Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 363
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ahlström, Stina
    et al.
    Rehabilitation Unit, Luleå Primary Health Care, Luleå, Sweden.
    Bernspång, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Occupational  performance of persons who have suffered a stroke: a follow-up study2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 88-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main purpose of this study was to describe the progress made in terms of occupational performance during a two-year period by persons who had suffered a stroke and had been discharged to their home after their initial hospital stay. The population of the study consisted of 49 persons, 30 men and 19 women, with a mean age of 69 years. The Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) was used to assess their occupational performance. Of the whole population at discharge, 66% showed increased effort and 29% showed decreased efficiency and independency. The results also showed that the persons who had decreased the most in their efficiency dropped out from the study. Twenty-nine persons participated in the study for 2 years. The best ADL ability was seen in the population at 3 months after discharge. A decrease was seen at 18 months after discharge in AMPS ADL process ability and at 24 months in AMPS ADL motor ability. The results suggest that persons who have suffered a stroke and live in their homes maintain their AMPS ADL ability performance for 1.5 to 2 years. A low AMPS ADL process ability measure in persons who have suffered a stroke signifies a reduced possibility of living at home.

  • 2.
    Anaby, Dana
    et al.
    School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
    Vrotsou, Katerina
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kroksmark, Ulla
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Göteburg, Sweden.
    Ellegård, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Changes in participation patterns of youth with physical disabilities following the Pathways and Resources for Engagement and Participation intervention: A time-geography approach2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The PREP (Pathways and Resources for Engagement and Participation), an innovative 12-week occupational therapy intervention that focuses on changing the environment, was found effective in improving the participation of youth in specific chosen community-based activities.

    Objective: To complement existing evidence, this study explored changes in overall participation patterns of youth with physical disabilities following the PREP intervention.

    Methods: Guided by time-geography approach, 13 youth aged 12–17 completed a 24-hr diary using the Aday app during one typical weekday and another day during the weekend, pre- and post-intervention. Data of 50 diaries were plotted and analyzed using the VISUALTimePAcTS program.

    Results: Following the PREP, youth were engaged in less digital media and more in study-related activities. Number of occurrences and time spent doing activities with friends were greater post-intervention, whereas time spent doing activities at home was quite similar, particularly during the weekdays. During the weekends, however, youth spent slightly less time at home.

    Conclusions and significance: Findings provide preliminary support for the effectiveness of the PREP, extending beyond the accomplishment of specific targeted activities towards a change in the overall daily patterns of youth. Such knowledge can redirect occupational therapists’ attention to environment-focused interventions involving real-life experiences.

  • 3.
    Andreassen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öhman, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson Ranada, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Assessing occupational performance in special housing in Sweden2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 428-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Assessing occupational performance is commonly done by occupational therapists[OT] working in special housing in municipal elder care. Assessments should be relevant and evidence-based. Even so, we know little about how assessment of occupational performance is conducted in special housing.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to identify OTs’ use and perceptions of different methods to assess occupational performance for elderly clients living in special housing.  

    Method: An email questionnaire was sent to OTs working in special housing in Sweden. Data was analyzed using descriptive and parametric statistics.

    Results: The findings, based on data from 660 respondents, showed that OTs regularly assessed occupational performance but did not use standardized assessment instruments or structured methods to any great extent. In general, OTs reported that they were not pleased with their ability to assess their clients; however, OTs with higher education and with responsibility for fewer clients were more pleased with their assessments and stated that they had more knowledge about assessment methods. Conclusion: To support OTs in using structured assessments of occupational performance in everyday practice, organization as well as structures in the work environment and educational development need to be taken into consideration.

  • 4.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Occupational therapy students’ views on addressing sexual health2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 306-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sexual health is an important issue in daily life, but little is known about occupational therapy (OT) students’ views on these matters.

    Aim: To explore occupational therapy students’ views on addressing sexual health in their future professional role.

    Material and methods: A descriptive qualitative study involving 37 OT students in 5 focus groups was performed and analyzed using content analysis.

    Results: Three categories: ‘Sexual health is part of occupational therapy and but not of the OT educational program’; ‘Need for knowledge to identify and intervene related to sexual health problems’; and finally, ‘Communication about sexual health—unknown, untried, but necessary’, formed the theme, ‘Willing to try, wanting to know more, and recognizing not only the difficulties and challenges but also the importance of sexual health in OT practice’.

    Conclusions: OT-students consider sexual health as part of OT-practice, but experience lack of knowledge of sexual health related to disease/disability, cultural diversity, and age and sexual orientation. Educational programs need to cover these matters, including how to address sexual health in OT-practice, to enhance OT’s future competence related to promotion of sexual health for clients.

    Significance: Knowledge on students’ views are vital to guide education on this important, rather neglected, area. 

  • 5.
    Argentzell, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Lunds universitet, avd för arbetsterapi och gerontologi.
    Håkansson, Carita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Eklund, Mona
    Lunds universitet, avd för arbetsterapi och gerontologi.
    Experience of meaning in everyday occupations among unemployed people with severe mental illness2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 49-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Knowledge about how people with severe mental illness find meaning in non-work occupations is important in order to develop programmes of meaningful daily occupations for this group.

    Purpose. To examine the meaning daily occupations may bring to those who are severely mentally ill and unemployed.

    Methods. Twelve unemployed people with severe mental illness were interviewed regarding their experience of meaning in daily occupations.

    Findings. Meaning was experienced in a balance between occupations that helped the informants control their mental illness. Themes of meaning were: feeling competent and being socially engaged, having routines and being productive, being creative and seeking knowledge, and taking care of body and mind. Substitutes for paid work were found in occupations such as taking care of the household or being productive at a day centre.

    Implications. People with severe mental illness should be allowed to play an active role in their rehabilitation process, using the occupational therapist for forming daily routines, creating a balance between work-like and restful occupations, finding occupations that meet one’s skills and training social behaviour. Besides, work-related occupations should be emphasized in the rehabilitation.

