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  • 1.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Nurse students learning acute care by simulation: Focus on observation and debriefing2017In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 24, p. 6-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction:

    Simulation creates the possibility to experience acute situations during nursing education which cannot easily be achieved in clinical settings.

    Aim:

    To describe how nursing students learn acute care of patients through simulation exercises, based on observation and debriefing.

    Design:

    The study was designed as an observational study inspired by an ethnographic approach.

    Method:

    Data was collected through observations and interviews. Data was analyzed using an interpretive qualitative content analysis.

    Results:

    Nursing students created space for reflection when needed. There was a positive learning situation when suitable patient scenarios were presented. Observations and discussions with peers gave the students opportunities to identify their own need for knowledge, while also identifying existing knowledge. Reflections could confirm or reject their preparedness for clinical practice. The importance of working in a structured manner in acute care situations became apparent. However, negative feedback to peers was avoided, which led to a loss of learning opportunity.

    Conclusion:

    High fidelity simulation training as a method plays an important part in the nursing students' learning. The teacher also plays a key role by asking difficult questions and guiding students towards accurate knowledge. This makes it possible for the students to close knowledge gaps, leading to improved patient safety.

  • 2.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Nurse students learning acute care by simulation: Focus on observation and debriefing2017In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 24, p. 6-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Simulation creates the possibility to experience acute situations during nursing education which cannot easily be achieved in clinical settings. Aim: To describe how nursing students learn acute care of patients through simulation exercises, based on observation and debriefing. Design: The study was designed as an observational study inspired by an ethnographic approach.MethodData was collected through observations and interviews. Data was analyzed using an interpretive qualitative content analysis.Results: Nursing students created space for reflection when needed. There was a positive learning situation when suitable patient scenarios were presented. Observations and discussions with peers gave the students opportunities to identify their own need for knowledge, while also identifying existing knowledge. Reflections could confirm or reject their preparedness for clinical practice. The importance of working in a structured manner in acute care situations became apparent. However, negative feedback to peers was avoided, which led to a loss of learning opportunity.Conclusion: High fidelity simulation training as a method plays an important part in the nursing students' learning. The teacher also plays a key role by asking difficult questions and guiding students towards accurate knowledge. This makes it possible for the students to close knowledge gaps, leading to improved patient safety.

  • 3.
    Ahlin, Catharina
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Nursing and Care. Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital.
    Klang-Söderkvist, B
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Johansson, E
    Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital.
    Björkholm, M
    Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital.
    Löfmark, A
    University of Gävle / Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Haugesund, Norway.
    Assessing nursing students' knowledge and skills in performing venepuncture and inserting peripheral venous catheters2017In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 23, p. 8-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Venepuncture and the insertion of peripheral venous catheters are common tasks in health care, and training in these procedures is included in nursing programmes. Evidence of nursing students' knowledge and skills in these procedures is limited. The main aim of this study was to assess nursing students' knowledge and skills when performing venepuncture and inserting peripheral venous catheters. Potential associations between level of knowledge and skills, self-training, self-efficacy, and demographic characteristics were also investigated. The assessment was performed by lecturers at a university college in Sweden using the two previously tested instruments "Assess Venepuncture" and "Assess Peripheral Venous Catheter Insertion". Between 81% and 100% of steps were carried out correctly by the students. The step with the highest rating was "Uses gloves", and lowest rating was 'Informs the patients about the possibility of obtaining local anaesthesia'. Significant correlations between degree of self-training and correct performance were found in the group of students who registered their self-training. No associations between demographic characteristics and correct performances were found. Assessing that students have achieved adequate levels of knowledge and skills in these procedures at different levels of the nursing education is of importance to prevent complications and support patient safety.

  • 4.
    Ahlin, Catharina
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Red Cross University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Klang-Söderkvist, Birgitta
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, Erika
    Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björkholm, Magnus
    Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Löfmark, Anna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Department of Health Sciences, Haugesund, Norway.
    Assessing nursing students’ knowledge and skills in performing venepuncture and inserting peripheral venous catheters2017In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 23, p. 8-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Venepuncture and the insertion of peripheral venous catheters are common tasks in health care, and training in these procedures is included in nursing programmes. Evidence of nursing students’ knowledge and skills in these procedures is limited. The main aim of this study was to assess nursing students’ knowledge and skills when performing venepuncture and inserting peripheral venous catheters. Potential associations between level of knowledge and skills, self-training, self-efficacy, and demographic characteristics were also investigated. The assessment was performed by lecturers at a university college in Sweden using the two previously tested instruments "Assess Venepuncture"€ and "Assess Peripheral Venous Catheter Insertion". Between 81% and 100% of steps were carried out correctly by the students. The step with the highest rating was "€œUses gloves", and lowest rating was "€˜Informs the patients about the possibility of obtaining local anaesthesia"€™. Significant correlations between degree of self-training and correct performance were found in the group of students who registered their self-training. No associations between demographic characteristics and correct performances were found. Assessing that students have achieved adequate levels of knowledge and skills in these procedures at different levels of the nursing education is of importance to prevent complications and support patient safety.

  • 5.
    Arveklev Höglund, Susanna
    et al.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berg, Linda
    nstitute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Box 457, 40530 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Wigert, Helena
    nstitute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Box 457, 40530 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Morrison-Helme, Morag
    Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Lepp, Margret
    Østfold University College, Halden, Norway, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, Australia.
    Nursing students experiences of learning about nursing through drama2018In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 60-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to understand, interact and create a caring relationship with the patient is a core component in nursing. A shift in nursing education from traditional classroom teaching towards more experiential approaches should be encouraged as this will support learning that links theory with practice. The aim of this study was to describe nursing students' experiences of learning about nursing through drama. This qualitative study was conducted at a university in Sweden. Four focus group interviews were conducted with a total of 16 nursing students and the data was analyzed using a phenomenographic approach.Three themes with their attendant categories emerged through the analysis: "To explore the future professional self", "To develop an understanding of the patient perspective", and "To reflect on the nature of learning". In conclusion this study shows that the use of drama in nursing education can provide opportunities to explore interactions with others which can increase students' self-awareness and ability to reflect on their future professional identity. Acting in role as a patient can provide an opportunity to experience the patient perspective. Also clear was the importance of commitment and engagement ofthe students as a prerequisite for optimizing this form of learning experience through drama

  • 6.
    Arveklev Höglund, Susanna
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wigert, Helena
    University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden; Division of Neonatology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berg, Linda
    University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lepp, Margret
    University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden;Østfold University College, Halden, Norway; Griffith University, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Australia.
    Specialist nursing students' experiences of learning through drama in paediatric care2020In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 43, article id 102737Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Arvidsson , B
    et al.
    Skärsäter , I
    Baigi , A
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    The development of a questionnaire for evaluating process-oriented group supervision during nursing education2008In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 88-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The benefits of process-oriented group supervision are difficult to evaluate, as the validity and reliability of the existing instruments have been questioned. The aim was to develop and test the psychometric properties of a questionnaire in order to evaluate the effects of process-oriented group supervision on nursing students during their three-year nursing education. A 55-item Process-oriented Group Supervision Questionnaire (PGSQ) with a developmental design was formulated on the basis of a literature review and the expectations of nursing students who participated in a three-year nursing education programme (N=176). Construct validity and internal consistency reliability were tested at the end of each study year: year 1 (T1), year 2 (T2), and year 3 (T3) by means of exploratory factor analysis and Cronbach's alpha coefficient. An adequate explorative factor analysis (principal component analysis, varimax rotation) with an Eigenvalue >1.0 and factor loadings >0.40, reduced the questionnaire to 18 items comprising three factors labelled educative, supportive and developmental, which explained 60.2% at T1, 71.8% at T2, and 69.3% at T3 of the total cumulative variance. The corresponding Cronbach's alpha coefficient figures were 0.89 (T1), 0.94 (T2) and 0.93 (T3). The 18-item PGSQ is considered to be a short and useful tool due to its satisfactory validity and reliability figures.

