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  • 1.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping Univ.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping Univ.
    Bjorck-Akesson, Eva
    Jönköping Univ.
    Ibragimova, Nina
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Pless, Mia
    Jönköping Univ.
    EXPLORING CHANGES OVER TIME IN HABILITATION PROFESSIONALS' PERCEPTIONS AND APPLICATIONS OF THE INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFICATION OF FUNCTIONING, DISABILITY AND HEALTH, VERSION FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTH (ICF-CY)2010In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 42, no 7, p. 670-678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study explored how professionals in interdisciplinary teams perceived the implementation of the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, version for Children and Youth (ICF-CY) in Swedish habilitation services. Design: Descriptive longitudinal mixed-methods design. Methods: Following participation in a 2-day in-service training on the ICF-CY, 113 professionals from 14 interdisciplinary teams described their perceptions of the implementation of the ICF-CY at 3 consecutive time-points: during in-service training, after 1 year, and after 2.5 years. Results: Implementation of the ICF-CY in daily work focused on assessment and habilitation planning and required adaptations of routines and materials. The ICF-CY was perceived as useful in supporting analyses and in communication about children's needs. Professionals also perceived it as contributing to new perspectives on problems and a sharpened focus on participation. Conclusion: Professionals indicated that the ICF-CY enhanced their awareness of families' views of child participation, which corresponded to organizational goals for habilitation services. An implementation finding was a lack of tools fitting the comprehensive ICF-CY perspective. The study points to the need for ICF-CY-based assessment and intervention methods focusing on child participation.

  • 2.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Ibragimova, Nina
    Pless, Mia
    Exploring changes over time in habilitation professionals' perceptions and applications of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, version for children and youth (ICF-CY)2010In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 42, no 7, p. 670-678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:This study explored how professionals in interdisciplinary teams perceived the implementation of the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, version for Children and Youth (ICF-CY) in Swedish habilitation services.

    Design:Descriptive longitudinal mixed-methods design.

    Methods:Following participation in a 2-day in-service training on the ICF-CY, 113 professionals from 14 interdisciplinary teams described their perceptions of the implementation of the ICF-CY at 3 consecutive time-points: during in-service training, after 1 year, and after 2.5 years.

    Results:Implementation of the ICF-CY in daily work focused on assessment and habilitation planning and required adaptations of routines and materials. The ICF-CY was perceived as useful in supporting analyses and in communication about children’s needs. Professionals also perceived it as contributing to new perspectives on problems and a sharpened focus on participation.

    Conclusion:Professionals indicated that the ICF-CY enhanced their awareness of families’ views of child participation, which corresponded to organizational goals for habilitation services. An implementation finding was a lack of tools fitting the comprehensive ICF-CY perspective. The study points to the need for ICF-CY-based assessment and intervention methods focusing on child participation.

  • 3.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Granlund, Mats
    Hälsohögskolan, Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Ibragimova, Nina
    Akademin för utbildning, kultur och kommunikation, Mälardalens högskola.
    Pless, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Exploring changes over time in habilitation professionals' perceptions and applications of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, version for Children and Youth (ICF-CY).2010In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 42, no 7, p. 670-678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE

    This study explored how professionals in inter-disciplinary teams perceived the implementation of the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, version for Children and Youth (ICF-CY) in Swedish habilitation services.

    DESIGN

    Descriptive longitudinal mixed-methods design.

    METHODS

    Following participation in a 2-day in-service training on the ICF-CY, 113 professionals from 14 interdisciplinary teams described their perceptions of the implementation of the ICF-CY at 3 consecutive time-points: during in-service training, after 1 year, and after 2.5 years.

    RESULTS

    Implementation of the ICF-CY in daily work focused on assessment and habilitation planning and required adaptations of routines and materials. The ICF-CY was perceived as useful in supporting analyses and in communication about children's needs. Professionals also perceived it as contributing to new perspectives on problems and a sharpened focus on participation.

    CONCLUSION

    Professionals indicated that the ICF-CY enhanced their awareness of families' views of child participation, which corresponded to organizational goals for habilitation services. An implementation finding was a lack of tools fitting the comprehensive ICF-CY perspective. The study points to the need for ICF-CY-based assessment and intervention methods focusing on child participation

  • 4.
    Agnew, L.
    et al.
    University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia .
    Johnston, V.
    University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia .
    Ludvigsson, M. L.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Rehab Väst, County Council of Östergötland, Sweden.
    Peterson, G.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Overmeer, Thomas
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Johansson, G.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Peolsson, A.
    University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Factors associated with work ability in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder grade II-III: A cross-sectional analysis2015In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 546-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the factors related to self-perceived work ability in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder grades II-III. Design: Cross-sectional analysis. Patients: A total of 166 working age patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder. Methods: A comprehensive survey collected data on work ability (using the Work Ability Index); demographic, psychosocial, personal, work- and condition-related factors. Forward, stepwise regression modelling was used to assess the factors related to work ability. Results: The proportion of patients in each work ability category were as follows: poor (12.7%); moderate (39.8%); good (38.5%); excellent (9%). Seven factors explained 65% (adjusted R2= 0.65, p < 0.01) of the variance in work ability. In descending order of strength of association, these factors are: greater neck disability due to pain; reduced self-rated health status and health-related quality of life; increased frequency of concentration problems; poor workplace satisfaction; lower self-efficacy for performing daily tasks; and greater work-related stress. Conclusion: Condition-specific and psychosocial factors are associated with self-perceived work ability of individuals with chronic whiplash-associated disorder.

  • 5.
    Agnew, Louise
    et al.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Johnston, Venerina
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Overmeer, Thomas
    Malardalen University, Sweden; University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Johansson, Gun
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Queensland, Australia.
    FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH WORK ABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC WHIPLASH-ASSOCIATED DISORDER GRADE II-III: A CROSS-SECTIONAL ANALYSIS2015In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 546-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the factors related to self-perceived work ability in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder grades II-III. Design: Cross-sectional analysis. Patients: A total of 166 working age patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder. Methods: A comprehensive survey collected data on work ability (using the Work Ability Index); demographic, psychosocial, personal, work- and condition-related factors. Forward, stepwise regression modelling was used to assess the factors related to work ability. Results: The proportion of patients in each work ability category were as follows: poor (12.7%); moderate (39.8%); good (38.5%); excellent (9%). Seven factors explained 65% (adjusted R-2 = 0.65, p less than 0.01) of the variance in work ability. In descending order of strength of association, these factors are: greater neck disability due to pain; reduced self-rated health status and health-related quality of life; increased frequency of concentration problems; poor workplace satisfaction; lower self-efficacy for performing daily tasks; and greater work-related stress. Conclusion: Condition-specific and psychosocial factors are associated with self-perceived work ability of individuals with chronic whiplash-associated disorder.

  • 6. Agnew, Louise
    et al.
    Johnston, Venerina
    Ludvigsson, Maria Landen
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Overmeer, Thomas
    Johansson, Gun
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Factors associated with work ability in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder grade II-III: A cross-sectional analysis2015In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 546-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the factors related to self-perceived work ability in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder grades II-III. Design: Cross-sectional analysis. Patients: A total of 166 working age patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder. Methods: A comprehensive survey collected data on work ability (using the Work Ability Index); demographic, psychosocial, personal, work- and condition-related factors. Forward, stepwise regression modelling was used to assess the factors related to work ability. Results: The proportion of patients in each work ability category were as follows: poor (12.7%); moderate (39.8%); good (38.5%); excellent (9%). Seven factors explained 65% (adjusted R-2 = 0.65, p < 0.01) of the variance in work ability. In descending order of strength of association, these factors are: greater neck disability due to pain; reduced self-rated health status and health-related quality of life; increased frequency of concentration problems; poor workplace satisfaction; lower self-efficacy for performing daily tasks; and greater work-related stress. Conclusion: Condition-specific and psychosocial factors are associated with self-perceived work ability of individuals with chronic whiplash-associated disorder.