  • 6.
    Arnadottir, Gudrun
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Löfgren, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Fisher, Anne G.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Neurobehavioral functions evaluated in naturalistic contexts: Rasch analysis of the A-ONE Neurobehavioral Impact Scale2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 439-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The fact that different neurobehavioral impairments affect daily life task performance of clients with different neurological diagnoses currently restricts between-group comparisons in rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a single neurobehavioral impact scale could be constructed for use with different diagnostic groups. Methods and results. Rasch analysis of 422 clients (diagnosed with CVA and dementia) demonstrated that 29 of 55 items from the A-ONE Neurobehavioral Scale could be used to construct a short-form, Common Scale. Conclusions: While the use of different and longer diagnostic-specific scales versions may be more useful clinically, the short-form, Common Scale has the potential to be used in research focusing on comparison of groups. Further research will be needed to validate the common, short version.

  • 7. Aronsson, B
    et al.
    Perk, J
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Norlén, S
    Hedbäck, Bo
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Resuming domestic activities after myocardial infarction: a study in female patients2000In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 7, p. 39-44Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Research and Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Dada, Shakila
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Imms, Christine
    Centre for Disability and Development Research, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Bornman, Juan
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Elliott, Catherine
    School of Occupational Therapy, Speech pathology and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Content validity and usefulness of Picture My Participation for measuring participation in children with and without intellectual disability in South Africa and Sweden2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Participation comprises attendance and involvement in everyday situations. Picture My Participation (PmP) is an instrument intended to measure participation in children with disabilities, particularly in low and middle income countries.

    Aim: To investigate content validity and usefulness of PmP for measuring participation in children with intellectual disability (ID) in South Africa and Sweden.

    Methods: A picture supported interview with 149 children, 6?18 years, with and without ID. Twenty everyday activities were provided. The three most important activities were selected by the child. Attendance was rated on all activities. Involvement was rated on the most important.

    Results: All activities were selected as important by at least one child with ID in both countries. There were similarities in perceived importance between the children with and without ID from South Africa. The children from South Africa with ID were the only subgroup that used all scale points for rating attendance and involvement.

    Conclusion: The 20 selected activities of PmP were especially relevant for children with ID in South Africa. The usefulness of the scales was higher for the children with ID in both countries. PmP is promising for assessing participation across different settings but psychometrical properties and clinical utility need further exploration.

  • 9.
    Asbjørnslett, Mona
    et al.
    Oslo University .
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Participation at school as experienced by teenagers with physical disabilities2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 153-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the experiences that teenagers with physical disabilities have of their participation at school. Fourteen students from several locations in Norway aged between 13 and 18 years took part. Data were collected through focus-group interviews and individual interviews. The analysis revealed three main themes: Just like the others-but not quite; Participation in terms of being where things actually happen and; Participation as student-teacher cooperation. A major finding was the importance the students put on being where things actually happen, this being regarded as being even more important than doing the same activities as the other students. Opportunities to increase cooperation by holding short meetings with teachers on how to solve both practical and learning problems promoted participation. The need to include the individual's experience in the concept of participation is discussed.

  • 10. Backman, Annika
    et al.
    Kåwe, Kerstin
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Relevance and focal view point in occupational therapists' documentation in patient case records2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 212-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Code of Ethics for Occupational Therapists stipulates how occupational therapists should think about the profession’s central concepts in practice, where ‘Health’ is one such concept. Other guiding principles for practice are the Occupational Therapy Process Model and the ARTUR Case Record Structure. The aim of this study has been to identify and describe how occupational therapists at a hospital in Sweden documented interventions in patient case records. A stratified and random sample of one hundred case records was evaluated in relation to a checklist. The results showed that only 21 percent of the case records were complete. Often, the notes were found under the wrong keyword and 12 percent of the occupational therapy cases were indistinct and did not belong to any of the intervention categories in which occupational therapists normally intervene. Despite this, the majority of the case records reflected the ICF’s Activity/Participation component, which could be interpreted to mean that the occupational therapists held holistic health notions in line with the code of ethics. In order to improve the occupational therapists’ documentation in patient case records, further discussions of the central concepts and guiding principles for occupational therapy are required.

  • 11. Ballmer, Thomas
    et al.
    Helle, Tina
    Kaptain, Rina Juel
    Malinowsky, Camilla
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Test-retest and inter-rater reliability of the Danish version of the management of everday technology assessment for use with older adults with and without COPD2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 463-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The trend towards telemedicine increasingly requires clients to manage everyday technology (ET) to access and use health services. The Management of Everday Technology Assessment (META) is an observation-based instrument developed to evaluate the ability to manage ET. AIM: To examine test-retest (TRR) and inter-rater reliability (IRR) of the Danish translation of the META for older adults with and without COPD. METHOD AND MATERIALS: 47 older adults with COPD (n = 23) and without (n = 24) were recruited. IRR was examined by four raters paired across 30 participants. TRR was examined for 21 participants by the same rater administering the META twice within four weeks. A rank-based method for paired ordinal data was used to calculate percentage agreement (PA) and measures of systematic disagreement and individual variability. Mann Whitney U tests were used to compare PA to health status (presence/absence of COPD). RESULTS: Inter-rater PA was acceptable across 10 of 11 items and test-retest PA across 8 of 11 items. Systematic disagreement was present for one item in TRR. No significant differences in PA were found regarding health status. CONCLUSION: The Danish META generates reliable scores for this sample. However, conclusive statements cannot be made for all items.