  • 8.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Franke, Anita
    Department of Education, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nurses' various ways of conceiving their learning process as doctoral students: A phenomenograhic study2013In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 53-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim was to describe variations in how doctoral students conceive their learning process to become researchers in the light of their professional background as nurses. BACKGROUND: Nursing research is an emerging discipline and the number of nurses who acquire a doctor's degree is increasing. METHOD: The study had a descriptive, qualitative design with a phenomenographic approach and was carried out by means of 20 interviews. RESULTS: Three different description categories emerged: (1) A learning process that provides a synthesis of different parts of the research process aimed at developing preparedness for action within the nursing profession. (2) A learning process where practical problems are integrated with and problematised in relation to scientific theories. (3) A learning process involving the transformation from nurse to researcher. CONCLUSIONS: The description categories revealed that the focus was on solving problems that occur in health care and synthesising them by means of research tools. Furthermore, the doctoral students explored different ways of understanding and developing their awareness of the nature of research. Focus was also on the nursing profession and practice and a shift towards the role of a researcher was evident.

  • 9.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Baigi, Amir
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg, Sweden.
    The development of a questionnaire for evaluating process-oriented group supervision during nursing education2008In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 88-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The benefits of process-oriented group supervision are difficult to evaluate, as the validity and reliability of the existing instruments have been questioned. The aim was to develop and test the psychometric properties of a questionnaire in order to evaluate the effects of process-oriented group supervision on nursing students during their three-year nursing education. A 55-item Process-oriented Group Supervision Questionnaire (PGSQ) with a developmental design was formulated on the basis of a literature review and the expectations of nursing students who participated in a three-year nursing education programme (N = 176). Construct validity and internal consistency reliability were tested at the end of each study year: year 1 (T1), year 2 (T2), and year 3 (T3) by means of exploratory factor analysis and Cronbach’s coefficient. An adequate explorative factor analysis (principal component analysis, varimax rotation) with an Eigenvalue >1.0 and factor loadings >0.40, reduced the questionnaire to 18 items comprising three factors labelled educative, supportive and developmental, which explained 60.2% at T1, 71.8% at T2, and 69.3% at T3 of the total cumulative variance. The corresponding Cronbach’s coefficient figures were 0.89 (T1), 0.94 (T2) and 0.93 (T3). The 18-item PGSQ is considered to be a short and useful tool due to its satisfactory validity and reliability figures.

  • 10.
    Backåberg, Sofia
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Gummesson, Christina
    Lund University.
    Impact of musculoskeletal symptoms on general physical activity during nursing education.2014In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 385-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nursing education should prepare students for a lifelong professional career including managing clinical physical demands. Musculoskeletal symptoms, such as bodily pain, have been reported among nurses and nursing students but less is known about the impact of symptoms in daily activities. The aim was to explore the prevalence of self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms and their impact on general physical activity among nursing students. This cross-sectional study was based on a questionnaire to all undergraduate nursing students at one university. The prevalence of symptoms and physical impact during past 3 and 12 months was calculated for each study year. Odds ratio was analysed with logistic regression. Of 348 students 224 responded, 84% women, mean age 24.6 years (range 20-46). Of those 143 (64%) reporting symptoms during the past 12 months, 91 (64%) reported impact on physical activities. Most commonly reported were everyday activities such as transportations and prolonged sitting. The odds ratio for reporting symptoms was 1.8 for year 2 (95% CI: 0.9-3.5), and 4.7 for year 3 (95% CI: 2.1-10.7). The prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms was high among nursing students and higher the final study year and not only resulted in discomfort but had an impact on the students' general physical activities.

  • 11. Bendz, Mona
    et al.
    Widäng, Ingrid
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Johansson, Inez
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Paulsson, Åsa
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Student nurses' views of a learning model: a multi-method research study2004In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 279-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to describe students´ perceptions of various assignments within a specific learning model. In particular the study focuses on how the students perceived and reacted to the assessment processes used. A learning model was developed in which the learning of nursing theory and practice was integrated with the overall aim of motivating students to integrate their cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills.

    A multi-methods design was applied using a questionnaire and qualitative interviews. Two hundred and eighty four students were asked to complete the questionnaire. Fifteen of the 252 students who returned the questionnaire were interviewed. The main findings were that the students constructed their own learning depending on how they understood the specific assignment and there was diversity and the students´ interpretation of f the assignments.

    They focused on the assignments in accordance to the demands they expected to face as registered nurses and their interpretations on the demands differed between them.

    The way the individual student understands the paradigm of nursing must therefore be challenged; what does the student intend to achieve and why. Dialogues in which students and teachers share their understandings of the meaning of various aspects of nursing must be emphasized in nursing education.

  • 12.
    Bergström, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Lindh, Viveca
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Developing the role of Swedish advanced practice nurse (APN) through a blended learning master's program: consequences of knowledge organisation2018In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 28, p. 196-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on a research study conducted with a group of nurses in Sweden enrolled in a newly developed blended learning master's programme to become advanced practice nurses (APNs). As background, the paper presents the regional needs the programme is intended to address and describes how the programme was designed. The aim was to understand how, from students' perspective, the nurse master's programme structured knowledge for their future position as APNs. The research question focuses on how the master's programme prepares students by meeting their diverse needs for knowledge. Empirical material was collected at two times during the students' first and second years of study through semi-structured qualitative interviews. The findings highlight the process in which these master's students gained a more advanced identity of becoming APNs. This process demonstrates how students perceive their current position as nurses based on a discourse of knowledge in relation to the practical and theoretical knowledge they encounter in the master's programme. This article concludes by recommending that attention should be paid to developing APN role models in the current Swedish healthcare system.