  • 7.
    Agnew, Louise
    et al.
    Division of Physiotherapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Johnston, Venerina
    Division of Physiotherapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Ludvigsson, Maria Landen
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Rehab Väst, County Council of Östergötland, Motala, Sweden.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Overmeer, Thomas
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. School of Health Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Johansson, Gun
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Division of Physiotherapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Factors associated with work ability in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder grade II-III: a cross-sectional analysis2015In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 546-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the factors related to self-perceived work ability in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder grades II-III.

    Design: Cross-sectional analysis.

    Patients: A total of 166 working age patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder.

    Methods: A comprehensive survey collected data on work ability (using the Work Ability Index); demographic, psychosocial, personal, work- and condition-related factors. Forward, stepwise regression modelling was used to assess the factors related to work ability.

    Results: The proportion of patients in each work ability category were as follows: poor (12.7%); moderate (39.8%); good (38.5%); excellent (9%). Seven factors explained 65% (adjusted R-2 = 0.65, p < 0.01) of the variance in work ability. In descending order of strength of association, these factors are: greater neck disability due to pain; reduced self-rated health status and health-related quality of life; increased frequency of concentration problems; poor workplace satisfaction; lower self-efficacy for performing daily tasks; and greater work-related stress.

    Conclusion: Condition-specific and psychosocial factors are associated with self-perceived work ability of individuals with chronic whiplash-associated disorder.

  • 8.
    Ahlgren, Christina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Waling, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Djupsjöbacka, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation. Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, National Institute for Working Life, Umeå , Sweden.
    Thornell, Lars-Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Sundelin, Gunnevi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Effects on physical performance and pain from three dynamic training programs for women with work-related trapezius myalgia2001In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 162-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To compare training programs for women with trapezius myalgia regarding physical performance and pain, 102 women were randomized to strength, endurance, co-ordination and non-training groups. Before and after the intervention, static strength and dynamic muscular endurance in shoulder muscles were measured on a Cybex II dynamometer. Muscle activity in shoulder muscles was monitored via surface EMG. The signal amplitude ratio between the active and passive phase of repeated contractions indicated the ability to relax. Pain at present, pain in general and pain at worst were measured on visual analogue scales. After training, within group comparisons showed that the training groups rated less pain, and in the strength training group ratings of pain at worst differed from the non-training group. Using the non-training group as a reference, static strength increased in the strength and endurance training groups and muscular endurance in all training groups. The study indicates that regular exercises with strength, endurance or co-ordination training of neck/shoulder muscles might alleviate pain for women with work-related trapezius myalgia.

  • 9.
    Ahlgren, Åsa
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Bergroth, Alf
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Ekholm, Jan
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Ekholm, Kristina Schüldt
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Selection of clients for vocational rehabilitation at six local social insurance offices: a combined register and questionnaire study on rehabilitation measures and attitudes among social insurance officers.2008In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 178-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate possible differences between local social insurance offices with regard to their selection of clients for vocational rehabilitation. A further aim was to determine whether social insurance officers from different local insurance offices have uniform attitudes regarding professional practice in their application of the insurance system. METHODS: A register-based investigation of 815 vocational rehabilitees served by 6 local social insurance offices in a Swedish county. The study was supplemented with a questionnaire to 30 officers about attitudes to social insurance. RESULTS: The office with the lowest rate of sick-listing periods exceeding one year, and a high frequency of employment training, showed the highest degree of work resumption and the lowest pension rate after vocational rehabilitation. There were wide differences in attitude among the local social insurance officers regarding professional practice in their application of the system. CONCLUSION: Intra-county differences occur in handling people on sick-leave who undergo vocational rehabilitation. The local social insurance offices with the highest and lowest outcome rates of work resumption and disability pension, respectively, select clients for vocational rehabilitation from different categories of cases. Social insurance officers from different local offices differ in their attitudes towards the social insurance system and its clients.

  • 10.
    Ahlgren, Åsa
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Bergroth, Alf
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Ekholm, Jan
    Schüldt Ekholm, Kristina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Selection of clients for vocational rehabilitation at six local social insurance offices.: a combined register and questionnaire study on rehabilitation measures and attitudes among social insurance officers.2008In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 178-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate possible differences between local social insurance offices with regard to their selection of clients for vocational rehabilitation. A further aim was to determine whether social insurance officers from different local insurance offices have uniform attitudes regarding professional practice in their application of the insurance system. METHODS: A register-based investigation of 815 vocational rehabilitees served by 6 local social insurance offices in a Swedish county. The study was supplemented with a questionnaire to 30 officers about attitudes to social insurance. RESULTS: The office with the lowest rate of sick-listing periods exceeding one year, and a high frequency of employment training, showed the highest degree of work resumption and the lowest pension rate after vocational rehabilitation. There were wide differences in attitude among the local social insurance officers regarding professional practice in their application of the system. CONCLUSION: Intra-county differences occur in handling people on sick-leave who undergo vocational rehabilitation. The local social insurance offices with the highest and lowest outcome rates of work resumption and disability pension, respectively, select clients for vocational rehabilitation from different categories of cases. Social insurance officers from different local offices differ in their attitudes towards the social insurance system and its clients.

  • 11.
    Alföldi, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Wiklund, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    SPREADING OF PAIN AND INSOMNIA IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC PAIN: RESULTS FROM A NATIONAL QUALITY REGISTRY (SQRP)2017In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 63-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore how demographics, pain, psychosocial factors and insomnia relate to the spread of chronic pain. Methods: The study included 708 patients (68% women; median age 46 years; interquartile range 3557 years) with chronic pain who were referred to a multidisciplinary pain centre. Spreading of pain was assessed using a questionnaire covering 36 anatomically predefined pain regions. Data were collected on demographics, pain symptoms, psychological distress, and insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index). Four sub-categories of chronic pain were established: chronic local pain, chronic regional pain medium, chronic regional pain heavy, and chronic widespread pain. Results: The median number of pain regions was 10 (interquartile range 6-18). Prevalence of chronic pain was as follows: chronic local pain 9%, chronic regional pain medium 21%, chronic regional pain heavy 39%, and chronic widespread pain 31%. In the regression models, being a woman and persistent pain duration had the strongest associations with spreading of pain, but anxiety, pain interference, and insomnia were also important factors. Conclusion: Spreading of chronic pain can only partly be explained by the simultaneous levels of insomnia. Female sex, pain duration, pain interference and anxiety appear to have more significant relationships with the spread of pain. Targeting these factors may lead to improvements in treatment and prevention strategies.

  • 12.
    Almborg, Ann-Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Quality of Life among Swedish Patients after Stroke: Psychometric Evaluation of SF-362009In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 48-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Alvsaker, Kristin
    et al.
    University of Oslo.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Kleffelgard, Ingerid
    University of Oslo.
    Mongs, Malin
    University of Oslo.
    Aas Draegebo, Randi
    University of Oslo.
    Keller, Anne
    University of Oslo.
    INTER-RATER RELIABILITY OF THE EARLY FUNCTIONAL ABILITIES SCALE2011In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 892-899Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the inter-rater reliability of the Early Functional Abilities (EFA) scale. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDesign: An observational study of inter-rater reliability in an open cohort. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanPatients: Twenty-four patients with traumatic brain injury in need of medical or surgical intervention in the early rehabilitation section of the intensive care unit. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: The EFA was assessed by 4 different professions in the rehabilitation team. Inter-rater reliability was assessed using linear weighted kappa statistics. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: The overall weighted kappa values of the different EFA items varied from 0.27 to 0.60. The items in the sensorimotor functional area had the highest pairwise agreement, with a mean kappa range of 0.68-0.76. The vegetative stability, position tolerance and wakefulness items had the lowest mean kappa values (0.49, 0.33 and 0.49, respectively). Agreement was good to excellent between the occupational therapist and physiotherapist across the majority of the items, whereas the physician and nurse agreed less with one another. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: The inter-rater reliability of the EFA scale was good for most items among all the raters. The scale may be used by all members of the interdisciplinary team after training in administration and scoring. A reduction in the number of items in the vegetative functional domain is recommended.