  • 12.
    Bellner, Anna-Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Working conditions Influencing Professionalization of Occupational and Physical Therapists: Part 1: A Quantitative Perspective1995In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 2, no 3-4, p. 145-152Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Bergstrom, Aileen
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Tham, Kerstin
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Association between satisfaction and participation in everyday occupations after stroke2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 339-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Within occupational therapy, it is assumed that individuals are satisfied when participating in everyday occupations that they want to do. However, there is little empirical evidence to show this. Aims: The aim of this study is to explore and describe the relation between satisfaction and participation in everyday occupations in a Swedish cohort, 5 years post stroke. Methods: Sixty-nine persons responded to the Occupational Gaps Questionnaire (OGQ). The questionnaire measures subjective restrictions in participation, i.e. the discrepancy between doing and wanting to do 30 different occupations in everyday life, and satisfaction per activity. Results were analysed with McNemar/chi-square. Results: Seventy percent of the persons perceived participation restrictions. Individuals that did not perceive restrictions in their participation had a significantly higher level of satisfaction (p=.002) compared to those that had restrictions. Participants that performed activities that they wanted to do report between 79 and 100% satisfaction per activity. Conclusion: In this cohort, there was a significant association between satisfaction and participating in everyday occupations one wants to do, showing that satisfaction is an important aspect of participation and substantiates a basic assumption within occupational therapy. The complexity of measuring satisfaction and participation in everyday occupations is discussed.

  • 14.
    Bergström, Aileen L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Asaba, Eric
    Erikson, Anette
    Tham, Kerstin
    Complex negotiations: The lived experience of enacting agency after a stroke2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 43-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This qualitative, longitudinal, descriptive study aimed to understand the lived experience of enacting agency, and to describe the phenomenon of agency and the meaning structure of the phenomenon during the year after a stroke. Agency is defined as making things happen in everyday life through one's actions. Methods: This study followed six persons (three men and three women, ages 63 to 89), interviewed on four separate occasions. Interview data were analysed using the Empirical Phenomenological Psychological method. Results: The main findings showed that the participants experienced enacting agency in their everyday lives after stroke as negotiating different characteristics over a span of time, a range of difficulty, and in a number of activities, making these negotiations complex. The four characteristics described how the participants made things happen in their everyday lives through managing their disrupted bodies, taking into account their past and envisioning their futures, dealing with the world outside themselves, and negotiating through internal dialogues. Conclusions: This empirical evidence regarding negotiations challenges traditional definitions of agency and a new definition of agency is proposed. Understanding clients' complex negotiations and offering innovative solutions to train in real-life situations may help in the process of enabling occupations after a stroke.

  • 15.
    Bergström, Aileen L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Asaba, Eric
    Erikson, Anette
    Tham, Kerstin
    Complex negotiations: The lived experience of enacting agency after a stroke2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 43-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This qualitative, longitudinal, descriptive study aimed to understand the lived experience of enacting agency, and to describe the phenomenon of agency and the meaning structure of the phenomenon during the year after a stroke. Agency is defined as making things happen in everyday life through one's actions. Methods: This study followed six persons (three men and three women, ages 63 to 89), interviewed on four separate occasions. Interview data were analysed using the Empirical Phenomenological Psychological method. Results: The main findings showed that the participants experienced enacting agency in their everyday lives after stroke as negotiating different characteristics over a span of time, a range of difficulty, and in a number of activities, making these negotiations complex. The four characteristics described how the participants made things happen in their everyday lives through managing their disrupted bodies, taking into account their past and envisioning their futures, dealing with the world outside themselves, and negotiating through internal dialogues. Conclusions: This empirical evidence regarding negotiations challenges traditional definitions of agency and a new definition of agency is proposed. Understanding clients' complex negotiations and offering innovative solutions to train in real-life situations may help in the process of enabling occupations after a stroke.

  • 16.
    Bergström, Maria
    et al.
    Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Department of Rheumatology, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Börsbo, Björn
    Division of Community Medicine, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Sweden.
    ‘Like the worst toothache you’ve had’ – How people with rheumatoid arthritis describe and manage pain2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 468-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease often associated with disability. Despite new treatments, pain and activity limitations are still present.

    Objectives: To describe how persons with RA experience and manage pain in their daily life.

    Methods: Seven semi-structured focus groups (FGs) were conducted and analyzed using content analysis.

    Results: The analysis revealed four categories: 1) Pain expresses itself in different ways referred to pain as overwhelming, aching or as a feeling of stiffness. 2) Mitigating pain referred to the use of heat, cold, medications and activities as distractions from the pain. 3) Adapting to pain referred to strategies employed as coping mechanisms for the pain, e.g. planning and adjustment of daily activities, and use of assistive devices. 4) Pain in a social context referred to the participants’ social environment as being both supportive and uncomprehending, the latter causing patients to hide their pain.

    Conclusions: Pain in RA is experienced in different ways. This emphasizes the multi-professional team to address this spectrum of experiences and to find pain management directed to the individual experience that also include the person’s social environment.

  • 17.
    Bergström, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Jonköping University, Sweden; Curtin University, Australia.
    Börsbo, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Like the worst toothache you've had - How people with rheumatoid arthritis describe and manage pain2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 468-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease often associated with disability. Despite new treatments, pain and activity limitations are still present. Objectives: To describe how persons with RA experience and manage pain in their daily life. Methods: Seven semi-structured focus groups (FGs) were conducted and analyzed using content analysis. Results: The analysis revealed four categories: 1) Pain expresses itself in different ways referred to pain as overwhelming, aching or as a feeling of stiffness. 2) Mitigating pain referred to the use of heat, cold, medications and activities as distractions from the pain. 3) Adapting to pain referred to strategies employed as coping mechanisms for the pain, e.g. planning and adjustment of daily activities, and use of assistive devices. 4) Pain in a social context referred to the participants social environment as being both supportive and uncomprehending, the latter causing patients to hide their pain. Conclusions: Pain in RA is experienced in different ways. This emphasizes the multi-professional team to address this spectrum of experiences and to find pain management directed to the individual experience that also include the persons social environment.