  • 13.
    Berndtsson, Ina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Dahlborg, Elisabeth
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Pennbrant, Sandra
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Work-integrated learning as a pedagogical tool to integrate theory and practice in nursing education: An integrative literature review2020In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, article id 102685Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It can be challenging for nursing students to navigate between theory and practice and to implement theoretical knowledge in real work situations and vice-versa. Work-integrated learning can support the students by enabling them to combine theoretical studies with practical work experience during their clinical placement. The aim of this integrative literature review was to identify models for the integration of theory and practice during clinical placements in nursing education by using work-integrated learning. Sixteen articles were found and analyzed using an integrative review method. Three themes were identified: 1) Supervisor support to enable students to develop a professional identity 2) Variety of modalities for teaching and 3) Collaboration between academic lecturers and clinical supervisors aimed at integrating theoretical and practical knowledge. Work-integrated learning enables students to integrate theory and practice, develop skills for knowledge-in practice and prepares them for working life. It also supports the sharing of experiences between various healthcare professionals. This review identified a need for further research on work-integrated learning as a method for enhancing nursing students’ workplace learning.

  • 14.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Ohlsson, Ulla
    Örebro universitet.
    Agneta, Kullén Engström
    Höhskolan i Borås.
    Annelie, Sundler Johansson
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    Örebro universitet.
    Nursing students' assessment of the learning environment in different clinical settings2014In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 304-310Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Ulla
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Engström, Agneta Kullén
    School of Health, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Nursing students' assessment of the learning environment in different clinical settings2014In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 304-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Nursing students perform their clinical practice in different types of clinical settings. The clinical learning environment is important for students to be able to achieve desired learning outcomes. Knowledge is lacking about the learning environment in different clinical settings.

    AIM: The aim was to compare the learning environment in different clinical settings from the perspective of the nursing students.

    DESIGN: A cross-sectional study with comparative design was conducted.

    METHOD: Data was collected from 185 nursing students at three universities by means of a questionnaire involving the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher (CLES + T) evaluation scale. An open-ended question was added in order to ascertain reasons for dissatisfaction with the clinical placement.

    RESULTS: The nursing students' satisfaction with the placement did not differ between clinical settings. However, those with clinical placement in hospital departments agreed more strongly that sufficient meaningful learning situations occurred and that learning situations were multi-dimensional. Some students reported that the character of the clinical setting made it difficult to achieve the learning objectives.

    CONCLUSION: In the planning of the clinical placement, attention must be paid to whether the setting offers the student a meaningful learning situation where the appropriate learning outcome may be achieved.

  • 16.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Ulla
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kullén Engström, Agneta
    School of Health, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Johansson Sundler, Annelie
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nursing students' assessment of the learning environment in different clinical settings2014In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 304-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Nursing students perform their clinical practice in different types of clinical settings. The clinical learning environment is important for students to be able to achieve desired learning outcomes. Knowledge is lacking about the learning environment in different clinical settings. Aim: The aim was to compare the learning environment in different clinical settings from the perspective of the nursing students. Design: A cross-sectional study with comparative design was conducted. Method: Data was collected from 185 nursing students at three universities by means of a questionnaire involving the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher (CLES + T) evaluation scale. An open-ended question was added in order to ascertain reasons for dissatisfaction with the clinical placement. Results: The nursing students' satisfaction with the placement did not differ between clinical settings. However, those with clinical placement in hospital departments agreed more strongly that sufficient meaningful learning situations occurred and that learning situations were multi-dimensional. Some students reported that the character of the clinical setting made it difficult to achieve the learning objectives. Conclusion: In the planning of the clinical placement, attention must be paid to whether the setting offers the student a meaningful learning situation where the appropriate learning outcome may be achieved. 

  • 17.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Ulla
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kullén Engström, Agneta
    School of Health, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Johansson Sundler, Annelie
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nursing students' assessment of the learning environment in different clinical settings2014In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 304-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Nursing students perform their clinical practice in different types of clinical settings. The clinical learning environment is important for students to be able to achieve desired learning outcomes. Knowledge is lacking about the learning environment in different clinical settings. Aim: The aim was to compare the learning environment in different clinical settings from the perspective of the nursing students. Design: A cross-sectional study with comparative design was conducted. Method: Data was collected from 185 nursing students at three universities by means of a questionnaire involving the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher (CLES + T) evaluation scale. An open-ended question was added in order to ascertain reasons for dissatisfaction with the clinical placement. Results: The nursing students' satisfaction with the placement did not differ between clinical settings. However, those with clinical placement in hospital departments agreed more strongly that sufficient meaningful learning situations occurred and that learning situations were multi-dimensional. Some students reported that the character of the clinical setting made it difficult to achieve the learning objectives. Conclusion: In the planning of the clinical placement, attention must be paid to whether the setting offers the student a meaningful learning situation where the appropriate learning outcome may be achieved. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 18.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ohlsson, Ulla
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Kullén Engström, Agneta
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Sundler J, Annelie
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Nursing students' assessment of the learning environment in different clinical settings2014In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 304-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Nursing students perform their clinical practice in different types of clinical settings. The clinical learning environment is important for students to be able to achieve desired learning outcomes. Knowledge is lacking about the learning environment in different clinical settings. Aim The aim was to compare the learning environment in different clinical settings from the perspective of the nursing students. Design A cross-sectional study with comparative design was conducted. Method Data was collected from 185 nursing students at three universities by means of a questionnaire involving the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher (CLES + T) evaluation scale. An open-ended question was added in order to ascertain reasons for dissatisfaction with the clinical placement. Results The nursing students' satisfaction with the placement did not differ between clinical settings. However, those with clinical placement in hospital departments agreed more strongly that sufficient meaningful learning situations occurred and that learning situations were multi-dimensional. Some students reported that the character of the clinical setting made it difficult to achieve the learning objectives. Conclusion In the planning of the clinical placement, attention must be paid to whether the setting offers the student a meaningful learning situation where the appropriate learning outcome may be achieved.

  • 19. Bogren, Malin
    et al.
    Rosengren, Josefin
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Berg, Marie
    Build professional competence and equip with strategies to empower midwifery students - An interview study evaluating a simulation-based learning course for midwifery educators in Bangladesh.2019In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 35, p. 27-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Use of simulation-based learning in midwifery education programmes is crucial. Due to midwifery educators in Bangladesh were lacking competence in using such pedagogical methods in their teaching, they were invited to participate in a simulation-based learning course. In this paper, we present a study on the perceived usefulness of this course. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with 17 of the 28 midwifery educators participating on the course and data were analysed using inductive content analysis. Findings showed that the simulation-based learning course for midwifery educators in Bangladesh was useful. It "builds the professional competence of midwifery educators" and "equips them with strategies to empower midwifery students". The findings show that a simulation-based learning course is of major importance in pre-service education in settings where the capacity of midwifery educators needs to be strengthened. However, without continuous in-service training, the midwives' competence will deteriorate and this in turn will threaten the quality of midwifery education and the midwifery profession. Thus, contextualized pre- and in-service simulation-based education to secure midwifery core competencies is necessary. Simultaneously implementing and evaluating pre- and in-service education programmes is the next step in the struggle to increase the quality of maternity care services.

