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  • 1.
    Abdellah, Mohamed
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry. South Valley Univ, Qena Fac Sci, Dept Chem, Qena 83523, Egypt..
    El-Zohry, Ahmed M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Antila, Liisa J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Windle, Christopher D.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Chem, Christian Doppler Lab Sustainable SynGas Chem, Lensfield Rd, Cambridge CB2 1EW, England..
    Reisner, Erwin
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Chem, Christian Doppler Lab Sustainable SynGas Chem, Lensfield Rd, Cambridge CB2 1EW, England..
    Hammarström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Time-Resolved IR Spectroscopy Reveals a. Mechanism with TiO2 as a Reversible Electron Acceptor in a TiO2-Re Catalyst System for CO2 Photoreduction2017In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 139, no 3, p. 1226-1232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Attaching the phosphonated molecular catalyst [(ReBr)-Br-I(bpy)-(CO)(3)](0) to the wide-bandgap semiconductor TiO2 strongly enhances the rate of visible-light-driven reduction of CO2 to CO in dimethylformamide with triethanolamine (TEOA) as sacrificial electron donor. Herein, we show by transient mid-IR spectroscopy that the mechanism of catalyst photoreduction is initiated by ultrafast electron injection into TiO2, followed by rapid (ps-ns) and sequential two-electron oxidation of TEOA that is coordinated to the Re center. The injected electrons can be stored in the conduction band of TiO2 on an ms-s time scale, and we propose that they lead to further reduction of the Re catalyst and completion of the catalytic cycle. Thus, the excited Re catalyst gives away one electron and would eventually get three electrons back. The function of an electron reservoir would represent a role for TiO2 in photocatalytic CO2 reduction that has previously not been considered. We propose that the increase in photocatalytic activity upon heterogenization of the catalyst to TiO2 is due to the slow charge recombination and the high oxidative power of the Re-II species after electron injection as compared to the excited MLCT state of the unbound Re catalyst or when immobilized on ZrO2, which results in a more efficient reaction with TEOA.

  • 2.
    Abelein, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Jarvet, Jüri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. The National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Estonia.
    Barth, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Danielsson, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ionic Strength Modulation of the Free Energy Landscape of A beta(40) Peptide Fibril Formation2016In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 138, no 21, p. 6893-6902Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein misfolding and formation of cross-beta structured amyloid fibrils are linked to, many neurodegenerative disorders. Although recently developed,quantitative approaches have started to reveal the molecular nature of self-assembly and fibril formation of proteins and peptides, it is yet unclear how these self-organization events are precisely modulated by microenvironmental factors, which are known to strongly affect the macroscopic aggregation properties. Here, we characterize the explicit effect of ionic strength on the microscopic aggregation rates of amyloid beta peptide (A beta 40) self-association, implicated in Alzheimer's disease. We found that physiological ionic strength accelerates A beta 40 aggregation kinetics by promoting surface-catalyzed secondary nucleation reactions. This promoted catalytic effect can be assigned to shielding of electrostatic repulsion between Monomers on the fibril surface or between the fibril surface itself and monomeric peptides. Furthermore, we observe the formation of two different beta-structured states with =similar but distinct spectroscopic features, which can be assigned to an off-pathway immature state (F-beta*) and a mature stable State (F-beta), where salt favors formation of the F-beta fibril morphology. Addition of salt to preformed F-beta* accelerates transition to F-beta, underlining the dynamic nature of A beta 40 fibrils in solution. On the basis of,these results we suggest a model where salt decreases the free-energy barrier for A beta 40 folding to the F-beta state, favoring the buildup of the mature fibril morphology while omitting competing, energetically less favorable structural states.

  • 3.
    Abrahamsson, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, För teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten gemensamma enheter, Accelerator mass spectrometry group. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science.
    Jäger, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science.
    Kumar, Rohan J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science.
    Österman, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Quantum Chemistry.
    Persson, Petter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Quantum Chemistry.
    Becker, Hans-Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science.
    Johansson, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Quantum Chemistry.
    Hammarström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science.
    Bistridentate Ruthenium(II)polypyridyl-Type Complexes with Microsecond 3MLCT State Lifetimes: Sensitizers for Rod-Like Molecular Arrays2008In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 130, no 46, p. 15533-15542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of bistridentate ruthenium(II) polypyridyl-type complexes based on the novel 2,6-di(quinolin-8-yl)pyridine (dqp) ligand have been synthesized and their photophysical properties have been studied. The complexes are amenable to substitution in the 4-position of the central pyridine with conserved quasi-C2v symmetry, which allows for extension to isomer-free, rod-like molecular arrays for vectorial control of electron and energy transfer. DFT calculations performed on the parent [Ru(dqp) 2](2+) complex (1) predicted a more octahedral structure than in the typical bistridentate complex [Ru(tpy)2](2+) (tpy is 2,2':6',2"-terpyridine) thanks to the larger ligand bite angle, which was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. A strong visible absorption band, with a maximum at 491 nm was assigned to a metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) transition, based on time-dependent DFT calculations. 1 shows room temperature emission (Phi = 0.02) from its lowest excited ((3)MLCT) state that has a very long lifetime (tau = 3 micros). The long lifetime is due to a stronger ligand field, because of the more octahedral structure, which makes the often dominant activated decay via short-lived metal-centered states insignificant also at elevated temperatures. A series of complexes based on dqp with electron donating and/or accepting substituents in the 4-position of the pyridine was prepared and the properties were compared to those of 1. An unprecedented (3)MLCT state lifetime of 5.5 micros was demonstrated for the homoleptic complex based on dqpCO2Et. The favorable photosensitizer properties of 1, such as a high extinction coefficient, high excited-state energy and long lifetime, and tunable redox potentials, are maintained upon substitution. In addition, the parent complex 1 is shown to be remarkably photostable and displays a high reactivity in light-induced electron and energy transfer reactions with typical energy and electron acceptors and donors: methylviologen, tetrathiofulvalene, and 9,10-diphenylanthracene. This new class of complexes constitutes a promising starting point for the construction of linear, rod-like molecular arrays for photosensitized reactions and applications in artificial photosynthesis and molecular electronics.

  • 4.
    Abrahamsson, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, För teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten gemensamma enheter, Accelerator mass spectrometry group. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science.
    Jäger, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science.
    Österman, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Quantum Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Persson, Petter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Quantum Chemistry.
    Becker, Hans-Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science.
    Johansson, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science.
    Hammarström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science.
    A 3.0 mu s room temperature excited state lifetime of a bistridentate Ru-II-polypyridine complex for rod-like molecular arrays2006In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 128, no 39, p. 12616-12617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A bistridentate RuII-polypyridine complex [Ru(bqp)2]2+ (bqp = 2,6-bis(8'-quinolinyl)pyridine) has been prepared, which has a coordination geometry much closer to a perfect octahedron than the typical Ru(terpyridine)2-type complex. Thus, the complex displays a 3.0 mus lifetime of the lowest excited metal-to-ligand charge transfer (3MLCT) state at room temperature. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the longest MLCT state lifetime reported for a RuII-polypyridyl complex at room temperature. The structure allows for the future construction of rod-like, isomer-free molecular arrays by substitution of donor and acceptor moieties on the central pyridine units. This makes it a promising photosensitizer for applications in molecular devices for artificial photosynthesis and molecular electronics.