  • 14. Andersson, Åsa G.
    et al.
    Kamwendo, Kitty
    Örebro University, Department of Nursing and Caring Sciences.
    Seiger, Åke
    Appelros, Peter
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    How to identify potential fallers in a stroke unit: validity indexes of 4 test methods2006In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 186-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe general characteristics of patients with stroke who have a tendency to fall and to determine whether certain test instruments can identify fallers. METHODS: Patients treated in a stroke unit during a 12-month period were included. At inclusion assessments were made with Berg Balance Scale Berg Balance Scale, Stops Walking When Talking, Timed Up & Go (TUG) and diffTUG. At follow-up 6 or 12 months later, patients who had fallen were identified. RESULTS: During the time from discharge to follow-up on 159 patients, 68 patients fell and 91 did not. Fallers fell more often during their initial hospital stay, used sedatives more often and were more visually impaired, compared with non-fallers. The Berg Balance Scale, Stops Walking When Talking and TUG results differed between fallers and non-fallers. The combined results of Berg Balance Scale and Stops Walking When Talking increased the possibility of identifying fallers. CONCLUSION: Berg Balance Scale, Stops Walking When Talking and TUG can be used to evaluate which patients have a tendency to fall in order to carry out preventive measures. Berg Balance Scale can be used in all patients. Stops Walking When Talking can give additional information if the patient is able to walk. TUG is a possible choice, but fewer patients can perform it.

  • 15. Andréll, Paulin
    et al.
    Schultz, Tomas
    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa
    Nordeman, Lena
    Börjesson, Mats
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Mannheimer, Clas
    Health-related quality of life in fibromyalgia and refractory angina pectoris: a comparison between two chronic non-malignant pain disorders.2014In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 341-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To compare health-related quality of life in 2 different populations with chronic pain: patients with fibromyalgia and patients with refractory angina pectoris. Previous separate studies have indicated that these patient groups report different impacts of pain on health-related quality of life.

    METHODS: The Short-Form 36 was used to assess health- related quality of life. In order to adjust for age and gender differences between the groups, both patient groups were compared with age- and gender-matched normative controls. The difference in health-related quality of life between the 2 patient groups was assessed by transforming the Short-Form 36 subscale scores to a z-score.

    RESULTS: The patients with fibromyalgia (n = 203) reported poorer health-related quality of life in all the subscale scores of Short-Form 36 (p < 0.05-0.0001) than the patients with refractory angina (n = 146) when both groups were compared with their corresponding normal population (z-score).

    CONCLUSION: Patients with fibromyalgia experience greater impairment in health-related quality of life compared with the normal population than do patients with refractory angina pectoris, despite the fact that the latter have a potentially life-threatening disease. The great impairment in health- related quality of life in patients with fibromyalgia should be taken into consideration when planning rehabilitation.

  • 16.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Rheumatology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University.
    International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories explored for self-rated participation in Swedish adolescents and adults with a mild intellectual disability2012In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 44, no 7, p. 562-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To explore internal consistency and correlations between perceived ability, performance and perceived importance in a preliminary selection of self-reported items representing the activity/participation component of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF).

    DESIGN: Structured interview study.

    SUBJECTS: Fifty-five Swedish adolescents and adults with a mild intellectual disability.

    METHODS: Questions about perceived ability, performance and perceived importance were asked on the basis of a 3-grade Likert-scale regarding each of 68 items representing the 9 ICF domains of activity/participation.

    RESULTS: Internal consistency for perceived ability (Cronbach’s alpha for all 68 items): 0.95 (values for each domain varied between 0.57 and 0.85), for performance: 0.86 (between 0.27 and 0.66), for perceived importance: 0.84 (between 0.27 and 0.68). Seventy-two percent of the items showed correlations > 0.5 (mean = 0.59) for performance vs perceived importance, 41% > 0.5 (mean = 0.47) for perceived ability vs performance and 12% > 0.5 (mean = 0.28) for perceived ability vs perceived importance.

    CONCLUSION: Measures of performance and perceived importance may have to be based primarily on their estimated clinical relevance for describing aspects of the ICF participation concept. With a clinimetric approach, parts of the studied items and domains may be used to investigate factors related to different patterns and levels of participation, and outcomes of rehabilitation.

  • 17.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Granlund, Mats
    University of Örebro, Sweden Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories explored for self-rated participation in Swedish adolescents and adults with a mild intellectual disability2012In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 44, no 7, p. 562-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore internal consistency and correlations between perceived ability, performance and perceived importance in a preliminary selection of self-reported items representing the activity/participation component of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Design: Structured interview study. Subjects: Fifty-five Swedish adolescents and adults with a mild intellectual disability. Methods: Questions about perceived ability, performance and perceived importance were asked on the basis of a 3-grade Likert-scale regarding each of 68 items representing the 9 ICF domains of activity/participation. Results: Internal consistency for perceived ability (Cron-bachs alpha for all 68 items): 0.95 (values for each domain varied between 0.57 and 0.85), for performance: 0.86 (between 0.27 and 0.66), for perceived importance: 0.84 (between 0.27 and 0.68). Seventy-two percent of the items showed correlations greater than0.5 (mean =0.59) for performance vs perceived importance, 41% greater than0.5 (mean =0.47) for perceived ability vs performance and 12% greater than0.5 (mean =0.28) for perceived ability vs perceived importance. Conclusion: Measures of performance and perceived importance may have to be based primarily on their estimated clinical relevance for describing aspects of the ICF participation concept. With a clinimetric approach, parts of the studied items and domains may be used to investigate factors related to different patterns and levels of participation, and outcomes of rehabilitation.

  • 18.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Swedish Institute for Disability Research, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; CHILD, School of Health Science, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Rheumatology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    International classification of functioning, disability and health categories explored for selfrated participation in swedish adolescents and adults with a mild intellectual disability2012In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 44, no 7, p. 562-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore internal consistency and correlations between perceived ability, performance and perceived importance in a preliminary selection of self-reported items representing the activity/participation component of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF).

    Design: Structured interview study. Subjects: Fifty-five Swedish adolescents and adults with a mild intellectual disability.

    Methods: Questions about perceived ability, performance and perceived importance were asked on the basis of a 3-grade Likert-scale regarding each of 68 items representing the 9 ICF domains of activity/participation.

    Results: Internal consistency for perceived ability (Cron-bach's alpha for all 68 items): 0.95 (values for each domain varied between 0.57 and 0.85), for performance: 0.86 (between 0.27 and 0.66), for perceived importance: 0.84 (between 0.27 and 0.68). Seventy-two percent of the items showed correlations >0.5 (mean =0.59) for performance vs perceived importance, 41% >0.5 (mean =0.47) for perceived ability vs performance and 12% >0.5 (mean =0.28) for perceived ability vs perceived importance.

    Conclusion: Measures of performance and perceived importance may have to be based primarily on their estimated clinical relevance for describing aspects of the ICF participation concept. With a clinimetric approach, parts of the studied items and domains may be used to investigate factors related to different patterns and levels of participation, and outcomes of rehabilitation.

  • 19.
    Aspegren Kendall, Sally
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Elert, Jessica
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Are perceived muscle tension, electromyographic hyperactivity and personality traits correlated in the fibromyalgia syndrome?2002In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 73-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study was performed to investigate the relationship between perceived muscle tension and electromyographic hyperactivity and to what extent electromyographic (EMG) hyperactivity relates to personality traits in fibromyalgics. Thirty-six females with fibromyalgia performed isokinetic maximal forward flexions of the shoulder combined with surface EMG recordings of the trapezius and infraspinatus muscles. Signal amplitude ratio and peak torque were calculated in the initial and endurance test phases. Pain intensity, perceived general and local shoulder muscle tension, and personality traits using the Karolinska Scales of Personality were assessed pre-test. Neither perceived muscle tension nor muscular tension personality trait correlated with EMG muscle hyperactivity. Perceived general muscle tension correlated with aspects of anxiety proneness (including muscle tension) of the Karolinska Scales of Personality. Pain intensity interacted with many of the variables. We propose that when patients with fibromyalgia report muscle tension that they may be expressing something other than physiological muscle tension.