  • 20. Bohman, Doris M
    et al.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Student exchange for nursing students: Does it raise cultural awareness'? A descriptive, qualitative study.2014In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 259-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With free movement for citizens within the European Union and with distant parts of our globe becoming more accessible, cultural awareness and cultural competence are becoming important skills for nurses. Internationalisation and raising awareness of other cultural contexts are essential elements in Swedish higher education, thus explaining the variety of student exchange programmes that are available. The aim of this study was to explore Swedish nursing students' perceptions of student exchange and their experiences. Data were collected through group interviews and then analysed following the principles of content analysis. Our analysis resulted in three categories: Preparing to go abroad, Reasons for going abroad and From expectation to experience. Cultural aspects and cultural awareness were emphasised as strong motivational factors, both personal and professional, behind participation in student exchange programmes. Information was also highlighted as a crucial means of reaching potential students as well as the power of knowledge through personal experience. This study highlights the importance of student exchange in expanding the individual student's personal and professional horizons. It also stresses the importance of including a transcultural nursing element in nursing curricula.

  • 21.
    Borch, Ellen
    et al.
    Hogskolan Dalarna, Dept Hlth & Social Sci, S-79188 Falun, Sweden.;Cty Hosp Dalama, Dept Gen Surg & Med, Falun, Sweden.
    Athlin, Elsy
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Hov, Reidun
    Hedmark Univ Coll, Fac Hlth Studies, Elverum, Norway.
    Duppils, Gill Sorensen
    Hogskolan Dalarna, Dept Hlth & Social Sci, S-79188 Falun, Sweden.;Cty Hosp Dalama, Dept Gen Surg & Med, Falun, Sweden.
    Group supervision to strengthen nurses in their preceptor role in the bachelor nursing education: Perceptions before and after participation2013In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 101-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A collaborative project was carried out at four bachelor nursing colleges in Sweden and Norway, to support preceptors in the clinical fields by means of group supervision. The aim of this study was to investigate the preceptors' views on their own ability and satisfaction in the role before and after taking part in group supervision during one year and to describe their perception of the supervision model used. Method: Forty-five preceptors participated in the study. Baseline and endpoint questionnaires were used for data collection. Results: Before taking part in group supervision most preceptors expressed that they were content with their ability and knowledge with regards to the preceptor role. Despite this most of them considered that the participation had increased their ability to supervise students, and more than half of them considered that it also had promoted to their personal development. At the end of the project a majority of them had positive experiences of group supervision. Most of the structure and climate factors in the supervision model were considered important and almost all were highly realised. Conclusion: The study showed that group supervision could be a valuable tool to provide support to clinical preceptors in bachelor nursing education. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 22.
    Borch, Ellen
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Sörensen Duppils, Gill
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Hov, Reidun
    Athlin, Elsy
    Group supervision to strengthen nurses in their preceptor role in the bachelor nursing education: Perceptions before and after participation2013In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 101-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A collaborative project was carried out at four bachelor nursing colleges in Sweden and Norway, to support preceptors in the clinical fields by means of group supervision.

    The aim of this study was to investigate the preceptors’ views on their own ability and satisfaction in the role before and after taking part in group supervision during one year and to describe their perception of the supervision model used.

    Method: Forty-five preceptors participated in the study. Baseline and endpoint questionnaires were used for data collection. 

    Results: Before taking part in group supervision most preceptors expressed that they were content with their ability and knowledge with regards to the preceptor role.  Despite this most of them considered that the participation had increased their ability to supervise students, and more than half of them considered that it also had promoted to their personal development. At the end of the project a majority of them had positive experiences of group supervision. Most of the structure and climate factors in the supervision model were considered important and almost all were highly realised. Conclusion: The study showed that group supervision could be a valuable tool to provide support to preceptors in bachelor nursing education.

  • 23.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Fagerström, Cecilia
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Nursing students understanding of critical thinking and appraisal and academic writing: a descriptive qualitative study2012In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 356-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, regulations from the National Agency for Higher Education advocate an education that equips students with independence as well as critical, problem-based thinking, i.e. academic literacy skills. However, some research findings indicate that students may leave higher education without mastering these skills effectively. As part of quality-assuring a nursing programme at a university college in south-east Sweden we explored the nursing student's view of crucial academic literacy skills, such as critical thinking and appraisal and academic writing, by conducting a descriptive, qualitative study. Informants were recruited through an advertisement posted on the university's e-learning tool. Eight focused interviews were conducted during autumn 2010. The transcribed interviews were analysed – inspired by content analysis – and two categories became apparent: constantly questioning and formality before substance. The latter revealed a gap between the student's perception of academic writing and that of the educators, thus implying that nursing students might not be equipped with the tools they need to develop within academia. We suggest that students could benefit in their academic endeavours from theoretical educational models that integrate several academic skills simultaneously and which could be incorporated into the development of syllabuses and curriculums.

  • 24.
    Bos, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Centre for Family and Community Medicine, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Löfmark, Anna
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Törnkvist, Lena
    Centre for Family and Community Medicine, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Huddinge, Sweden.
    District nurses' experience of supervising nursing students in primary health care: A pre- and post-implementation questionnaire study2009In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 361-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nursing students go through clinical supervision in primary health care settings but district nurses' (DNs) circumstances when supervising them are only briefly described in the literature. The aim of this study was to investigate DNs experience of supervising nursing students before and after the implementation of a new supervision model. Ninety-eight (74%) DNs answered a questionnaire before and 84 (65%) after implementation of the new supervision model. The study showed that DNs in most cases felt that conditions for supervision in the workplace were adequate. But about 70% lacked training for the supervisory role and 20% had no specialist district nurse training. They also experienced difficulty in keeping up-to-date with changes in nurse education programmes, in receiving support from the university and from their clinic managers, and in setting aside time for supervision. Improvements after the implementation of a new model chiefly concerned organisation; more DNs stated that one person had primary responsibility for students' clinical practice, that information packages for supervisors and students were available at the health care centres, and that conditions were in place for increasing the number of students they supervised. DNs also stated that supervisors and students benefited from supervision by more than one supervisor. To conclude, implementation of a new supervision model resulted in some improvements.

  • 25.
    Bos (Sparén), Elisabeth
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Löfmark, Anna
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Törnkvist, Lena
    Karolinska institutet.
    District nurses' experience of supervising nursing students in primary health care: A pre- and post-implementation questionnaire study.2009In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 361-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nursing students go through clinical supervision in primary health care settings but district nurses' (DNs) circumstances when supervising them are only briefly described in the literature. The aim of this study was to investigate DNs experience of supervising nursing students before and after the implementation of a new supervision model. Ninety-eight (74%) DNs answered a questionnaire before and 84 (65%) after implementation of the new supervision model. The study showed that DNs in most cases felt that conditions for supervision in the workplace were adequate. But about 70% lacked training for the supervisory role and 20% had no specialist district nurse training. They also experienced difficulty in keeping up-to-date with changes in nurse education programmes, in receiving support from the university and from their clinic managers, and in setting aside time for supervision. Improvements after the implementation of a new model chiefly concerned organisation; more DNs stated that one person had primary responsibility for students' clinical practice, that information packages for supervisors and students were available at the health care centres, and that conditions were in place for increasing the number of students they supervised. DNs also stated that supervisors and students benefited from supervision by more than one supervisor. To conclude, implementation of a new supervision model resulted in some improvements.

