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  • 1.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Belastningsskadecentrum.
    Barnekow-Bergkvist, Margareta
    University of Gävle, Belastningsskadecentrum.
    Angquist, Karl-Axel
    Brulin, Christine
    Relationships between work-related factors and disorders in the neck-shoulder and low-back region among female and male ambulance personnel2005In: Journal of Occupational Health, ISSN 1341-9145, E-ISSN 1348-9585, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 481-489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This cross-sectional study on a random sample of 1,500 ambulance personnel investigated the relationships between self-reported work-related physical and psychosocial factors, worry about work conditions, and musculoskeletal disorders among female and male ambulance personnel. Three different outcomes, complaints, activity limitation, and sick leave, for the neck-shoulder and low-back region, respectively, were chosen. Among the female personnel, physical demands was significantly associated with activity limitation in the neck-shoulder (OR 4.13) and low-back region (OR 2.17), and psychological demands with neck-shoulder (OR 2.37) and low-back (OR 2.28) complaints. Among the male personnel, physical demands was significantly associated with low-back complaints (OR 1.41) and activity limitation (OR 1.62). Psychological demands and lack of social support were significantly associated with neck-shoulder complaints (OR 1.86 and OR 1.58, respectively) and activity limitation (OR 3.46 and OR 1.71) as well as activity limitation due to low-back complaints (OR 2.22 and OR 1.63). Worry about work conditions was independently associated with activity limitation due to low-back complaints among the female (OR 5.28), and to both neck-shoulder and low-back complaints (OR 1.79 and OR 2.04, respectively) and activity limitation (OR 2.32 and OR 1.95) among the male personnel. In conclusion, the association patterns between physical and psychological demands and MSDs suggest opportunities for intervention.

  • 2.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Barnekow-Bergkvist, Margareta
    Angquist, Karl-Axel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Brulin, Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Relationships between work-related factors and disorders in the neck-shoulder and low-back region among female and male ambulance personnel.2005In: Journal of Occupational Health, ISSN 1341-9145, E-ISSN 1348-9585, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 481-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This cross-sectional study on a random sample of 1,500 ambulance personnel investigated the relationships between self-reported work-related physical and psychosocial factors, worry about work conditions, and musculoskeletal disorders among female and male ambulance personnel. Three different outcomes, complaints, activity limitation, and sick leave, for the neck-shoulder and low-back region, respectively, were chosen. Among the female personnel, physical demands was significantly associated with activity limitation in the neck-shoulder (OR 4.13) and low-back region (OR 2.17), and psychological demands with neck-shoulder (OR 2.37) and low-back (OR 2.28) complaints. Among the male personnel, physical demands was significantly associated with low-back complaints (OR 1.41) and activity limitation (OR 1.62). Psychological demands and lack of social support were significantly associated with neck-shoulder complaints (OR 1.86 and OR 1.58, respectively) and activity limitation (OR 3.46 and OR 1.71) as well as activity limitation due to low-back complaints (OR 2.22 and OR 1.63). Worry about work conditions was independently associated with activity limitation due to low-back complaints among the female (OR 5.28), and to both neck-shoulder and low-back complaints (OR 1.79 and OR 2.04, respectively) and activity limitation (OR 2.32 and OR 1.95) among the male personnel. In conclusion, the association patterns between physical and psychological demands and MSDs suggest opportunities for intervention.