  • 20.
    Awad, A
    et al.
    Umeå Center for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI), Umeå, Sweden..
    Levi, Richard
    Umeå Center for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI), Umeå, Sweden..
    Lindgren, L
    Umeå Center for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI), Umeå, Sweden..
    Hultling, C
    Umeå Center for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI), Umeå, Sweden..
    Westling, G
    Umeå Center for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI), Umeå, Sweden..
    Nyberg, L
    Umeå Center for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI), Umeå, Sweden..
    Eriksson, J
    Umeå Center for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI), Umeå, Sweden..
    Preserved somatosensory conduction in a patient with complete cervical spinal cord injury.2015In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 426-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Neurophysiological investigation has shown that patients with clinically complete spinal cord injury can have residual motor sparing ("motor discomplete"). In the current study somatosensory conduction was assessed in a patient with clinically complete spinal cord injury and a novel methodology for assessing such preservation is described, in this case indicating "sensory discomplete" spinal cord injury.andlt;br /andgt;Methods: Blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI) was used to examine the somatosensory system in a healthy subject and in a subject with a clinically complete cervical spinal cord injury, by applying tactile stimulation above and below the level of spinal cord injury, with and without visual feedback.andlt;br /andgt;Results: In the participant with spinal cord injury, somatosensory stimulation below the neurological level of the lesion gave rise to BOLD signal changes in the corresponding areas of the somatosensory cortex. Visual feedback of the stimulation strongly modulated the somatosensory BOLD signal, implying that cortico-cortical rather than spino-cortical connections can drive activity in the somatosensory cortex. Critically, BOLD signal change was also evident when the visual feedback of the stimulation was removed, thus demonstrating sensory discomplete spinal cord injury.andlt;br /andgt;Conclusion: Given the existence of sensory discomplete spinal cord injury, preserved but hitherto undetected somatosensory conduction might contribute to the unexplained variability related to, for example, the propensity to develop decubitus ulcers and neuropathic pain among patients with clinically complete spinal cord injury.

  • 21.
    Awad, Amar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Levi, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Lindgren, Lenita
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Hultling, Claes
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (Neurorehabilitation), Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westling, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Eriksson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Preserved somatosensory conduction in a patient with complete cervical spinal cord injury2015In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 426-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Neurophysiological investigation has shown that patients with clinically complete spinal cord injury can have residual motor sparing ("motor discomplete"). In the current study somatosensory conduction was assessed in a patient with clinically complete spinal cord injury and a novel ethodology for assessing such preservation is described, in this case indicating "sensory discomplete" spinal cord injury. Methods: Blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI) was used to examine the somatosensory system in a healthy subject and in a subject with a clinically complete cervical spinal cord injury, by applying tactile stimulation above and below the level of spinal cord injury, with and without visual feedback. Results: In the participant with spinal cord injury, somatosensory stimulation below the neurological level of the lesion gave rise to BOLD signal changes in the corresponding areas of the somatosensory cortex. Visual feedback of the stimulation strongly modulated the somatosensory BOLD signal, implying that cortico-cortical rather than spino-cortical connections can drive activity in the somatosensory cortex. Critically, BOLD signal change was also evident when the visual feedback of the stimulation was removed, thus demonstrating sensory discomplete spinal cord injury. Conclusion: Given the existence of sensory discomplete spinal cord injury, preserved but hitherto undetected somatosensory conduction might contribute to the unexplained variability related to, for example, the propensity to develop decubitus ulcers and neuropathic pain among patients with clinically complete spinal cord injury.

  • 22. Bergstrom, Aileen L.
    et al.
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Tistad, Malin
    Tham, Kerstin
    von Koch, Lena
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Perceived occupational gaps one year after stroke: An explorative study2012In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 36-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore and describe factors associated with occupational gaps and to identify factors at 3 months that predict occupational gaps one year post-stroke. A gap, a restriction in participation, is considered to be present when there is a discrepancy between what the individual wants to do and what they actually do in everyday life. Design: Prospective longitudinal study. Subjects: Two hundred persons with stroke. Methods: Data from the Occupational Gaps Questionnaire, one year post-stroke, was used as the dependent variable in 3- and 12-month regression analyses. Domains of the Stroke Impact Scale, global life satisfaction, demographic and medical factors were used as independent variables. Results: At 3 months, activities of daily living abilities, social participation and not being born in Sweden predicted occupational gaps at 12 months. Stroke severity and not being born in Sweden and 3 factors at 12 months: social participation, self-rated recovery, and global life satisfaction were associated with occupational gaps. Conclusion: Activities of daily living ability at 3 months predicted occupational gaps after stroke. Thus, it is possible to identify early on, and provide interventions for, those that risk participation restrictions. Not being born in the country might be an indicator of a risk for participation restrictions.

  • 23.
    Bergström, Aileen L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    von Koch, Lena
    Andersson, Magnus
    Tham, Kerstin
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Participation in everyday life and life satisfaction in persons with stroke and their caregivers 3–6 months after onset2015In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 508-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore and describe persons with stroke and their caregivers' restrictions in participation in everyday occupations, i.e. occupational gaps, 3-6 months post-stroke, in relation to life satisfaction, combined life satisfaction, caregiver burden, perceived impact of stroke, and activities of daily living. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects: Persons with stroke and their caregivers (105 dyads). Methods: The Occupational Gaps Questionnaire, Life Satisfaction Checklist, Caregiver Burden Scale, Stroke Impact Scale and Barthel Index were used. Correlations were analysed with Spearman's rank, and regression analyses used life satisfaction as the dependent variable. Results: At least one person in 86% of the dyads perceived restrictions in participation, with the most common gap in travelling for pleasure. Correlations were low between the numbers of occupational gaps and life satisfaction (R=-0.33, R=-0.31); however, life satisfaction accounted for occupational gaps both for persons with stroke and for caregivers. A greater number of occupational gaps were perceived in the dyads with combined low levels of life satisfaction compared with those with combined high levels of life satisfaction. Conclusion: Participation in everyday occupations is related to life satisfaction even for caregivers of persons with stroke. The results of this study add to our knowledge about the stroke-caregiver dyad and will help to inform family-centred approaches within stroke rehabilitation.

  • 24.
    Bergström, Aileen L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    von Koch, Lena
    Andersson, Magnus
    Tham, Kerstin
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Participation in everyday life and life satisfaction in persons with stroke and their caregivers 3–6 months after onset2015In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 508-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore and describe persons with stroke and their caregivers' restrictions in participation in everyday occupations, i.e. occupational gaps, 3-6 months post-stroke, in relation to life satisfaction, combined life satisfaction, caregiver burden, perceived impact of stroke, and activities of daily living. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects: Persons with stroke and their caregivers (105 dyads). Methods: The Occupational Gaps Questionnaire, Life Satisfaction Checklist, Caregiver Burden Scale, Stroke Impact Scale and Barthel Index were used. Correlations were analysed with Spearman's rank, and regression analyses used life satisfaction as the dependent variable. Results: At least one person in 86% of the dyads perceived restrictions in participation, with the most common gap in travelling for pleasure. Correlations were low between the numbers of occupational gaps and life satisfaction (R=-0.33, R=-0.31); however, life satisfaction accounted for occupational gaps both for persons with stroke and for caregivers. A greater number of occupational gaps were perceived in the dyads with combined low levels of life satisfaction compared with those with combined high levels of life satisfaction. Conclusion: Participation in everyday occupations is related to life satisfaction even for caregivers of persons with stroke. The results of this study add to our knowledge about the stroke-caregiver dyad and will help to inform family-centred approaches within stroke rehabilitation.