  • 26.
    Bullington, Jennifer
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Söderlund, Mona
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Bos Sparén, Elisabeth
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Kneck, Åsa
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Omérov, Pernilla
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Cronqvist, Agneta
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Communication skills in nursing: A phenomenologically-based communication training approach2019In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 9, p. 136-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to present a communication skills training curriculum for nursing students, based upon phenomenology. Research shows that nurses have difficulty prioritizing dialogue with patients, due to lack of time, organizational and cultural factors. Like other health care professionals, nurses may also have difficulties communicating with patients due to personal fears and shortcomings. The communication training curriculum based upon phenomenology aims at systematically training students to stay focused upon patients' and relatives' narratives, allowing them to reflect upon and better understand their current situation. This approach to communication is applicable in any clinical situation where it important to provide space for the patients' experiences. The philosophical principles guiding the training are presented here as well as the practical steps in the program. Finally, the approach is compared to other common communication methods used in nursing (motivational interviewing, caring conversations, empathy training). The authors hope that the article will highlight the nurses’ role as dialogue partner as well as emphasize the importance of communication skills training in nursing education. This approach can be refined, tested and modified in future research and may serve as an inspirational model for creating a generic communicative competence for nurses.

  • 27.
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Critical friends: a way to develop preceptor competence?2015In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 470-471Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Preceptorship entails for nurses to create a supportive learning and working climate where students or newcomers are given opportunities to develop professional competence. However, being a skilled and experienced nurse does not automatically turn the professional into a skilled educator as teaching of a subject is a whole different story. Preceptors need to continuously and critically reflect on their practices in order to facilitate the development of professional pedagogical competence. Critical friends are colleagues with comparable educational background evaluating the work of each other. The relationship should rely on friendship and mutual trust, adding new dimensions to the reflective process. Being engaged in a critical friendship allows the “friends” to become aware of their own shortcomings which can then be reflected on in relation to clinical as well as pedagogical practices. Being and having a critical friend might be one promising way forward for preceptors to develop pedagogical and professional competence.

  • 28.
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Time, trust and reflection: three aspects of precepting in clinical nursing education2013In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 237-238Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Pilhammar, Ewa
    Wann-Hansson, Christine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    The team builder: the role of nurses facilitating interprofessional student teams at a Swedish clinical training ward2011In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 309-313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is an educational strategy attracting increased interest as a method to train future health care professionals. One example of IPE is the clinical training ward, where students from different health care professions practice together. At these wards the students work in teams with the support of facilitators. The professional composition of the team of facilitators usually corresponds to that of the students. However, previous studies have revealed that nurse facilitators are often in the majority, responsible for student nurses’ profession specific facilitation as well as interprofessional team orientated facilitation. The objective of this study was to describe how nurses act when facilitating interprofessional student teams at a clinical training ward. The research design was ethnography and data were collected through participant observations and interviews. The analysis revealed the four strategies used when facilitating teams of interprofessional students to enhance collaborative work and professional understanding. The nurse facilitator as a team builder is a new and exciting role for nurses taking on the responsibility of facilitating interprofessional student teams. Future research needs to explore how facilitating nurses balance profession specific and team oriented facilitating within the environment of an interprofessional learning context.

  • 30.
    Charlotta, Sunnqvist
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Karlsson, Karin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Lindell, Lisbeth
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Fors, Uno
    Virtual patient simulation in psychiatric care: A pilot study of digital support for collaborate learning2016In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 17, p. 30-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychiatric and mental health nursing is built on a trusted nurse and patient relationship. Therefore communication and clinical reasoning are two important issues. Our experiences as teachers in psychiatric educational programmes are that the students feel anxiety and fear before they start their clinical practices in psychiatry. Therefore there is a need for bridging over the fear. Technology enhanced learning might support such activities so we used Virtual patients (VPs), an interactive computer simulations of real-life clinical scenarios. The aim of this study was to investigate 4th term nursing students’ opinions on the use of Virtual Patients for assessment in a Mental Health and Ill-health course module. We asked 24 volunteering students to practise with five different VP cases during almost 10 weeks before the exam. The participants were gathered together for participating in a written and an oral evaluation. The students were positive to the use of VPs in psychiatry and were very positive to use VPs in their continued nursing education. It seems that Virtual Patients can be an activity producing pedagogic model promoting students’ independent knowledge development, critical thinking, reflection and problem solving ability for nurse students in psychiatric care.

  • 31.
    Chen, Jian Hua
    et al.
    Lishui Univ, Med & Hlth Coll, Dept Nursing, Lishui 323000, Zhejiang, Peoples R China.
    Björkman, Annica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research. Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Kungsbacksvagen 47, S-80176 Gavle, Sweden.
    Zou, Ji Hua
    Lishui Univ, Med & Hlth Coll, Dept Nursing, Lishui 323000, Zhejiang, Peoples R China.
    Engström, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Kungsbacksvagen 47, S-80176 Gavle, Sweden.
    Self-regulated learning ability, metacognitive ability, and general self-efficacy in a sample of nursing students: A cross-sectional and correlational study2019In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 37, p. 15-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The healthcare sector is fast-growing and knowledge-intensive, and to meet the demands associated with it, nursing students must have high levels of self-regulated learning (SRL), metacognition, and general self-efficacy (GSE). In this cross-sectional, correlational study, data were collected from 216 nursing students through a questionnaire. The aims were: 1) to describe the levels of SRL ability, metacognitive ability and GSE among second- and third-year nursing students; 2) to explore the relationships between the SRL ability, metacognitive ability and GSE of second- and third-year nursing students; 3) and to compare SRL ability, metacognitive ability and GSE between second- and third-year nursing students. Nursing students had moderate levels of SRL ability and metacognitive ability, but lower levels of GSE. Positive relationships between SRL ability, metacognitive ability, and GSE were observed. Third-year nursing students had a higher level of SRL ability but lower levels of GSE, compared to second-year students. In terms of metacognitive ability, no significant differences were observed between the student batches. Interventions are required for the improvement of nursing students' SRL ability, metacognitive ability, and GSE.