  • 3. Bruno Pena Gralle, Ana Paula
    et al.
    Barbosa Moreno, Arlinda
    Lopes Juvanhol, Leidjaira
    de Jesus Mendes da Fonseca, Maria
    Prates Melo, Enirtes Caetano
    Antunes Nunes, Maria Angelica
    Toivanen, Susanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Harter Griep, Rosane
    Job strain and binge eating among Brazilian workers participating in the ELSA-Brasil study: does BMI matter?2017In: Journal of Occupational Health, ISSN 1341-9145, E-ISSN 1348-9585, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 247-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess the association between job strain and binge eating as well as the effect-modifying influence of body mass index (BMI) on this association. Methods: A total of 11,951 active civil servants from the multicenter Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil) was included in this cross-sectional analysis. Job strain was assessed using the Demand-Control-Support Questionnaire. Binge eating was defined as eating a large amount of food with a sense of lack of control over what and how much is eaten in less than 2 hours at least twice a week. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine the association between binge eating and job strain as well as its interaction with BMI. Results: After adjustment, and using low-strain job as the reference category, binge eating was associated with high-strain job (high demand/low control: odds ratio [OR]=1.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.26-1.98), active job (high demand/high control: OR=1.35, 95% CI 1.07-1.70), and passive job (low demand/low control: OR=1.24, 95% CI 1.01-1.53). Psychological job demands were positively associated with binge eating (OR=1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.07), while greater job control and social support at work were each inversely associated with binge eating (OR=0.95, 95% CI 0.92-0.97 and OR=0.96, 95% CI 0.94-0.98, respectively). BMI modified the association between job strain and binge eating: Heavier psychological job demands were associated with higher odds of binge eating among obese participants, while a stronger inverse association between job control and binge eating was seen among slimmer participants. Conclusions: Job strain increases the odds of binge eating and this association is modified by BMI.

  • 4.
    Engkvist, Inga-Lill
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy.
    Nurses' expectations, experiences and attitudes towards the intervention of a 'No Lifting Policy'2007In: Journal of Occupational Health, ISSN 1341-9145, E-ISSN 1348-9585, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 294-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to evaluate expectations and attitudes towards a No Lifting Policy programme, the "No Lift system", among nurses at hospitals where an introduction of the intervention was planned (PreNLS hospitals), and to make a comparison with nurses' experiences and attitudes at one hospital where the intervention had already been implemented (NLS hospital). A cross-sectional study of nurses at two PreNLS hospitals and one NLS hospital was performed. Most nurses at both the PreNLS hospitals and the NLS hospital were positive or very positive to the intervention. The expected and experienced obstacles differed between nurses at the PreNLS hospitals and the NLS hospital, however, there was more agreement concerning benefits. The most frequently expected obstacles at the PreNLS hospitals were organisational issues and obstacles related to the facilities, while most obstacles identified at the NLS hospital concerned specific transfers or were patientrelated. A decrease in the number of injuries was the most often considered benefit among most nurses. Nurses at the NLS hospital rated their physical exertion as lower in seven out of nine specific patient transfers compared with nurses at the PreNLS hospitals. They also reported increased well-being at work and an improved ability to manage their daily work. The comprehensive approach and participatory design, including all levels of staff and extensive support from the nurses' own union and management, is probably one important explanation for the positive attitudes and successful introduction of the intervention.

  • 5.
    Gunnarsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Josephson, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Entrepreneurs' Self-reported Health, Social Life, and Strategies for Maintaining Good Health2011In: Journal of Occupational Health, ISSN 1341-9145, E-ISSN 1348-9585, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 205-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This study investigated the association between self-reported good health and self-valued good social life. An additional aim was to examine entrepreneur's strategies for maintaining good health. Methods: The study design included a two-wave questionnaire, with five years between the surveys (2001 and 2006), and qualitative interviews. The study group consisted of 246 entrepreneurs from the central region of Sweden and represented ten different trades. Entrepreneurs reporting good health in both 2001 and 2006 were compared with entrepreneurs reporting poor health on both occasions or with inconsistent answers. Six of the entrepreneurs were strategically chosen for the interview study. Results: Consistent good health was reported by 56% of the entrepreneurs. Good social life in 2001 was associated with an increased odds ratio (OR) for consistent good health when the analyses were adjusted for physical work conditions and job satisfaction (OR 2.12, 95% CI 1.07-4.17). Findings for good leisure time, weekly moderate physical exercise, and a rating of work being less or equally important as other life areas, were similar but not statistically significant when job satisfaction was considered in the analyses. Strategies for maintaining good health included good planning and control over work, flexibility at work, good social contact with family, friends and other entrepreneurs, and regular physical exercise. Conclusion: This study demonstrated an association between self-reported good health and good social life for entrepreneurs in small-scale enterprises. In addition, the entrepreneurs emphasised strategies such as planning and control over work and physical exercise are important for maintaining good health.

