-crystallites are congregated to form ball-shape particles with diameter of 800-1000 nm. The LiNiCuZn oxides electrodes exhibits high ion conductivity and low polarization resistance to hydrogen oxidation reaction and oxygen reduction reaction at low temperature. The LTSOFC using the LiNiCuZn oxides electrodes demonstrates good cell performance of 1000 mW cm -2 when it operates at 470 °C. It is considered that nano-composite would be an effective way to develop catalyst for LTSOFC.

  • 29.
    Jönsson, Petra E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Physics.
    Effects of Interparticle Interaction in Ferromagnetic Nanoparticle Systems2010In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 10, no 9, p. 6067-6071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of interparticle interaction in ferromagnetic nanoparticle systems is reviewed focusing on metallic nanoparticles in an insulating host. Strong dipolar interparticle interactions may give rise to a superspin glass phase with dynamical properties radically different from the superparamagnetic relaxation displayed by non-interacting or only weakly interacting nanoparticles. Strong exchange coupling in nanoparticle systems with a volume concentration above the threshold for geometrical percolation induces ferromagnetism.

  • 30.
    Kapaklis, Vassilios
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Physics.
    Grammatikopoulos, Spyridon
    Sordan, Roman
    Miranda, Alessio
    Traversi, Floriano
    von Kanei, Hans
    Trachylis, Dimitrios
    Poulopoulos, Panagiotis
    Politis, Constantin
    Nanolithographic Templates Using Diblock Copolymer Films on Chemically Heterogeneous Substrates2010In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 10, no 9, p. 6056-6061Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The orientation of the lamellae formed by the phase separation of symmetric diblock copolymer thin films is strongly affected by the wetting properties of the polymer blocks with respect to the substrate. On bare silicon wafers the lamellae of polystyrene-b-polymethylmethacrylate thin films tend to order parallel to the wafer surface, with the polymethylmethacrylate block preferentially wetting silicon. We have developed a methodology for inducing the arrangement of lamellae perpendicular to the substrate by using chemically modified substrates. This is done by chemisorbing a self-assembled monolayer of thiol-terminated alkane chains on thin gold films deposited on silicon wafers. We also show that it is possible to spatially control the perpendicular orientation of the lamellae at sub-micron length scales by using simple chemical patterns and etch them, in order to produce nanolithographic templates. This method may be of great technological interest for the preparation of well-defined templates using block copolymer thin films.

  • 31.
    Kapaklis, Vassilios
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Physics.
    Pappas, Spiridon D.
    Poulopoulos, Panagiotis
    Trachylis, Dimitrios
    Schweiss, Peter
    Politis, Constantin
    Structure and Magnetic Properties of hcp and fcc Nanocrystalline Thin Ni Films and Nanoparticles Produced by Radio Frequency Magnetron Sputtering2010In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 10, no 9, p. 6024-6028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the growth of thin Ni films by radio frequency magnetron sputtering in Ar-plasma. The growth temperature was about 350 K and the films were deposited on various substrates such as glass, silicon, sapphire and alumina. The thickness of the thinnest films was estimated by the appearance of Kiessig fringes up to about 2 theta = 8 degrees in the small-angle X-ray diffraction pattern, as expected for high-quality atomically-flat thin films. With the help of this, a quartz balance system was calibrated and used for measuring the thickness of thicker samples with an accuracy of better than 5%. Structural characterization via X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed an Ar-gas pressure window, where single phase hcp Ni films may be grown. The magnetic response of the Ni films was checked at room temperature via a newly established and fully automatic polar magneto-optic Kerr effect magnetometer. The hcp films show no magnetic response. Interestingly, the magnetic saturation field of fcc films deposited at low Ar pressure is comparable to the one of bulk Ni, while the one of fcc films deposited at high Ar pressures is decreased, revealing the presence of residual strain in the films. Finally, it is shown that it is possible to form films which contain magnetic Ni fcc nanoparticles in a non-magnetic hcp matrix, i.e., a system interesting for technological applications demanding a single Ni target for its production.