  • 18.
    Bernspång, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Editorial2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 203-204Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Bernspång, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Editorial. A more global arena for occupational therapy science.2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 67-67Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Bernspång, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    International occupational therapy journal.2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 99-100Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Bernspång, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Rater calibration stability for the assessment of motor and process skills1999In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 101-109Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Bernspång, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Scandinavian journal of occupational therapy2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 83-84Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Bernspång, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    The publications are covering fields of great interest to our researchers and research students, as well as all clinicians2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24. Bertilsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Ranner, Maria
    von Koch, Lena
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Ytterberg, Charlotte
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Tham, Kerstin
    A client-centred ADL intervention: three-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 377-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to study a client-centred activities of daily living (ADL) intervention (CADL) compared with the usual ADL intervention (UADL) in people with stroke regarding: independence in ADL, perceived participation, life satisfaction, use of home-help service, and satisfaction with training and, in their significant others, regarding: caregiver burden, life satisfaction, and informal care. Methods: In this multicentre study, 16 rehabilitation units were randomly assigned to deliver CADL or UADL. The occupational therapists who provided the CADL were specifically trained. Eligible for inclusion were people with stroke treated in a stroke unit 3 months after stroke, dependent in two ADL, not diagnosed with dementia, and able to understand instructions. Data were collected at inclusion and three months thereafter. To detect a significant difference between the groups in the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) domain "participation", 280 participants were required. Intention-to-treat analysis was applied. Results: At three months, there was no difference in the outcomes between the CADL group (n = 129) and the UADL group (n = 151), or their significant others (n = 87/n = 93) except in the SIS domain "emotion" in favour of CADL (p = 0.04). Conclusion: The CADL does not appear to bring about short-term differences in outcomes and longer follow-ups are required.

  • 25. Bertilsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Ranner, Maria
    von Koch, Lena
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Ytterberg, Charlotte
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Tham, Kerstin
    A client-centred ADL intervention: three-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 377-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to study a client-centred activities of daily living (ADL) intervention (CADL) compared with the usual ADL intervention (UADL) in people with stroke regarding: independence in ADL, perceived participation, life satisfaction, use of home-help service, and satisfaction with training and, in their significant others, regarding: caregiver burden, life satisfaction, and informal care. Methods: In this multicentre study, 16 rehabilitation units were randomly assigned to deliver CADL or UADL. The occupational therapists who provided the CADL were specifically trained. Eligible for inclusion were people with stroke treated in a stroke unit 3 months after stroke, dependent in two ADL, not diagnosed with dementia, and able to understand instructions. Data were collected at inclusion and three months thereafter. To detect a significant difference between the groups in the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) domain "participation", 280 participants were required. Intention-to-treat analysis was applied. Results: At three months, there was no difference in the outcomes between the CADL group (n = 129) and the UADL group (n = 151), or their significant others (n = 87/n = 93) except in the SIS domain "emotion" in favour of CADL (p = 0.04). Conclusion: The CADL does not appear to bring about short-term differences in outcomes and longer follow-ups are required.

  • 26. Bertilsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Ranner, Maria
    von Koch, Lena
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Ytterberg, Charlotte
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Tham, Kerstin
    A client-centred ADL intervention: three-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 377-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to study a client-centred activities of daily living (ADL) intervention (CADL) compared with the usual ADL intervention (UADL) in people with stroke regarding: independence in ADL, perceived participation, life satisfaction, use of home-help service, and satisfaction with training and, in their significant others, regarding: caregiver burden, life satisfaction, and informal care. Methods: In this multicentre study, 16 rehabilitation units were randomly assigned to deliver CADL or UADL. The occupational therapists who provided the CADL were specifically trained. Eligible for inclusion were people with stroke treated in a stroke unit 3 months after stroke, dependent in two ADL, not diagnosed with dementia, and able to understand instructions. Data were collected at inclusion and three months thereafter. To detect a significant difference between the groups in the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) domain "participation", 280 participants were required. Intention-to-treat analysis was applied. Results: At three months, there was no difference in the outcomes between the CADL group (n = 129) and the UADL group (n = 151), or their significant others (n = 87/n = 93) except in the SIS domain "emotion" in favour of CADL (p = 0.04). Conclusion: The CADL does not appear to bring about short-term differences in outcomes and longer follow-ups are required.

  • 27.
    Bertilsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Von Koch, Lena
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Neurol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tham, Kerstin
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Occupat Therapy, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Client-centred ADL intervention after stroke: Significant others' experiences2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 377-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Client-centredness is a prominent contemporary concept in rehabilitation. However, there is a lack of knowledge on if and how a client-centred rehabilitation approach is incorporated in the everyday life of significant others of people who receive such rehabilitation. Objective: Explore and describe if and how a client-centred ADL intervention (CADL) was integrated in the everyday lives of significant others of people with stroke. Materials and methods: Qualitative longitudinal design, with a grounded theory approach. Seven significant others, who cohabited with persons receiving a CADL intervention, were interviewed during the first year. Findings: One core category was identified: "Taking responsibility and achieving balance with respect to self-esteem in order to get on with everyday life". The integration of the CADL was a process. A key aspect was that as the person with stroke acted upon his/her own desired activity goals the significant others were encouraged to act on their own needs. Conclusions: Enablement is important also for the significant others of people with stroke. One way of enabling significant others to maintain an active lifestyle and find respite in everyday life might be to enable people with stroke to formulate and act upon their desired activity goals.

  • 28.
    Bigelius, Ulla
    et al.
    Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Eklund, Mona
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    The value and meaning of an instrumental occupation performed in a clinical setting2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 4-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate how patients in a clinical setting, combining acute stroke care and rehabilitation, perceived the value and meaning attached to a commonly used instrumental occupation, namely "Brewing coffee and making an open-face cheese sandwich with sliced vegetable". Another aim was to validate the ValMO model, proposing that value and meaning are related phenomena. Upon performing the occupation, 38 participants answered questionnaires concerning perceived meaning and occupational value. The results showed that the occupation was highly valued by the participants and that it was perceived as meaningful. No age or gender differences were found. The findings confirmed the proposed link between value and meaning. In conclusion, a commonly used and supposedly meaningful occupation was indeed found to be valued and meaningful by the patients and the findings validated the targeted aspects of the ValMO model. This study was unique in its focus on value and meaning in a clinical context. Futures studies should clarify if the link between meaningful occupation and well-being, which has been shown in many studies of everyday situations and is another of the assumptions in the ValMO model, can be proved in clinical contexts as well. © 2010 Informa UK Ltd.