  • 6.
    Gustafsson, Klas
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Insurance Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergström, Gunnar
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Institute of Environmental Medicine, Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Marklund, Staffan
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Insurance Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Aboagye, Emmanuel
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. Institute of Environmental Medicine, Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Presenteeism as a predictor of disability pension: A prospective study among nursing professionals and care assistants in Sweden2019In: Journal of Occupational Health, ISSN 1341-9145, E-ISSN 1348-9585Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to examine how presenteeism affects the risk of future disability pension among nursing professionals and care assistants (assistant nurses, hospital ward assistants, home-based personal care workers, and child care assistants). A specific objective was to compare health and social care employees with all other occupations.

    METHODS: The study was based on a representative sample of working women and men (n = 43 682) aged 16-64 years, who had been interviewed between 2001 and 2013 for the Swedish Work Environment Survey conducted every second year since 1989. Information on disability pension was obtained from the Social Insurance Agency's database (2002-2014). The studied predictors were related to disability pension using Cox's proportional hazard regression with hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) and selected confounders were controlled for. The follow-up period was 6.7 years (SD 4.2).

    RESULTS: Health and social care employees with frequent presenteeism showed a particularly elevated risk of future disability pension after adjusting for sex, sociodemographic variables, physical and psychosocial working conditions, and self-rated health symptoms. In the amalgamated occupational group of nursing professionals and care assistants, the impact on disability pension of having engaged in presenteeism four times or more during the prior year remained significant (HR = 3.72, 95% CI = 2.43-5.68).

    CONCLUSIONS: The study suggests that frequent presenteeism contributes to an increased risk of disability pension among nursing professionals and care assistants as well as among all other occupations.

  • 7.
    Gustafsson, Klas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lindfors, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Aronsson, Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lundberg, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Relationships between self-rating of recovery from work and morning salivary cortisol2008In: Journal of Occupational Health, ISSN 1341-9145, E-ISSN 1348-9585, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 24-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To date, the understanding of how recovery from work relates to cortisol output is poor. Considering this, the present study set out to investigate the associations between self-ratings of 15 items of rest and recovery and salivary cortisol sampled every second hour across two working days. Data came from 12 female and 13 male white-collar workers and were analyzed by linear regression analyses and repeated measures ANOVA. Poor rest and recovery was associated with high levels of morning cortisol, with the strongest relationships emerging for "rested in the morning", "rested after a weekend", "feel energetic during the working day", "tired during the working day", "sufficient sleep" and "worry about something". Moreover, significant interaction effects emerged between sex and "rested after a weekend" and "worry about something". To conclude, the findings show that self-ratings of rest and recovery are related to cortisol, particularly to morning cortisol, and that self-ratings provide important information on physiological recovery in terms of cortisol output.

  • 8.
    Körning-Ljungberg, Jessica
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå university.
    Cognitive after-effects of vibration and noise exposure and the role of subjective noise sensitivity2007In: Journal of Occupational Health, ISSN 1341-9145, E-ISSN 1348-9585, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 111-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the effects on attention performance after exposure to noise and whole-body vibration in relation to subjective noise sensitivity. Sixteen high and 16 low sensitivity male students, as determined by the Weinstein Noise Sensitivity Questionnaire, participated in a within-subjects experiment. Noise and vibration stimuli similar to those usually occurring in forestry vehicles were presented either individually, combined or not at all in four separate sessions lasting approximately 44 min. After exposure, participants completed an attention task and made subjective ratings of alertness. No main effect of noise sensitivity was observed in MANOVA, thus the data was pooled with the data from a pilot study using the exact same procedure without using a noise sensitivity inclusion criterion. The combined data revealed performance degradation in the attention task after exposure to vibration, regardless as to whether it was presented alone or in combination with noise. Increased ratings of alertness after vibration exposure and decreased ratings of alertness after noise exposure were also found. Neither synergistic nor antagonistic effects were observed from the combined noise and vibration exposure