  • 32.
    Chen, Jian Hua
    et al.
    Department of Nursing, Medicine and Health College, Lishui University, Lishui, Zhejiang Province, China.
    Björkman, Annica
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Zou, Ji Hua
    Department of Nursing, Medicine and Health College, Lishui University, Lishui, Zhejiang Province, China.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Self–regulated learning ability, metacognitive ability, and general selfefficacy in a sample of nursing students: A cross-sectional and correlational study2019In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 37, p. 15-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The healthcare sector is fast-growing and knowledge-intensive, and to meet the demands associated with it, nursing students must have high levels of self-regulated learning (SRL), metacognition, and general self-efficacy (GSE). In this cross-sectional, correlational study, data were collected from 216 nursing students through a questionnaire. The aims were: 1) to describe the levels of SRL ability, metacognitive ability and GSE among second- and third-year nursing students; 2) to explore the relationships between the SRL ability, metacognitive ability and GSE of second- and third-year nursing students; 3) and to compare SRL ability, metacognitive ability and GSE between second- and third-year nursing students. Nursing students had moderate levels of SRL ability and metacognitive ability, but lower levels of GSE. Positive relationships between SRL ability, metacognitive ability, and GSE were observed. Third-year nursing students had a higher level of SRL ability but lower levels of GSE, compared to second-year students. In terms of metacognitive ability, no significant differences were observed between the student batches. Interventions are required for the improvement of nursing students’ SRL ability, metacognitive ability, and GSE.

  • 33.
    Ehrenberg, Anna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Häggblom, M
    Problem-based learning in clinical nursing education: Integrating theory and practice.2007In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 7, p. 67-74Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    A Learning Model for Nursing Students during Clinical Studies2011In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 384-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a research project where the aim was to develop a new model for learning support in nursing education that makes it possible for the student to encounter both the theoretical caring science structure and the patient’s lived experiences in his/her learning process. A reflective group supervision model was developed and tested. The supervision was lead by a teacher and a nurse and started in patient narratives that the students brought to the supervision sessions. The narratives were analyzed by using caring science concepts with the purpose of creating a unity of theory and lived experiences. Data has been collected and analyzed phenomenologically in order to develop knowledge of the students’ reflection and learning when using the supervision model. The result shows that the students have had good use of the theoretical concepts in creating a deeper understanding for the patient. They have learned to reflect more systematically and the learning situation has become more realistic to them as it is now carried out in a patient near context. In order to reach these results, however, demands the necessity of recognizing the students’ lifeworld in the supervision process.

  • 35.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Doraiswamy, Sathyanarayanan
    Wallin, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Karolinska institutet; Göteborgs universitet.
    Bogren, Malin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. UNFPA Country Office, Bangladesh.
    Capacity building of midwifery faculty to implement a 3-years midwifery diploma curriculum in Bangladesh: a process evaluation of a mentorship programme2018In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 29, p. 212-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When a midwifery diploma-level programme was introduced in 2010 in Bangladesh, only a few nursing faculty staff members had received midwifery diploma-level. The consequences were an inconsistency in interpretation and implementation of the midwifery curriculum in the midwifery programme. To ensure that midwifery faculty staff members were adequately prepared to deliver the national midwifery curriculum, a mentorship programme was developed. The aim of this study was to examine feasibility and adherence to a mentorship programme among 19 midwifery faculty staff members who were lecturing the three years midwifery diploma-level programme at ten institutes/colleges in Bangladesh. The mentorship programme was evaluated using a process evaluation framework: (implementation, context, mechanisms of impact and outcomes). An online and face-to-face blended mentorship programme delivered by Swedish midwifery faculty staff members was found to be feasible, and it motivated the faculty staff members in Bangladesh both to deliver the national midwifery diploma curriculum as well as to carry out supportive supervision for midwifery students in clinical placement. First, the Swedish midwifery faculty staff members visited Bangladesh and provided a two-days on-site visit prior to the initiation of the online part of the mentorship programme. The second on-site visit was five-days long and took place at the end of the programme, that being six to eight months from the first visit. Building on the faculty staff members' response to feasibility and adherence to the mentorship programme, the findings indicate opportunities for future scale-up to all institutes/collages providing midwifery education in Bangladesh. It has been proposed that a blended online and face-to-face mentorship programme may be a means to improving national midwifery programmes in countries where midwifery has only recently been introduced.

  • 36. Erlandsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Osman, Fatumo
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Egal, Jama Ali
    Byrskog, Ulrika
    Pedersen, Christina
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Evaluation of an online master's programme in Somaliland. A phenomenographic study on the experience of professional and personal development among midwifery faculty.2017In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 25, p. 96-103, article id S1471-5953(17)30005-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To record the variation of perceptions of midwifery faculty in terms of the possibilities and challenges related to the completion of their first online master's level programme in Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights in Somaliland. The informants included in this phenomenongraphical focus group study were those well-educated professional women and men who completed the master's program. The informant perceived that this first online master's level programme provided tools for independent use of the Internet and independent searching for evidence-based information, enhanced professional development, was challenge-driven and evoked curiosity, challenged professional development, enhanced personal development and challenged context-bound career paths. Online education makes it possible for well-educated professional women to continue higher education. It furthermore increased the informants' confidence in their use of Internet, software and databases and in the use of evidence in both their teaching and their clinical practice. Programmes such as the one described in this paper could counter the difficulties ensuring best practice by having a critical mass of midwives who will be able to continually gather contemporary midwifery evidence and use it to ensure best practice. An increase of online education is suggested in South-central Somalia and in similar settings globally.

  • 37.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Osman, Fatumo
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Informatics, Dalarna University, Borlänge, Sweden.
    Egal, Jama Ali
    Department of Nursing, Hargeisa University, Hargeisa, Somalia; Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Byrskog, Ulrika
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Pedersen, Christina
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Evaluation of an online master’s programme in Somaliland: A phenomenographic study on the experience of professional and personal development among midwifery faculty2017In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 25, p. 96-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To record the variation of perceptions of midwifery faculty in terms of the possibilities and challenges related to the completion of their first online master's level programme in Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights in Somaliland. The informants included in this phenomenongraphical focus group study were those well-educated professional women and men who completed the master's program. The informant perceived that this first online master's level programme provided tools for independent use of the Internet and independent searching for evidence-based information, enhanced professional development, was challenge-driven and evoked curiosity, challenged professional development, enhanced personal development and challenged context-bound career paths. Online education makes it possible for well-educated professional women to continue higher education. It furthermore increased the informants' confidence in their use of Internet, software and databases and in the use of evidence in both their teaching and their clinical practice. Programmes such as the one described in this paper could counter the difficulties ensuring best practice by having a critical mass of midwives who will be able to continually gather contemporary midwifery evidence and use it to ensure best practice. An increase of online education is suggested in South-central Somalia and in similar settings globally.

  • 38.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Osman, Fatumo
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.
    Egal, Jama Ali
    Byrskog, Ulrika
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Pedersen, Christina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Evaluation of an online master’s programme in Somaliland. A phenomenographic study on the experience of professional and personal development among midwifery faculty2017In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 25, p. 96-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To record the variation of perceptions of midwifery faculty in terms of the possibilities and challenges related to the completion of their first online master's level programme in Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights in Somaliland. The informants included in this phenomenongraphical focus group study were those well-educated professional women and men who completed the master's program. The informant perceived that this first online master's level programme provided tools for independent use of the Internet and independent searching for evidence-based information, enhanced professional development, was challenge-driven and evoked curiosity, challenged professional development, enhanced personal development and challenged context-bound career paths. Online education makes it possible for well-educated professional women to continue higher education. It furthermore increased the informants' confidence in their use of Internet, software and databases and in the use of evidence in both their teaching and their clinical practice. Programmes such as the one described in this paper could counter the difficulties ensuring best practice by having a critical mass of midwives who will be able to continually gather contemporary midwifery evidence and use it to ensure best practice. An increase of online education is suggested in South-central Somalia and in similar settings globally.