  • 29. Bigelius, Ulla
    et al.
    Eklund, Mona
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    The value and meaning of an instrumental occupation performed in a clinical setting2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 4-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate how patients in a clinical setting, combining acute stroke care and rehabilitation, perceived the value and meaning attached to a commonly used instrumental occupation, namely “Brewing coffee and making an open-face cheese sandwich with sliced vegetable”. Another aim was to validate the ValMO model, proposing that value and meaning are related phenomena. Upon performing the occupation, 38 participants answered questionnaires concerning perceived meaning and occupational value. The results showed that the occupation was highly valued by the participants and that it was perceived as meaningful. No age or gender differences were found. The findings confirmed the proposed link between value and meaning. In conclusion, a commonly used and supposedly meaningful occupation was indeed found to be valued and meaningful by the patients and the findings validated the targeted aspects of the ValMO model. This study was unique in its focus on value and meaning in a clinical context. Futures studies should clarify if the link between meaningful occupation and well-being, which has been shown in many studies of everyday situations and is another of the assumptions in the ValMO model, can be proved in clinical contexts as well.

  • 30.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. AFR. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Occupational Therapist: A Chameleon in the Light of Paradigms1994In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 59-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this pilotstudy is to present a more disticnct profile of the profession, deriving inspiration from Törnebohm's theory of paradigms. Six occupational therapists answered in writing 12 open essay questions about their ideas on paradigmatic matters. The focus in the questions is within the occupational therapist's field of action view and results are presented as aspects of practice. The occupational therapist is like a chameleon in the field of health care. She alters between different roles, using various parts of her professional competence to support the patient in reaching a meaningful everyday life from the patient's own perspective. The flexibility of the profession may contribute to many occupational therapists' feelings of having av vague professional profile, but is fundamental and a prerequisite of good occupational therapy. A greater awareness of our professional paradigm creates conditions by which it can be improved and adapted to variable demands. and a greater possibility to express the profession to society.

  • 31.
    Björklund, Anita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. AFR. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Borell, Lena
    Svensson, Tommy
    What Occupational Therapists Consider to be Worth Knowing: An Analysis of Swedish Occupational Therapists' Examination Papers 1984-96.1999In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 127-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine and characterize an aggregation of experienced occupational therapists´ exam papers with regard to the occupational therapists´ research interests, concerning especially ontological and strategical matters, during the time period 1984-1996. The title pages, summaries and results discussions of 84 papers were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively with the starting point in two of the components from Törnebohm´s structure of paradigms: the world view- and the field of action view-component. The occupational therapists´ interest in research subjects related to the field of action view component of paradigms, and applied research on strategical matters, dominates throughout the material. The interest in research subjects related to the world view component of paradigms, and basic research on ontological matters, increases in the last five year period. The increasing interest in more ontological matters seems as a natural and necessary progress for a profession which is deeply involved in knowledge aquired by experience. Only by the development of a “double-edged” knowledge, the profession has the possibility of developing and adapting to future demands.

  • 32.
    Björklund, Anita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Svensson, Tommy
    Health, the Body and Occupational Therapy2000In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 26-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify and characterise conceptions of health in a group of experienced occupational therapists. Data-collection involved the occupational therapists´ personal accounts of the meaning of health and data analysis was accomplished qualitatively. The material was found to comprise 52 distinguishable articulations of the meaning of health, which were categorized under three main themes: 22 articulations of Health as “feeling fine“; 20 articulations of Health as ability to act; and 10 articulations of Health as an objective state of body and/or mind. The results show a very strong tendency towards holistic health conceptions and also toward a phenomenological view on the body. If this tendency should be taken to reflect current basic views within the profession this would indicate a movement away from biomedical frames of reference on the theoretical level. This would seem to imply consequent movements on the practice level away from organ focused interventions to the benefit of interventions in the person/context dimension of occupational performance. Studies of processes of change seem to be needed and we suggest that a paradigm theory approach probably be most pertinent.

  • 33. Björklund, Anita
    et al.
    Svensson, Tommy
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Sociology.
    Read, Sanna
    Holistic and biomedical concepts of health: A study of health notions among Swedish occupational therapists and a suggestion for developing an instrument for comparative studies2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 141-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of this study were to inquire into notions of health among a group of 439 Swedish occupational therapists and to test a model derived from a qualitative study by Björklund & Svensson with a representative sample of occupational therapists in Sweden. The data were collected through a questionnaire and were analyzed using descriptive statistics, cluster analysis, and confirmatory factor analysis. The means and ranking of the health notions showed that Swedish occupational therapists most frequently hold holistic notions of health, and to a lesser extent biostatistical ones. Most Swedish occupational therapists indicate that being clearly conscious of one's health notions is important both to themselves and to their profession. The test of the model provides a step towards developing an instrument for measuring notions of health that clearly distinguishes between holistic and biomedical ones and that could possibly be used for comparative studies.

  • 34.
    Björklund, Anita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Svensson, Tommy
    Read, Sanna
    Holistic and biomedical concepts of health: A study of health notions among Swedish occupational therapists and a suggestion for developing an instrument for comparative studies.2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 141-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of this study were to inquire into notions of health among a group of 439 Swedish occupational therapists and to test a model derived from a qualitative study by Björklund and Svensson in a representative sample of occupational therapists in Sweden. The data were collected through a questionnaire and were analyzed using descriptive statistics, cluster analysis and confirmatory factor analysis. The means and ranking of the health notions showed that the Swedish occupational therapists most frequently hold holistic notions of health, and to a smaller extent biostatistical ones. Most Swedish occupational therapists indicate that being clearly conscious of one’s health notions is important both to themselves and to their profession. The test of the model provides a step towards developing an instrument for measuring notions of health that clearly distinguishes between holistic and biomedical ones and that could possibly be used for comparative studies.