  • 25.
    Bjerkefors, Anna
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Squair, Jordan W
    Chua, Romeo
    Lam, Tania
    Chen, Zhen
    Carpenter, Mark G
    Assessment of abdominal muscle function in individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury above T6 in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation.2015In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 138-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To use transcranial magnetic stimulation and electromyography to assess the potential for preserved function in the abdominal muscles in individuals classified with motor-complete spinal cord injury above T6. Subjects: Five individuals with spinal cord injury (C5-T3) and 5 able-bodied individuals. Methods: Transcranial magnetic stimulation was delivered over the abdominal region of primary motor cortex during resting and sub-maximal (or attempted) contractions. Surface electromyography was used to record motor-evoked potentials as well as maximal voluntary (or attempted) contractions in the abdominal muscles and the diaphragm. Results: Responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in the abdominal muscles occurred in all spinal cord injury subjects. Latencies of muscle response onsets were similar in both groups; however, peak-to-peak amplitudes were smaller in the spinal cord injury group. During maximal voluntary (or attempted) contractions all spinal cord injury subjects were able to elicit electromyography activity above resting levels in more than one abdominal muscle across tasks. Conclusion: Individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury above T6 were able to activate abdominal muscles in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation and during maximal voluntary (or attempted) contractions. The activation was induced directly through corticospinal pathways, and not indirectly by stretch reflex activations of the diaphragm. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and electromyography measurements provide a useful method to assess motor preservation of abdominal muscles in persons with spinal cord injury.

  • 26.
    Björck van Dijken, Christina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Hildingsson, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Low back pain, lifestyle factors and physical activity: a population-based study.2008In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 40, no 10, p. 864-869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective and designThe prevalence of low back pain was assessed in relation to physical activity, for both work and leisure activities, in a randomly selected population in the northern part of Sweden. Additionally, the associations between age, sex, level of education, lifestyle factors, demographic characteristics, and low back pain were evaluated. Subjects: A total of 5798 subjects aged 25–79 years were selected randomly from a geographically well-defined area in northern Sweden. Methods: Additional questions concerning people's experience of low back pain were added to the questionnaire of the World Health Organization MONICA (MONItoring of trends and determinants in CArdiovascular disease) health survey with the aim of investigating prevalence rates and factors associated with low back pain. Results: Forty-one percent of the participants reported having low back pain (of these 55% were women and 45% men). The prevalence rate was highest in the age group 55–64 years. Chronic low back pain was the most frequent occurring problem. Of those with low back pain, 43% of the women and 37% of the men reported having continuous low back pain for more than 6 months. Individuals with low back pain often experienced a more physically heavy workload at work and lower physical activity during leisure time, and they were also more likely to have been smokers, have had higher body mass index, lived in smaller communities, and were less educated than people without low back pain. Conclusion: Low back pain seems to be associated with physical activity at work and in leisure time, certain lifestyle factors and demographic characteristics.

  • 27.
    Björkdahl, Ann
    et al.
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Lundgren Nilsson, Åsa
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Stibrant Sunnerhagen, Katharina
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Can rehabilitation in the home setting reduce the burden of care for the next-of-kin of stroke victims?2007In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 27-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: More evidence of the efficacy of caregiver interventions is needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether counselling in the home setting reduces the caregiver burden.

    METHODS: Thirty-six patients after stroke, median age 53 years, with a close family member, were selected for an evaluation of the burden of care and 35 participated. They were part of a randomized controlled trial, comparing rehabilitation in the home setting with outpatient rehabilitation. In the home setting, counselling about the stroke and its consequences was included. Assessments with the Caregiver Burden scale were made at 3 weeks, 3 months and one year after discharge.

    RESULTS: The burden of the 2 groups did not differ. After the intervention, there was a tendency to a lower burden for the home setting. The burden for the home setting was then unchanged from 3 weeks to 1 year, while outpatient rehabilitation showed a reduced burden over time. For the home setting, significant correlations to activity level were seen after the intervention.

    CONCLUSION: A positive effect of counselling was seen, as the home setting burden tends to be lower after the intervention, while outpatient rehabilitation seems to adjust with time. The results suggest that counselling reduces burden and the remaining burden is associated with the patient's ability.

  • 28.
    Björkman Randström, Kerstin
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Paulson, Margareta
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Activity and participation in home rehabilitation: Older people's and family members perspectives2013In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 211-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore the experiences of older people and their supporting family members in relation to home rehabilitation, with a focus on activity and participation.

    Methods: Qualitative interviews were carried out with 6 older people and 6 family members at 1 and 6 months after the older person’s discharge to their home. Qualitative content analysis of the data was carried out. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health provides a guiding framework for rehabilitation.

    Results: Informants’ experiences of home rehabilitation contributed to the formation of 6 categories: (i) living with a frail body; (ii) striving for well-being in daily life; (iii) being close at hand; (iv) feeling dependent in daily life; (v) struggling to carry on; and (vi) striving to be at home.

    Conclusion: Older people’s goals were to return to daily routines and to perform meaningful activities without feeling dependent on other people. Family members’ participation was crucial. Psychosocial support and autonomy were essential for facilitating activity and participation. Healthcare professionals should consider each individual’s unique experiences along with the significance of being at home.

  • 29.
    Björkman Randström, Kerstin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Paulson, Margareta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Activity and participation in home rehabilitation: Older people's and family members perspectives2013In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 211-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore the experiences of older people and their supporting family members in relation to home rehabilitation, with a focus on activity and participation. Methods: Qualitative interviews were carried out with 6 older people and 6 family members at 1 and 6 months after the older person’s discharge to their home. Qualitative content analysis of the data was carried out. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health provides a guiding framework for rehabilitation. Results: Informants’ experiences of home rehabilitation contributed to the formation of 6 categories: (i) living with a frail body; (ii) striving for well-being in daily life; (iii) being close at hand; (iv) feeling dependent in daily life; (v) struggling to carry on; and (vi) striving to be at home. Conclusion: Older people’s goals were to return to daily routines and to perform meaningful activities without feeling dependent on other people. Family members’ participation was crucial. Psychosocial support and autonomy were essential for facilitating activity and participation. Healthcare professionals should consider each individual’s unique experiences along with the significance of being at home.

  • 30.
    Björnhagen, Viveca
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Ekholm, Kristina Schüldt
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Larsen, Flemming
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Ekholm, Jan
    Danderyd University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Burn survivors' pulmonary and muscular impairment, exercise tolerance and return-to-work following medical-vocational rehabilitation: A long-term follow-up2018In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 465-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To follow up the long-term outcome in return-to-work (RTW) rate in burn-injury patients, and to determine the degree of impairment in pulmonary and muscular function and exercise tolerance. Design: A prospective, longitudinal follow-up study without a control group. Patients: Twenty-five burn-injury patients referred for medical-vocational rehabilitation. Methods: Return-to-work rate was followed after completed medical-vocational rehabilitation. Pulmonary function was evaluated with spirometry, diffusing capacity and radio spirometry. Exercise capacity was determined using a bicycle ergometer. Muscle functions evaluated in the arms and legs were: isokinetic torque, isometric strength, endurance and muscular strength utilization. Results: Return-to-work rate was 87%. During bicycle exercise tests the patients, on average, reached their expected workloads. The dominating lung function abnormality observed on lung scintigraphy was delayed wash-out time of inhaled radioactive xenon gas, suggesting airway obstruction. All tests of shoulder-flexor and knee-extensor muscle function showed large minimum-maximum differences. Mean isometric endurance of shoulder flexors was lower than mean of references, and isokinetic knee extensor torques were slightly lower. Conclusion: High return-to-work rates can be achieved after burn injury requiring hospital-ward care. Despite measurable impairments in muscle strength/endurance and pulmonary function in a substantial proportion of these patients, overall normal bicycle exercise capacity was observed except for a few cases.

  • 31. Borg, Jörgen
    et al.
    Holm, Lena
    Cassidy, J David
    Peloso, Paul M.
    Carroll, Linda J.
    von Holst, Hans
    Department of Neurosurgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ericson, Kaj
    Diagnostic procedures in mild traumatic brain injury: results of the WHO Collaborating Centre Task Force on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury2004In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 36, no 43, p. 61-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined diagnostic procedures in mild traumatic brain injury by a systematic literature search. After screening 38,806 abstracts, we critically reviewed 228 diagnostic studies and accepted 73 (32%). The estimated prevalence of intracranial CT scan abnormalities is 5% in patients presenting to hospital with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15 and 30% or higher in patients presenting with a score of 13. About 1% of all treated patients with mild traumatic brain injury require neurosurgical intervention. There is strong evidence that clinical factors can predict computerized tomography scan abnormalities and the need for intervention in adults, but no such evidence for mild traumatic brain injury in children. We found evidence that skull fracture is a risk factor for intracranial lesions, but the diagnostic accuracy of radiologically diagnosed skull fracture as an indication of intracranial lesions is poor. There is only a little evidence for the diagnostic validity of cognitive testing and other diagnostic tools for mild traumatic brain injury.