  • 39.
    Eskilsson, Camilla
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö, Institutionen för hälso- och vårdvetenskap.
    The experiences of patients receiving care from nursing students at a Dedicatd Education Unit: A phenomenological study2015In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 353-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to describe how patients perceive being cared for by student nurses, in aclinical context in the form of a Dedicated Education Unit (DEU). The study has been performed with aReflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) approach grounded in phenomenology. Lifeworld interviews wereconducted with patients who had received care from student nurses on an orthopaedic DEU and datahave been analysed for meanings. The findings reveal how patients experience to be carried along as apart of the students' learning process. This is described in more detail via the constituents: a mutualinvitation to participate, the importance of genuine encounters, and essential support. Patients experienceboth a stable and a less stable care in a learning environment and it is thus essential for them to beinvited to be a part of both the students' learning process and their own health process. The findings alsohighlight the key role of the supervisors for patients' sense of security. Finally there are indications thatconcepts such as DEU with a lifeworld-led didactic, based on reflection on both the patients' stories andthe students' experiences, can create learning environments that support patients' health processes andalso students’ learning processes.

  • 40.
    Eskilsson, Camilla
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    The experiences of patients receiving care from nursing students at a Dedicated Education Unit: A phenomenological study2015In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 353-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to describe how patients perceive being cared for by student nurses, in a clinical context in the form of a Dedicated Education Unit (DEU). The study has been performed with a Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) approach grounded in phenomenology. Lifeworld interviews were conducted with patients who had received care from student nurses on an orthopaedic dedicated education unit (DEU) and data have been analysed for meanings. The findings reveal how patients experience to be carried along as a part of the students' learning process. This is described in more detail via the constituents: a mutual invitation to participe, the importance of genuine encounters, and essential support. Patients experience both a stable and a less stable care in a learning environment and it is thus essential for them to be invited to be a part of both the students’ learning process and their own health process. The findings also highlight the key role of the supervisors for patients’ sense of security. Finally there are indications that concepts such as DEU with a lifeworld-led didactic, based on reflection on both the patients’ stories and the students’ experiences, can create learning environments that support patients’ health processes and also students’ learning processes.

  • 41.
    Ewertsson, Mona
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Allvin, Renee
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Clinical Skills Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Holmström, Inger K.
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Caring Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Walking the bridge: Nursing students' learning in clinical skill laboratories2015In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 277-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite an increasing focus on simulation as a learning strategy in nursing education, there is limited evidence on the transfer of simulated skills into clinical practice. Therefore it's important to increase knowledge of how clinical skills laboratories (CSL) can optimize students' learning for development of professional knowledge and skills, necessary for quality nursing practice and for patient safety. Thus, the aim was to describe nursing students' experiences of learning in the CSL as a preparation for their clinical practice. Interviews with 16 students were analysed with content analysis. An overall theme was identified walking the bridge in which the CSL formed a bridge between the university and clinical settings, allowing students to integrate theory and practice and develop a reflective stance. The theme was based on categories: conditions for learning, strategies for learning, tension between learning in the skills laboratory and clinical settings, and development of professional and personal competence. The CSL prepared the students for clinical practice, but a negative tension between learning in CSL and clinical settings was experienced. However, this tension may create reflection. This provides a new perspective that can be used as a pedagogical approach to create opportunities for students to develop their critical thinking.

  • 42.
    Ewertsson, Mona
    et al.
    Univ Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Allvin, Renee
    Univ Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Holmström, Inger K.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Univ Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Walking the bridge: Nursing students' learning in clinical skill laboratories2015In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 277-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite an increasing focus on simulation as a learning strategy in nursing education, there is limited evidence on the transfer of simulated skills into clinical practice. Therefore it's important to increase knowledge of how clinical skills laboratories (CSL) can optimize students' learning for development of professional knowledge and skills, necessary for quality nursing practice and for patient safety. Thus, the aim was to describe nursing students' experiences of learning in the CSL as a preparation for their clinical practice. Interviews with 16 students were analysed with content analysis. An overall theme was identified walking the bridge in which the CSL formed a bridge between the university and clinical settings, allowing students to integrate theory and practice and develop a reflective stance. The theme was based on categories: conditions for learning, strategies for learning, tension between learning in the skills laboratory and clinical settings, and development of professional and personal competence. The CSL prepared the students for clinical practice, but a negative tension between learning in CSL and clinical settings was experienced. However, this tension may create reflection. This provides a new perspective that can be used as a pedagogical approach to create opportunities for students to develop their critical thinking.

  • 43. Ewertsson, Mona
    et al.
    Allvin, Renee
    Holmström, Inger Knutsson
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Walking the bridge: Nursing students' learning in clinical skill laboratories2015In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 277-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite an increasing focus on simulation as a learning strategy in nursing education, there is limited evidence on the transfer of simulated skills into clinical practice. Therefore it's important to increase knowledge of how clinical skills laboratories (CSL) can optimize students' learning for development of professional knowledge and skills, necessary for quality nursing practice and for patient safety. Thus, the aim was to describe nursing students' experiences of learning in the CSL as a preparation for their clinical practice. Interviews with 16 students were analysed with content analysis. An overall theme was identified walking the bridge in which the CSL formed a bridge between the university and clinical settings, allowing students to integrate theory and practice and develop a reflective stance. The theme was based on categories: conditions for learning, strategies for learning, tension between learning in the skills laboratory and clinical settings, and development of professional and personal competence. The CSL prepared the students for clinical practice, but a negative tension between learning in CSL and clinical settings was experienced. However, this tension may create reflection. This provides a new perspective that can be used as a pedagogical approach to create opportunities for students to develop their critical thinking.

  • 44.
    Ewertsson, Mona
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Nursing students' socialisation into practical skills2017In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 27, p. 157-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Socialisation is a significant factor that shapes nursing students' learning in clinical settings. Little is known about the ways in which students learn practical skills during their clinical practice and how they are socialised into these skills. This knowledge is important for creating an optimal environment for ensuring a high standard of care and patient safety. This study aims to address this knowledge gap. An ethnographic approach was used. Data were collected by participant observations during nursing students' clinical practice in an emergency department at a university hospital in Sweden, and during informal conversations with students and their preceptors. In the analysis, four themes emerged: A reflective approach based on a theoretical framing; Multitasking situations; Shifts in an active role as a nursing student; and Styles of supervision. Students' socialisation into practical skills was shaped by several factors where preceptors played a key role. Teaching and learning styles and interactions between the preceptor and the student shaped the learning situations. A dominant discrepancy regarding whether and how reflections took place between preceptors and students was identified. This highlights the need for creating continuity between the ways that experiences are organised across the settings of learning (university-based and clinically based learning) to enhance nursing students' learning and socialisation into practical skills.