  • 32.
    Karimipour, Masoud
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Physics.
    Wikberg, J. Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Shahtahmasebi, Nasser
    Abad, Mahmood Rezaee Rokn
    Bagheri-Mohagheghi, M. M.
    Svedlindh, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Effect of Annealing Temperature on the Structural and Magnetic Properties of Co-Doped TiO2 Nanoparticles via Complex-Polymer Sol-Gel Method2012In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 950-954Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Co-doped TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized via non hydrous complex-polymer sol gel method. A series of Co-x:Ti1-xO2 samples with x = 0.01, 0.03, 0.05, 0.08 and 0.10, were prepared and subsequently annealed at 400 degrees, 600 degrees and 800 degrees C. Structural and magnetic properties of Co-x:Ti1-xO2 have been studied by means of X-ray diffraction and DC magnetometry. All samples annealed at 400 degrees C show a paramagnetic behavior with an average grain size of 11 nm. With increasing annealing temperatures a complete crystallization is seen with growth of the cluster size up to 31 nm with clear evidence of a presence of CoTiO3. For all concentrations and annealing conditions no sign of a metallic phase, even at x = 0.10, is seen.

  • 33.
    Khun, Kimleang
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mansor, N. A.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    An Electrochemical Dopamine Sensor Based on the ZnO/CuO Nanohybrid Structures2014In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 14, no 9, p. 6646-6652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The selective detection of dopamine (DA) is of great importance in the modern medicine because dopamine is one of the main regulators in human behaviour. In this study, ZnO/CuO nanohybrid structures, grown on the gold coated glass substrate, have been investigated as a novel electrode material for the electrochemical detection of dopamine. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques were used for the material characterization and the obtained results are in good agreement. The selective determination of dopamine was demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometric experiments. The amperometric response was linear for dopamine concentrations between 1.0 x 10(-3) and 8.0 mM with a sensitivity of 90.9 mu A mM(-1) cm(-2). The proposed dopamine biosensor is very stable, selective over common interferents as glucose, uric acid and ascorbic acid, and also good reproducibility was observed for seven electrodes. Moreover, the dopamine sensor exhibited a fast response time of less than 10 s. The wide range and acceptable sensitivity of the presented dopamine sensor provide the possible application in analysing the dopamine from the real samples.

  • 34.
    Khun, Kimleang
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Danielsson, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Selective Potentiometric Copper (II) Ion Sensor Based on the Functionalized ZnO Nanorods2014In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 14, no 9, p. 6723-6731Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, ZnO nanorods were hydrothermally grown on the gold-coated glass substrate and characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The ZnO nanorods were functionalized by two different approaches and performance of the sensor electrode was monitored. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was carried out for the confirmation of interaction between the ionophore molecules and ZnO nanorods. In addition to this, the surface of the electrode was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showing the chemical and electronic state of the ionophore and ZnO nanorod components. The ionophore solution was prepared in the stabilizer, poly vinyl chloride (PVC) and additives, and then functionalized on the ZnO nanorods that have shown the Nernstian response with the slope of 31 mV/decade. However, the Cu2+ ion sensor was fabricated only by immobilizing the selective copper ion ionophore membrane without the use of PVC, plasticizers, additives and stabilizers and the sensor electrode showed a linear potentiometric response with a slope of 56.4 mV/decade within a large dynamic concentration range (from 1.0 x 10(-6) to 1.0 x 10(-1) M) of copper (II) nitrate solutions. The sensor showed excellent repeatability and reproducibility with response time of less than 10 s. The negligible response to potentially interfering metal ions such as calcium (Ca2+), magnesium (Mg2+), potassium (K+), iron (Fe3+), zinc (Zn2+), and sodium (Na+) allows this sensor to be used in biological studies. It may also be used as an indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration.

  • 35.
    Kukli, Kaupo
    et al.
    University of Helsinki.
    Kemell, Marianna
    University of Helsinki.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Riedel, Stefan
    Fraunhofer Centre for Nanoelect Technology.
    Sundqvist, Jonas
    Fraunhofer Centre Nanoelect Technology.
    Ritala, Mikko
    University of Helsinki.
    Leskela, Markku
    University of Helsinki.
    Atomic Layer Deposition of Ruthenium Films on Strontium Titanate2011In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 11, no 9, p. 8378-8382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atomic layer deposition of ruthenium on SrTiO(3) layers was investigated using (C(2)H(5)C(5)H(4)) center dot (NC(4)H(4))Ru and air as precursors. For comparison, the growth was studied also on ZrO(2) films and SiO(2)/Si surfaces. Deposition temperature was 325 degrees C. Using rather short but intense air pulses, smooth and uniform Ru films were deposited on SrTiO(3). The films were crystallized at early stages of the growth. The nucleation density and rate on SrTiO(3) were notably lower compared to that on ZrO(2) and SiO(2), but the physical qualities including the film conductivity were considerably enhanced after reaching Ru film thickness around 10 nm.