  • 9.
    Ljungberg, Jessica K
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Enviromental Medicine.
    Neely, Gregory
    Cognitive after-effects of vibration and noise exposure and the role of subjective noise sensitivity.2007In: Journal of Occupational Health, ISSN 1341-9145, E-ISSN 1348-9585, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 111-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the effects on attention performance after exposure to noise and whole-body vibration in relation to subjective noise sensitivity. Sixteen high and 16 low sensitivity male students, as determined by the Weinstein Noise Sensitivity Questionnaire, participated in a within-subjects experiment. Noise and vibration stimuli similar to those usually occurring in forestry vehicles were presented either individually, combined or not at all in four separate sessions lasting approximately 44 min. After exposure, participants completed an attention task and made subjective ratings of alertness. No main effect of noise sensitivity was observed in MANOVA, thus the data was pooled with the data from a pilot study using the exact same procedure without using a noise sensitivity inclusion criterion. The combined data revealed performance degradation in the attention task after exposure to vibration, regardless as to whether it was presented alone or in combination with noise. Increased ratings of alertness after vibration exposure and decreased ratings of alertness after noise exposure were also found. Neither synergistic nor antagonistic effects were observed from the combined noise and vibration exposure.

  • 10. Lovseth, Lise Tevik
    et al.
    Aasland, Olaf Gjerlow
    Fridner, Ann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Jonsdottir, Lilja Sigrun
    Marini, Massimo
    Linaker, Olav Morten
    Confidentiality and Physicians' Health. A Cross-sectional Study of University Hospital Physicians in Four European Cities (the HOUPE-study)2010In: Journal of Occupational Health, ISSN 1341-9145, E-ISSN 1348-9585, Vol. 52, no 5, p. 263-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate how the subjective burden of confidentiality can act as a stressor that affects physicians' psychological health and wellbeing. Method: Cross-sectional survey data from a sample of university hospital physicians (N=1,956) in four European countries (Sweden, Norway, Iceland and Italy) who participated in the HOUPE (Health and Organization among University hospital Physicians in Europe) study was analysed. Results: About 25% of the participants reported that confidentiality impedes emotional support to a considerable degree. An index of confidentiality as a barrier to seeking support (ICBS) had a negative effect on physicians' health and wellbeing. The effect of ICBS was confirmed and slightly increased when controlled for variables known to buffer the adverse mental and physical effects of stress. Though the physicians in Iceland and in Norway found confidentiality the most challenging, it was the physicians in Italy and Sweden who showed a significant effect of ICBS on their health and wellbeing. Conclusions: Whether confidentiality is a stressor in its own right or an amplifier of stressful situations in medical practice should be further investigated to gain a better understanding of the effect of confidentiality on physicians' coping, stress and health. In addition, there is a need to investigate how physicians can balance coping with the inevitable emotional demands of medical practice and maintaining the ethics of confidentiality in a way that protects both patients' privacy rights and physicians' health and wellbeing.

  • 11. Milton, AH
    et al.
    Hasan, Z
    Rahman, A
    Rahman, M
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Chronic arsenic poisoning and respiratory effects in Bangladesh2001In: Journal of Occupational Health, ISSN 1341-9145, E-ISSN 1348-9585, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 136-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A large population in Bangladesh have been exposed to naturally occurring inorganic arsenic through their drinking water. A prevalence comparison study of respiratory disorders among subjects with and without arsenic exposure through drinking water was conducted in Bangladesh. Characteristic skin lesions, keratoses and pigmentation alteration, and the water arsenic level confirmed the arsenic exposure. Three villages were selected from health awareness campaign programs. Participants in these courtyard meetings who had suspected skin lesions, i.e., keratosis, hyperpigmentation and hypopigmentation, were examined by a well-trained medical officer to confirm the diagnosis. Unexposed subjects were randomly selected from another village, where tubewells were not contaminated with arsenic. We interviewed and examined 218 individuals irrespective of age and sex from these villages. The arsenic level in their drinking water was measured and the mean arsenic level was 614 ╡g/l (ranging from 136 ╡g/l to 1,000 ╡g/l). Information regarding respiratory system signs and symptoms was also collected. There were few smokers, and analyses were therefore confined to nonsmokers. The overall crude prevalence (or risk) among the exposed subjects for chronic cough, and chronic bronchitis, was three times the prevalence in the control population. Age was a slightly negative confounding factor. The crude prevalence ratios were noticeably increased for female participants compared to male participants. A possible explanation for this noticeably increased occurrence of respiratory signs and symptoms in women is related to the presence of weakness. These results add to the evidence that longterm ingestion of arsenic can cause respiratory problems especially among females.