  • 35. Bolic, Vedrana
    et al.
    Lidström, Helene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Thelin, Nils
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Computer use in educational activities by students with ADHD2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 357-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate computer use in educational activities by students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in comparison with that of students with physical disabilities and students from the general population. Methods: The design of the study was cross-sectional with group comparison. Students with ADHD (n = 102) were pair-matched in terms of age and sex with students with physical disabilities and students from the general population (n = 940) were used as a reference group. Results: The study showed that less than half of the students with ADHD had access to a computer in the classroom. Students with ADHD reported significantly less frequent use of computers for almost all educational activities compared with students with physical disabilities and students from the general population. Students with ADHD reported low satisfaction with computer use in school. In addition, students with ADHD reported a desire to use computers more often and for more activities in school compared with students with physical disabilities. Conclusions: These results indicate that occupational therapists should place more emphasize on how to enable students with ADHD to use computers in educational activities in school.

  • 36.
    Bolic, Vedrana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thelin, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Computer use in educational activities by students with ADHD2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 357-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate computer use in educational activities by students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in comparison with that of students with physical disabilities and students from the general population.

    Methods: The design of the study was cross-sectional with group comparison. Students with ADHD (n = 102) were pair-matched in terms of age and sex with students with physical disabilities and students from the general population (n = 940) were used as a reference group.

    Results: The study showed that less than half of the students with ADHD had access to a computer in the classroom. Students with ADHD reported significantly less frequent use of computers for almost all educational activities compared with students with physical disabilities and students from the general population. Students with ADHD reported low satisfaction with computer use in school. In addition, students with ADHD reported a desire to use computers more often and for more activities in school compared with students with physical disabilities.

    Conclusions: These results indicate that occupational therapists should place more emphasize on how to enable students with ADHD to use computers in educational activities in school.

  • 37.
    Boman, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Danderyd Hospital.
    Lindberg Stenvall, Charlotte
    Danderyd Hospital.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Karolinska Institute.
    Bartfai, Aniko
    Danderyd Hospital.
    A training apartment with a set of electronic memory aids for patients with cognitive problems2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 140-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims were to investigate whether patients with memory difficulties after acquired brain injury (ABI) are able to learn how to use a set of electronic memory aids integrated in a training apartment, and to use the same setting for identifying activities that these patients tend to forget among a predefined set of activities. This identification is done by using a computer system to register activities that are not performed, which the system is designed to act upon with reminders or alarms. During a stay of five days in the training apartment, 14 patients received training from an experienced occupational therapist to learn how to use the electronic memory aids. Significant improvements were found at group level in learning how to use the electronic memory aids. Computer registrations showed that the refrigerator and the stove were most challenging to remember. The total number of alarms and reminders as indication/measure of memory difficulties did not correlate with the Rivermead Behavioral Memory Test scores in the individuals. These findings indicate the importance of a stay in a training apartment to examine whether or not patients have difficulties in everyday activities and to try out electronic memory aids that might support these difficulties before they are discharged from the rehabilitation clinic.

  • 38.
    Borell, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Family Medicine, Section of Geriatric Mediant, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm University College of Health Sciences.
    Lilja, Margareta
    Carlsson-Alm, Siv
    Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Family Medicine, Section of Geriatric Mediant, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm University College of Health Sciences.
    Törnquist, Kristina
    Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Family Medicine, Section of Geriatric Mediant, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm University College of Health Sciences.
    Ståhl, Eva
    Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Family Medicine, Section of Geriatric Mediant, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm University College of Health Sciences.
    Community-based Occupational Therapy: A Study of Elderly People with Home Help in a Social-Welfare District in Stockholm1995In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 2, no 3-4, p. 138-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 1992 the local authorities in Sweden have been responsible for the rehabilitation of elderly people living at home. Few studies of this relatively new form of rehabilitation have been reported. The aim of this study was to describe the type of occupational- therapy interventions received by elderly people over the age of 65 living in an urban area. Another aim was to describe the patterns in the performances of 648 elderly people. The study demonstrated that most of the elderly people who received occupational therapy also received home help several times a day. indicating that these elderly people had severe problems in the activities of daily living (ADL) in the area of self-care. Home-making activities and activities outside the home were the most problematic activities. The elderly also wanted to engage in more activities than they were judged to have the capacity for and or the environmental support to do. The implications of the results for community-base, occupational-therapy programs are discussed

  • 39.
    Borell, Lena
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Nygard, Louise
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Asaba, Eric
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Gustavsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Qualitative approaches in occupational therapy research2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, p. 80-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Development of research in occupational therapy requires a continuous critical discussion concerning methodological approaches. In this paper the authors wish to contribute to such a discussion by introducing the Formal Data-Structure Analysis approach (FDSA) as a method for understanding peoples experiences. Methods and results: A review of selected publications from occupational therapy journals between 2003 and 2005 illustrated that qualitative articles within occupational therapy publications were mainly descriptive in nature. This finding raises questions about how to develop new knowledge that contributes to occupational therapy. Conclusions: In this paper the authors suggest that it is possible to apply the FDSA approach not only when describing and categorizing qualitative phenomena, but also when aiming to reach an in-depth understanding of issues related to human meaning-making; for example, how we understand engagement in occupations or living with a disability. Examples of the application of the FDSA approach are included and discussed.

