Digitala Vetenskapliga Arkivet

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  • 1.
    Carlsson, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Working with Facebook in Public Libraries: A Backstage Glimpse into the Library 2.0 Rhetoric2012In: Libri (Copenhagen), ISSN 0024-2667, E-ISSN 1865-8423, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 199-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ideals and visions of a Library 2.0 have in recent years been widely discussed in public library research and practice. Influenced by the Web 2.0 discourse, the Library 2.0 rhetoric has to a large extent been coloured by utopian and revolutionary overtones, identifyingsocial media as key to transforming the public library institution. While previous research has primarily addressed this development conceptually, this paper explores how the visions of Library 2.0 are put to work in everyday practices. Drawing on ethnographic data, this paper critically examines the micro-level interplay between the social networking site Facebook and librarianship in the setting of a Swedish public library.The study reveals that the labour required to realize the visions of Library 2.0 is characterized by a constant flux between self-determination and precarity (i.e. existence without predictability or security). While the librarians participating in the study creatively construct new routines and strategies for doing work, they are always at the beck and call of Facebook and have only marginal opportunities of influencing the technology they use. Still, this everyday and situated use gives them a possibility of interpreting the purpose of Facebook differently. The paper suggests that by articulating such alternative understandings of technologymore clearly public libraries could reject a position of being merely victims of technological change and make a difference in ICT-development.

  • 2.
    Haikola, Simon
    et al.
    Swedish School of Library and Information Science (SSLIS) at Göteborg University; Högskolan i Borås, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Sara
    Swedish School of Library and Information Science (SSLIS) at Göteborg University; Högskolan i Borås, Sweden.
    State Surveillance on the Internet: The Swedish Debate and the Future Role of Libraries and LIS2007In: Libri (Copenhagen), ISSN 0024-2667, E-ISSN 1865-8423, Vol. 57, no 4, p. 209-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contributes to what we hope will become a vigorous debate on Internet surveillance and privacy issues, ensuring that privacy issues will not be neglected in the future when political propositions on state surveillance are made. The relevant question to ask is not how to protect privacy at all costs, but how a balance can be found between the need of the state to know about its citizens and those same citizens’ need for privacy from state intrusion. This paper explores the future role of the library pertaining to the issue of state sur veillance. After a short introduction, we present the procedure and theoretical background for the article. The latter is grounded on Foucault’s theory on discourse, power and the modern state. We then discuss our two main fi ndings, and fi nally we relate those fi ndings to the library and its future roles, and to library and information science research and teaching. We fi nd one of these roles to be as instigator of and facilitator and forum for a healthy debate on surveillance and privacy issues.

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  • 3.
    Limberg, Louise
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Alexandersson, Mikael
    Lantz-Andersson, Annika
    Folkesson, Lena
    What matters? Shaping meaningful learning through teaching information literacy2008In: Libri (Copenhagen), ISSN 0024-2667, E-ISSN 1865-8423, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 82-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The point of departure for this article is an assumed gap between the different communities concerned with the practices of teaching or researching information literacy. Its purpose is to discuss some critical features of teaching information literacy identified in three previous research studies with a view toward understanding how they support meaningful learning outcomes and what the implications of this understanding are for information literacy education. The analysis is framed by a sociocultural perspective of learning that views information seeking and learning as social practices set within the discursive practice of school. The findings indicate that teacher/student interaction with a focus on learning goals and content is a vital condition for students' meaningful learning. Focus on the object of teaching, away from information seeking skills toward an emphasis on the quality of students' research questions, on negotiating learning goals between pedagogues and students, and on the critical evaluation of information sources related to the knowledge contents of students' assignments improves learning. The conclusions are that observing such critical features of information literacy in teaching may allow the discursive practice of school to be reshaped in favour of more genuine research-based learning. A second conclusion is that there are mutual benefits in a closer interaction between the communities of teaching and researching information literacy.

  • 4.
    Lindh, Karolina
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Haider, Jutta
    Lund University.
    Development and the documentation of indigenous knowledge: Good intentions in bad company?2010In: Libri (Copenhagen), ISSN 0024-2667, E-ISSN 1865-8423, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There appears to be an increasing interest within library and information studies (LIS) in so-called indigenous or traditional knowledge. Discussions on usefulness and applicability of indigenous knowledge in development seem to be motivating electronic documentation and the creation of databases. Often, definitions provided by international organisations are drawn on unquestioningly, while power structures embedded in descriptions provided by such organisations are ignored. This article aims at drawing attention to the ways in which international organisations define and talk about indigenous knowledge in relation to development. This is achieved by critical, close reading of six publications issued between 1998 and 2008 by the following organisations: WIPO, UNESCO, ICSU, UNDP, the World Bank, and IFLA. The critical reflections are also intended to shed light on how documentation practises can be understood as extensions of power. For this the authors draw on Foucauldian notions of power and discourse as well as on post-development and postcolonial perspectives. Relationships and discursive procedures for statements on science, development discourse and intellectual property rights, are shown to be influential in the creation of the concept indigenous knowledge. Relating indigenous knowledge to post-colonial and post-development studies reveals how indigenous knowledge is created and kept marginalized within the discursive structure of development. The analysis concludes by showing how knowledge named indigenous knowledge is trapped and created in a circular flow which legitimises international aid organizations, development discourse and the intellectual property rights system. The article concludes by demanding greater awareness among LIS researchers and practitioners regarding the culturally embedded character of knowledge practices and of the power of classifying and defining.

  • 5.
    Lundh, Anna
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Limberg, Louise
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Information practices in elementary school2008In: Libri (Copenhagen), ISSN 0024-2667, E-ISSN 1865-8423, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 92-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a qualitative study that examines the roles of pedagogues in elementary schools with regard to young children's information literacy. The concept of information literacy is seen from a sociocultural perspective, as a dimension of literacy that varies in different social practices. Further, from this perspective the importance of the mediating functions of tools used in information seeking is stressed. Data was collected from a Swedish village school from one focus group interview and two individual interviews with different kinds of pedagogues. Problem-centred teaching was also observed in five forms with pupils aged 6-8. In the analysis an overarching division or two discourses connected to information literacy emerged. On the one hand, literacy, aesthetic activities and the reading of fiction were the focus and, on the other hand, there was a focus on information literacy, utilitarian information-seeking activities and ICT tools. It is also shown that information seeking is given a certain meaning in problem-centred activities in elementary school. The authors consider that the discourses found in the empirical material might have implications for the concept of information literacy, if they are explored to a fuller extent.

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  • 6.
    Maceviciute, Elena
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Conceptions of bibliography in Russian federation: The Russian phenomenon of bibliographic theory2004In: Libri (Copenhagen), ISSN 0024-2667, E-ISSN 1865-8423, Vol. 54, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 6 of 6
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  • nn-NO
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