  • 36. Kurtan, U.
    et al.
    Amir, Md.
    Baykal, A.
    Sozeri, H.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Magnetically Recyclable Fe3O4@His@Cu Nanocatalyst for Degradation of Azo Dyes2016In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 2548-2556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fe3O4@His@Cu magnetic recyclable nanocatalyst (MRCs) was synthesized by reflux method using L-histidine as linker. The composition, structure and magnetic property of the product were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). Powder XRD, FTIR and EDAX results confirmed that the as-synthesized products has Fe3O4 with spinel structure and Cu nanoparticles with moderate crystallinity without any other impurities. The surface of the Fe3O4@His nanocomposite was covered by tiny Cu nanoparticles. We examine the catalytic activity of Fe3O4@His@Cu MRCs for the degradation of two azo dyes, methyl orange (MO) and methylene blue (MB) as well as their mixture. The reusability of the nanocatalyst was good and sustained even after 3 cycles. Therefore this innovated Fe3O4@His@Cu MRCs has a potential to be used for purification of waste water.

  • 37.
    Li, Junxin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry.
    Chajara, Khalil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry.
    Lindgren, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry.
    Grennberg, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry.
    Rapid Acid-Mediated Purification of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Homogenization of Bulk Properties2007In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 7, no 4-5, p. 1525-1529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A rapid, mild and readily scaleable method for purification and isolation of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) using aqueous nitric acid that, in only 1-2 hours at reflux temperature, not only decrease the content of residual metal particles but also the relative ratio of small diameter and metallic NTs. The acid-treated SWNTs have been characterised by TEM, FT-IR, and Raman spectroscopy (514 and 783 cm-1). The results are discussed in relation to observations from other acid-mediated treatments and the reactive chemical species involved at different conditions.

  • 38.
    Li, Shanghua
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Microelectronics and Applied Physics, MAP.
    Liang, Yibin
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Microelectronics and Applied Physics, MAP.
    Qin, Jian
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Microelectronics and Applied Physics, MAP.
    Toprak, Muhammet
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Microelectronics and Applied Physics, MAP.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Microelectronics and Applied Physics, MAP.
    Template electrodeposition of ordered bismuth telluride nanowire arrays2009In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 1543-1547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermoelectric bismuth telluride nanowire arrays have been synthesized by direct-current electrodeposition into porous anodic alumina membranes both galvanostatically and potentiostatically. The as-synthesized Bi2Te3 nanowire arrays are highly ordered in large area, stoichiometric, uniform, with high aspect ratio (above 100) and high filling ratio (>90%) of the membrane. The effects of different electrochemical deposition parameters on crystal structures, morphology and composition have been investigated. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been used to characterize the physical and chemical properties of the nanowires.

  • 39.
    Li, Shanghua
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Zhang, Shuo
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    He, Zeming
    Toprak, Muhammet
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Stiewe, Christian
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Mueller, Eckhard
    Novel Solution Route Synthesis of Low Thermal Conductivity Nanocrystalline Bismuth Telluride2010In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 10, no 11, p. 7658-7662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel synthesis approach based on a solution route has been developed for the fabrication of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride. The method consists of dissolving both bismuth and tellurium into the same organic solvent with the assistance of complexing agents and one-step coprecipitation of bismuth telluride. The synthesized nanocrystalline bismuth telluride powders possess rhombohedral crystal structure and are nanosheet/nanorod-like with an average size of between 30 and 40 nm. The thermal conductivity of the hot-pressed compact consolidated from the as-synthesized nanopowders is 0.39-0.45 Wm(-1)K(-1) in the temperature range of 323 to 523 K, which is at most one third of that of bulk bismuth telluride-based materials reported in the literature. Such low thermal conductivity of the investigated bismuth telluride is mainly attributed to substantially high concentration of grain boundaries provided by nanostructuring to scatter phonons intensively.