  • 32. Borg, Jörgen
    et al.
    Holm, Lena
    Peloso, Paul M.
    Cassidy, J. David
    Carroll, Linda J.
    von Holst, Hans
    Department of Neurosurgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Paniak, Chris
    Yates, David
    Non-surgical intervention and cost for mild traumatic brain injury: results of the WHO Collaborating Centre Task Force on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury2004In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 36, no 43, p. 76-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined the evidence for non-surgical interventions and for economic costs for mild traumatic brain injury patients by a systematic search of the literature and a best-evidence synthesis. After screening 38,806 abstracts, we critically reviewed 45 articles on intervention and accepted 16 (36%). We reviewed 16 articles on economic costs and accepted 7 (44%). We found some evidence that early educational information can reduce long-term complaints and that this early intervention need not be intensive. Most cost studies were performed more than a decade ago. Indirect costs are probably higher than direct costs. Studies comparing costs for routine hospitalized observation vs the use of computerized tomography scan examination for selective hospital admission indicate that the latter policy reduces costs, but comparable clinical outcome of these policies has not been demonstrated. The sparse scientific literature in these areas reflects both conceptual confusion and limited knowledge of the natural history of mild traumatic brain injury.

  • 33.
    Brogårdh, Christina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Johansson, Fredrik W
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Nygren, Frida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Sjölund, Bengt H
    Mode of hand training determines cortical reorganisation: A randomized controlled study in healthy adults2010In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 789-794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate two commonly used forms of hand training with respect to influence on dexterity and cortical reorganization.

    Subjects: Thirty healthy volunteers (mean age 24.2 years).

    Methods: The subjects were randomized to 25 min of shaping exercises or general activity training of the non-dominant hand. The dexterity and the cortical motor maps (number of excitable positions) of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle were evaluated pre- and post-training by the Purdue Peg Board test and transcranial magnetic stimulation, respectively.

    Results: After shaping exercises the dexterity increased significantly (p ≤ 0.005) for both hands, mostly so in the non-dominant hand. The cortical motor map of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle shifted forwardly into the pre-motor area without expanding. After general activity training, no significant improvements in dexterity were found for the non-dominant hand. The cortical motor map of the non-dominant abductor pollicis brevis muscle expanded significantly (p = 0.03) in the posterior (sensory) direction.

    Conclusion: These results indicate that shaping exercises, but not general activity training, increase dexterity of the trained non-dominant hand in parallel with a shift of location of active transcranial magnetic stimulation positions. Shifts of active cortical areas might be important for the interpretation of brain plasticity in common behavioural tasks.

  • 34.
    Brogårdh, Christina
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Lexell, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Sjödahl Hammarlund, Catharina
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Experiences of falls and strategies to manage the consequences of falls in persons with late effects of polio: a qualitative study2017In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 49, no 8, p. 652-658Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To explore how persons with late effects of polio experience falls and what strategies they use to manage the consequences of falls.

    DESIGN:

    A qualitative study with face-to-face interviews. Data were analysed by systematic text condensation.

    PARTICIPANTS:

    Fourteen ambulatory persons (7 women; mean age 70 years) with late effects of polio.

    RESULTS:

    Analysis resulted in one main theme, "Everyday life is a challenge to avoid the consequences of falls", and 3 categories with 7 subcategories. Participants perceived that falls were unpredictable and could occur anywhere. Even slightly uneven surfaces could cause a fall, and increased impairments following late effects of polio led to reduced movement control and an inability to adjust balance quickly. Physical injuries were described after the falls, as well as emotional and psychological reactions, such as embarrassment, frustration and fear of falling. Assistive devices, careful planning and strategic thinking were strategies to prevent falls, together with adaptation and social comparisons to mitigate the emotional reactions.

    CONCLUSION:

    Experiences of falls greatly affect persons with late effects of polio in daily life. To reduce falls and fall-related consequences both problem-focused and emotion-focused strategies are used. In order to increase daily functioning, these findings should be included in a multifaceted falls management programme.

  • 35.
    Brogårdh, Christina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine. Department of Rehabilitation, Lund University Hospital, Lund.
    Vestling, Monika
    Sjölund, Bengt H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine. 3Rehabilitation and Research Centre for Torture Victims, Copenhagen and University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Shortened constraint-induced movement therapy in subacute stroke - no effect of using a restraint: a randomized controlled study with independent observers2009In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 231-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine the effect of using a mitt during shortened constraint-induced movement therapy for patients in the subacute phase after stroke.

    Subjects: Twenty-four patients with stroke (mean age 57.6 (standard deviation 8.5) years; average 7 weeks post-stroke) with mild to moderate impaired hand function.

    Methods: The patients were randomized to mitt use or no mitt use on the less affected hand for 90% of waking hours for 12 days. All patients received 3 h of arm and hand training per day for 2 weeks. Assessments were made by blinded observers using the modified Motor Assessment Scale, the Sollerman hand function test, the 2-Point Discrimination test and Motor Activity Log test.

    Results: Patients in both groups showed significant improvements in arm and hand motor performance and on self-reported motor ability after 2 weeks of therapy and at 3 months follow-up. However, no statistically significant differences between the groups were found in any measures at any point in time.

    Conclusion: In this study, no effect of using a restraint in patients with subacute stroke was found. Thus, this component in the constraint-induced therapy concept seems to be of minor importance for the outcome.

  • 36.
    Brorsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Hilliges, Marita
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Sollerman, Christer
    Department of Hand Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg.
    Nilsdotter, Anna
    R & D Center, Spenshults Hospital of Rheumatic Diseases .
    A six-week hand exercise programme improves strength and hand function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis2009In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 338-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To evaluate the effects of hand exercise in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and to compare the results with healthy controls.

    METHODS:

    Forty women (20 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 20 healthy controls) performed a hand exercise programme. The results were evaluated after 6 and 12 weeks with hand force measurements (with a finger extension force measurement device (EX-it) and finger flexion force measurement with Grippit). Hand function was evaluated with the Grip Ability Test (GAT) and with patient relevant questionnaires (Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) and Short Form-36). Ultrasound measurements were performed on m. extensor digitorum communis for analysis of the muscle response to the exercise programme.

    RESULTS:

    The extension and flexion force improved in both groups after 6 weeks (p < 0.01). Hand function (GAT) also improved in both groups (p < 0.01). The rheumatoid arthritis group showed improvement in the results of the DASH questionnaire (p < 0.05). The cross-sectional area of the extensor digitorum communis increased significantly in both groups measured with ultrasound.

    CONCLUSION:

    A significant improvement in hand force and hand function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis was seen after 6 weeks of hand training; the improvement was even more pronounced after 12 weeks. Hand exercise is thus an effective intervention for rheumatoid arthritis patients, leading to better strength and function.

  • 37.
    Brorsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Nilsdotter, Anna
    Department of Research and Education, Halmstad County Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Pedersen, Eja
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Bremander, Ann
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Thorstensson, Carina
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Relationship between finger flexion and extension force in healthy women and women with rheumatoid arthritis2012In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 44, no 7, p. 605-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Balance between flexor and extensor muscle activity is essential for optimal function. The purpose of this pilot study was to compare the relationship between maximum finger flexion force and maximum finger extension force in women with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy women.

    METHODS: Twenty healthy women (median age 61 years) and 20 women with rheumatoid arthritis (median age 59.5 years, median disease duration 16.5 years) were included in the study. Finger extension force was measured with an electronic device, EX-it, and finger flexion force using Grippit. The Grip Ability Test and the score from the patient-reported outcome Disability Arm Shoulder and Hand were used to evaluate activity limitations.