  • 12. Milton, AH
    et al.
    Rahman, M
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Environmental pollution and skin involvement pattern of chronic arsenicosis in Bangladesh. 1999In: Journal of Occupational Health, ISSN 1341-9145, E-ISSN 1348-9585, Vol. 41, p. 207-208Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Sconfienza, Carolina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Lindfors, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Lantz Friedrich, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Social support at work and mental distress: A three-wave study of normal, reversed, and reciprocal relationships2019In: Journal of Occupational Health, ISSN 1341-9145, E-ISSN 1348-9585, Vol. 61, no 1, p. 91-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This longitudinal study aimed to investigate the causal relationships between social support at work and mental health in terms of mental distress. Despite assuming social support at work to be associated with less mental distress, reversed and reciprocal relationships were investigated as well.

    Methods: Self-reports in questionnaires of social support and mental distress were collected longitudinally, with annual measurements over three consecutive years, among 301 office workers (57% women) in Sweden. Cross-lagged structural equation modeling was used to test the hypotheses.

    Results: The reciprocal causation model was considered the best-fitting model. The results suggest that social support and mental distress influenced each other negatively, but with a delayed effect. Specifically, this involves Time 1 levels of social support being negatively associated with Time 2 levels of mental distress, while Time 2 levels of mental distress were negatively associated with Time 3 levels of support.

    Conclusions: The findings partly align with the hypothesis that social support is related to lower levels of mental distress but also suggest that mental distress can reduce levels of social support. While the findings also suggest a mutual interrelation between social support and mental distress, this is not a consistent reciprocal causation. Rather, and due to the variation in reciprocity between time points, it appears to he a cyclical process, which needs further investigation.

  • 14. Stoetzer, Ulrich
    et al.
    Ahlberg, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Johansson, Gun
    Bergman, Peter
    Hallsten, Lennart
    Forsell, Yvonne
    Lundberg, Ingvar
    Problematic Interpersonal Relationships at Work and Depression: A Swedish Prospective Cohort Study2009In: Journal of Occupational Health, ISSN 1341-9145, E-ISSN 1348-9585, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 144-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problematic Interpersonal Relationships at Work and Depression: A Swedish Prospective Cohort Study: Ulrich STOETZER, et al. Department of Public Health Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden-Objectives: Studies have shown that interpersonal relations at work are important for several health related outcomes. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether low social support, serious conflict, exclusion by superiors or by co-workers at work may be determinants of depression. Methods: In a representative Swedish cohort study data were obtained in two waves three years apart. 4,040 women and men who did not change their jobs between the waves were chosen for the study. Exposure and confounders were obtained at Time 1 and outcome, depression according to Bech's MDI at Time 2. Previous depression was controlled for by adjusting for depression at Time 1. Data were analyzed using multiple logistic regression analyses. Results: Odds-ratios adjusted for possible confounders and depression at base-line showed significant effects for all four exposures on depression (adjusted OR, low social support 1.5 CI 95% 1.1-2.0, serious conflict 1.4 CI 95% 1.1-1.9, exclusion by superiors 1.6 CI 5% 1.2-2.1 and exclusion by co-workers 1.7 CI 95% 1.22.3). Conclusions: The present results support the conclusion that problematic interpersonal relationships at work can be determinants of depression. These prospective findings may be of relevance for prevention and when rehabilitating depressed patients.