  • 5.
    Acharya, P
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Bioorganic Chemistry.
    Cheruku, P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Bioorganic Chemistry.
    Chatterjee, Sunanda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Bioorganic Chemistry.
    Karthick Babu, S
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Bioorganic Chemistry.
    Acharya, S
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Bioorganic Chemistry.
    Measurement of nucleobase pKa values in model mononucleotides shows RNA-RNA duplexes to be more stable than DNA-DNA duplexes2004In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 126, no 9, p. 2862-2869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To understand why the RNA-RNA duplexes in general has a higher thermodynamic stability over the corresponding DNA-DNA duplexes, we have measured the pK(a) values of both nucleoside 3',5'-bis-ethyl phosphates [Etp(d/rN)pEt] and nucleoside 3'-ethyl phosphates [(d/rN)pEt] (N = A, G, C, or T/U), modeling as donors and acceptors of base pairs in duplexes. While the 3',5'-bis-phosphates, Etp(d/rN)pEt, mimic the internucleotidic monomeric units of DNA and RNA, in which the stacking contribution is completely absent, the 3'-ethyl phosphates, (d/rN)pEt, mimic the nucleotide at the 5'-end. The pK(a) values of the nucleobase in each of these model nucleoside phosphates have been determined with low pK(a) error (sigma = +/-0.01 to 0.02) by (1)H NMR (at 500 MHz) with 20-33 different pH measurements for each compound. This study has led us to show the following: (1) All monomeric DNA nucleobases are more basic than the corresponding RNA nucleobases in their respective Etp(d/rN)pEt and (d/rN)pEt. (2) The pK(a) values of the monomeric nucleotide blocks as well as Delta pK(a) values between the donor and acceptor can be used to understand the relative base-pairing strength in the oligomeric duplexes in the RNA and DNA series. (3) The Delta G*(pKa) of the donor and acceptor of the base pair in duplexes enables a qualitative dissection of the relative strength of the base-pairing and stacking in the RNA-RNA over the DNA-DNA duplexes. (4) It is also found that the relative contribution of base-pairing strength and nucleobase stacking in RNA-RNA over DNA-DNA is mutually compensating as the % A-T/U content increases or decreases. This interdependency of stacking and hydrogen bonding can be potentially important in the molecular design of the base-pair mimics to expand the alphabet of the genetic code.

  • 6.
    Acharya, Parag
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Bioorganic Chemistry.
    Acharya, Sandipta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Bioorganic Chemistry.
    Cheruku, P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Bioorganic Chemistry.
    Amirkhanov, N. V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Bioorganic Chemistry.
    Földesi, A
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Bioorganic Chemistry.
    Chattopadhyaya, J
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Bioorganic Chemistry.
    Cross-Modulation of the pKa of Nucleobases in a Single-Stranded Hexameric-RNA Due to Tandem Electrostatic Nearest-Neighbor Interactions2003In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 125, no 33, p. 9948-9961Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pH titration studies (pH 6.7-12.1) in a series of dimeric, trimeric, tetrameric, pentameric, and hexameric oligo-RNA molecules [GpA (2a), GpC (3a), GpApC (5), GpA(1)pA(2)pC (6), GpA(1)pA(2)pA(3)pC (7), GpA(1)pA(2)pA(3)pA(4)pC (8)] have shown that the pK(a) of N(1)-H of 9-guaninyl could be measured not only from its own deltaH8G, but also from the aromatic marker protons of other constituent nucleobases. The relative chemical shift differences [Deltadelta((N)(-)(D))] between the protons in various nucleotide residues in the oligo-RNAs at the neutral (N) and deprotonated (D) states of the guanine moiety show that the generation of the 5'-(9-guanylate ion) in oligo-RNAs 2-8 reduces the stability of the stacked helical RNA conformation owing to the destabilizing anion(G(-))-pi/dipole(Im(delta)(-)) interaction. This destabilizing effect in the deprotonated RNA is, however, opposed by the electrostatically attractive atom-pisigma (major) as well as the anion(G(-))-pi/dipole(Py(delta)(+)) (minor) interactions. Our studies have demonstrated that the electrostatically repulsive anion(G(-))-pi/dipole(Im(delta)(-)) interaction propagates from the first to the third nucleobase quite strongly in the oligo-RNAs 6-8, causing destacking of the helix, and then its effect is gradually reduced, although it is clearly NMR detectable along the RNA chain. Thus, such specific generation of a charge at a single nucleobase moiety allows us to explore the relative strength of stacking within a single-stranded helix. The pK(a) of 5'-Gp residue from its own deltaH8G in the hexameric RNA 8 is found to be 9.76 +/- 0.01; it, however, varies from 9.65 +/- 0.01 to 10.5 +/- 0.07 along the RNA chain as measured from the other marker protons (H2, H8, H5, and H6) of 9-adeninyl and 1-cytosinyl residues. This nucleobase-dependent modulation of pK(a)s (DeltapK(a) +/- 0.9) of 9-guaninyl obtained from other nucleobases in the hexameric RNA 8 represents a difference of ca. 5.1 kJ mol(-)(1), which has been attributed to the variable strength of electrostatic interactions between the electron densities of the involved atoms in the offset stacked nucleobases as well as with that of the phosphates. The chemical implication of this variable pK(a) for guanin-9-yl deprotonation as obtained from all other marker protons of each nucleotide residue within a ssRNA molecule is that it enables us to experimentally understand the variation of the electronic microenvironment around each constituent nucleobase along the RNA chain in a stepwise manner with very high accuracy without having to make any assumption. This means that the pseudoaromaticity of neighboring 9-adeninyl and next-neighbor nucleobases within a polyanionic sugar-phosphate backbone of a ssRNA can vary from one case to another due to cross-modulation of an electronically coupled pi system by a neighboring nucleobase. This modulation may depend on the sequence context, spatial proximity of the negatively charged phosphates, as well as whether the offset stacking is ON or OFF. The net outcome of this electrostatic interaction between the neighbors is creation of new sequence-dependent hybrid nucleobases in an oligo- or polynucleotide whose properties are unlike the monomeric counterpart, which may have considerable biological implications.

  • 7.
    Acharya, Sandipta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Bioorganic Chemistry.
    Barman, Jharna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Bioorganic Chemistry.
    Cheruku, Pradeep
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Bioorganic Chemistry.
    Chatterjee, Subhrangsu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Bioorganic Chemistry.
    Acharya, Parag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Bioorganic Chemistry.
    Isaksson, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Bioorganic Chemistry.
    Chattopadhyaya, Jyoti
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Bioorganic Chemistry.
    Significant pKa Perturbation of Nucleobases Is an Intrinsic Property of the Sequence Context in DNA and RNA2004In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 126, no 28, p. 8674-8681Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Ahlquist, Mårten
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Fabrizi, Giancarlo
    Cacchi, Sandro
    Norrby, Per-Ola
    Technical Univeristy of Denmark.
    The mechanism of the phosphine-free palladium-catalyzed hydroarylation of alkynes2006In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 128, no 39, p. 12785-12793Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanism of the Pd-catalyzed hydroarylation and hydrovinylation reaction of alkynes has been studied by a combination of experimental and theoretical methods (B3LYP), with an emphasis on the phosphine-free version. The regioselectivity of the hydroarylation and hydrovinylation shows unexpected differences, which could be attributed mainly to the higher steric demand of the cyclohexenyl group as compared to the phenyl group. Hydroarylation of alpha,beta-acetylenic carbonyl substrates yields a very unusual anti-Michael selectivity, which is shown to result from reaction of the nonconjugated double bond, leaving the conjugation intact. In all cases were the regioselectivities reproduced by the calculations.

  • 9.
    Ahlquist, Mårten
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark.
    Nielsen, Robert J.
    Periana, Roy A.
    Goddard, William A., III
    Product Protection, the Key to Developing High Performance Methane Selective Oxidation Catalysts2009In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 131, no 47, p. 17110-17115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Selective, direct conversion of methane to methanol might seem an impossible task since the C-H bond energy of methane is 105 kcal mol(-1) compared to the C-H bond energy for methanol of 94. We show here that the Catalytica catalyst is successful because the methanol is protected as methyl bisulfate, which is substantially less reactive than methanol toward the catalyst. This analysis suggests a limiting performance for systems that operate by this type of protection that is well above the Catalytica system.