  • 40. Li, Song
    et al.
    Zhu, Bin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Electrochemical Performances of Nanocomposite Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Using Nano-Size Material LaNi0.2Fe0.65Cu0.15O3 as Cathode2009In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 3824-3827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to develop nanocomposite solid oxide fuel cells (NANOCOFCs) at the range of intermediate temperature (500-700 degrees C), the new cathode materials LaNi0.2Fe0.8-xCuxO3 (x = 0.0-0-2) (LNFCu) powders were prepared using coprecipitation method. It was found that the orthorhombic structure could be formed after being calcined at 900 degrees C for 4 h, and the powders were mainly composed of nano-size particles. The lattice volume of LNFCu decreased with increasing x, and the second phase La2CuO4 appeared when x = 0.15. Fuel cells based on the nano-ceramic composite electrolyte were fabricated to evaluate the electrochemical properties of the LNFCu materials as cathodes at different operating temperatures. The peak power density of the fuel cell with LaFe0.65Ni0.2Cu0.15O3 cathode reached 635.2 mW/cm(2) and 762.7 mW/cm(2) at 580 degrees C and 650 degrees C respectively, which were much higher than that of LaFe0.8Ni0.2O3 under the same condition. The results indicate doping with copper improves evidently electrochemical properties of the cathode compared with the LaFe0.8Ni0.2O3 cathode. The excellent performance of fuel cells makes LaNi0.2Fe0.8-xCuxO3 material as the candidate electrode for NANOCOFCs.

  • 41.
    Lim, Eunhee
    et al.
    University of Cambridge, England; Korea Institute Ind Technology KITECH, South Korea.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Schwartz, Erik
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Cornelissen, Jeroen J. L. M.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Nolte, Roeland J. M.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Rowan, Alan E.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Greenham, Neil C.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Do, Lee-Mi
    Elect and Telecommun Research Institute ETRI, South Korea.
    Carbazole Functionalized Isocyanide Brushes in Heterojunction Photovoltaic Devices2012In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 503-507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, carbazole-containing polyisocyanide (PIACz) brushes were used for photovoltaic devices. A photovoltaic device was fabricated on top of the brushes by spin-coating a suitable acceptor and evaporating an Al cathode. Devices with a poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) bulk polymer were also prepared for comparison. Interestingly, the brushes showed better photovoltaic characteristics as compared to the blended PVK system. This is attributed to the specific morphologies of the polyisocyanide brushes, which provide a large interfacial area between the donor and acceptor for efficient photogeneration. It was found that the device performance varied according to the molecular size of the incorporated acceptors.

  • 42. Liu, Li-Hong
    et al.
    Nandamuri, Gopichand
    Solanki, Raj
    Yan, Mingdi
    Portland State University.
    Electrical Properties of Covalently Immobilized Single-Layer Graphene Devices2011In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 1288-1292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arrays of covalently immobilized and aligned graphene ribbons have been successfully prepared on silicon wafers. The effect of covalent modification on the electrical properties of the single-layer graphene was investigated. The effective electron field mobility of the constructed FETs, measured at 2700 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1), was higher than that for graphene film directly deposited on SiO(2), possibly due to lower phonon scattering from the substrate surface, implying that the field effect mobilities may be enhanced with proper choice of substrates. The contact resistance between Cr electrodes and the single-layer graphene ribbon was determined to be 1.62 k Omega from the TLM structures.

  • 43.
    Makarova, Tatiana L.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Shelankov, Aandrei L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Lyubchik, Svetlana B.
    Serenkov, Igor T.
    Sakharov, Vladimir I.
    Induced Ferromagnetism in Helium-Bombarded Graphite2012In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 5051-5053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Irradiation with helium ions is an effective method for triggering ferromagnetism in graphite. Chemical inertness of helium suggests that local magnetic moment formation is determined solely by the intrinsic carbon defects created during the target damage. Interacting moments are located in two places: in the vicinity of the sample surface and near the point of maximum defect generation.