  • 15. Stoetzer, Ulrich
    et al.
    Ahlberg, Gunnel
    Johansson, Gun
    Bergman, Peter
    Hallsten, Lennart
    Forsell, Yvonne
    Lundberg, Ingvar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Problematic interpersonal relationships at work and depression: a Swedish prospective cohort study2009In: Journal of Occupational Health, ISSN 1341-9145, E-ISSN 1348-9585, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 144-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Studies have shown that interpersonal relations at work are important for several health related outcomes. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether low social support, serious conflict, exclusion by superiors or by co-workers at work may be determinants of depression. METHODS: In a representative Swedish cohort study data were obtained in two waves three years apart. 4,040 women and men who did not change their jobs between the waves were chosen for the study. Exposure and confounders were obtained at Time 1 and outcome, depression according to Bech's MDI at Time 2. Previous depression was controlled for by adjusting for depression at Time 1. Data were analyzed using multiple logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Odds-ratios adjusted for possible confounders and depression at base-line showed significant effects for all four exposures on depression (adjusted OR, low social support 1.5 CI 95% 1.1-2.0, serious conflict 1.4 CI 95% 1.1-1.9, exclusion by superiors 1.6 CI 95% 1.2-2.1 and exclusion by co-workers 1.7 CI 95% 1.2-2.3). CONCLUSIONS: The present results support the conclusion that problematic interpersonal relationships at work can be determinants of depression. These prospective findings may be of relevance for prevention and when rehabilitating depressed patients.

  • 16.
    Stoetzer, Ulrich
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ahlberg, Gunnel
    Avdelningen för psykologi, Akademin för hållbar samhälls- och teknikutveckling, Mälardalens högskola.
    Johansson, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bergman, Peter
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Hallsten, Lennart
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Forsell, Yvonne
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lundberg, Ingvar
    Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Arbets- och miljömedicin, Medicinska fakulteten, Uppsala Universitet.
    Problematic Interpersonal Relationships at Work and Depression: A Swedish Prospective Cohort Study2009In: Journal of Occupational Health, ISSN 1341-9145, E-ISSN 1348-9585, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 144-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problematic Interpersonal Relationships at Work and Depression: A Swedish Prospective Cohort Study: Ulrich STOETZER, et al. Department of Public Health Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden-Objectives: Studies have shown that interpersonal relations at work are important for several health related outcomes. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether low social support, serious conflict, exclusion by superiors or by co-workers at work may be determinants of depression. Methods: In a representative Swedish cohort study data were obtained in two waves three years apart. 4,040 women and men who did not change their jobs between the waves were chosen for the study. Exposure and confounders were obtained at Time 1 and outcome, depression according to Bechs MDI at Time 2. Previous depression was controlled for by adjusting for depression at Time 1. Data were analyzed using multiple logistic regression analyses. Results: Odds-ratios adjusted for possible confounders and depression at base-line showed significant effects for all four exposures on depression (adjusted OR, low social support 1.5 CI 95% 1.1-2.0, serious conflict 1.4 CI 95% 1.1-1.9, exclusion by superiors 1.6 CI 5% 1.2-2.1 and exclusion by co-workers 1.7 CI 95% 1.22.3). Conclusions: The present results support the conclusion that problematic interpersonal relationships at work can be determinants of depression. These prospective findings may be of relevance for prevention and when rehabilitating depressed patients.

  • 17.
    Theorell, Töres
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    A long-term perspective on cardiovascular job stress research2019In: Journal of Occupational Health, ISSN 1341-9145, E-ISSN 1348-9585, Vol. 61, no 1, p. 3-9Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This review provides perspectives on cardiovascular occupational stress research since the 1960s until now. The author argues for closer links between basic science and clinical follow-up examinations of patients. In an excellent way urinary excretion of adrenaline and noradrenaline during wake hours mirrors day to day or week to week variations in sympathomedullary activity which could be related to variations in the patient's and cardiovascular and psychosocial situation. Modern methods for following variations over time in heart contractility should also be related to the patients' psychosocial situation. In addition the author argues for more extensive use of the increasing knowledge regarding regeneration and vagal activity in relation to variations in job conditions and development or prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  • 18. Törnroos, Kaisa
    et al.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Perceived employability trajectories: A Swedish cohort study2017In: Journal of Occupational Health, ISSN 1341-9145, E-ISSN 1348-9585, Vol. 59, no 4, p. 336-344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This study identified perceived employability trajectories and their associations with sleeping difficulties and depressive symptoms over time. Methods: The sample was part of the Swedish Longitudinal Survey on Health from 2008 to 2014 (n=4,583). Results: Two stable trajectories (high and low perceived employability over time) and three trajectories with changes (increasing, decreasing, and V-shaped perceived employability over time) were identified. Workers with stable low perceived employability reported more sleeping difficulties and depressive symptoms than those who perceived high or increasing employability. Conclusion: Perceived employability is a rather stable personal resource, which is associated with well-being over time. However, changes in perceived employability do not seem to be echoed in well-being, at least not as immediately as theoretically expected.