  • 10.
    Aili, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rydberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nesterenko, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björefors, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baltzer, Lars
    Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, BMC, Box 599, Uppsala UniVersity, SE-751 24 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Folding Induced Assembly of Polypeptide Decorated Gold Nanoparticles2008In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 130, no 17, p. 5780-5788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reversible assembly of gold nanoparticles controlled by the homodimerization and folding of an immobilized de novo designed synthetic polypeptide is described. In solution at neutral pH, the polypeptide folds into a helix–loop–helix four-helix bundle in the presence of zinc ions. When immobilized on gold nanoparticles, the addition of zinc ions induces dimerization and folding between peptide monomers located on separate particles, resulting in rapid particle aggregation. The particles can be completely redispersed by removal of the zinc ions from the peptide upon addition of EDTA. Calcium ions, which do not induce folding in solution, have no effect on the stability of the peptide decorated particles. The contribution from folding on particle assembly was further determined utilizing a reference peptide with the same primary sequence but containing both D and L amino acids. Particles functionalized with the reference peptide do not aggregate, as the peptides are unable to fold. The two peptides, linked to the nanoparticle surface via a cysteine residue located in the loop region, form submonolayers on planar gold with comparable properties regarding surface density, orientation, and ability to interact with zinc ions. These results demonstrate that nanoparticle assembly can be induced, controlled, and to some extent tuned, by exploiting specific molecular interactions involved in polypeptide folding.

  • 11.
    Aili, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rydberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baltzer, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Aggregation-Induced Folding of a de novo Designed Polypeptide Immobilized on Gold Nanoparticles2006In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 128, no 7, p. 2194 -2195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This communication reports the first steps in the construction of a novel, nanoparticle-based hybrid material for biomimetic and biosensor applications. Gold nanoparticles were modified with synthetic polypeptides to enable control of the particle aggregation state in a switchable manner, and particle aggregation was, in turn, found to induce folding of the immobilized peptides.

  • 12. Aili, Daniel
    et al.
    Enander, Karin
    Rydberg, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry II.
    Nesterenko, Irina
    Björefors, Fredrik
    Baltzer, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry II.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Folding Induced Assembly of Polypeptide Decorated Gold Nanoparticles2008In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 130, no 17, p. 5780-5788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reversible assembly of gold nanoparticles controlled by the homodimerization and folding of an immobilized de novo designed synthetic polypeptide is described. In solution at neutral pH, the polypeptide folds into a helix-loop-helix four-helix bundle in the presence of zinc ions. When immobilized on gold nanoparticles, the addition of zinc ions induces dimerization and folding between peptide monomers located on separate particles, resulting in rapid particle aggregation. The particles can be completely redispersed by removal of the zinc ions from the peptide upon addition of EDTA. Calcium ions, which do not induce folding in solution, have no effect on the stability of the peptide decorated particles. The contribution from folding on particle assembly was further determined utilizing a reference peptide with the same primary sequence but containing both D and L amino acids. Particles functionalized with the reference peptide do not aggregate, as the peptides are unable to fold. The two peptides, linked to the nanoparticle surface via a cysteine residue located in the loop region, form submonolayers on planar gold with comparable properties regarding surface density, orientation, and ability to interact with zinc ions. These results demonstrate that nanoparticle assembly can be induced, controlled, and to some extent tuned, by exploiting specific molecular interactions involved in polypeptide folding.

  • 13.
    Alam, Rauful
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Pilarski, Lukasz T.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Pershagen, Elias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Szabo, Kalman J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Stereoselective intermolecular allylic C-H trifluoroacetoxylation of functionalized alkenes2012In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 134, no 21, p. 8778-8781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pd-catalyzed allylic C-H trifluoroacetoxylation of substituted alkenes was performed using PhI(OCOCF3)(2) as the oxidant and acyloxy source. Trifluoroacetoxylation of monosubstituted cyclopentenes and cyclohexenes proceeds with excellent regio- and diastereoselectivity. Studies with one of the possible (eta(3)-allyl)Pd(II) intermediates suggest that the reaction proceeds via stereoselective formation of Pd(IV) intermediates and subsequent stereo- and regioselective reductive elimination of the product.

  • 14.
    Alam, Rauful
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Vollgraff, Tobias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Szabó, Kálmán J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis of Adjacent Quaternary Stereocenters by Catalytic Asymmetric Allylboration2015In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 137, no 35, p. 11262-11265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Allylboration of ketones with gamma-disubstituted allylboronic acids is performed in the presence of chiral BINOL derivatives. The reaction is suitable for single-step creation of adjacent quaternary stereocenters with high selectivity. We show that, with an appropriate choice of the chiral catalyst and the stereoisomeric prenyl substrate, full control of the stereo- and enantioselectivity is possible in the reaction.

  • 15.
    Alonso, Diego A
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Brandt, P
    Nordin, Sofia J M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Andersson, Pher G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Ru(arene)(amino alcohol)-Catalyzed Transfer Hydrogenation of Ketones: Mechanism and Origin of Enantioselectivity1999In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 121, no 41, p. 9580-9588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanism of the Ru(arene)(amino alcohol)-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation of ketones using isopropyl alcohol as the hydrogen source has been studied by means of hybrid density functional methods (B3PW91). Three mechanistic alternatives were evaluated, and it was shown that the reaction takes place via a six-membered transition state, where a metal-bound hydride and a proton of a coordinated amine are transferred simultaneously to the ketone. Further calculations provided a general rationale for the rate of the reaction by comparison of steric effects in the ground and transition states of the ruthenium hydride complex. It was found that the TS has a strong preference for planarity, and this in turn is dependent on the conformational behavior of the O,N-linkage of the amino alcohol ligand. Finally, a general model, rationalizing the enantioselectivity of the reaction, was developed. Experimental studies of both rate and enantioselectivity were used in order to support the computational results.

  • 16. Ames, William
    et al.
    Pantazis, Dimitrios A
    Krewald, Vera
    Cox, Nicholas
    Messinger, Johannes
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Lubitz, Wolfgang
    Neese, Frank
    Theoretical Evaluation of Structural Models of the S(2) State in the Oxygen Evolving Complex of Photosystem II: Protonation States and Magnetic Interactions2011In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 133, no 49, p. 19743-19757Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protonation states of water ligands and oxo bridges are intimately involved in tuning the electronic structures and oxidation potentials of the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in Photosystem II, steering the mechanistic pathway, which involves at least five redox state intermediates S(n) (n = 0-4) resulting in the oxidation of water to molecular oxygen. Although protons are practically invisible in protein crystallography, their effects on the electronic structure and magnetic properties of metal active sites can be probed using spectroscopy. With the twin purpose of aiding the interpretation of the complex electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic data of the OEC and of improving the view of the cluster at the atomic level, a complete set of protonation configurations for the S(2) state of the OEC were investigated, and their distinctive effects on magnetic properties of the cluster were evaluated. The most recent X-ray structure of Photosystem II at 1.9 Å resolution was used and refined to obtain the optimum structure for the Mn(4)O(5)Ca core within the protein pocket. Employing this model, a set of 26 structures was constructed that tested various protonation scenarios of the water ligands and oxo bridges. Our results suggest that one of the two water molecules that are proposed to coordinate the outer Mn ion (Mn(A)) of the cluster is deprotonated in the S(2) state, as this leads to optimal experimental agreement, reproducing the correct ground state spin multiplicity (S = 1/2), spin expectation values, and EXAFS-derived metal-metal distances. Deprotonation of Ca(2+)-bound water molecules is strongly disfavored in the S(2) state, but dissociation of one of the two water ligands appears to be facile. The computed isotropic hyperfine couplings presented here allow distinctions between models to be made and call into question the assumption that the largest coupling is always attributable to Mn(III). The present results impose limits for the total charge and the proton configuration of the OEC in the S(2) state, with implications for the cascade of events in the Kok cycle and for the water splitting mechanism.