  • 44.
    Noroozi, Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Hamawandi, Bejan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Jayakumar, Ganesh
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Zahmatkesh, Katayoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Radamson, Henry H.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    A comparison of power factor in n and p-type SiGe nanowires for thermoelectric applications2017In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 71, no 3, p. 1622-1626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work presents the thermoelectric properties of n- and p-type doped SiGe nanowires and shows the potential to generate electricity from heat difference over nanowires. The Si0.74Ge0.26 layers were grown by reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition technique on silicon on insulator and were condensed to the final Si0.53Ge0.47 layer with thickness of 52 nm. The nanowires were formed by using sidewall transfer lithography (STL) technique at a targeted width of 60 nm. A high volume of NWs is produced per wafer in a time efficient manner and with high quality using this technique. The results demonstrate high Seebeck coefficient in both n- and p-types SiGe nanowires. N-type SiGe nanowires show significantly higher Seebeck coefficient and power factor compared to p-type SiGe nanowires near room temperature. These results are promising and the devised STL technique may pave the way to apply a Si compatible process for manufacturing SiGe-based TE modules for industrial applications.

  • 45.
    Okoli, Chuka
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Environmental Microbiology. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Fornara, Andrea
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Qin, Jian
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Dalhammar, Gunnel
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Environmental Microbiology.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Rajarao, Gunaratna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Environmental Microbiology.
    Characterization of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Its Application in Protein Purification2011In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 11, no 11, p. 10201-10206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The application of surface modified magnetic adsorbent particles in combination with magnetic separation techniques has received considerable awareness in recent years. There is a particular need in protein purification and analysis for specific, functional and generic methods of protein binding on solid supports. Nanoscale superparamagnetic iron oxide particles have been used to purify a natural coagulant protein extracted from Moringa oleiferaseeds. Spectrophotometric analysis of the coagulant protein was performed using synthetic clay solution as substrate. Protein binding with carboxyl and silica surface modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) were compared with the known carboxyl methyl cellulose (CMC) beads of ∼1 m. SPION modified with carboxyl surface showed higher binding capacity towards the coagulant protein compared to the CMC beads. The high surface area to volume ratio of the carboxyl-coated SPION resulted in high binding capacity and rapid adsorption kinetics of the crude protein extract. The purification and molecular weight of coagulant protein is analyzed by SDS-PAGE. This approach utilizes the most efficient, feasible and economical method of coagulant protein purification and it can also be applicable to other proteins that possess similar properties.

  • 46. Pappas, S. D.
    et al.
    Delimitis, A.
    Kapaklis, Vassilios
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Physics.
    Papaioannou, Evangelos Th.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Physics.
    Poulopoulos, P.
    Trachylis, D.
    Velgakis, M. J.
    Politis, C.
    Natural Nanomorphous Ni/NiO Magnetic Multilayers: Structure and Magnetism of the High-Ar Pressure Series2014In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 14, no 8, p. 6103-6107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural nanomorphous Ni/NiO multilayers have exhibited interesting magnetic properties, such as an unusual positive surface anisotropy and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Most attention has been paid to multilayers prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering under relatively low (3x10(-3) mbar) Ar pressure. Here we report on the correlation between structural and magnetic properties for a new series of multilayers, prepared under relatively high (3x10(-2) mbar) Ar pressure. The crystalline Ni individual layer thickness ranges between 5-8 nm. The amorphous NiO layer thickness is constant, about 1.1 nm thick. X-ray reflectivity showed that in some of the multilayers the high-order Bragg peaks become broader and diminish quickly. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy reveals that this occurs because the first bilayers are formed in accordance to the growth conditions, while the ones near the top are vanished. Despite the deterioration of the interface quality, all samples show tendency for perpendicular magnetic anisotropy even for large bilayer thickness of about 9 nm. Similar tendency is observed even by a 330 nm thick non-multilayered Ni film grown under the same conditions. This observation reveals the important role of strain and magnetoelastic anisotropy as a source of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in the Ni/NiO multilayers.