  • 45.
    Ewertsson, Mona
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Nursing students' socialisation into practical skills2017In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 27, p. 157-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Socialisation is a significant factor that shapes nursing students' learning in clinical settings. Little is known about the ways in which students learn practical skills during their clinical practice and how they are socialised into these skills. This knowledge is important for creating an optimal environment for ensuring a high standard of care and patient safety. This study aims to address this knowledge gap. An ethnographic approach was used. Data were collected by participant observations during nursing students' clinical practice in an emergency department at a university hospital in Sweden, and during informal conversations with students and their preceptors. In the analysis, four themes emerged: A reflective approach based on a theoretical framing; Multitasking situations; Shifts in an active role as a nursing student; and Styles of supervision. Students' socialisation into practical skills was shaped by several factors where preceptors played a key role. Teaching and learning styles and interactions between the preceptor and the student shaped the learning situations. A dominant discrepancy regarding whether and how reflections took place between preceptors and students was identified. This highlights the need for creating continuity between the ways that experiences are organised across the settings of learning (university-based and clinically based learning) to enhance nursing students' learning and socialisation into practical skills.

  • 46.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Gilje, Fredricka
    A comparison of curricular approaches of care of the aged in Swedish and US nursing programs2007In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 358-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an era of global aging, the steady increase in older people in Sweden and the United States is having a direct effect on nursing practice, presenting unprecedented opportunities and challenges in nursing education. The aim of this study was to highlight differences and similarities in curricular approaches to care of aged in Swedish and US baccalaureate nursing programs. The Swedish response rate was 100% (N=26); the US response rate was 36% (N=202). The results, which compare curricula approaches, have implications for nursing education in Sweden and the United States. Both include stand-alone and integrated courses on care of the aged, geriatrics and gerontology. Differences are noted in the percentage of programs that include care of the age in their curricula and the clinical education settings. Results of this study add to the sparse body of knowledge of cross-cultural nursing research on curricular approaches to geriatrics and gerontology, high-light similarities and differences in nursing education in two countries and invite dialogue among nurse educators. Future research is needed to address curricular issues on the aged population and cross cultural perspectives.

  • 47. Forsberg, Elenita
    et al.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Hult, Håkan
    Fors, Uno
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Assessing progression of clinical reasoning through virtual patients: An exploratory study2016In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 97-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To avoid test-driven learning, there have been discussions regarding the use of more formative assessments in health care education to promote students' deep learning. Feedback is important in formative assessment, but many students ignore it; therefore, interventions should be introduced which stimulate them to reflect on the new knowledge. The aim for this study was to explore if Virtual Patient (VP)-based formative assessments, in connection with self-evaluations, had an impact on postgraduate pediatric nursing students' development of clinical reasoning abilities. Students' self-evaluations served as the basis for measuring progress. Data was analysed using deductive content analysis. The findings showed a clear progression of the clinical reasoning ability of the students. After the first assessment, the students described feelings of uncertainty and that their knowledge gaps were exposed. At the mid-course assessment the awareness of improved clinical reasoning was obvious and the students were more certain of knowing how to solve the VP cases. In the final assessment, self-efficacy was expressed. VP -based assessments, in connection with self-evaluations, early in the education resulted in a gain of students' own identification of the concept of clinical reasoning, awareness of what to focus on during clinical practice and visualised expected clinical competence.

  • 48.
    Forsberg, Elenita
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Hult, Håkan
    Dept. of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fors, Uno
    Dept. of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV), Stockholm University, Kista, Sweden.
    Assessing progression of clinical reasoning through virtual patients: An exploratory study2016In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 97-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To avoid test-driven learning, there have been discussions regarding the use of more formative assessments in health care education to promote students' deep learning. Feedback is important in formative assessment, but many students ignore it; therefore, interventions should be introduced which stimulate them to reflect on the new knowledge.

    The aim for this study was to explore if Virtual Patient (VP)-based formative assessments, in connection with self-evaluations, had an impact on postgraduate pediatric nursing students' development of clinical reasoning abilities. Students' self-evaluations served as the basis for measuring progress. Data was analysed using deductive content analysis.

    The findings showed a clear progression of the clinical reasoning ability of the students. After the first assessment, the students described feelings of uncertainty and that their knowledge gaps were exposed. At the mid-course assessment the awareness of improved clinical reasoning was obvious and the students were more certain of knowing how to solve the VP cases. In the final assessment, self-efficacy was expressed.

    VP-based assessments, in connection with self-evaluations, early in the education resulted in a gain of students' own identification of the concept of clinical reasoning, awareness of what to focus on during clinical practice and visualised expected clinical competence. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 49.
    Forsgren Gebring, Susanne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing. University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Christensson, Tanja
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.
    Hedemalm, Azar
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing. University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Evaluation of the case method in nursing education2014In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 164-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The case based learning (CBL) is a problem-based learning which engaging students and presenting them with learning-related and cognitive challenges. The purpose of the study was to elucidate nursing students experiences of the CBL as an educational tool in order to find out if it supports their learning. Qualitative content analysis was used and performed on the statements from nursing students’ course evaluations. Students perceived the CBL as an approach combining theory with practice which provides an overview of upcoming profession. Students gain adequate knowledge about patient care in reality and thereby enabling them to obtain a holistic understanding of patients health problems. Reflections related to case seminars widen students perspectives, improve their capacity for cooperation and help them to achieve long-lasting knowledge. This learning method offers nursing students an opportunity to enhance their judgment and critical thinking skills by applying theory in practice. Students gain adequate knowledge about patient care which may benefit patient care due to students acting professionally in their future role.

  • 50.
    Forss, Katarina Sjogren
    et al.
    Malmö universitet.
    Persson, Karin
    Malmö universitet.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Malmö universitet.
    Nursing students' experiences of caring for ethnically and culturally diverse patients: A scoping review2019In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 37, p. 97-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about nursing students' experiences of caring for patients from diverse cultures, which is an important factor in educational settings when it comes to understanding whether the teaching strategies applied are successful. Thus, the aim of this study was to conduct a scoping review of the literature, thereby synthesising existing studies to explore nursing students' experiences of caring for patients with different cultural backgrounds from theirs. A systematic article search was done in PubMed, CINAHL and ERIC. A total of 996 studies were found in the searches and finally seven studies met the inclusion criteria and were included. The analysis of the seven included studies was interpreted to represent two overarching themes, namely the challenge of communication and non-mutual language and the challenge of culture and culturally influenced behaviour, representing nursing students' experiences of caring for patients with a different cultural background from theirs. A major challenge for nursing educators appears to be creating pedagogical interventions that cultivate a humble, solicitous and caring curiosity among students, such that they do not perceive only challenges in caring for culturally diverse patients.

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