  • 19.
    Wulff, Cornelia
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Psykologiska institutionen.
    Lindfors, Petra
    Stockholms universitet, Psykologiska institutionen.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholms universitet, Psykologiska institutionen.
    Childhood General Mental Ability and Midlife Psychosocial Work Characteristics as Related to Mental Distress, Neck/Shoulder Pain and Self-rated Health in Working Women and Men2011In: Journal of Occupational Health, ISSN 1341-9145, E-ISSN 1348-9585, Vol. 53, no 6, p. 439-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Childhood General Mental Ability and Midlife Psychosocial Work Characteristics as Related to Mental Distress, Neck/Shoulder Pain and Self-rated Health in Working Women and Men: Cornelia WULFF, et al. Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Sweden Psychosocial work characteristics including high demands, lack of control and poor social support have consistently been linked to poor health as has poor general mental ability (GMA). However, less is known about the relationships between stable individual factors such as GMA, psychosocial work characteristics and health. Objective: The present study investigated how childhood mental ability and psychosocial work characteristics relate to health in terms of mental distress, neck/shoulder pain (NSP) and self-rated health (SRH). Methods: Data on childhood GMA, occupational level, self-reports of demands, control and social support and health (mental distress, NSP and SRH) in midlife came from working women (n=271) and men (n=291) included in a Swedish school cohort. Hierarchical regression analyses, controlling for occupational level, were used to examine associations between childhood GMA, self-reports of high demands, low control and poor social support and the three health indicators. Taking into consideration the gendered labor market and variations in health patterns between women and men, gender specific analyses were performed. Results: There were no significant associations between childhood GMA and health indicators. Further, there were no significant interactions between GMA and psychosocial work factors. As regards the strength of the associations between GMA, psychosocial work factors and health, no consistent differences emerged between women and men. Conclusions: In a cohort of healthy and working middle-aged women and men, self-reports of current psychosocial work characteristics seem to be more strongly linked to health, than are stable childhood factors such as GMA.

  • 20.
    Wulff, Cornelia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lindfors, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Childhood General Mental Ability and Midlife Psychosocial Work Characteristics as Related to Mental Distress, Neck/Shoulder Pain and Self-rated Health in Working Women and Men2011In: Journal of Occupational Health, ISSN 1341-9145, E-ISSN 1348-9585, Vol. 53, no 6, p. 439-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Childhood General Mental Ability and Midlife Psychosocial Work Characteristics as Related to Mental Distress, Neck/Shoulder Pain and Self-rated Health in Working Women and Men: Cornelia WULFF, et al. Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Sweden Psychosocial work characteristics including high demands, lack of control and poor social support have consistently been linked to poor health as has poor general mental ability (GMA). However, less is known about the relationships between stable individual factors such as GMA, psychosocial work characteristics and health. Objective: The present study investigated how childhood mental ability and psychosocial work characteristics relate to health in terms of mental distress, neck/shoulder pain (NSP) and self-rated health (SRH). Methods: Data on childhood GMA, occupational level, self-reports of demands, control and social support and health (mental distress, NSP and SRH) in midlife came from working women (n=271) and men (n=291) included in a Swedish school cohort. Hierarchical regression analyses, controlling for occupational level, were used to examine associations between childhood GMA, self-reports of high demands, low control and poor social support and the three health indicators. Taking into consideration the gendered labor market and variations in health patterns between women and men, gender specific analyses were performed. Results: There were no significant associations between childhood GMA and health indicators. Further, there were no significant interactions between GMA and psychosocial work factors. As regards the strength of the associations between GMA, psychosocial work factors and health, no consistent differences emerged between women and men. Conclusions: In a cohort of healthy and working middle-aged women and men, self-reports of current psychosocial work characteristics seem to be more strongly linked to health, than are stable childhood factors such as GMA.

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