  • 47. Pappas, S. D.
    et al.
    Grammatikopoulos, S.
    Poulopoulos, P.
    Kapaklis, Vassilios
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Physics.
    Delimitis, A.
    Trachylis, D.
    Politis, C.
    A Cost-Effective Growth of SiOx Thin Films by Reactive Sputtering: Photoluminescence Tuning2011In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 3684-3687Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a new cost-effective method to produce substoichiometric SiO2 thin films by means of a simple sputter-coater operated at a base pressure of 1 x 10(-3) mbar. During sputtering air is introduced through a fine valve so that the sputtering gas is a mixture of air/Ar. High-resolution electron microscopy shows the formation of amorphous SiOx thin films for the as-deposited samples. The index x approaches 1 when the ratio of the partial pressure of air/Ar tends to 0.1. On the other hand, pure silica is formed when the ratio of the partial pressure of air/Ar approaches 0.5. The films in the as-deposited state show intense green yellow photoluminescence. This fades away with short annealing under air at 950 degrees C. If on the other hand, prolonged annealing is performed under Argon atmosphere at 1000 degrees C, red-infrared photoluminescence is recorded due to the formation of Si nanocrystals embedded in SiO2. This simple method could be suitable for the production of thin SiOx films with embedded nanocrystals for optoelectronic or photovoltaic applications.

  • 48.
    Pinto, Helder M.
    et al.
    College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter.
    Palmer, Derek W.
    College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter.
    Jones, R.
    College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter.
    Goss, Jonathan P.G.
    School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, University of Newcastle upon Tyne.
    Briddon, Patrick R.
    School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, University of Newcastle upon Tyne.
    Öberg, Sven
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mathematical Science.
    Ab initio studies of fluorine passivation on the electronic structure of the NV- defect in nanodiamond2012In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 12, no 11, p. 8589-8593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have investigated using density functional theory the effect of fluorine termination of a (001) diamond surface on the electronic energy levels of an NV- centre buried beneath the surface. We find that, like OH termination, fluorine passivates the surface and reduces the influence of the surface on the electronic properties of the NV- centre. The results have significance for the optical properties of NV- defects in nanodiamonds

  • 49. Promnimit, S.
    et al.
    Dutta, Joydeep
    School of Engineering and Technology, Asian Institute of Technology, Thailand.
    Self-organization of colloidal nanoparticles into functional pressure sensing device2012In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 12, no 10, p. 8143-8146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, we report the multilayer thin film device for pressure sensing based on self-organized colloidal nanoparticles through the Layer-by-Layer (LbL) technique. The method in which macromolecules and nanoparticles are self-organized into assemblies to create novel nanostructures is receiving increasing research attention. Nanoparticles based multilayer thin films through the LbL self assembly process relies on electrostatic interaction of charged nanoparticles on flat substrates are reported as an interesting alternative for the fabrication of electronic devices.(3) These electronic devices composed of alternating chitosan capped zinc sulphide nanoparticles layers and citrate stabilized gold nanoparticles layers onto ITO coated glass substrates. The multilayered assemblies, attached to the surface by strong ionic bonds, were highly stable and could not be removed by moderate scratching. The multilayer films can be applied to detect pressure with satisfactory results where the conduction onset voltage decreases linearly with the applied pressure. Current voltage (I-V) characteristics were measured at room temperature in direct current mode in samples grown with varying number of deposition cycles, which are directly related to the number of multilayers grown on the substrate. It is a promising method for the future of pressure sensing device fabrication.

  • 50. Qian, J.
    et al.
    Wang, Y. L.
    Gao, X. W.
    Zhan, Q. Q.
    Xu, Z. P.
    He, Sailing
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electromagnetic Engineering.
    Carboxyl-Functionalized and Bio-Conjugated Silica-Coated Quantum Dots as Targeting Probes for Cell Imaging2010In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 1668-1675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the synthesis of carboxyl-functionalized silica-coated CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) via a reverse microemulsion approach. This facile method does not need to change the solvent phase of the nanoparticles during the synthesis process, and requires no other reaction condition such as high temperature or inertia atmosphere. The synthesized nanoparticles have many advantages, such as mono-dispersed and stable in aqueous solution, minimal non-specific targeting, and more direct and cost-effective for bio-conjugation. The carboxyl functionalized nanoparticles were further conjugated with apo-transferrin for receptor-mediated targeting in cancer cell lines. In vitro experiments have revealed that the cellular uptake of Tf-conjugated nanoparticles was significantly higher than that of (only-)carboxyl functionalized nanoparticles in HeLa cells, which are well known to over-express the transferrin-receptor. The bio-conjugated nanoparticles are potentially useful as efficient probes for bio-diagnosis, both in vitro and in vivo.

12 1 - 50 of 78
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf