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  • 1. Boccardelli, P.
    et al.
    Magnusson, Mats
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Dynamic Capabilities in Early-Phase Entrepreneurship2006In: Knowledge and Process Management, ISSN 1092-4604, E-ISSN 1099-1441, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 162-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dynamic capabilities perspective has received increasing attention in the field of strategic management research. By focusing not only on the competitive advantage that is provided by a certain resource constellation, but also on the change of firms' resources over time to fit changing business environments, this perspective underlines the strategic importance of innovation. Despite the apparent interest in the dynamics of firm resources, there is still limited empirical evidence for how the strategic matching of resources and market needs is actually done, particularly in more rapidly changing environments. In order to investigate this process, an empirical study of 59 start-ups in the Swedish mobile Internet industry was performed. A first finding from the study is that start-ups which change market focus have a significantly higher probability to survive their first years. Furthermore, it is seen that in most cases, the change in market focus takes place without any related change in the technological resources that are used by the firm, indicating that an important factor at this stage is the flexible use of resources in searching for a suitable match between resources and market opportunities. This mode of learning and adaptation is very different from earlier proposed models focusing on the acquisition and transformation of resources. Instead, the early-stage dynamic capabilities reveal themselves as bricolage, that is, the capacity to re-interpret and re-combine already existing resources and thereby improve their fit with the demands of the market environment. The results suggest that earlier proposed dynamic capabilities frameworks need to be modified, by taking into account the single entrepreneur as a source of dynamic capabilities, and by introducing the concept of resource flexibility. In terms of managerial implications, the findings underline the importance for entrepreneurs to balance the striving for distinctive capabilities that provide competitive advantage and the experimentation and improvisation needed to adapt to changes in the market.

  • 2.
    Bosua, Rachelle
    et al.
    The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
    Venkitachalam, Krishna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Fostering Knowledge Transfer and Learning in Shift Work Environments2015In: Knowledge and Process Management, ISSN 1092-4604, E-ISSN 1099-1441, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 22-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shift work is a continuous ‘round-the-clock’ work practice that involves rotating work schedules with a vital process of ‘handover’ denoting a change of teams between shifts. Handover as an activity requires that outgoing shift teams pass on insights and responsibility to incoming shift teams. Knowledge transfer in shift work environments is therefore crucial to allow for a seamless continuation of work practices between shifts. Studies in shift work indicate that knowledge transfer between shifts often fails—that is, incoming workers tend to solve problems with inadequate information, have an incomplete understanding of significant events that occurred in prior shifts, while workers often attempt to solve the same problems across different shifts. This study investigates the challenges associated with shift handover and proposes knowledge transfer enablers that can make a difference to handover. In addition, these enablers can foster learning, a process often overlooked in shift environments. A qualitative research methodology was used to study three distinctive case organisations in the manufacturing and educational sectors, where the nature of day-to-day work is shift-bound and transfer issues were present during handover processes. Our findings suggest that three enablers facilitate knowledge transfer problems associated with shift work: (1) a purposeful knowledge codification and classification culture, (2) open access to established boundary objects and boundary spanners and (3) a unified information infrastructure to facilitate knowledge transfer during shifts and handover.

  • 3. Chapman, R.
    et al.
    Magnusson, Mats
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Continuous Innovation, Performance and Knowledge Management: An Introduction2006In: Knowledge and Process Management, ISSN 1092-4604, E-ISSN 1099-1441, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 129-131Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Ljungquist, Urban
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Management.
    Going practical on the core competence concept: On Links, Levels, Time and Context2013In: Knowledge and Process Management, ISSN 1092-4604, E-ISSN 1099-1441, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 223-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We update the original core competence notions of identification and development to fit high efficient innovation processes in dynamic environments, with aim to progress the concept's applicability for scholars and practitioners. To the core competence concept we add four dimensions previously missing: time (shared history and shared future aims), managerial hierarchy levels (corporate and SBU), innovation development modes and outcome types (radical/incremental and exploitation/exploration), and finally innovation team characteristics and support structure (homogenous/heterogeneous and formal/informal structure). We propose that existing core competencies are ideally explored by homogenous teams managed at the SBU-level, in structured context, which infers competitive imitation protection. The process starts with identification then progressed by a change in structure: going from formal to informal, which will increase core competence and company performance.

  • 5.
    Magnusson, Mats
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Managing the Knowledge Landscape of an MNC: knowledge networking at Ericsson2004In: Knowledge and Process Management, ISSN 1092-4604, E-ISSN 1099-1441, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 261-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In organizations striving for continuous innovation, the deliberate handling of knowledge plays a fundamental role. This far, most knowledge management initiatives have consisted of the implementation of new IT tools allowing for more efficient information handling. This approach has been criticized, as it does not consider certain aspects of knowledge, e.g. tacitness, social embeddedness and the creation of new knowledge. Alternative knowledge management approaches based on a more comprehensive notion of knowledge have been called for, but few examples of what these could look like in practice have been given. One example of an attempt to manage knowledge in a more holistic manner is knowledge networking. Based on case studies of seven different knowledge networking initiatives within Ericsson, the key components of the overall approach are described and some of the challenges posed to management are identified. Key issues that need to be attended to when designing and implementing individual knowledge networking initiatives are the extension and focus of user groups, the role of management in the initiatives and the promotion of knowledge-sharing behaviour throughout the organization. Ericsson's knowledge networking strategy aims at developing a loosely coupled structure of nuclei for knowledge creation and sharing, connected to each other by different kinds of knowledge directories. This appears to have some advantages compared to traditional knowledge management strategies, as it supports the creation and sharing of both tacit and explicit knowledge. Furthermore, its strong focus on locally developed initiatives and knowledge directories may offer a more dynamic support structure than traditional top-down initiatives focusing primarily on knowledge repositories.

  • 6.
    Venkitachalam, Krishna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Bosua, Rachelle
    Perspectives on effective digital content management in organizations2019In: Knowledge and Process Management, ISSN 1092-4604, E-ISSN 1099-1441, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 202-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern corporations face enormous digital transformation challenges in order to incorporate digital content into its corporate memory. At the same time over the last decade and a half, there is growing evidence of the advent of different types of mechanisms to manage digital organizational content. The management of digital content is particularly important to support knowledge worker practices to access, share and reuse content in knowledge intensive organizations. Despite the availability of technological solutions in the marketplace to integrate content, managers are often overwhelmed by the choices they need to make to effectively manage digital content in their organizations. Extant literature indicates that in an increasingly digitized world, there is no clear understanding of the digital content considerations for informed decision-making in organizations. Based on our research experiences in knowledge management, particularly knowledge codification in digital infrastructures we provide certain perspectives on the four considerations for effective management of digital content in large organizations. We present four short exhibits to illustrate these four core considerations which we label as the ‘4Cs’ (i.e. content contribution, categorization, control and centralization) for effective digital content management in large organizations.

  • 7.
    Yakhlef, Ali
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Sié, Laurent
    From Producer to Purchaser of IT Services: Interactional Knowledge2012In: Knowledge and Process Management, ISSN 1092-4604, E-ISSN 1099-1441, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 79-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several researchers have sought to establish the drivers behind and effects of outsourcing on organizations (nations and economies at large). Less research, however, has concerned itself with the changing role that firms go through—from a producer of information technology services to a purchaser of those services—and the form of knowledge that this new role requires. The present paper describes this process of going from consumer to purchaser of information technology services, focusing on the form of knowledge that emerges in this process. As an illustration, the paper draws on case study material gleaned from four firms that have outsourced parts or all of their information technology activities. Becoming a purchaser, it is found, presupposes the development of “interactional knowledge”. Interactional knowledge or expertise involves a new language related to standardized monitoring performance and quality measurements, detailed contracts in the form of service level agreements—all of which facilitate communication, enable exchange, reduce transaction costs, and give birth to a new market. Several questions concerning the effects of outsourcing on firms can be revisited, and new research directions are suggested.

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