  • 17.
    Amft, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Edvinsson, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Skorodumova, Natalia V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Thermally Excited Vibrations in Copper, Silver, and Gold Trimers and Enhanced Binding of CO2010In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18. Andersen, Thomas L.
    et al.
    Friis, Stig D.
    Audrain, Helene
    Nordeman, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Antoni, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Skrydstrup, Troels
    Efficient C-11-Carbonylation of Isolated Aryl Palladium Complexes for PET: Application to Challenging Radiopharmaceutical Synthesis2015In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 137, no 4, p. 1548-1555Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the successful implementation of palladium-aryl oxidative addition complexes as stoichiometric reagents in carbonylation reactions with (CO)-C-11 to produce structurally challenging, pharmaceutically relevant compounds. This method enables the first C-11-carbonyl labeling of an approved PET tracer, [C-11]raclopride, for the dopamine D2/D3 receptor by carbonylation with excellent radiochemical purity and yield. Two other molecules, [C-11]olaparib and [C-11]JNJ 31020028, were efficiently labeled in this manner. The technique distinguishes itself from existing methods by the markedly improved purity profiles of the tracer molecules produced and provides access to complex structures in synthetically useful yields, hereby offering a viable alternative to other C-11-labeling strategies.

  • 19.
    Andersson, August
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mäler, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Magnetic resonance investigations of lipid motion in isotropic bicelles2005In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 21, no 7, p. 7702-7709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dynamics of DMPC in different isotropic bicelles have been investigated by NMR and EPR methods. The local dynamics were obtained by interpretation of 13C NMR relaxation measurements of DMPC in the bicelles, and these results were compared to EPR spectra of spin-labeled lipids. The overall size of the bicelles was investigated by PFG NMR translational diffusion measurements. The dynamics and relative sizes were compared among three different bicelles: [DMPC]/[DHPC] = 0.25, [DMPC]/[DHPC] = 0.5, and [DMPC]/[CHAPS] = 0.5. The local motion is found to depend much more strongly on the choice of the detergent, rather than the overall size of the bicelle. The results provide an explanation for differences in apparent dynamics for different peptides, which are bound to bicelles. This in turn determines under what conditions reasonable NMR spectra can be observed. A model is presented in which extensive local motion, in conjunction with the overall size, affects the spectral properties. An analytical expression for the size dependence of the bicelles, relating the radius of the bilayer region with physical properties of the detergent and the lipid, is also presented.

  • 20.
    Andersson, Charlotta S.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Öhrström, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Popović-Bijelić, Ana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Stenmark, Pål
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Högbom, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    The manganese ion of the heterodinuclear Mn/Fe cofactor in Chlamydia trachomatis ribonucleotide reductase R2c is located at metal position 1.2012In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 134, no 1, p. 123-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The essential catalytic radical of Class-I ribonucleotide reductase is generated and delivered by protein R2, carrying a dinuclear metal cofactor. A new R2 subclass, R2c, prototyped by the Chlamydia trachomatis protein was recently discovered. This protein carries an oxygen-activating heterodinuclear Mn(II)/Fe(II) metal cofactor and generates a radical-equivalent Mn(IV)/Fe(III) oxidation state of the metal site, as opposed to the tyrosyl radical generated by other R2 subclasses. The metal arrangement of the heterodinuclear cofactor remains unknown. Is the metal positioning specific, and if so, where is which ion located? Here we use X-ray crystallography with anomalous scattering to show that the metal arrangement of this cofactor is specific with the manganese ion occupying metal position 1. This is the position proximal to the tyrosyl radical site in other R2 proteins and consistent with the assumption that the high-valent Mn(IV) species functions as a direct substitute for the tyrosyl radical.

  • 21.
    Andersson, Ida E.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Batsalova, Tsvetelina
    Medical Inflammation Research, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet.
    Haag, Sabrina
    Medical Inflammation Research, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet.
    Dzhambazov, Balik
    Medical Inflammation Research, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet.
    Holmdahl, Rikard
    Medical Inflammation Research, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet.
    Kihlberg, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Linusson, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    (E)-Alkene and Ethylene Isosteres Substantially Alter the Hydrogen-Bonding Network in Class II MHC Aq/Glycopeptide Complexes and Affect T-Cell Recognition2011In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 133, no 36, p. 14368-14378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structural basis for antigen presentation by class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins to CD4(+) T-cells is important for understanding and possibly treating autoimmune diseases. In the work described in this paper, (E)-alkene and ethylene amide-bond isosteres were used to investigate the effect of removing hydrogen-bonding possibilities from the CII259-270 glycopeptide, which is bound by the arthritis-associated murine A(q) class II MHC protein. The isostere-modified glycopeptides showed varying and unexpectedly large losses of A(q) binding that could be linked to the dynamics of the system. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations revealed that the backbone of CII259-270 and the A(q) protein are able to form up to 11 hydrogen bonds, but fewer than this number are present at any one time. Most of the strong hydrogen-bond interactions were formed by the N-terminal part of the glycopeptide, i.e., in the region where the isosteric replacements were made. The structural dynamics also revealed that hydrogen bonds were strongly coupled to each other; the loss of one hydrogen-bond interaction had a profound effect on the entire hydrogen-bonding network. The A(q) binding data revealed that an ethylene isostere glycopeptide unexpectedly bound more strongly to A(q) than the corresponding (E)-alkene, which is in contrast to the trend observed for the other isosteres. Analysis of the MD trajectories revealed that the complex conformation of this ethylene isostere was structurally different and had an altered molecular interaction pattern compared to the other A(q)/glycopeptide complexes. The introduced amide-bond isosteres also affected the interactions of the glycopeptide/A(q) complexes with T-cell receptors. The dynamic variation of the patterns and strengths of the hydrogen-bond interactions in the class II MHC system is of critical importance for the class II MHC/peptide/TCR signaling system.

  • 22.
    Andrén, Oliver C. J.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Fernandes, Aristi P.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Heterogeneous Rupturing Dendrimers2017In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Utilizing macromolecular scaffolds as templates for the production of small molecules that are distinctively different from the original monomer feedstock has many potential applications. Herein, as a proof-of-concept, a family of dendrimers displaying internally queued disulfide bridges were synthesized and exploited as flawless macromolecular templates that selectively rupture into a set of monomeric mercaptans. Disassembly was accomplished in a reducing environment, using DTT as an external stimulus, and the thiol constituents were successfully isolated. Their composition was dictated by three dendritic regions, i.e., (i) the symmetrical trithiol of the core (C3), (ii) the interior-asymmetric trithiols (CD2), and (iii) the periphery-asymmetric monothiols (DB2), in which B functionality is of an orthogonal nature. Taking into account the steady state between disulfides and thiols in all living cells, the collapse of the dendrimers to a multitude of smaller thiols was intracellularly assessed as a means to disrupt the balance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) often elevated in cancer cells. Indeed, the fragmentation induced a significant increase of ROS in human lung carcinoma A549 cells. These findings can potentially alter the perception of dendrimers being limited to carriers to being prodrugs for intracellular delivery of ROS with the potential to fight cancer.

  • 23.
    Atluri, Rambabu
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Garcia-Bennett, Alfonso
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Hedin, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Nonsurfactant Supramolecular Synthesis of Ordered Mesoporous Silica2009In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 131, no 9, p. 3189-3191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hoogsteen-bonded tetrads and pentamers are formed by a large variety of organic molecules through H-donor and acceptor groups capable of inducing self-organization to form columnar and hexagonal mesophases. The biological importance of such macromolecular structures is exemplified by the assembly of guanosine-rich groups of telomere units and their implication in chromosomal replication. Folic acid is composed of a pterin group, chemically and structurally similar to guanine, conjugated to an l-glutamate moiety via a p-amino benzoic acid. Our aim has been to develop a delivery vehicle for folic acid and at the same time provide a novel synthetic route for ordered mesoporous materials without the use of amphiphilic surfactants. We present a new nonsurfactant route for the synthesis of highly ordered mesoporous materials, based on the supramolecular templating of stacked arrays of the tetramer-forming pterin groups of folic acid under a variety of synthetic conditions. This method leads to hexagonally ordered mesoporous structures with gyroid, spherical, and chiral morphologies with pores on the order of 25−30 Å in diameter and surface areas above 1000 m2/g. More importantly circular dichroism studies reveal that the folate template possesses a chiral signature within the pores in the as-synthesized solid and that chirality is transferred from the folate template to the pore surface via the aminopropyl triethoxysilane costructure directing agent used in the supramolecular assembly. This novel templating approach for ordered mesoporous materials breaks the hegemony of surfactant micellar systems for the preparation of these exciting high surface area solids and opens new opportunities for structural control, design of pore geometry, and novel applications.

  • 24.
    Atluri, Rambabu
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Garcia-Bennett, Alfonso E.
    Non-Surfactant Supramolecular Templating Synthesis of Ordered Mesoporous Silica2009In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 131, no 9, p. 3189-3191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hoogsteen-bonded tetrads and pentamers are formed by a large variety of organic molecules through H-donor and acceptor groups capable of inducing self-organization to form columnar and hexagonal mesophases. The biological importance of such macromolecular structures is exemplified by the assembly of guanosine-rich groups of telomere units and their implication in chromosomal replication. Folic acid is composed of a pterin group, chemically and structurally similar to guanine, conjugated to an l-glutamate moiety via a p-amino benzoic acid. Our aim has been to develop a delivery vehicle for folic acid and at the same time provide a novel synthetic route for ordered mesoporous materials without the use of amphiphilic surfactants. We present a new nonsurfactant route for the synthesis of highly ordered mesoporous materials, based on the supramolecular templating of stacked arrays of the tetramer-forming pterin groups of folic acid under a variety of synthetic conditions. This method leads to hexagonally ordered mesoporous structures with gyroid, spherical, and chiral morphologies with pores on the order of 25−30 Å in diameter and surface areas above 1000 m2/g. More importantly circular dichroism studies reveal that the folate template possesses a chiral signature within the pores in the as-synthesized solid and that chirality is transferred from the folate template to the pore surface via the aminopropyl triethoxysilane costructure directing agent used in the supramolecular assembly. This novel templating approach for ordered mesoporous materials breaks the hegemony of surfactant micellar systems for the preparation of these exciting high surface area solids and opens new opportunities for structural control, design of pore geometry, and novel applications.

  • 25.
    Aydin, Juhanes
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Larsson, Johanna M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Szabó, Kálmán J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Pincer Complex-Catalyzed Coupling Reactions via Palladium (IV) Intermediates2009In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 11, no 13, p. 2852-2854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Palladium pincer complexes directly catalyze the redox coupling reactions of functionalized alkenes and iodonium salts. The catalytic process, which is suitable for mild catalytic functionalization of allylic acetates and electron-rich alkenes, probably occurs through Pd(IV) intermediates. Due to the strong metal−ligand interactions, the oxidation of phosphine and amine ligands of the pincer complexes can be avoided in the presented reactions.

  • 26.
    Baber, Ashleigh E.
    et al.
    Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA.
    Xu, Fang
    Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA.
    Dvorak, Filip
    Charles University, Czech Republic.
    Mudiyanselage, Kumudu
    Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA.
    Soldemo, Markus
    KTH.
    Weissenrieder, Jonas
    KTH.
    Senanayake, Sanjaya D.
    Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA.
    Sadowski, Jerzy T.
    Rodriguez, José A.
    Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA.
    Matolín, Vladimír
    Charles University, Czech Republic.
    White, Michael G.
    Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA; Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA.
    Stacchiola, Darío J.
    Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA.
    In Situ Imaging of Cu2O under Reducing Conditions: Formation of Metallic Fronts by Mass Transfer2013In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 135, no 45, p. 16781-16784Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Active catalytic sites have traditionally been analyzed based on static representations of surface structures and characterization of materials before or after reactions. We show here by a combination of in situ microscopy and spectroscopy techniques that, in the presence of reactants, an oxide catalyst's chemical state and morphology are dynamically modified. The reduction of Cu2O films is studied under ambient pressures (AP) of CO. The use of complementary techniques allows us to identify intermediate surface oxide phases and determine how reaction fronts propagate across the surface by massive mass transfer of Cu atoms released during the reduction of the oxide phase in the presence of CO. High resolution in situ imaging by AP scanning tunneling microscopy (AP-STM) shows that the reduction of the oxide films is initiated at defects both on step edges and the center of oxide terraces.

  • 27. Baber, Ashleigh E.
    et al.
    Xu, Fang
    Dvorak, Filip
    Mudiyanselage, Kumudu
    Soldemo, Markus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Material Physics, MF.
    Weissenrieder, Jonas
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Material Physics, MF.
    Senanayake, Sanjaya D.
    Sadowski, Jerzy T.
    Rodriguez, José A.
    Matolín, Vladimír
    White, Michael G.
    Stacchiola, Darío J.
    In Situ Imaging of Cu2O under Reducing Conditions: Formation of Metallic Fronts by Mass Transfer2013In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 135, no 45, p. 16781-16784Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Active catalytic sites have traditionally been analyzed based on static representations of surface structures and characterization of materials before or after reactions. We show here by a combination of in situ microscopy and spectroscopy techniques that, in the presence of reactants, an oxide catalyst's chemical state and morphology are dynamically modified. The reduction of Cu2O films is studied under ambient pressures (AP) of CO. The use of complementary techniques allows us to identify intermediate surface oxide phases and determine how reaction fronts propagate across the surface by massive mass transfer of Cu atoms released during the reduction of the oxide phase in the presence of CO. High resolution in situ imaging by AP scanning tunneling microscopy (AP-STM) shows that the reduction of the oxide films is initiated at defects both on step edges and the center of oxide terraces.

  • 28. Baias, Maria
    et al.
    Dumez, Jean-Nicolas
    Svensson, Per Henrik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Schantz, Staffan
    Day, Graeme M.
    Emsley, Lyndon
    De Novo Determination of the Crystal Structure of a Large Drug Molecule by Crystal Structure Prediction-Based Powder NMR Crystallography2013In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 135, no 46, p. 17501-17507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The crystal structure of form 4 of the drug 4-[4-(2-adamantylcarbamoyl)-5-tert-butyl-pyrazol-1-yl]benzoic acid is determined using a protocol for NMR powder crystallography at natural isotopic abundance combining solid-state H-1 NMR spectroscopy, crystal structure prediction, and density functional theory chemical shift calculations. This is the first example of NMR crystal structure determination for a molecular compound of previously unknown structure, and at 422 g/mol this is the largest compound to which this method has been applied so far.

  • 29. Baranov, A. I.
    et al.
    Kloo, Lars A.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemistry.
    Olenev, A. V.
    Popovkin, B. A.
    Romanenko, A. I.
    Shevelkov, A. V.
    Unique (infinity Ni8Bi8S)-Ni-1 metallic wires in a novel quasi-1D compound. Synthesis, crystal and electronic structure, and properties of Ni8Bi8SI2001In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 123, no 49, p. 12375-12379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new quasi-one-dimensional compound Ni8Bi8SI has been synthesized and its crystal structure determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. The structure of Ni8Bi8SI consists of [(infinityNi8Bi8S)-Ni-1] columns separated by iodine atoms. Conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements (down to 4.2 K) show that Ni8Bi8SI is a one-dimensional metal and exhibits Pauli paramagnetic properties. These observations are in good agreement with the results from electronic structure calculations. An analysis of the chemical bonding employing difference electron charge density maps reveals strong multicenter Ni-Bi bonds and pair Ni-S interactions within the [(infinityNi8Bi8S)-Ni-1] columns. Only electrostatic interactions are inferred between the columns and iodine atoms.

  • 30.
    Barrozo, Alexandre
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Duarte, Fernanda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bauer, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Carvalho, Alexandra T. P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kamerlin, Shina C. Lynn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Cooperative Electrostatic Interactions Drive Functional Evolution in the Alkaline Phosphatase Superfamily2015In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 137, no 28, p. 9061-9076Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is becoming widely accepted that catalytic promiscuity, i.e., the ability of a single enzyme to catalyze the turnover of multiple, chemically distinct substrates, plays a key role in the evolution of new enzyme functions. In this context, the members of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily have been extensively studied as model systems in order to understand the phenomenon of enzyme multifunctionality. In the present work, we model the selectivity of two multiply promiscuous members of this superfamily, namely the phosphonate monoester hydrolases from Burkholderia caryophylli and Rhizobium leguminosarum. We have performed extensive simulations of the enzymatic reaction of both wild-type enzymes and several experimentally characterized mutants. Our computational models are in agreement with key experimental observables, such as the observed activities of the wild-type enzymes, qualitative interpretations of experimental pH-rate profiles, and activity trends among several active site mutants. In all cases the substrates of interest bind to the enzyme in similar conformations, with largely unperturbed transition states from their corresponding analogues in aqueous solution. Examination of transition-state geometries and the contribution of individual residues to the calculated activation barriers suggest that the broad promiscuity of these enzymes arises from cooperative electrostatic interactions in the active site, allowing each enzyme to adapt to the electrostatic needs of different substrates. By comparing the structural and electrostatic features of several alkaline phosphatases, we suggest that this phenomenon is a generalized feature driving selectivity and promiscuity within this superfamily and can be in turn used for artificial enzyme design.

  • 31.
    Bartholomeyzik, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Pendrill, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lihammar, Richard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Jiang, Tuo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Kinetics and Mechanism of the Palladium-Catalyzed Oxidative Arylating Carbocyclization of Allenynes2018In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 140, no 1, p. 298-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pd-catalyzed C-C bond-forming reactions under oxidative conditions constitute a class of important and widely used synthetic protocols. This Article describes a mechanistic investigation of the arylating carbocyclization of allenynes using boronic acids and focuses on the correlation between reaction conditions and product selectivity. Isotope effects confirm that either allenic or propargylic C-H activation occurs directly after substrate binding. With an excess of H2O, a triene product is selectively formed via allenic C-H activation. The latter C-H activation was found to be turnover-limiting and the reaction zeroth order in reactants as well as the oxidant. A dominant feature is continuous catalyst activation, which was shown to occur even in the absence of substrate. Smaller amounts of H2O lead to mixtures of triene and vinylallene products, where the latter is formed via propargylic C-H activation. The formation of triene occurs only in the presence of ArB(OH)(2). Vinylallene, on the other hand, was shown to be formed by consumption of (ArBO)(3) as a first-order reactant. Conditions with sub-stoichiometric BF3 center dot OEt2 gave selectively the vinylallene product, and the reaction is first order in PhB(OH)(2). Both C-H activation and transmetalation influence the reaction rate. However, with electron-deficient ArB(OH)(2), C-H activation is turnover-limiting. It was difficult to establish the order of transmetalation vs C-H activation with certainty, but the results suggest that BF3 center dot OEt2 promotes an early transmetalation. The catalytically active species were found to be dependent on the reaction conditions, and H2O is a crucial parameter in the control of selectivity.

  • 32.
    Barz, Bogdan
    et al.
    Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institute of Complex Systems: Structural Biochemistry (ICS-6), Jülich; Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Düsseldorf.
    Liao, Qinghua
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Biology. Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institute of Complex Systems: Structural Biochemistry (ICS-6), Jülich.
    Strodel, Birgit
    Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institute of Complex Systems: Structural Biochemistry (ICS-6), Jülich; Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Düsseldorf.
    Pathways of Amyloid-β Aggregation Depend on Oligomer Shape2018In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 140, no 1, p. 319-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the main research topics related to Alzheimer’s disease is the aggregation of the amyloid-β peptide, which was shown to follow different pathways for the two major alloforms of the peptide, Aβ40 and the more toxic Aβ42. Experimental studies emphasized that oligomers of specific sizes appear in the early aggregation process in different quantities and might be the key toxic agents for each of the two alloforms. We use transition networks derived from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to show that the oligomers leading to the type of oligomer distributions observed in experiments originate from compact conformations. Extended oligomers, on the other hand, contribute more to the production of larger aggregates thus driving the aggregation process. We further demonstrate that differences in the aggregation pathways of the two Aβ alloforms occur as early as during the dimer stage. The higher solvent-exposure of hydrophobic residues in Aβ42 oligomers contributes to the different aggregation pathways of both alloforms and also to the increased cytotoxicity of Aβ42.

  • 33.
    Bassan, Arianna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Que, Jr., Lawrence
    A Density Functional Study of O-O Bond Cleavage for a Biomimetic Non-Heme Iron Complex Demonstrating an Fe(V)-Intermediate2002In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 124, no 37, p. 11056-11063Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Berglund, Per
    et al.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    DeSantis, Grace
    Stabile, Michele R.
    Shang, Xiao
    Gold, Marvin
    Bott, Richard R.
    Graycar, Thomas P.
    Lau, Tony Hing
    Mitchinson, Colin
    Jones, J. Bryan
    Chemical Modification of Cysteine Mutants of Subtilisin Bacillus lentus Can Create Better Catalysts Than the Wild-Type Enzyme1997In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 119, no 22, p. 5265-5266Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35. Bergström, Fredrik
    et al.
    Mikhalyov, Ilya
    Hägglöf, Peter
    Wortmann, Rüdiger
    Ny, Tor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Johansson, Lennart B A
    Dimers of dipyrrometheneboron difluoride (BODIPY) with light spectroscopic applications in chemistry and biology.2002In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 124, no 2, p. 196-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A ground-state dimer (denoted D(I)) exhibiting a strong absorption maximum at 477 nm (epsilon = 97 000 M(-1)cm(-1)) can form between adjacent BODIPY groups attached to mutant forms of the protein, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1). No fluorescence from excited D(I) was detected. A locally high concentration of BODIPY groups was also achieved by doping lipid phases (micelles, vesicles) with BODIPY-labeled lipids. In addition to an absorption band located at about 480 nm, a new weak absorption band is also observed at ca. 570 nm. Both bands are ascribed to the formation of BODIPY dimers of different conformation (D(I) and D(II)). Contrary to D(I) in PAI-1, the D(II) aggregates absorbing at 570 nm are emitting light observed as a broad band centered at about 630 nm. The integrated absorption band of D(I) is about twice that of the monomer, which is compatible with exciton coupling within a dimer. The Förster radius of electronic energy transfer between a BODIPY excited monomer and the ground-state dimer (D(I)()) is 57 +/- 2 A. A simple model of exciton coupling suggests that in D(I) two BODIPY groups are stacked on top of each other in a sandwich-like configuration with parallel electronic transition dipoles. For D(II) the model suggests that the S(0) --> S(1) transition dipoles are colinear. An explanation for the previously reported (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1994, 116, 7801) exceptional light spectroscopic properties of BODIPY is also presented. These are ascribed to the extraordinary electric properties of the BODIPY chromophore. First, changes of the permanent electric dipole moment (Delta(mu) approximately -0.05 D) and polarizability (-26 x 10(-40) C m(2) V(-1)) between the ground and the first excited states are small. Second, the S(0) <--> S(1) electronic transition dipole moments are perpendicular to Delta(mu).