    RESULTS: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis showed significantly decreased hand function compared with healthy controls. A correlation was found between extension force and flexion force in the healthy group (r = 0.65, p = 0.002),but not in the rheumatoid arthritis group (r = 0.25, p = 0.289).

    CONCLUSION: Impaired hand function appears to influence the relationship between maximum finger flexion and extension force. This study showed a difference in the relationship between maximum finger flexion and extension force in healthy controls and those with rheumatoid arthritis. © 2012 Foundation of Rehabilitation Information.

  • 38.
    Brorsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Halmstad University.
    Nilsdotter, Anna
    Pedersen, Eja
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Bremander, Ann
    Lunds universitet.
    Thorstensson, Carina
    Lunds universitet.
    The relationship between finger flexion and extension force in healthy women and women with rheumatoid arthritis2012In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, ISSN 1650-1977, Vol. 44, no 7, p. 605-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    Balance between flexor and extensor muscle activity is essential for optimal function. The purpose of this pilot study was to compare the relationship between maximum finger flexion force and maximum finger extension force in women with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy women.

    METHODS:

    Twenty healthy women (median age 61 years) and 20 women with rheumatoid arthritis (median age 59.5 years, median disease duration 16.5 years) were included in the study. Finger extension force was measured with an electronic device, EX-it, and finger flexion force using Grippit. The Grip Ability Test and the score from the patient-reported outcome Disability Arm Shoulder and Hand were used to evaluate activity limitations.

    RESULTS:

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis showed significantly decreased hand function compared with healthy controls. A correlation was found between extension force and flexion force in the healthy group (r = 0.65, p = 0.002),but not in the rheumatoid arthritis group (r = 0.25, p = 0.289).

    CONCLUSION:

    Impaired hand function appears to influence the relationship between maximum finger flexion and extension force. This study showed a difference in the relationship between maximum finger flexion and extension force in healthy controls and those with rheumatoid arthritis.

  • 39.
    Buhrman, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nilsson-Ihrfelt, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Jannert, Maria
    Ström, Lars
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Guided internet-based cognitive behavioural treatment for chronic back pain reduces pain catastrophizing: a randomized controlled trial2011In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 500-505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether an Internet-based cognitive behavioural intervention would have an effect on the symptoms of chronic back pain. Design: Experimental design with a treatment group and a control group measured before and after a treatment period. Subjects: Participants who met the criteria for chronic back pain (n = 54). Methods: All participants were screened in a live, structured interview before inclusion. The study period was 12 weeks and the treatment consisted of education, cognitive skills acquisition, behavioural rehearsal, generalization and maintenance. The main outcome of interest was the catastrophizing subscale of the Coping Strategies Questionnaire. Results: There were statistically significant reductions from pre- to post-treatment in catastrophizing in the treatment group, and an improvement in quality of life for the treatment group. However, most outcome measures did not indicate a positive treatment outcome. On a scale measuring pain catastrophizing, 58% (15/26) of the treated participants showed reliable improvement, compared with 18% (5/28) of the control group. Conclusion: Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy can serve as a complement for individuals with chronic pain who prefer this treatment and have difficulties accessing specialist treatment facilities.

  • 40. Bäck, M
    et al.
    Jansson, B
    Cider, A
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lundberg, M
    Validation of a questionnaire to detect kinesiophobia (fear of movement) in patients with coronary artery disease.2012In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 363-369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the validity and reliability of the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia Heart (TSK-SV Heart), a brief questionnaire to detect kinesiophobia (fear of movement) in patients with coronary artery disease. Design: Methodological research (cross-sectional study). Subjects: A total of 332 patients, mean age 65 years (standard deviation 9.1) diagnosed with coronary artery disease at a university hospital were included in the study. Methods: The psychometric properties of the TSK-SV Heart were tested. The tests of validity comprised face, content, and construct validity. The reliability tests included composite reliability, internal consistency and stability over time. Results: In terms of reliability, the TSK-SV Heart was found to be stable over time (intra-class correlation coefficient 0.83) and internally consistent (Cronbach's alpha 0.78). Confirmatory factor analysis provided acceptable fit for a hypothesized 4-factor model with inclusion of a method factor. Conclusion: These results provide support for the reliability of the TSK-SV Heart. The questionnaire appears to be valid for use in patients with coronary artery disease. However, some items require further investigation due to low influence on some sub-dimensions of the test. The sub-dimensions of kinesiophobia require future research concerning their implications for the target group.

  • 41.
    Bäck, Maria
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Jivegård, Lennart
    Department of Vascular Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Sahlgrenska.
    Johansson, Anna
    Department of Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Nordanstig, Joakim
    Department of Vascular Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Sahlgrenska.
    Svanberg, Therese
    HTA-Centrum, Region Västra.
    Adania, Ulla Wikberg
    Medical Library, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Mölndal, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjögren, Petteri
    HTA-Centrum, Region Västra.
    Home-based supervised exercise versus hospital-based supervised exercise or unsupervised walk advice as treatment for intermittent claudication: a systematic review.2015In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 47, no 9, p. 801-808Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of home-based supervised exercise vs hospital-based supervised exercise, and the effects of home-based supervised exercise vs unsupervised "go home and walk advice" on daily life and corridor-walking capacity, health-related quality of life and patient-reported functional walking capacity in patients with intermittent claudication.

    DATA SOURCES: Systematic literature searches were conducted in PubMed, EMBASE, ProQuest, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), the Cochrane Library, and a number of Health Technology Assessment (HTA)-databases in October 2014.

    STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials and non-randomized controlled trials (> 100 patients) were considered for inclusion.

    DATA EXTRACTION: Data extraction and risk of bias assessment was performed independently and discussed in meetings.

    DATA SYNTHESIS: Seven randomized controlled trials and 2 non-randomized controlled studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The included studies had some, or major, limitations.

    CONCLUSION: Based on a low quality of evidence, home-based supervised exercise may lead to less improvement in maximum and pain-free walking distance, and in more improvement in daily life walking capacity, compared with hospital-based supervised exercise. Home-based supervised exercise may improve maximum and pain-free walking distance compared with "go home and walk advice" and result in little or no difference in health-related quality of life and functional walking capacity compared with hospital-based supervised exercise or "go home and walk advice". Further research is needed to establish the optimal exercise modality for these patients.

  • 42. Börsbo, Björn
    et al.
    Peolsson, Michael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Catastrophizing, depression, and pain: Correlation with and influence on quality of life and health - A study of chronic whiplash-associated disorders2008In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 40, no 7, p. 562-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aims of this study were: (i) to classify subgroups according to the degree of pain intensity, depression, and catastrophizing, and investigate distribution in a group of patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorders; and (h) to investigate how these subgroups were distributed and inter-related multivariately with respect to consequences such as health and quality of life outcome measures. Design: Descriptive cross-sectional study. Patients: A total of 275 consecutive chronic pain patients with whiplash-associated disorders who were referred to a university hospital. Methods: The following data were obtained by means of self-report questionnaires: pain intensity in neck and shoulders, background history, Beck Depression Inventory, the catastrophizing scale of Coping Strategy Questionnaire, Life Satisfaction Checklist, the SF-36 Health Survey, and the EuroQol. Results: Principal component analysis was used to recognize subgroups according to the degree of pain intensity, depression, and catastrophizing. These subgroups have specific characteristics according to perceived health and quality of life, and the degree of depression appears to be the most important influencing factor. Conclusion: From a clinical point of view, these findings indicate that it is important to assess patients for intensity of pain, depression, and catastrophizing when planning a rehabilitation programme. Such an evaluation will help individualize therapy and intervention techniques so as to optimize the efficiency of the programme.

  • 43.
    Börsbo, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Peolsson, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Catastrophizing, depression, and pain: Correlation with and influence on quality of life and health: A study of chronic whiplash-associated disorders2008In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 40, no 7, p. 562-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aims of this study were: (i) to classify subgroups according to the degree of pain intensity, depression, and catastrophizing, and investigate distribution in a group of patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorders; and (ii) to investigate how these subgroups were distributed and inter-related multivariately with respect to consequences such as health and quality of life outcome measures.

    Design: Descriptive cross-sectional study.

    Patients: A total of 275 consecutive chronic pain patients with whiplash-associated disorders who were referred to a university hospital.

    Methods: The following data were obtained by means of self-report questionnaires: pain intensity in neck and shoulders, background history, Beck Depression Inventory, the catastrophizing scale of Coping Strategy Questionnaire, Life Satisfaction Checklist, the SF-36 Health Survey, and the EuroQol.

    Results: Principal component analysis was used to recognize subgroups according to the degree of pain intensity, depression, and catastrophizing. These subgroups have specific characteristics according to perceived health and quality of life, and the degree of depression appears to be the most important influencing factor.

    Conclusion: From a clinical point of view, these findings indicate that it is important to assess patients for intensity of pain, depression, and catastrophizing when planning a rehabilitation programme. Such an evaluation will help individualize therapy and intervention techniques so as to optimize the efficiency of the programme.

  • 44.
    Carballeira Suarez, Nivia
    et al.
    Umeå Universitet.
    Levi, Richard
    Umeå Universitet.
    Bullington, Jennifer
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Regaining health and wellbeing after traumatic spinal cord injury2013In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 45, no 10, p. 1023-1027Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Traumatic spinal cord injury is typically a devastating event, leading to permanent physical disability. Despite the severity of the condition, many persons with traumatic spinal cord injury manage to lead both active and independent lives. The aim of this study was to investigate the experience of health and wellbeing of persons living with a traumatic spinal cord injury for at least 20 years. Design and methods: A qualitative design was used. Data was analysed using a phenomenological-hermeneutical method. Rich narratives were obtained from 14 persons with paraplegia due to traumatic spinal cord injury sustained at least 20 years ago. RESULTS: The key finding was that health and wellbeing were attained when persons were able to perceive themselves as being “normal” in everyday relationships and circumstances. The normalization process involved learning to negotiate and/or prevent potentially embarrassing situations by acting in a “parallel world”, covertly “behind the scenes”. CONCLUSION: The subjective experience of wellbeing and health after traumatic spinal cord injury depends upon the ability to prevent or resolve potentially embarrassing situations without this being noticed by others. Performing this work “behind the scenes”, enables persons with traumatic spinal cord injury to interact smoothly with others and thereby be perceived as normal, despite substantial disability.

  • 45. Carroll, L. J.
    et al.
    Cassidy, J. D.
    Peloso, P. M.
    Borg, J.
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Holm, L.
    Paniak, C.
    Pepin, M.
    Prognosis for mild traumatic brain injury: Results of the WHO Collaborating Centre Task Force on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury2004In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 36, p. 84-105Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We searched the literature on the epidemiology, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and costs of mild traumatic brain injury. Of 428 studies related to prognosis after mild traumatic brain injury, 120 (28%) were accepted after critical review. These comprise our best-evidence synthesis on prognosis after mild traumatic brain injury. There was consistent and methodologically sound evidence that children's prognosis after mild traumatic brain injury is good, with quick resolution of symptoms and little evidence of residual cognitive, behavioural or academic deficits. For adults, cognitive deficits and symptoms are common in the acute stage, and the majority of studies report recovery for most within 3-12 months. Where symptoms persist, compensation/litigation is a factor, but there is little consistent evidence for other predictors. The literature on this area is of varying quality and causal inferences are often mistakenly drawn from cross-sectional studies.

  • 46.
    Cassidy, David J.
    et al.
    Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, Section for Personal Injury Prevention, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carrol, Linda J.
    Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
    Peloso, Paul M.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa Health Center, Iowa City, Iowa, USA.
    Borg, Jörgen
    Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    von Holst, Hans
    Department of Neurosurgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Holm, Lena
    Section for Personal Injury Prevention, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kraus, Jess
    Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, California, USA.
    Coronado, Victor G.
    National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
    Incidence, risk factors and prevention of mild traumatic brain injury: Results of the WHO Collaborating Centre Task Force on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury2004In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 36, no 43, p. 28-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: We undertook a best-evidence synthesis on the incidence, risk factors and prevention of mild traumatic brain injury. Methods: Medline, Cinahl, PsycINFO and Embase were searched for relevant articles. After screening 38,806 abstracts, we critically reviewed 169 studies on incidence, risk and prevention, and accepted 121 (72%).Results: The accepted articles show that 70–90% of all treated brain injuries are mild, and the incidence of hospital- treated patients with mild traumatic brain injury is about 100–300/100,000 population. However, much mild traumatic brain injury is not treated at hospitals, and the true population-based rate is probably above 600/100,000. Mild traumatic brain injury is more common in males and in teenagers and young adults. Falls and motor-vehicle colli- sions are common causes.Conclusion: Strong evidence supports helmet use to prevent mild traumatic brain injury in motorcyclists and bicyclists. The mild traumatic brain injury literature is of varying quality, and the studies are very heterogeneous. Never- theless, there is evidence that mild traumatic brain injury is an important public health problem, but we need more high- quality research into this area.

  • 47. Cassidy, David J.
    et al.
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Best evidence synthesis on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Results of the WHO collaborating centre for neurotrauma prevention, management and rehabilitation task force on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury2004In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. Feb, no Supplement 43, p. 1-144Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Dyster-Aas, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Kildal, Morten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Return to work and health-related quality of life after burn injury2007In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 49-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Although severe burn injury is associated with long-term rehabilitation and disability, research on returning to work in burn patients is limited. The aims of this study were: (i) to explore injury- and personality-related predictors of returning to work, and (ii) to compare health-related quality of life and health outcome in working versus non-working individuals.Design: Cross-sectional study.Subjects: Forty-eight former patients with pre-burn employment were evaluated on average 3.8 years after the burn.Methods: Data were collected from medical records and by a questionnaire in which the patients were asked about their main activity status described in the terms: work, studies, pension, disability pension, sick leave or unemployment. It also contained the Swedish universities Scales of Personality, SF-36, Burn Specific Health Scale-Brief, items assessing fear-avoidance, Impact of Event Scale-Revised and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale.Results: Thirty-one percent had not returned to work. In logistic regression, returning to work was associated with time since injury, the extent of full-thickness injuries, and the personality trait embitterment. Those who did not work had lower health-related quality of life, poorer burn-specific health, more fear-avoidance and more symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, but they did not differ from those who were working regarding general mood.Conclusion: Returning to work was explained by both injury severity and personality characteristics. Those who did not work were characterized by low health-related quality of life and poorer trauma-related physical and psychological health.

  • 49. Ekholm, Jan
    et al.
    Ekholm Schudt, Kristina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Vocational rehabilitation: Editorial2009In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 113-114Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Ekstrand, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Lexell, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation. Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Brogårdh, Christina
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Test-retest reliability of the life satisfaction questionnaire lisat-11 and association between items in individuals with chronic stroke2018In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 50, no 8, p. 713-718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate the test-retest reliability of the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (LiSat-11) and the association between items in individuals with chronic stroke. Design: Test-retest design. Subjects: Forty-five individuals (mean age 65 years) with mild to moderate disability at least 6 months post-stroke. Methods: LiSat-11, which includes 1 global item "Life as a whole" and 10 domain-specific items, was rated on 2 occasions, one week apart. Test-retest reliability was evaluated by kappa statistics, the percent agreement (PA) and the Svensson rank-invariant method. The association between items was evaluated with the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rho). Results: The kappa coefficients showed good to excellent agreement (0.59-0.97) and the PA <= 1 point was high (> 89%) for all items. According to the Svensson method, a small systematic disagreement was found for "Partner relationship". The other items showed no systematic or random disagreements. All domain-specific items, except one ("Sexual life") were significantly correlated with "Life as a whole" (rhos 0.29-0.80). Conclusion: LiSat-11 is considered reliable and can be recommended for assessing life satisfaction after stroke. The association between items indicates that LiSat-11 measures various aspects that can impact on an individual's life satisfaction.

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