  • 40.
    Borell, Lena
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
    Nygård, Louise
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
    Asaba, Eric
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
    Gustavsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Qualitative approaches in occupational therapy research.2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 521-529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Objective: Development of research in occupational therapy requires a continuous critical discussion concerning methodological approaches. In this paper the authors wish to contribute to such a discussion by introducing the Formal Data-Structure Analysis approach (FDSA) as a method for understanding people's experiences. Methods and results: A review of selected publications from occupational therapy journals between 2003 and 2005 illustrated that qualitative articles within occupational therapy publications were mainly descriptive in nature. This finding raises questions about how to develop new knowledge that contributes to occupational therapy. Conclusions: In this paper the authors suggest that it is possible to apply the FDSA approach not only when describing and categorizing qualitative phenomena, but also when aiming to reach an in-depth understanding of issues related to human meaning-making; for example, how we understand engagement in occupations or living with a disability. Examples of the application of the FDSA approach are included and discussed.

  • 41. Borell, Lena
    et al.
    Nygård, Louise
    Asaba, Eric
    Gustavsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Qualitative approaches in occupational therapy research2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, p. 80-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Development of research in occupational therapy requires a continuous critical discussion concerning methodological approaches. In this paper the authors wish to contribute to such a discussion by introducing the Formal Data-Structure Analysis approach (FDSA) as a method for understanding people's experiences. Methods and results: A review of selected publications from occupational therapy journals between 2003 and 2005 illustrated that qualitative articles within occupational therapy publications were mainly descriptive in nature. This finding raises questions about how to develop new knowledge that contributes to occupational therapy. Conclusions: In this paper the authors suggest that it is possible to apply the FDSA approach not only when describing and categorizing qualitative phenomena, but also when aiming to reach an in-depth understanding of issues related to human meaning-making; for example, how we understand engagement in occupations or living with a disability. Examples of the application of the FDSA approach are included and discussed.

  • 42. Borell, Lena
    et al.
    Nygård, Louise
    Asaba, Eric
    Gustavsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Qualitative approaches in occupational therapy research2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 521-529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Development of research in occupational therapy requires a continuous critical discussion concerning methodological approaches. In this paper the authors wish to contribute to such a discussion by introducing the Formal Data-Structure Analysis approach (FDSA) as a method for understanding people's experiences. Methods and results: A review of selected publications from occupational therapy journals between 2003 and 2005 illustrated that qualitative articles within occupational therapy publications were mainly descriptive in nature. This finding raises questions about how to develop new knowledge that contributes to occupational therapy. Conclusions: In this paper the authors suggest that it is possible to apply the FDSA approach not only when describing and categorizing qualitative phenomena, but also when aiming to reach an in-depth understanding of issues related to human meaning-making; for example, how we understand engagement in occupations or living with a disability. Examples of the application of the FDSA approach are included and discussed.

  • 43.
    Borgestig, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Falkmer, Torbjorn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Curtin University, Australia .
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Improving computer usage for students with physical disabilities through a collaborative approach: A pilot study2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 463-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an assistive technology (AT) intervention to improve the use of available computers as assistive technology in educational tasks for students with physical disabilities during an ongoing school year. Methods: Fifteen students (aged 12-18) with physical disabilities, included in mainstream classrooms in Sweden, and their teachers took part in the intervention. Pre-, post-, and follow-up data were collected with Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS), a computer usage diary, and with the Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale (PIADS). Teachers opinions of goal setting were collected at follow-up. Results: The intervention improved the goal-related computer usage in educational tasks and teachers reported they would use goal setting again when appropriate. At baseline, students reported a positive impact from computer usage with no differences over time regarding the PIADS subscales independence, adaptability, or self-esteem. Discussion: The AT intervention showed a positive effect on computer usage as AT in mainstream schools. Some additional support to teachers is recommended as not all students improved in all goal-related computer usage. A clinical implication is that students computer usage can be improved and collaboratively established computer-based strategies can be carried out by teachers in mainstream schools.

  • 44.
    Borgestig, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Falkmer, Torbjorn
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Improving computer usage for students with physical disabilities through a collaborative approach: A pilot study2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 463-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an assistive technology (AT) intervention to improve the use of available computers as assistive technology in educational tasks for students with physical disabilities during an ongoing school year. Methods: Fifteen students (aged 12-18) with physical disabilities, included in mainstream classrooms in Sweden, and their teachers took part in the intervention. Pre-, post-, and follow-up data were collected with Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS), a computer usage diary, and with the Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale (PIADS). Teachers' opinions of goal setting were collected at follow-up. Results: The intervention improved the goal-related computer usage in educational tasks and teachers reported they would use goal setting again when appropriate. At baseline, students reported a positive impact from computer usage with no differences over time regarding the PIADS subscales independence, adaptability, or self-esteem. Discussion: The AT intervention showed a positive effect on computer usage as AT in mainstream schools. Some additional support to teachers is recommended as not all students improved in all goal-related computer usage. A clinical implication is that students' computer usage can be improved and collaboratively established computer-based strategies can be carried out by teachers in mainstream schools.

  • 45.
    Borgestig, Maria
    et al.
    Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden; Folke Bernadotte Regional Habilitation Centre, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjorn
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth WA, Australia; School of Occupational Therapy, La Trobe University, Melbourne VIC, Australia; Faculty of Health Sciences, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Rehabilitation, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Improving computer usage for students with physical disabilities through a collaborative approach: A pilot study2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 463-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an assistive technology (AT) intervention to improve the use of available computers as assistive technology in educational tasks for students with physical disabilities during an ongoing school year.

    Methods: Fifteen students (aged 12-18) with physical disabilities, included in mainstream classrooms in Sweden, and their teachers took part in the intervention. Pre-, post-, and follow-up data were collected with Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS), a computer usage diary, and with the Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale (PIADS). Teachers opinions of goal setting were collected at follow-up.

    Results: The intervention improved the goal-related computer usage in educational tasks and teachers reported they would use goal setting again when appropriate. At baseline, students reported a positive impact from computer usage with no differences over time regarding the PIADS subscales independence, adaptability, or self-esteem.

    Discussion: The AT intervention showed a positive effect on computer usage as AT in mainstream schools. Some additional support to teachers is recommended as not all students improved in all goal-related computer usage. A clinical implication is that students computer usage can be improved and collaboratively established computer-based strategies can be carried out by teachers in mainstream schools.