  • 36.
    Berry, Bruce W.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. University of Pennsylvania, USA.
    Elvekrog, Margaret M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. University of Pennsylvania, USA.
    Tommos, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. University of Pennsylvania, USA.
    Environmental modulation of protein cation-pi interactions2007In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 129, no 17, p. 5308+-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein cation-pi interactions are frequently found near the protein surface with their interacting residues partly solvent exposed. The structurally characterized alpha W-3 model protein contains the W32/K36 cation-pi interaction which has properties similar to those of naturally occurring protein cation-pi interactions. alpha W-3 was studied with the following results: Cation-pi interactions formed by a buried tryptophan and a partly solvated lysine, arginine, or histidine range from -0.8 to -0.5 kcal mol(-1) and rank as: W32/K36 approximate to W32/R36 > W32/H36. The W32/K36 pair in alpha W-3 represents the first W/K cation-pi interaction for which both the structure and the bond energy have been experimentally determined. Upon increasing the solvent exposure of the cation-pi pair, the W/K interaction energy drops from -0.73 to -0.06 and +0.15 kcal mol(-1). These results suggest that solvent exposure can tune the interaction energy between a tryptophan and a lysine by at least 0.9 kcal mol(-1).

  • 37. Bertelsen, Søren
    et al.
    Dinér, Peter
    Johansen, Rasmus Lyng
    Jørgensen, Karl Anker
    Asymmetric organocatalytic beta-hydroxylation of alpha, beta-unsaturated aldehydes2007In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 129 1536-1537, no 6, p. 1536-1537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first catalytic enantioselective β-hydroxylation of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes is presented. Using commercially available (E)-benzaldehyde oxime in the presence of 2-[bis(3,5-bis-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)trimethyl-silanyloxymethyl]pyrrolidine as organocatalyst, the corresponding chiral carbonyl β-oxime ethers are obtained in high yields and with excellent enantioselectivities. These optically active carbonyl and hydroxy β-oxime ethers are highly interesting biological compounds in, e.g., sex pheromone analogues, highly potent antiinflammatory agents, and penicillin and cephalosporin analogues. The chiral carbonyl β-oxime ethers can be reduced to the corresponding 1,3-diols in high yields. Furthermore, the organocatalytic enantioselective β-hydroxylation of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes could be performed on gram scale without loss of enantioselectivity.

  • 38. Bertelsen, Søren
    et al.
    Dinér, Peter
    Center for Catalysis, Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University.
    Johansen, Rasmus Lyng
    Jørgensen, Karl Anker
    Asymmetric organocatalytic beta-hydroxylation of alpha, beta-unsaturated aldehydes2007In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 129, no 6, p. 1536-1537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first catalytic enantioselective beta-hydroxylation of alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes is presented. Using commercially available (E)-benzaldehyde oxime in the presence of 2-[bis(3,5-bis-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)trimethyl-silanyloxymethyl]pyrrolidine as organocatalyst, the corresponding chiral carbonyl beta-oxime ethers are obtained in high yields and with excellent enantioselectivities. These optically active carbonyl and hydroxy beta-oxime ethers are highly interesting biological compounds in, e.g., sex pheromone analogues, highly potent antiinflammatory agents, and penicillin and cephalosporin analogues. The chiral carbonyl beta-oxime ethers can be reduced to the corresponding 1,3-diols in high yields. Furthermore, the organocatalytic enantioselective beta-hydroxylation of alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes could be performed on gram scale without loss of enantioselectivity.

  • 39. Bertelsen, Søren
    et al.
    Marigo, Mauro
    Brandes, Sebastian
    Dinér, Peter
    Jørgensen, Karl Anker
    Dienamine catalysis: organocatalytic asymmetric gamma-amination of alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes2006In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 128, no 39, p. 12973-12980Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40. Bertelsen, Søren
    et al.
    Marigo, Mauro
    Brandes, Sebastian
    Dinér, Peter
    Center for Catalysis, Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University.
    Jørgensen, Karl Anker
    Dienamine catalysis: organocatalytic asymmetric gamma-amination of alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes2006In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 128, no 39, p. 12973-12980Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new concept in organocatalysis is presented, the direct asymmetric gamma-functionalization of alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes. We disclose that secondary amines can invert the usual reactivity of alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, enabling a direct gamma-amination of the carbonyl compound using azodicarboxylates as the electrophilic nitrogen-source. The scope of the reaction is demonstrated for the enantioselective gamma-amination of different alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, giving the products in moderate to good yields and with high enantioselectivities up to 93% ee. Experimental investigations and DFT calculations indicate that the reaction might proceed as a hetero-Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction. Such a mechanism can explain the "unexpected" stereochemical outcome of the reaction.

  • 41.
    Björk, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hanke, Felix
    Surface Science Research Centre, University of Liverpool, UK.
    Stafström, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mechanisms of halogen-based covalent self-assembly on metal surfaces2013In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 135, no 15, p. 5768-5775Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We computationally study the reaction mechanisms of halogen-based covalent self-assembly, a major route for synthesizing molecular nanostructures and nanographenes on surfaces. Focusing on biphenyl as a small model system, we describe the dehalogenation, recombination, and diffusion processes. The kinetics of the different processes are also investigated, in particular how diffusion and coupling barriers affect recombination rates. Trends across the periodic table are derived from three commonly used close-packed (111) surfaces (Cu, Ag, and Au) and two halogens (Br and I). We show that the halogen atoms can poison the surface, thus hindering long-range ordering of the self-assembled structures. Finally, we present core-level shifts of the relevant carbon and halogen atoms, to provide reference data for reliably detecting self-assembly without the need for atomic-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy.

  • 42.
    Björk, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Stafström, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hanke, Felix
    University of Liverpool.
    Zipping Up: Cooperativity Drives the Synthesis of Graphene Nanoribbons2011In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 133, no 38, p. 14884-14887Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the cooperative effects controlling the synthesis of a graphene nanoribbon on the Au(111) surface starting from an anthracene polymer using density functional calculations including van der Waals interactions. We focus on the high-temperature cyclodehydrogenation step of the reaction and find that the reaction proceeds by simultaneously transferring two H-atoms from the anthracene units to the Au surface, leaving behind a C C bond in the process. This step is significantly more favorable than the three other potential reaction paths. Moreover, we find that successive dehydrogenations proceed from one end of the polyanthracene and propagate step-by-step through the polymer in a domino-like fashion.

  • 43.
    Blaha-Nelson, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Krüger, Dennis M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Szeler, Klaudia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ben-David, Moshe
    Weizmann Inst Sci, Dept Biol Chem, IL-76100 Rehovot, Israel.;Univ Toronto, Banting & Best Dept Med Res, Donnelly Ctr Cellular & Biomol Res, 160 Coll St, Toronto, ON M5S 3E1, Canada..
    Kamerlin, Shina Caroline Lynn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Active Site Hydrophobicity and the Convergent Evolution of Paraoxonase Activity in Structurally Divergent Enzymes: The Case of Serum Paraoxonase 12017In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 139, no 3, p. 1155-1167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a native lactonase capable of promiscuously hydrolyzing a broad range of substrates, including organophosphates, esters, and carbonates. Structurally, PON1 is a six-bladed beta-propeller with a flexible loop (residues 70-81) covering the active site. This loop contains a functionally critical Tyr at position 71. We have performed detailed experimental and computational analyses of the role of selected Y71 variants in the active site stability and catalytic activity in order to probe the role of Y71 in PON1's lactonase and organophosphatase activities. We demonstrate that the impact of Y71 substitutions on PON1's lactonase activity is minimal, whereas the k(cat) for the paraoxonase activity is negatively perturbed by up to 100-fold, suggesting greater mutational robustness of the native activity. Additionally, while these substitutions modulate PON1's active site shape, volume, and loop flexibility, their largest effect is in altering the solvent accessibility of the active site by expanding the active site volume, allowing additional water molecules to enter. This effect is markedly more pronounced in the organophosphatase activity than the lactonase activity. Finally, a detailed comparison of PON1 to other organophosphatases demonstrates that either a similar "gating loop" or a highly buried solvent excluding active site is a common feature of these enzymes. We therefore posit that modulating the active site hydrophobicity is a key element in facilitating the evolution of organophosphatase activity. This provides a concrete feature that can be utilized in the rational design of next-generation organophosphate hydrolases that are capable of selecting a specific reaction from a pool of viable substrates.

  • 44.
    Blid, Jan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Panknin, Olaf
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Somfai, Peter
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Asymmetric [2,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement of allylic ammonium ylides2005In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 127, no 26, p. 9352-9353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An asymmetric Lewis acid-mediated [2,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement of allylic amines has been developed, affording the corresponding homoallylic amines in good yield and excellent enantioselectivities. The rearrangement proceeds by complexation of the chiral Lewis acid to the amine followed by deprotonation and rearrangement.

  • 45.
    Bokvist, Marcus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Gröbner, Gerhard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Misfolding of amyloidogenic proteins at membrane surfaces:  the impact of macromolecularcCrowding2007In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 129, no 48, p. 14848-14849Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of inert macromolecular crowding agents mimics the situation in vivo where amyloidogenic proteins are released into an aqueous, congested intracellular environment. By using the amphiphatic Alzheimer A-protein as the model system, the presence of a three-dimensional macromolecular crowding environment enhanced significantly its misfolding behavior if charged membrane surfaces as two-dimensional aggregation templates were present.

  • 46. Borgström, Magnus
    et al.
    Shaikh, Nizamuddin
    Johansson, Olof
    Anderlund, Magnus F
    Styring, Stenbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Åkermark, Björn
    Magnuson, Ann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Hammarström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Light-Induced Manganese Oxidation and Long-Lived Charge Separation in a Mn2II,II─RuII─Acceptor Triad.2005In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 127, p. 17504-17515Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Borgström, Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry.
    Shaikh, Nizamuddin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Johansson, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry.
    Anderlund, Magnus
    Styring, Stenbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Åkerman, Björn
    Magnusson, Ann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Hammarström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry.
    Light induced manganese oxidation and long-lived charge separation in a Mn2II,II-RuII(bpy)3-acceptor triad2005In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 127, no 49, p. 17504-17515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The photoinduced electron-transfer reactions in a Mn2II,II-RuII-NDI triad (1) ([Mn2(bpmp)(OAc)2]+, bpmp = 2,6-bis[bis(2-pyridylmethyl)aminomethyl]-4-methylphenolate and OAc = acetate, RuII = tris-bipyridine ruthenium(II), and NDI = naphthalenediimide) have been studied by time-resolved optical and EPR spectroscopy. Complex 1 is the first synthetically linked electron donor-sensitizer-acceptor triad in which a manganese complex plays the role of the donor. EPR spectroscopy was used to directly demonstrate the light induced formation of both products: the oxidized manganese dimer complex (Mn2II,III) and the reduced naphthalenediimide (NDI*-) acceptor moieties, while optical spectroscopy was used to follow the kinetic evolution of the [Ru(bpy)3]2+ intermediate states and the NDI*- radical in a wide temperature range. The average lifetime of the NDI*- radical is ca. 600 micros at room temperature, which is at least 2 orders of magnitude longer than that for previously reported triads based on a [Ru(bpy)3]2+ photosensitizer. At 140 K, this intramolecular recombination was dramatically slowed, displaying a lifetime of 0.1-1 s, which is comparable to many of the naturally occurring charge-separated states in photosynthetic reaction centra. It was found that the long recombination lifetime could be explained by an unusually large reorganization energy (lambda approximately 2.0 eV), due to a large inner reorganization of the manganese complex. This makes the recombination reaction strongly activated despite the large driving force (Delta-G degrees = 1.07 eV). Thus, the intrinsic properties of the manganese complex are favorable for creating a long-lived charge separation in the "Marcus normal region" also when the charge separated state energy is high.

  • 48. Borowski, Thomasz
    et al.
    Noack, Holger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Radon, Mariusz
    Zych, Konrad
    Siegbahn, Per E.M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Mechanism of Selective Halogenation by SyrB2: A Computational Study2010In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 132, no 37, p. 12887-12898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanism of the chlorination reaction of SyrB2, a representative α-ketoglutarate dependent halogenase, was studied with computational methods. First, a macromolecular model of the Michaelis com- plex was constructed using molecular docking proce- dures. Based on this structure a smaller model com- prising the first- and some of the second shell residues of iron, and a model substrate was constructed and used in DFT investigations on the reaction mecha- nism. Computed relative energies and Mo ̈ssbauer iso- mer shifts and quadrupole splittings indicate that the two oxoferryl species observed experimentally are two stereoisomers resulting from an exchange of the coordi- nation sites occupied by the oxo and chloro ligands. In principle both FeIV =O species are reactive and decay to FeIIICl(OH)/carbon radical intermediates via C-H bond cleavage. In the final rebound step, which is very fast and thus precluding equilibration between the two forms of the radical intermediate, the ligand (oxo or chloro) placed closest to the carbon radical (trans to His235) is transfered to the carbon. For the native substrate (L-Thr) the lowest barrier for C-H cleavage was found for an isomer of the oxoferryl species favor- ing chlorination in the rebound step. CASPT2 cal- culations for the spin state splittings in the oxoferryl species support the conclusion that once the FeIV =O intermediate is formed, the reaction proceeds on the quintet potential energy surface.

  • 49.
    Borowski, Tomasz
    et al.
    Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences.
    Georgiev, Valentin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Siegbahn, Per E.M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Catalytic Reaction Mechanism of Homogentisate Dioxygenase: A Hybrid DFT Study2005In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 127, no 49, p. 17303-17314Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Bowring, Miriam A.
    et al.
    Yale Univ, Dept Chem, 225 Prospect St, New Haven, CT 06520 USA;Univ Washington, Dept Chem, Seattle, WA 98195 USA;Reed Coll, Dept Chem, Portland, OR 97202 USA.
    Bradshaw, Liam R.
    Univ Washington, Dept Chem, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Parada, Giovanny A.
    Yale Univ, Dept Chem, 225 Prospect St, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.
    Pollock, Timothy P.
    Univ Washington, Dept Chem, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Fernandez-Teran, Ricardo J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Kolmar, Scott S.
    Yale Univ, Dept Chem, 225 Prospect St, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.
    Mercado, Brandon Q.
    Yale Univ, Dept Chem, 225 Prospect St, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.
    Schlenker, Cody W.
    Univ Washington, Dept Chem, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Gamelin, Daniel R.
    Univ Washington, Dept Chem, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Mayer, James M.
    Yale Univ, Dept Chem, 225 Prospect St, New Haven, CT 06520 USA;Univ Washington, Dept Chem, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Activationless Multiple-Site Concerted Proton-Electron Tunneling2018In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 140, no 24, p. 7449-7452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transfer of protons and electrons is key to energy conversion and storage, from photosynthesis to fuel cells. Increased understanding and control of these processes are needed. A new anthracene-phenol-pyridine molecular triad was designed to undergo fast photo-induced multiple-site concerted proton-electron transfer (MS-CPET), with the phenol moiety transferring an electron to the photoexcited anthracene and a proton to the pyridine. Fluorescence quenching and transient absorption experiments in solutions and glasses show rapid MS-CPET (3.2 X 10(10) s(-1) at 298 K). From 5.5 to 90 K, the reaction rate and kinetic isotope effect (KIE) are independent of temperature, with zero Arrhenius activation energy. From 145 to 350 K, there are only slight changes with temperature. This MS-CPET reaction thus occurs by tunneling of both the proton and electron, in different directions. Since the reaction proceeds without significant thermal activation energy, the rate constant indicates the magnitude of the electron/proton double tunneling probability.

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