  • 46.
    Borgestig, Maria
    et al.
    Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Improving computer usage for students with physical disabilities through a collaborative approach: a pilot study2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 463-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an assistive technology (AT) intervention to improve the use of available computers as assistive technology in educational tasks for students with physical disabilities during an ongoing school year. Methods: Fifteen students (aged 12–18) with physical disabilities, included in mainstream classrooms in Sweden, and their teachers took part in the intervention. Pre-, post-, and follow-up data were collected with Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS), a computer usage diary, and with the Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale (PIADS). Teachers' opinions of goal setting were collected at follow-up. Results: The intervention improved the goal-related computer usage in educational tasks and teachers reported they would use goal setting again when appropriate. At baseline, students reported a positive impact from computer usage with no differences over time regarding the PIADS subscales independence, adaptability, or self-esteem. Discussion: The AT intervention showed a positive effect on computer usage as AT in mainstream schools. Some additional support to teachers is recommended as not all students improved in all goal-related computer usage. A clinical implication is that students' computer usage can be improved and collaboratively established computer-based strategies can be carried out by teachers in mainstream schools.

  • 47.
    Breivik, Ingrid
    et al.
    Habilitation Centre, Östersund Hospital, Jämtland County Council, Sweden.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Experiences of handwriting and using a computerized ATD in school: Adolescents with Asperger's syndrome2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescents with Asperger's syndrome (AS), often have handwriting difficulties that affect their academic performance. The purpose of this descriptive multiple-case mixed-method study was to highlight how adolescents with AS experience writing in the school setting when writing by hand and when using a computerized Assistive Technology Device (ATD), for writing. A qualitative content analysis approach was used, including interviews with five adolescents, their parents, and their teachers. This was complemented by asking the adolescents to rate their perceived performance and satisfaction of writing with and without the ATD. All adolescents described handwriting difficulties, but a reduced ability to express oneself in writing was also common. Initiating and completing writing tasks was often so demanding that it caused resistance to the activity. Several advantages when using the ATD were described by the participants and the self-ratings showed higher scores for performance of and satisfaction with writing when the ATD was used. The results show that teachers' encouragement seemed to be important for the initiation and continuation of use of the ATD.

  • 48.
    Brorsson, Anna
    et al.
    1Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet,.
    Öhman, Annika
    1Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet,.
    Cutchin, Malcolm
    University of South Carolina at Chapel Hill.
    Nygård, Louise
    1Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet,.
    Managing critical incidents in grocery shopping by community-living people with Alzheimer's disease.2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 4, no 20, p. 292-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: People with Alzheimer's disease (AD) remain in their ordinary housing and continue to use public space despite increasing disabilities. The aim of this study was to discover and describe problematic situations and critical incidents that took place when people with AD performed the ordinary outside-home activity of grocery shopping and how these were met by them. Methods: Individual interviews (n = 12) and participant observations (n = 8) with six informants were performed and analysed using a grounded theory approach. Results: The findings are presented in six categories and each category describes different critical incidents and actions used to meet these. The categories were: (a) Remembering to bring things when leaving home, (b) Finding the way to and from the grocery shop without getting lost, (c) Finding a way through traffic when not feeling safe, (d) Finding objects when organization is disrupted, (e) Choosing when a lot of objects and products are available, and (f) Finding a method to pay when payment opportunities are restricted. The core category, “A challenging and unstable process of meeting critical incidents in grocery shopping”, was characterised by reflections and creativity to achieve relative harmony in each critical incident. Conclusions: In conclusion, it is important that relatives and professionals take into account relevant actions to help people with AD coordinate with their environment.Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/11038128.2012.752031

  • 49.
    Daremo, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Activity and participation in psychiatric institutional care2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 131-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    National action plans emphasize the importance of strengthening the role of patients in health and medical care. Patients should feel that they can participate and that they are seen as a resource. In occupational therapy, the client-centred approach has developed, whereby it is key to enable patients to participate in their treatment. The International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) has inspired this study, in which concepts such as activity and participation are central. The purpose of the study was to describe how patients in psychiatric institutional care conceive their opportunities to be active, and how they participate in their own treatment. Questionnaires were sent to patients who had received care during a six-month period. Ten patients were then selected for interview. The study shows that younger patients and patients who were treated involuntarily were generally more dissatisfied than other patients. The patients' perceptions of their environment were influenced by the values in the ward. Topics such as atmosphere in the ward, reception, continuity, and support were presented. Important factors related to activity and participation were: agreement concerning the treatment plan, discussions about expectations, creating conditions for engagement in activities, and providing the patients with opportunities to take responsibility for themselves.

  • 50.
    de Groot, Gudrun Cathrine Lindgren
    et al.
    Telemark Hospital, Norway / Buskerud University College, Norway.
    Fagerström, Lisbeth
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. Buskerud University College, Norway / Lovisenberg Deaconale University College, Norway.
    Older adults' motivating factors and barriers to exercise to prevent falls2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 153-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe motivating factors and barriers for older adults to adhere to group exercise in the local community aiming to prevent falls, and thereby gain knowledge about how health professionals can stimulate adherence. The motivation equation was used as a theoretical framework. Data were collected from individual semi-structured interviews (n = 10). The interviews were taped, transcribed, and thereafter analysed by using a descriptive content analysis consisting of four steps. The results showed that motivating factors to adhere to recommended exercise were perceived prospects of staying independent, maintaining current health status, and improving physical balance and the ability to walk. Barriers were reduced health status, lack of motivation, unpleasant experience during previous exercise group sessions, and environmental factors. All participants wanted information from health professionals on the benefit of exercise. Many considered individual variations in functional skills within each group as a disadvantage. The knowledge gained from this study suggests a greater involvement from all health professionals in motivating older adults to attend exercise groups. The results also suggest that physical therapists should be more aware of the importance of comparative levels of physical function when including participants in exercise groups.

1234567 1 - 50 of 363
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf