Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 879
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Aasa, Agneta
    et al.
    Kirurgmottagningen, Ryhovs Länssjukhus, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hovbäck, Malin
    Kirurgmottagningen, Ryhovs Länssjukhus, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The importance of preoperative information for patient participation in colorectal surgery care2013In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 11-12, p. 1604-1612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To identify and describe patients' experiences of a preoperative information session with a nurse, as part of the enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) concept, and its impact on patient participation in their own care.

    Background

    Enhanced recovery after surgery is a standardised, multimodal treatment programme for elective colorectal surgery, leading to faster recovery and shorter hospital stays via interprofessional collaboration. The ERAS concept is initiated for patients a week before surgery when the patient receives detailed information about the care process during a meeting with a nurse.

    Design

    The study is a qualitative interpretive study based on interviews.

    Methods

    Twelve patients, nine men and three women, were interviewed. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA).

    Results

    The analysis identified and formulated five themes: being seen, security, trust, responsibility and participation. All themes are closely related and illustrate positive and negative sides of the patient's experience. They hang together and form a complete set of experiences: ERAS conversation and its impact on patients' participation.

    Conclusions

    The results show that patients feel confirmed in the ERAS conversation. Healthcare professionals need to be bonding more information call during hospitalisation. It is important to confirm the patient in order for them to participate and take responsibility. Reliance on caregivers is important for patients to feel safe and to participate in their own care. This study shows that the ERAS conversation was experienced as being structured and individually tailored, but the information must apply to the patients throughout the period of care.

    Relevance to clinical practice

    Some shortcomings have been revealed, which should enable improvement in the care of patients. Healthcare professionals need to raise awareness of patients' responsibilities for participation in their own recovery and care. Healthcare professionals and patients need to be aware of each other's responsibilities.

  • 2.
    Abrahamsen Grøndahl, Vigdis
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Karlsson, Ingela
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Hall-Lord, Marie-Louise
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Appelgren, Jari
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Quality of care from patients' perspective: impact of the combination of person-related and external objective care conditions2011In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 20, no 17/18, p. 2540-2551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. To describe patients' perceptions of quality of care and to explore combinations of person-related and external objective care conditions as potential predictors of these perceptions. Background. Several studies have examined various single factors of person-related and external objective care conditions in relation to quality of care. None of these has included the effect of over-occupancy on patients' perception of quality of care. Furthermore, little is known about how combinations of different factors are related to each other and to the perception of quality of care using multivariate analysis. Design. A cross-sectional design. Method. A total of 528 patients (83·7%) from 12 medical, surgical or medical-surgical wards in five hospitals in Norway participated. Perceptions of quality of care and person-related conditions were measured with the 'Quality from Patient's Perspective' instrument. Data on external objective care conditions was collected from ward statistics provided by head nurses. Multivariate general linear modelling was used ( p < 0·05). Results. The combination of person-related and external objective care conditions revealed five factors that predict patients' perception of quality of care. Three of these are person-related conditions: sex, age and self-reported psychological well-being and two of them are external objective care conditions: RNs (headcount) on the wards and frequency of over-occupancy. These five factors explained 55% of the model. Patients rated the quality of care high. Conclusions. Sex, age, psychological well-being, frequency of over-occupancy and the number of RNs are important factors that must be emphasised if patients are to perceive the quality of care as high. Relevance to clinical practice. Head nurses and healthcare authorities must continually prepare the wards for over-occupancy and they must consider the number of RNs working on the wards.

  • 3. Agneta, Breitholtz
    et al.
    Snellman, Ingrid
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Ingegerd, Fagerberg
    Ersta Skondal Univ Coll, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Older persons self determination within municipal home care services2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, p. 142-142Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Ahlander, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Department of Radiology, Ryhov County Hosptial, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Engvall, Jan
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Center of Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Maret, Eva
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska Institutet, stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Positive effect on patient experience of video-information given prior to cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging, a clinical trial2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 5-6, p. 1250-1261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To evaluate the effect of video information given before cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging on patient anxiety and to compare patient experiences of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging versus myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. To evaluate whether additional information has an impact on motion artefacts.

    Background: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy are technically advanced methods for the evaluation of heart diseases. Although cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is considered to be painless, patients may experience anxiety due to the closed environment.

    Design: A prospective randomised intervention study, not registered.

    Methods: The sample (n = 148) consisted of 97 patients referred for cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging, randomised to receive either video information in addition to standard text-information (CMR-video/n = 49) or standard text-information alone (CMR-standard/n = 48). A third group undergoing myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (n = 51) was compared with the cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging-standard group. Anxiety was evaluated before, immediately after the procedure and 1 week later. Five questionnaires were used: Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale, MRI Fear Survey Schedule and the MRI-Anxiety Questionnaire. Motion artefacts were evaluated by three observers, blinded to the information given. Data were collected between April 2015–April 2016. The study followed the CONSORT guidelines.

    Result: The CMR-video group scored lower (better) than the cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging-standard group in the factor Relaxation (p =.039) but not in the factor Anxiety. Anxiety levels were lower during scintigraphic examinations compared to the CMR-standard group (p <.001). No difference was found regarding motion artefacts between CMR-video and CMR-standard.

    Conclusion: Patient ability to relax during cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging increased by adding video information prior the exam, which is important in relation to perceived quality in nursing. No effect was seen on motion artefacts.

    Relevance to clinical practice: Video information prior to examinations can be an easy and time effective method to help patients cooperate in imaging procedures.

  • 5.
    Ahlander, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Department of Radiology, Ryhov County Hospital, SE-55185, Jönköping, Sweden..
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Maret, Eva
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-14186, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Science, Örebro University, SE-701 82, Örebro, Sweden..
    Positive effect on patient experience of video-information given prior to cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging, a clinical trial2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 5-6, p. 1250-1261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To evaluate the effect of video information given before cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging on patient anxiety and to compare patient experiences of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging versus myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. To evaluate if additional information has an impact on motion artefacts. Background: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy are technically advanced methods for the evaluation of heart diseases. Although cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is considered to be painless, patients may experience anxiety due to the closed environment. Design: A prospective randomized intervention study, not registered. Methods: The sample (n=148) consisted of 97 patients referred for cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging, randomized to receive either video information in addition to standard text-information (CMR-video/n=49) or standard text-information alone (CMR-standard/n=48). A third group undergoing myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (n=51) was compared with the cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging-standard group. Anxiety was evaluated before, immediately after the procedure and one week later. Five questionnaires were used: Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire, State-Trait-Anxiety Inventory, Hospital-Anxiety and Depression-scale, MRI-Fear-Survey-Schedule and the MRI-Anxiety-Questionnaire. Motion artefacts were evaluated by three observers, blinded to the information given. Data were collected between April 2015 and April 2016. The study followed the CONSORT guidelines RESULT: The CMR-video group scored lower (better) than the cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging-standard group in the factor Relaxation (p=0.039) but not in the factor Anxiety. Anxiety levels were lower during scintigraphic examinations compared to the CMR-standard group (p<0.001). No difference was found regarding motion artefacts between CMR-video and CMR-standard. Conclusion: Patient ability to relax during cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging increased by adding video information prior the exam, which is important in relation to perceived quality in nursing. No effect was seen on motion artefacts. Relevance To Clinical Practice: Video information prior to examinations can be an easy and time effective method to help patients cooperate in imaging procedures.

  • 6.
    Ahlqvist, Margary
    et al.
    Division of Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bogren, Agneta
    Department of Nursing in Gastroenterology and Endochrinology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hagman, Sari
    Department of Nursing in Gastroenterology and Endochrinology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nazar, Isabel
    Department of Nursing in Gastroenterology and Endochrinology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Katarina
    Department of Nursing in Gastroenterology and Endochrinology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordin, Karin
    Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Human Pharmacological Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sunde Valfridsson, Berit
    Intensive Care Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Söderlund, Mona
    Lecturer, Ersta Sko¨ ndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordström, Gun
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Handling of peripheral intravenous cannulae: effects of evidence-based clinical guidelines2006In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 15, no 11, p. 1354-1361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. This study aimed at evaluating the outcome of implemented evidence-based clinical guidelines by means of surveying the frequency of thrombophlebitis, nurses’ care, handling and documentation of peripheral intravenous cannulae. Background. Peripheral intravenous cannulae are frequently used for vascular access and, thereby, the patients will be exposed to local and systemic infectious complications. Evidence-based knowledge of how to prevent these complications and how to care for patients with peripheral intravenous cannula is therefore of great importance. Deficient care, handling and documentation of peripheral intravenous cannulae have previously been reported. Design. A cross-sectional survey was conducted by a group of nurses at three wards at a university hospital before and after the implementation of the evidence-based guidelines. Method. A structured observation protocol was used to review the frequency of thrombophlebitis, the nurses’ care, handling and the documentation of peripheral intravenous cannulae in the patient's record. Results. A total of 107 and 99 cannulae respectively were observed before and after the implementation of the guidelines. The frequency of peripheral intravenous cannulae without signs of thrombophlebitis increased by 21% ( P < 0·01) and the use of cannula size 0·8 mm increased by 22% ( P < 0·001). Nurses’ documentation of peripheral intravenous cannula improved significantly ( P < 0·001). Conclusion. We conclude that implementation of the guidelines resulted in significant improvements by means of decreased frequency of signs of thrombophlebitis, increased application of smaller cannula size (0·8 mm), as well as of the nurses’ documentation in the patient's record. Relevance to clinical practice. Further efforts to ameliorate care and handling of peripheral intravenous cannulae are needed. This can be done by means of increasing nurses’ knowledge and recurrent quality reviews. Well-informed patients can also be more involved in the care than is common today.

  • 7.
    Ahlqvist, Margary
    et al.
    Division of Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bogren, Agneta
    Hagman, Sari
    Nazar, Isabel
    Nilsson, Katarina
    Nordin, Karin
    Valfridsson, Berit Sunde
    Söderlund, Mona
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Nordström, Gun
    Handling of peripheral intravenous cannulae: effects of evidence-based clinical guidelines.2006In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 15, no 11, p. 1354-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This study aimed at evaluating the outcome of implemented evidence-based clinical guidelines by means of surveying the frequency of thrombophlebitis, nurses' care, handling and documentation of peripheral intravenous cannulae. BACKGROUND: Peripheral intravenous cannulae are frequently used for vascular access and, thereby, the patients will be exposed to local and systemic infectious complications. Evidence-based knowledge of how to prevent these complications and how to care for patients with peripheral intravenous cannula is therefore of great importance. Deficient care, handling and documentation of peripheral intravenous cannulae have previously been reported. DESIGN: A cross-sectional survey was conducted by a group of nurses at three wards at a university hospital before and after the implementation of the evidence-based guidelines. METHOD: A structured observation protocol was used to review the frequency of thrombophlebitis, the nurses' care, handling and the documentation of peripheral intravenous cannulae in the patient's record. RESULTS: A total of 107 and 99 cannulae respectively were observed before and after the implementation of the guidelines. The frequency of peripheral intravenous cannulae without signs of thrombophlebitis increased by 21% (P < 0.01) and the use of cannula size 0.8 mm increased by 22% (P < 0.001). Nurses' documentation of peripheral intravenous cannula improved significantly (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: We conclude that implementation of the guidelines resulted in significant improvements by means of decreased frequency of signs of thrombophlebitis, increased application of smaller cannula size (0.8 mm), as well as of the nurses' documentation in the patient's record. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Further efforts to ameliorate care and handling of peripheral intravenous cannulae are needed. This can be done by means of increasing nurses' knowledge and recurrent quality reviews. Well-informed patients can also be more involved in the care than is common today.

  • 8. Ahlström, B H
    et al.
    Skarsäter, I
    Danielson, Ella
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    The meaning of major depression in family life: the viewpoint of the ill parent2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no 1-2§, p. 284-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objective.

    The aim was to elucidate the meaning of major depression in family life

    from the viewpoint of an ill parent.

    Background.

    Major depression according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of

    Mental Disorders is common and may appear repeatedly over several

    years, and affects family life. Depression in parents has a negative

    impact on family function and children's health; however, studies

    regarding the deeper understanding of major depression in family life

    are lacking.

    Design.

    A qualitative explorative study using narrative interviews with eight

    parents who were identified with major depression.

    Methods.

    A phenomenological-hermeneutic method of interpretation was used for

    analysing interview texts and included naive understanding, a

    structural analysis where text was divided into meaning units, which

    were condensed and abstracted, and finally a comprehensive

    understanding.

    Result.

    Two themes were extracted: 'to be afflicted in an almost unmanageable

    situation' with sub-themes 'feeling hopelessly bad', 'being worthless',

    'being unsatisfied' and the theme 'to reconcile oneself to the

    situation' with sub-themes 'being active', 'being satisfied' and

    'maintaining parenthood'.

    Conclusion.

    Comprehensive understanding revealed the parents' simultaneous

    suffering and dignity in family life; suffering with serious lack of

    well-being and health, destroyed self-confidence and unhappiness, and

    dignity with strength, confidence and joy in children. The movement

    between suffering and dignity complicated family life. Dignity was

    threatened by the awareness that suffering in major depression was

    recurrent. Dignity had to be repeatedly restored for self and the

    family, and family dignity has to be restored before others outside the

    family circle.

    Relevance to clinical practice.

    A deeper understanding of the meaning of major depression in family

    life is helpful and for healthcare professionals to prevent individual

    and family suffering by assisting and preserving dignity.

     

  • 9.
    Ahlström, Britt Hedman
    et al.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Danielson, Ella
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The meaning of major depression in family life: the viewpoint of the ill parent2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no 1-2, p. 284-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM AND OBJECTIVE: The aim was to elucidate the meaning of major depression in family life from the viewpoint of an ill parent. Background. Major depression according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders is common and may appear repeatedly over several years, and affects family life. Depression in parents has a negative impact on family function and children's health; however, studies regarding the deeper understanding of major depression in family life are lacking.

    DESIGN: A qualitative explorative study using narrative interviews with eight parents who were identified with major depression.

    METHODS: A phenomenological-hermeneutic method of interpretation was used for analysing interview texts and included naïve understanding, a structural analysis where text was divided into meaning units, which were condensed and abstracted, and finally a comprehensive understanding.

    RESULT: Two themes were extracted: 'to be afflicted in an almost unmanageable situation' with sub-themes 'feeling hopelessly bad', 'being worthless', 'being unsatisfied' and the theme 'to reconcile oneself to the situation' with sub-themes 'being active', 'being satisfied' and 'maintaining parenthood'.

    CONCLUSION: Comprehensive understanding revealed the parents' simultaneous suffering and dignity in family life; suffering with serious lack of well-being and health, destroyed self-confidence and unhappiness, and dignity with strength, confidence and joy in children. The movement between suffering and dignity complicated family life. Dignity was threatened by the awareness that suffering in major depression was recurrent. Dignity had to be repeatedly restored for self and the family, and family dignity has to be restored before others outside the family circle.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: A deeper understanding of the meaning of major depression in family life is helpful and for healthcare professionals to prevent individual and family suffering by assisting and preserving dignity.

  • 10.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Experiences of loss and chronic sorrow in persons with severe chronic illness2007In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 3A, p. 76-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. The aims of the present study were to describe losses narrated by persons afflicted with severe chronic physical illness and to identify the concomitant occurrence of chronic sorrow. Background. Reactions connected with repeated losses are referred to in the literature as chronic sorrow, which has recently been described in conjunction with chronic illness. Design. A qualitative study with an abductive approach of analysis, including both inductive and deductive interpretations. Method. The study is based on 30 persons of working age with average disease duration of 18 years. The average age was 51 years. All of the persons had personal assistance for at least three months because of considerable need for help in daily life due to physical disability. Each person was interviewed twice. There was also an independent assessment of the deductive results concerning chronic sorrow. Results. The inductive findings show that all persons had experienced repeated physical, emotional and social losses. Most common were 'Loss of bodily function', 'Loss of relationship', 'Loss of autonomous life' and 'Loss of the life imagined'. 'Loss of identity' included the loss of human worth, dignity and a changed self-image. In addition, the deductive findings suggest that chronic sorrow exists in the study population. Sixteen of 30 participating subjects were assessed by both assessors to be in a state of chronic sorrow and there was an especially high agreement with respect to one criterion of chronic sorrow 'Loss experience, ongoing or single event' (28 of 30 subjects). Conclusions. This study shows that persons with severe chronic illness often experience recurring losses. These experiences are consistent with the phenomenon of chronic sorrow. Relevance to clinical practice. Knowledge of the existence of chronic sorrow in persons with chronic illness will enable nurses to support these persons in a more sensitive and appropriate way.

  • 11.
    Algilani, Samal
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Langius-Eklöf, Ann
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    An interactive ICT-platform for early assessment and management of patient-reported concerns among older adults living in ordinary housing: development and feasibility2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 11-12, p. 1575-1583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objectives: To develop and test feasibility and acceptability of an interactive ICT-platform integrated in a tablet for collecting and managing patient reported concerns of older adults in home care.

    Background: Using different ICT-applications, e.g. interactive tablets for self-assessment of health and health issues, based on health monitoring as well as other somatic and psychiatric monitoring systems may improve quality of life, staff and patient communication and feelings of being reassured. The European Commission hypothesize that introduction of ICT-applications to the older population will enable improved health. However, evidence-based and user-based applications are scarce.

    Design: The design is underpinned by the Medical Research Council's complex intervention evaluation framework. A mixed-method approach was used combining interviews with older adults and healthcare professionals, and logged quantitative data.

    Methods: In cooperation with a health management company, a platform operated by an interactive application for reporting and managing health related problems in real time was developed. Eight older adults receiving home care were recruited to test feasibility. They were equipped with the application and reported three times weekly over four weeks, and afterwards interviewed about their experiences. Three nurses caring for them were interviewed. The logged data was extracted as a coded file.

    Results: The older adults reported as instructed, in total 107 reports (mean 13). The most frequent concerns were pain, fatigue and dizziness. The older adults experienced the application as meaningful with overall positive effects as well as potential benefits for the nurses involved.

    Conclusions The overall findings in this study indicated high feasibility among older adults using the ICT-platform. The study's results support further development of the platform, as well as tests in full-scale studies and in other populations.

    Relevance to practice: An ICT-platform increased the older adults' perception of involvement and facilitated communication between the patient and nurses.

  • 12.
    Almborg, Ann-Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Ulander, K.
    Thulin, A.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Discharge planning of stroke patients: The relatives' perceptions of participation2009In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 857-865Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Almborg, Ann-Helene
    et al.
    Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University.
    Ulander, Kerstin
    Kristianstad University College, School of Health and Society.
    Thulin, Anders
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Berg, Stig
    Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University.
    Discharge planning of stroke patients: the relatives' perceptions of participation2009In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 857-865Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To describe relatives' perceived participation in discharge planning for patients with stroke and identify correlates to perceived participation. Stroke affects both patients and their relatives and previous research shows that relatives were often dissatisfied with their perceived involvement in discharge planning and the information they get. Prospective cross-sectional study. The study comprised 152 consecutively enrolled relatives (mean age = 60.8 years) of acute stroke patients admitted to a stroke unit in southern Sweden during 2003-2005. Data were collected through interviews 2-3 weeks after discharge using 'Relative's Questionnaire about Participation in Discharge planning'. This instrument measures perceived participation in three subscales: R-Information-Illness, R-Information-Care/support, and R-Goals and Needs. The Overall Rating of Relative's Perceived Participation in Discharge Planning was measured by a visual analogue scale (VAS) (1-10 score). Among the relatives, 56-68% reported positively according to R-Information-Illness, but 46-53% perceived that they did not receive any information about care/medication/rehabilitation/support. About 80% perceived no participation at all in goals and needs. The mean value of the VAS was 3.89 (SD 3.40) score. Regression analyses revealed that longer stay at hospital, patients with higher education, and relatives of female patients and female relatives were associated with relatives' perceptions of higher participation in discharge planning. Relatives perceived that they needed more information and knowledge about stroke and care/medication/rehabilitation/support. They also needed to be more involved in goal-setting and in identifying patient needs. Professionals should take into consideration these associated variables to improve relatives' perceived participation. Clinicians should give more attention to the altered situation of stroke patients' relatives when planning for continuing care and when setting postdischarge goals for the patients. The professionals need to develop strategies to involve relatives in sharing information, goal-setting and needs assessment in discharge planning.

  • 14.
    Almborg, Ann-Helene
    et al.
    Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University.
    Ulander, Kerstin
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Thulin, Anders
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Berg, Stig
    Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University.
    Discharged after stroke - important factors for health-related quality of life2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no 15-16, p. 2196-2206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims. This study examines different correlates to health-related quality (HRQoL) of life after discharge in patients with stroke. Background. HRQoL is an important aspect of life after suffering a stroke. Previous research has revealed several variables associated with poststroke quality of life, including age, gender, depression, fatigue, length of hospital stay, functional status and amount of social participation. However, the time span after stroke varies greatly in the different studies. Although the multiple factors that contribute to short-term postdischarge HRQoL have potential importance for discharge planning, to our knowledge, these factors have not been systematically investigated during the earlier days following discharge. Design. Cross-sectional study. Methods. The sample consisted of 188 consecutively included individuals (mean age 74 years, 56% men) from a stroke unit in southern Sweden. The interviews were performed two to three weeks after discharge and included use of the SF-36, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, the Barthel Index, the Frenchay Activities Index, performance of interests and survey of patients' perceived participation in discharge planning. Multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to identify variables associated with HRQoL. Results. Multiple regression analyses with the eight scales of SF-36 as dependent variables revealed eight models, one for each scale, which were statistically significant. Depressive symptoms were associated with lower HRQoL. Ability to perform personal and social activities, interests, younger age, education (elementary school) and shorter hospital stay were related to higher HRQoL. Patients' perceived participation in discharge planning was both positively and negatively associated with HRQoL. Conclusions. Several variables were related to good HRQoL two to three weeks post-discharge, particularly fewer depressive symptoms, participation in social activities such as outdoor activities and performance of interests. Relevance to clinical practice. These results can be used to design needs assessment forms of discharge planning to promote adaptation and recovery after stroke.

  • 15.
    Almborg, Ann-Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Ulander, Kerstin
    Thulin, Anders
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Discharged after stroke - important factors for health-related quality of life.2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no 15-16, p. 2196-2206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: This study examines different correlates to health-related quality (HRQoL) of life after discharge in patients with stroke.

    BACKGROUND: HRQoL is an important aspect of life after suffering a stroke. Previous research has revealed several variables associated with poststroke quality of life, including age, gender, depression, fatigue, length of hospital stay, functional status and amount of social participation. However, the time span after stroke varies greatly in the different studies. Although the multiple factors that contribute to short-term postdischarge HRQoL have potential importance for discharge planning, to our knowledge, these factors have not been systematically investigated during the earlier days following discharge.

    DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.

    METHODS: The sample consisted of 188 consecutively included individuals (mean age 74 years, 56% men) from a stroke unit in southern Sweden. The interviews were performed two to three weeks after discharge and included use of the SF-36, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, the Barthel Index, the Frenchay Activities Index, performance of interests and survey of patients' perceived participation in discharge planning. Multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to identify variables associated with HRQoL.

    RESULTS: Multiple regression analyses with the eight scales of SF-36 as dependent variables revealed eight models, one for each scale, which were statistically significant. Depressive symptoms were associated with lower HRQoL. Ability to perform personal and social activities, interests, younger age, education (elementary school) and shorter hospital stay were related to higher HRQoL. Patients' perceived participation in discharge planning was both positively and negatively associated with HRQoL.

    CONCLUSIONS: Several variables were related to good HRQoL two to three weeks post-discharge, particularly fewer depressive symptoms, participation in social activities such as outdoor activities and performance of interests.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: These results can be used to design needs assessment forms of discharge planning to promote adaptation and recovery after stroke.

  • 16.
    Almborg, Ann-Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Ulander, Kerstin
    Thulin, Anders
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Patients' perceptions of their participation in discharge planning after acute stroke.2008In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 199-209Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Almborg, Ann-Helene
    et al.
    Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University.
    Ulander, Kerstin
    Kristianstad University College, School of Health and Society.
    Thulin, Anders
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Berg, Stig
    Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University.
    Patients' perceptions of their participation in discharge planning after acute stroke2009In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 199-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. To describe stroke patients' perceptions of their participation in the discharge planning process and identify correlates of perceived participation.

    Background. Patients have the right to participate in discharge planning, but earlier research has shown that they are often dissatisfied with the information they receive and their involvement in goal-setting during discharge planning.

    Design. Cross-sectional study.

    Methods. The sample consisted of 188 persons (mean age 74 years, SD 11·2) with acute stroke who were admitted to a stroke unit at a hospital in southern Sweden during 2003–2005. Data was collected by face-to-face interviews 2–3 weeks after discharge using the 'Patients' Questionnaire on Participation in Discharge Planning'. This instrument measures perceived participation in discharge planning in three subscales: P-Information, P-Medical Treatment, P-Goals and Needs.

    Results. The percentage of patients who perceived that they had participated in discharge planning was as follows: 72–90% according to P-Information, 29–38% according to P-Medical Treatment and 15–47% according to P-Goals and Needs. Age, education and performance of activities of daily living were significantly related to perceived participation as measured by different subscales.

    Conclusions. Most of the patients perceived that they received information, but fewer perceived participation in the planning of medical treatment and needs of care/service/rehabilitation and goal-setting. Professionals need to pay more attention to patients in different subgroups to facilitate their participation in discharge planning.

    Relevance to clinical practice. To facilitate and increase patients' participation in discharge planning, methods should be implemented for goal-setting and identifying patients' needs. Methods that foster patient participation may improve goal-orientated care, services and rehabilitation after discharge.

  • 18.
    Alsén, Pia
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, undergraduate level. University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Brink, Eva
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Advanced Nursing.
    Fatigue after myocardial infarction - a two-year follow-up study2013In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 11-12, p. 1647-1652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To investigate changes in self-reported fatigue and depression from four months to two years following a myocardial infarction, as well as to explore gender differences, identify the incidence of fatigue without coexisting depression and finally predict health-related quality of life at a two-year follow-up. Background: Depression and fatigue are associated with decreased health-related quality of life after myocardial infarction. Although there is a close relationship between fatigue and depression, it has been shown that symptoms of fatigue can occur without coexisting depression. Design: Quantitative and longitudinal design. Methods: Participants (n = 155) were asked to complete the following questionnaires: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory-20 (MFI-20) and the Short Form Survey (SF-36) following myocardial infarction (after four months and two years). Descriptive statistics, paired t-tests and multiple regressions were carried out. Results: In the entire group, self-reported fatigue had decreased from four months to two years after myocardial infarction. After two years, 18% of respondents reported depression together with fatigue and 30% reported fatigued without depression. Women scored higher than men on the fatigue dimensions reduced activity, reduced motivation and mental fatigue. Moreover, the physical dimension of health-related quality of life two years after myocardial infarction was predicted by experienced general fatigue at four months. Conclusion: Fatigue with or without coexisting possible/probable depression remains as a significant symptom two years after myocardial infarction in nearly half of the entire group. Relevance to clinical practice: Fatigue is a problem following myocardial infarction. Therefore, systematic screening and early identification of patients experiencing symptoms of depression and fatigue after myocardial infarction are important for suitable care planning. In contemporary coronary care, strategies aimed at relieving fatigue should be developed. ᅵ 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 19.
    Alsén, Pia
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.
    Brink, Eva
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Advanced Nursing.
    Persson, Lars-Olof
    Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Institute of Health and Care Sciences.
    Patients' illness perception four months after a myocardial infarction.2008In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, no 5A, p. 25-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to explore patients' illness perception of myocardial infarction four months after a myocardial infarction. BACKGROUND: An important task for research on recovery from myocardial infarction is to understand the factors that influence an individual's adherence to secondary preventive strategies. Perceptual, cognitive and motivational factors have been found to influence adherence to a secondary preventive regimen. METHOD: Twenty-five patients were interviewed four months after a myocardial infarction. In accordance with grounded theory methodology, data collection and analysis were carried out simultaneously. RESULTS: The findings can be understood in light of two core categories: 'trust in oneself ' vs. 'trust in others'; belief in one's own efforts to control the illness; and 'illness reasoning', lines of thought about illness identity. In searching for relationships, six categories describing variation in illness perceptions of a myocardial infarction emerged: (i) 'sign of a chronic condition - feasible to influence'; (ii) 'sign of a chronic condition - uncontrollable'; (iii) 'acute event that can recur - feasible to influence'; (iv) 'acute event that can recur - uncontrollable'; (v) 'unthinkable acute event'; and (vi) 'non-recurring acute event'. CONCLUSION: The more reflective patients perceived the heart attack as a sign of a chronic condition; they also devoted time for reasoning about the possible causes of their illness. This is in contrast to patients who were less reflective and viewed their myocardial infarction as an acute event, which they avoided thinking about. The findings contribute to our understanding of variation in illness perceptions. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The examination of how individuals perceive myocardial infarction may help health-care professionals individualize secondary preventive strategies, thereby improving adherence to health-care regimens. Nurse-patient discussions could begin with identification of the patient's variations of reflectiveness concerning his/her illness.

  • 20.
    Alsén, Pia
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Health and Culture.
    Illness perceptions of fatigue and the association with sense of coherence and stress in patients one year after myocardial infarction.2016In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 3-4, p. 525-533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. To explore the associations between illness perceptions offatigue, sense of coherence and stress in patients one year after myocardial infarc-tion.Background. Post-myocardial infarction fatigue is a stressful symptom that is dif-ficult to cope with. Patients' illness perceptions of fatigue guide professionals inpredicting how individuals will respond emotionally and cognitively to symptoms.Individuals' sense of coherence can be seen as a coping resource in managingstressors.Design. A cross-sectional study design was used.Method. One year post-myocardial infarction, a total of 74 patients still experi-encing fatigue completed four questionnaires: the Multidimensional Fatigue ScaleInventory -20, the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire, the Sense of Coherencescale (sense of coherence-13) and a single-item measure of stress symptoms.Descriptive statistics, correlations and stepwise regression analysis were carriedout.Results. Strong negative associations were found between illness perceptions offatigue, sense of coherence and stress. Sense of coherence has an impact on illnessperceptions of fatigue. Of the dimensions of sense of coherence, comprehensibilityseemed to play the greatest role in explaining illness perceptions of fatigueone year after myocardial infarction.Conclusion. To strengthen patients' coping resources, health-care professionalsshould create opportunities for patients to gain individual-level knowledge thatallows them to distinguish between common fatigue symptoms and warning signsfor myocardial infarction.Relevance to clinical practice. There is a need to improve strategies for copingwith fatigue. It is also essential to identify patients with fatigue after myocardialinfarction, as they need explanations for their symptoms and extra support

  • 21. Aléx, Lena
    et al.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Norberg, Astrid
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research. Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Lundman, Berit
    Construction of masculinities among men aged 85 and older in the north of Sweden.2008In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 451-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim was to analyse the construction of masculinities among men aged 85 and older. BACKGROUND: All societies have a gender order, constructed from multiple ideas of what is seen as feminine and masculine. As the group of men aged 85 and older is increasing in size and their demand for care will increase, we must recognize the importance of studying these men and various discourses of masculinities. DESIGN: Qualitative explorative. METHODS: Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse thematic narratives. Masculinity theories provided the point of departure for the analysis. RESULTS: The analysis coalesced into three masculinities. 'Being in the male centre', developed from subthemes as: taking pride in one's work and economic situation; being in the centre in relation to others; regarding women as sexual objects; and belonging to a select group. 'Striving to maintain the male facade' developed from subthemes as: emphasizing 'important' connections; having feelings of loss; striving to maintain old norms and rejecting the fact of being old. 'Being related' was formulated from subthemes as: feeling at home with domestic duties; being concerned; accepting one's own aging; and reflecting on life. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates the importance of being aware of the existence of multiple masculinities, in contrast to the generally unproblematic and unsubtle particular healthcare approaches which consider men as simply belonging to one masculinity. Relevance to clinical practice. Diverse masculinities probably affect encounters between men and healthcare providers and others who work with an older population and therefore our results are of importance in a caring context.

  • 22.
    Aléx, Lena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lundman, Berit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Construction of masculinities among men aged 85 and older in the north of Sweden2008In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 451-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim was to analyse the construction of masculinities among men aged 85 and older. BACKGROUND: All societies have a gender order, constructed from multiple ideas of what is seen as feminine and masculine. As the group of men aged 85 and older is increasing in size and their demand for care will increase, we must recognize the importance of studying these men and various discourses of masculinities. DESIGN: Qualitative explorative. METHODS: Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse thematic narratives. Masculinity theories provided the point of departure for the analysis. RESULTS: The analysis coalesced into three masculinities. 'Being in the male centre', developed from subthemes as: taking pride in one's work and economic situation; being in the centre in relation to others; regarding women as sexual objects; and belonging to a select group. 'Striving to maintain the male facade' developed from subthemes as: emphasizing 'important' connections; having feelings of loss; striving to maintain old norms and rejecting the fact of being old. 'Being related' was formulated from subthemes as: feeling at home with domestic duties; being concerned; accepting one's own aging; and reflecting on life. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates the importance of being aware of the existence of multiple masculinities, in contrast to the generally unproblematic and unsubtle particular healthcare approaches which consider men as simply belonging to one masculinity. Relevance to clinical practice. Diverse masculinities probably affect encounters between men and healthcare providers and others who work with an older population and therefore our results are of importance in a caring context.

  • 23.
    Andersen, Anna-Eva
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Moberg, Catherine
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Bengtsson-Tops, Anita
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Garmy, Pernilla
    Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Environment Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO). Lund University.
    Lesbian, gay and bisexual parents' experiences of nurses' attitudes in child health care: a qualitative study2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 23-24, p. 5065-5071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe lesbian, gay and bisexual parents' experiences of nurses' attitudes in child health care.

    BACKGROUND: Lesbian, gay and bisexual people are often reluctant to disclose their gender identity for fear of discrimination. This fear may lead to avoidance of healthcare for themselves or their children and may negatively affect families' health and well-being.

    DESIGN: A qualitative inductive design was employed.

    METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 lesbian, gay or bisexual parents (11 mothers and 3 fathers) with child health care experiences in southern Sweden. Interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: Two themes were identified. One, a 'sense of marginalization', included lesbian, gay and bisexual parents' experiences of heteronormative attitudes among child health care nurses which led them to feel alienated and questioned as parents. Another, 'being respected for who you are', included experiences of being respected and included at child health care appointments.

    CONCLUSIONS: Findings paint a complex picture of lesbian, gay and bisexual parents' interactions with child health care nurses in that they experienced both positive and negative attitudes. Knowledge gaps about lesbian, gay and bisexual families within the child health care field must be filled.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Child health care nurses should work with the entire family to provide the best care for the child; however, discrimination in health care is common and often caused by a lack of knowledge. The number of children living with same-sex parents has increased more than ten-fold since the end of the 1990s. It is therefore important to explore lesbian, gay and bisexual parents' experiences with child health care nurses' attitudes to improve quality of care.

  • 24.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Relatives in end-of-life care – part 1: a systematic review of the literature the five last years, January 1999–February 20042006In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 15, no 9, p. 1158-1169Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Relatives in end-of-life care--part 1: a systematic review of the literature the five last years, January 1999-February 20042006In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 15, no 9, p. 1158-1169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    To review systematically research conducted during the past five years focusing on the relatives' situation and needs in end-of-life care.

    BACKGROUND AND AIM:

    That relatives make a large contribution in the care of the dying is well-known. In this situation, relatives often have to solve many new practical problems in the care as well as dealing with the sorrow of both themselves and the dying person. In recent years, palliative care has been developed in many countries and many new studies have been carried out.

    METHODS:

    A systematic search of the literature was performed in the CINAHL and Medline databases. Of the 94 papers analysed, there were 59 qualitative and 35 quantitative studies with differing designs. The studies were carried out in 11 countries and were published in 34 different journals.

    RESULTS:

    The results were categorized in two main themes with several subthemes: (1) being a close relative--the situation: (i) exposed position--new responsibility, (ii) balance between burden and capacity and (iii) positive values; (2) being a close relative--needs: (i) good patient care, (ii) being present, (iii) knowing and communicating and (iv) support from and trusting relationship with the professional. The relative's feelings of security and trust in the professional were found to be of great importance.

    CONCLUSION:

    More than twice as many studies had a descriptive/explorative design, which is of importance in the assessment of evidence. However, different studies complement one another and in summary, it can be said that analytic evidence is unequivocal: good patient care, communication, information and the attitude of the professional are of decisive importance regarding relatives' situation. These results are also in accord with earlier review studies.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

    Staff members have a great deal of responsibility for assuring that the patient feels as good as possible, facilitating relatives' involvement based on the family's wishes and limiting the stress and difficulties experienced by the family. The results showed that the relative's satisfaction could depend on the attitude of the professional as well as on good communication, good listening and good information. This can also be viewed as a prerequisite for the professional to get to know the family and to provide 'care in the light'.

  • 26.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Gjövik, Norway.
    Ewertzon, Mats
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Johansson, Anita
    Skaraborgs sjukhus.
    An isolated involvement in mental health care: Experiences of parents of young adults.2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 7-8, p. 1053-1065Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this study was to explore parents' involvement in the informal and professional care of their young adult child with mental illness. A further aim was to examine concepts in the caring theory of "Involvement in the light - involvement in the dark" in the context of mental health care.

    BACKGROUND: Mental illness has increased among young people in high-income countries and suicide is now the leading cause of death for this group. Because of their disease, these young people may have difficulty in carrying out daily, taken-for-granted, tasks. Consequently, they often become dependent on their parents, and their parents shoulder a considerable responsibility.

    DESIGN AND METHODS: A secondary descriptive design with a deductive content analysis was used. Ten parents who have a son or daughter with long-term mental illness (aged 18 - 25) were interviewed. The deductive analysis was based on the caring theory of "Involvement in the light - Involvement in the dark".

    RESULTS: The results are described using the following concepts in the theory: "Knowing", "Doing", "Being" and "Attitude of the health professionals". The result are to a great extent consistent with the "Involvement in the dark" metaphor, which describes an isolated involvement in which the parents were not informed, seen or acknowledged by the health professionals. Continuous support by professionals with a positive attitude was described as being of decisive importance for meaningful involvement. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 27.
    Andersson, Ann-Christine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Olheden, Anna
    Landstinget i Kalmar län.
    Patient participation in quality improvement: managers’ opinions of patients as resources2012In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, no 23-24, p. 3590-3593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate managers’ opinions of how to take advantage of patients as resources in quality improvement work in the Swedish healthcare sector.

  • 28.
    Andersson, Ewa K.
    et al.
    Blekinge Inst Technol, Dept Hlth, SE-37179 Karlskrona, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Sjostrom-Strand, Annica
    Lund Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Willman, Ania
    Blekinge Inst Technol, Dept Hlth, SE-37179 Karlskrona, Sweden.;Malmo Univ, Dept Care Sci, Malmo, Sweden..
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Malmo Univ, Dept Care Sci, Nursing, Malmo, Sweden. .
    Registered nurses views of caring in coronary care - a deductive and inductive content analysis2015In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 23-24, p. 3481-3493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. To extend nurses' descriptions of how they understood caring, as reflected in the findings of an earlier study (i.e. the hierarchical outcome space) and to gain additional understandings and perspectives of nurses' views of caring in relation to a coronary care patient case. Background. Scientific literature from the 1970s-1990s contains descriptions of caring in nursing. In contrast, the contemporary literature on this topic - particularly in the context of coronary care - is very sparse, and the few studies that do contain descriptions rarely do so from the perspective of nurses. Design. Qualitative descriptive study. Methods. Twenty-one nurses were interviewed using the stimulated recall interview technique. The data were analysed using deductive and inductive qualitative content analysis. Results. The results of the iterative and integrated content analysis showed that the data mainly reproduced the content of the hierarchical outcome space describing how nurses could understand caring; however, in the outcome space, the relationship broke up (i.e. flipped). The nurses' views of caring could now also be understood as: person-centredness 'lurking' in the shadows; limited 'potential' for safeguarding patients' best interests; counselling as virtually the 'only' nursing intervention; and caring preceded by the 'almighty' context. Their views offered alternative and, at times, contrasting perspectives of caring, thereby adding to our understanding of it. Conclusion. Caring was described as operating somewhere between the nurses caring values and the contextual conditions in which caring occurred. This challenged their ability to sustain caring in accordance with their values and the patients' preferences. Relevance to clinical practice. To ensure that the essentials of caring are met at all times, nurses need to plan and deliver caring in a systematic way. The use of systematic structures in caring, as the nursing process, can help nurses to work in a person-centred way, while sustaining their professional values.

  • 29.
    Andersson, Ewa
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health.
    Sjöstrand-Strand, Annica
    Willman, Ania
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Registered nurses views of caring in coronary care: a deductive and inductive content analysis2015In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 23-24, p. 3481-3493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To extend nurses’ descriptions of how they understood caring, as reflected in the findings of an earlier study (i.e. the hierarchical outcome space) and to gain additional understandings and perspectives of nurses’ views of caring in relation to a coronary care patient case.

    Background

    Scientific literature from the 1970s–1990s contains descriptions of caring in nursing. In contrast, the contemporary literature on this topic – particularly in the context of coronary care – is very sparse, and the few studies that do contain descriptions rarely do so from the perspective of nurses.

    Design

    Qualitative descriptive study.

    Methods

    Twenty-one nurses were interviewed using the stimulated recall interview technique. The data were analysed using deductive and inductive qualitative content analysis.

    Results

    The results of the iterative and integrated content analysis showed that the data mainly reproduced the content of the hierarchical outcome space describing how nurses could understand caring; however, in the outcome space, the relationship broke up (i.e. flipped). The nurses’ views of caring could now also be understood as: person-centredness ‘lurking’ in the shadows; limited ‘potential’ for safeguarding patients’ best interests; counselling as virtually the ‘only’ nursing intervention; and caring preceded by the ‘almighty’ context. Their views offered alternative and, at times, contrasting perspectives of caring, thereby adding to our understanding of it.

    Conclusion

    Caring was described as operating somewhere between the nurses caring values and the contextual conditions in which caring occurred. This challenged their ability to sustain caring in accordance with their values and the patients’ preferences.

    Relevance to clinical practice

    To ensure that the essentials of caring are met at all times, nurses need to plan and deliver caring in a systematic way. The use of systematic structures in caring, as the nursing process, can help nurses to work in a person-centred way, while sustaining their professional values.

  • 30.
    Andersson, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Pettersson, Elisabet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    Daily life after moving into a care home - experiences from older people, relatives and contact persons2007In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 9, p. 1712-1718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. To describe older people's experiences of daily life at the care home after admittance with respect to their perceptions of participation in the decision to move. Furthermore, the aim was to study the experiences of their relatives and contact persons with respect to the daily life of the same residents. Background. When older persons move into a care home, the whole family often play an important part. Thus, it is interesting to study how newly admitted older people, their relatives and staff members experience daily life in a modern care home. Methods. Qualitative design. The participants comprised a purposive sample of 13 residents, recently admitted to a care home, 69-90 years old, both single living and married, both moving from their own homes and from different institutions. Interviews were carried out with the older people (n = 13), their relatives (n = 10) and contact persons (n = 11). Results. The majority of the residents reported satisfaction with care home living. The relatives were also satisfied, secure and appreciated the privacy and homely atmosphere of the flat. The disadvantage of one-room flats was that the residents might have felt lonely. The relatives felt that the residents were bored, but few residents desired more activities, even if some of them longed for people to socialize with. For many older people, perhaps talking is the most important 'activity' at care homes. Concerning self-determination, some residents did not find it satisfactory. Relevance to clincial practice. Staff members must pay attention to residents' need to talk with people. For many older people, talking is perhaps the most important 'activity' at care homes. Nurses must safeguard residents' self-determination. When residents are in control of their lives, they may become satisfied with time.

  • 31.
    Andersson, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Carinng Sciences.
    Pettersson, Elisabet
    Department of Public Health and Carinng Sciences.
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Daily life after moving into a care home: experiences of older people, relatives and contact persons.2007In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 9, p. 1712-1718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: When older persons move into a care home, the whole family often play an important part. Thus, it is interesting to study how newly admitted older people, their relatives and staff members experience daily life in a modern care home. Aims and objectives: To describe older people’s experiences of daily life at the care home after admittance with respect to their perceptions of participation in the decision to move. Furthermore, the aim was to study the experiences of their relatives and contact persons with respect to the daily life of the same residents. Methods: Qualitative design. The participants comprised a purposive sample of thirteen residents, recently admitted to a care home, 69-90 years old, both single living and married, both moving from their own homes and from different institutions. Interviews were carried out with the older people (n=13), their relatives (n=10) and contact persons (n=11). Results: The majority of the residents reported satisfaction with care home living. The relatives were also satisfied, secure and appreciated the privacy and homely atmosphere of the flat. The disadvantage of one-room flats was that the residents might have felt lonely. The relatives felt that the residents were bored, but few residents desired more activities, even if some of them longed for people to socialize with. For many older people, perhaps talking is the most important ‘activity’ at care homes. Concerning self-determination, some residents did not find it satisfactory. Relevance to Clinical Practice: Staff members must pay attention to residents’ need to talk with people. For many older people, talking is perhaps the most important ”activity” at care homes. Nurses must safeguard residents’ self-determination. When residents are in control of their lives, they may become satisfied with time

  • 32. Andersson, Nina
    et al.
    Klang, Birgitta
    Petersson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Differences in clinical reasoning among nurses working in highly specialised paediatric care2012In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, no 5-6, p. 870-879Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. The aim of the study was to examine differences in clinical reasoning among novice, experienced and specialist paediatric nurses. Background. Highly specialised paediatric care requires specific knowledge and ongoing skill performance of the nurses employed. There is a lack of research in how paediatric nurses manage the daily care problems they encounter and how they acquire the skills required to give patients the best possible care. More knowledge is needed about how paediatric nurses with different experience and education reason and communicate about paediatric patient situations. Design. The study was based on six recorded group discussions of a fictitious, but realistic paediatric case. Three categories of nurses: novices (n = 7), experienced (n = 7) and specialists (n = 7) from a paediatric hospital participated. A qualitative content analysis approach was chosen to examine differences in clinical reasoning. Results. Several themes were uncovered: child's social situation, child abuse and the child's illness, qualitative differences emerged in how the nurses discussed the case. Three approaches were identified: a task-oriented approach (novices and experienced), an action-oriented approach (novices and experienced) and hypothesis-oriented approach (specialists) while discussing the case. Conclusion. When comparing nurses in three competence groups, it was established that the groups with extensive experience and specialist education reasoned differently than the other groups. Between the novice and experienced groups, no obvious differences were found. Thus, the importance of experience alone for the development of competence is still an open question. Experience combined with further education appears important for developing professional competence in paediatric care. Relevance to clinical practice. Nurses' reasoning in clinical paediatric care is related to experience and training.

  • 33.
    Andersson, Pia
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Lena
    Centre for Caring Sciences, Lund University.
    Hallberg, Ingalill
    Centre for Caring Sciences, Lund University.
    Renvert, Stefan
    Kristianstad University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Testing an oral assessment guide during chemotherapy treatmen in a Swedish care setting: a pilot study1999In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 150-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oral complications are common in patients with haematological malignancies who undergo chemotherapy treatment. A pilot study including 16 haematological patients was carried out to evaluate the oral status using an Oral Assessment Guide (OAG) and to test the reliability of the OAG. The oral assessments were made daily by registered nurses at a Department of Internal Medicine in Sweden. Once a week a dental hygienist made the oral assessments independent of the registered nurses in order to provide data for calculations of inter-rater reliability. All patients had varying degrees of alterations in the oral cavity, especially in the mucous membranes, teeth/dentures and gums. The inter-rater agreement between the nurses and the dental hygienist was good for saliva and swallow, and moderate for voice and gums. Assessments to detect alterations in the oral cavity afford the opportunity for early and individualized interventions and may decrease the risk of oral infections. It is necessary to train the nurses to ensure high levels of reliability in the oral assessments. The OAG seems to be a reliable and clinical useful tool for assessing the oral cavity status and determining changes.

  • 34.
    Andersson, Susanne
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Svanström, Rune
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ek, Kristina
    University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Rosén, Helena
    Health Sciences, University of Lund, Lund.
    Berglund, Mia
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    'The challenge to take charge of life with long-term illness': Nurses' experiences of supporting patients' learning with the didactic model2015In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 23-24, p. 3409-3416Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Andersson, Åsa
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Frank, Catharina
    Karolinska institutet.
    Willman, Ania Ml
    Malmö universitet.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Karolinska institutet.
    Hansebo, Görel
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Factors contributing to serious adverse events in nursing homes.2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 1-2, p. e354-e362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To identify the most common serious adverse events that occurred in nursing homes and their most frequent contributing factors to the improvement of safe nursing care.

    BACKGROUND: There is a need to improve safe nursing care in nursing homes. Residents are often frail and vulnerable with extensive needs for nursing care. A relatively minor adverse event in nursing care can cause serious injury that could have been preventable.

    DESIGN: This was a retrospective study, with a total sample of data regarding adverse events (n = 173) in nursing homes, concerning nursing care reported by healthcare providers in Sweden to the Health and Social Care Inspectorate. The reports were analysed with content analysis, and the frequencies of the adverse events, and their contributing factors, were described with descriptive statistics.

    RESULTS: Medication errors, falls, delayed or inappropriate intervention and missed nursing care contributed to the vast majority (89%) of the serious adverse events. A total of 693 possible contributing factors were identified. The most common contributing factors were (i) lack of competence, (ii) incomplete or lack of documentation, (iii) teamwork failure and (iv) inadequate communication.

    CONCLUSIONS: The contributing factors frequently interacted yet they varied between different groups of serious adverse events. The resident's safety depends on the availability of staff's competence as well as adequate documentation about the resident's condition. Lack of competence was underestimated by healthcare providers.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Registered nurses and assistant nurses need to have awareness of contributing factors to adverse events in nursing care. A holistic approach to improve patient safety in nursing homes requires competence of the staff, safe environments as well as resident's and relative's participation.

  • 36.
    Anderzen-Carlsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden; Faculty of Health, Science, and Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Gillå, Cristina
    Central Child Health Unit, County Council of Varmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Lind, Maria
    Central Child Health Unit, Örebro County Region, Örebro, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Kjerstin
    Department of Social and Psychological studies, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Fändriks, Anna Lindgren
    Central Child Health Unit, County Council of Varmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Källström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Child healthcare nurses' experiences of asking new mothers about intimate partner violence2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 13-14, p. 2752-2762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate child health care nurses' experiences of asking mothers of 8-month-old children about intimate partner violence using a two-step questionnaire.

    Background: Exposure to intimate partner violence is detrimental to women and to their children, and its early detection is vital. Child health care is a promising setting for detecting intimate partner violence.

    Design: The overall project had a quasi-experimental design, and was employed in 2015 at 12 child health care centers in Sweden. The project aimed to test a two-step method for talking about intimate partner violence with mothers (n = 198) at the child health care center. In this paper we disclose the experiences of the intervention from the perspective of the nurses (n = 13) who were educated and involved in the intervention.

    Methods: Data were collected by semi-structured interviews, analyzed by thematic analysis.

    Results: Five categories emerged: Using the two-step questionnaire method, Asking about IPV as an important issue, Being comfortable in the professional role and with asking about IPV, The importance of time and place in asking about IPV, and Spill-over effects.

    Conclusions: Asking mothers visiting the child health clinic about their experiences of intimate partner violence was seen as an important task. Using a questionnaire could facilitate asking, but the questionnaire must be short and easy to use. Furthermore, the time and place for initiating a talk about this sensitive topic must be carefully chosen.

    Relevance to clinical practice: The Violence in Families questionnaire was regarded as a useful tool and could thus be implemented in practice. However, it is important to offer education to the nurses prior to implementing a routine of asking about intimate partner violence in the child healthcare setting.

  • 37.
    Anderzen-Carlsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Örebro universitet.
    Gillå, Cristina
    Central Child Health Unit, County Council of Varmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Lind, Maria
    Central Child Health Unit, Orebro County Region, Orebro, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Kjerstin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Lindgren Fändriks, Anna
    Central Child Health Unit, County Council of Varmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Källström, Åsa
    School of Law, Psychology and Socialwork, Orebro University, Orebro, Sweden.
    Child healthcare nurses' experiences of asking new mothers about intimate partner violence2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 13-14, p. 2752-2762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To investigate child healthcare nurses' experiences of asking mothers of 8-month-old children about intimate partner violence using a two-step questionnaire. Background: Exposure to intimate partner violence is detrimental to women and to their children, and its early detection is vital. Child health care is a promising setting for detecting intimate partner violence. Design: The overall project had a quasi-experimental design and was employed in 2015 at 12 child healthcare centres in Sweden. The project aimed to test a two-step method for talking about intimate partner violence with mothers (n = 198) at the child healthcare centre. In this article, we disclose the experiences of the intervention from the perspective of the nurses (n = 13) who were educated and involved in the intervention. Methods: Data were collected by semi-structured interviews, analysed by thematic analysis. Results: Five categories emerged: using the two-step questionnaire method, asking about IPV as an important issue, being comfortable in the professional role and with asking about IPV, the importance of time and place in asking about IPV and spillover effects. Conclusions: Asking mothers visiting the child health clinic about their experiences of intimate partner violence was seen as an important task. Using a questionnaire could facilitate asking, but the questionnaire must be short and easy to use. Furthermore, the time and place for initiating a talk about this sensitive topic must be carefully chosen. Relevance to clinical practice: The Violence in Families questionnaire was regarded as a useful tool and could thus be implemented in practice. However, it is important to offer education to the nurses prior to implementing a routine of asking about intimate partner violence in the child healthcare setting.

  • 38.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Nursing Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Nursing Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.;Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Arestedt, Kristofer
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Nursing Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linnaeus Univ, Ctr Collaborat Palliat Care, Kalmar, Sweden..
    Prevalence and associated factors for decreased appetite among patients with stable heart failure2016In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 11-12, p. 1703-1712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectivesTo explore the prevalence of decreased appetite and factors associated with appetite among patients with stable heart failure. BackgroundDecreased appetite is an important factor for the development of undernutrition among patients with heart failure, but there are knowledge gaps about prevalence and the factors related to appetite in this patient group. DesignObservational, cross-sectional study. MethodsA total of 186 patients with mild to severe heart failure were consecutively recruited from three heart failure outpatient clinics. Data were obtained from medical records (heart failure diagnosis, comorbidity and medical treatment) and self-rated questionnaires (demographics, appetite, self-perceived health, symptoms of depression and sleep). Blood samples were taken to determine myocardial stress and nutrition status. Heart failure symptoms and cognitive function were assessed by clinical examinations. The Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire was used to assess self-reported appetite. Bivariate correlations and multivariate linear regression analyses were conducted to explore factors associated with appetite. ResultsSeventy-one patients (38%) experienced a loss of appetite with a significant risk of developing weight loss. The final multiple regression model showed that age, symptoms of depression, insomnia, cognitive function and pharmacological treatment were associated with appetite, explaining 27% of the total variance. ConclusionIn this cross-sectional study, a large share of patients with heart failure was affected by decreased appetite, associated with demographic, psychosocial and medical factors. Relevance to clinical practiceLoss of appetite is a prevalent problem among patients with heart failure that may lead to undernutrition. Health care professionals should routinely assess appetite and discuss patients' experiences of appetite, nutrition intake and body weight and give appropriate nutritional advice with respect to individual needs.

  • 39.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University ; Uppsala University.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Linköping University.
    Prevalence and associated factors for decreased appetite among patients with stable heart failure2016In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 11-12, p. 1703-1712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectivesTo explore the prevalence of decreased appetite and factors associated with appetite among patients with stable heart failure.

    BackgroundDecreased appetite is an important factor for the development of undernutrition among patients with heart failure, but there are knowledge gaps about prevalence and the factors related to appetite in this patient group.

    DesignObservational, cross-sectional study.

    MethodsA total of 186 patients with mild to severe heart failure were consecutively recruited from three heart failure outpatient clinics. Data were obtained from medical records (heart failure diagnosis, comorbidity and medical treatment) and self-rated questionnaires (demographics, appetite, self-perceived health, symptoms of depression and sleep). Blood samples were taken to determine myocardial stress and nutrition status. Heart failure symptoms and cognitive function were assessed by clinical examinations. The Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire was used to assess self-reported appetite. Bivariate correlations and multivariate linear regression analyses were conducted to explore factors associated with appetite.

    ResultsSeventy-one patients (38%) experienced a loss of appetite with a significant risk of developing weight loss. The final multiple regression model showed that age, symptoms of depression, insomnia, cognitive function and pharmacological treatment were associated with appetite, explaining 27% of the total variance.

    ConclusionIn this cross-sectional study, a large share of patients with heart failure was affected by decreased appetite, associated with demographic, psychosocial and medical factors. Relevance to clinical practiceLoss of appetite is a prevalent problem among patients with heart failure that may lead to undernutrition. Health care professionals should routinely assess appetite and discuss patients' experiences of appetite, nutrition intake and body weight and give appropriate nutritional advice with respect to individual needs.

  • 40.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Prevalence and associated factors for decreased appetite among patients with stable heart failure2016In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 11-12, p. 1703-1712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectivesTo explore the prevalence of decreased appetite and factors associated with appetite among patients with stable heart failure. BackgroundDecreased appetite is an important factor for the development of undernutrition among patients with heart failure, but there are knowledge gaps about prevalence and the factors related to appetite in this patient group. DesignObservational, cross-sectional study. MethodsA total of 186 patients with mild to severe heart failure were consecutively recruited from three heart failure outpatient clinics. Data were obtained from medical records (heart failure diagnosis, comorbidity and medical treatment) and self-rated questionnaires (demographics, appetite, self-perceived health, symptoms of depression and sleep). Blood samples were taken to determine myocardial stress and nutrition status. Heart failure symptoms and cognitive function were assessed by clinical examinations. The Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire was used to assess self-reported appetite. Bivariate correlations and multivariate linear regression analyses were conducted to explore factors associated with appetite. ResultsSeventy-one patients (38%) experienced a loss of appetite with a significant risk of developing weight loss. The final multiple regression model showed that age, symptoms of depression, insomnia, cognitive function and pharmacological treatment were associated with appetite, explaining 27% of the total variance. ConclusionIn this cross-sectional study, a large share of patients with heart failure was affected by decreased appetite, associated with demographic, psychosocial and medical factors. Relevance to clinical practiceLoss of appetite is a prevalent problem among patients with heart failure that may lead to undernutrition. Health care professionals should routinely assess appetite and discuss patients experiences of appetite, nutrition intake and body weight and give appropriate nutritional advice with respect to individual needs.

  • 41.
    Andreassen, Sissel
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Randers, Ingrid
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Näslund, Erik
    Stockeld, Dag
    Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Patients' experiences of living with oesophageal cancer2006In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 685-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The aim of this study is to describe patients' experiences of living with oesophageal cancer and how they seek information. BACKGROUND: Oesophageal cancer is a devastating disease with poor prognosis. Nursing care for individuals with oesophageal cancer requires increased knowledge of how they experience illness and how it affects them. METHOD: Data were collected by semi-structured, qualitative interviews with 13 participants. Content analysis was used to analyse data. RESULTS: Four themes were identified: (i) Experiences of becoming a patient diagnosed with oesophageal cancer is distinguished by the participants' experiences of vague symptoms, of receiving the diagnosis and of existential concerns evoked by the illness. (ii) Experiences of undergoing investigations and treatment consist of the participants' experiences of extreme tiredness in relation to investigations and treatment. (iii) Experiences of intrusions in daily life is conceptualized by the participants' experiences of how the illness influenced their daily life. (iv) Managing a life-threatening illness consists of a variety of strategies, which the participants employed to manage their life-threatening illness. CONCLUSIONS: The participants were unprepared of receiving a diagnosis of oesophageal cancer. Dysphagia, fatigue and uncertainty influenced the participants' everyday life. To manage the illness one of their strategies was seeking for information. The physicians were considered the main source of information, but family as well as friends with medical knowledge were also acknowledged as valuable sources. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Understanding patients' experiences of living with oesophageal cancer is important to improve nursing care. When caring for these patients, focus ought to be on the whole family. In nursing care, it is important to be aware of the effects of dysphagia and fatigue. Health-care professionals ought to organize meetings with fellow patients and recommend literature and websites that provide patients with high quality information.

  • 42.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Sleep quality and mood in mothers and fathers accommodated in the family-centred paediatric ward2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 3-4, p. e544-e550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To describe sleep quality and mood in parents accommodated with their sick child in a family‐centred paediatric ward. Secondary aims were to compare mothers’ and fathers’ sleep quality and mood in the paediatric ward and to compare the parents’ sleep quality and mood between the paediatric ward and in a daily‐life home setting after discharge.

    Background

    Frequent interruptions, ward noise and anxiety affect parents’ sleep quality and mood negatively when accommodated with their sick child in paediatric wards. Poor sleep quality and negative mood decrease the parents’ ability to sustain attention and focus, and to care for their sick child.

    Methods

    This was a prospective and descriptive study. Eighty‐two parents (61 mothers and 21 fathers) with children (median age 6.25 years) admitted to six paediatric wards participated in the study. Uppsala Sleep Inventory, a sleep diary and the Mood Adjective Checklist were used to measure sleep quality and mood.

    Results

    The parents had a good sleep quality in the paediatric ward even though they had more nocturnal awakenings compared to home. Moreover, they were less alert, less interested and had reduced concentration, and were more tired, dull and passive in the hospital than at home after discharge. Vital sign checks, noises made by the staff and medical treatment were given reasons influencing sleep. Poor sleep quality correlated with negative mood.

    Conclusion

    Parents’ sleep quality in family‐centred paediatric care is good. However, the habitual sleep efficacy before admittance to the hospital is lower than expected and needs to be further investigated.

    Relevance to Clinical Practice

    The healthcare professionals should acknowledge parents’ sleep and mood when they are accommodated with their sick child. Further should care at night be scheduled and sleep promoted for the parents to maintain health and well‐being in the family.

  • 43.
    Appelgren Engstrom, Helene
    et al.
    Malardalen Univ, Sweden.
    Haggstrom-Nordin, Elisabet
    Malardalen Univ, Sweden.
    Borneskog-Sinclair, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Northumbria Univ, England.
    Almqvist, Anna-Lena
    Malardalen Univ, Sweden.
    Mothers in same-sex relationships-Striving for equal parenthood: A grounded theory study2019In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives To get a deeper understanding of how mothers in same-sex relationships think and reason about their parenthood in terms of gender equality, and how they experience early parental support from child healthcare professionals. Background There is an increasing amount of research on how women in same-sex relationships experience healthcare services when forming a family. Yet there is limited knowledge of what kind of early parental support these women may request. Design Grounded theory. Follows guidelines for qualitative research (COREQ). Method Twenty women ranging from 25 to 42 years of age participated in semi-structured interviews. Data collection and analysis took place in parallel, as recommended in grounded theory methodology. Results The results are described by the core category Same-sex mothers request professional support to achieve equal parenthood, which includes five categories: (a) equality in everyday life, (b) diversity in mother and child attachment, (c) justification of the family structure, (d) ambivalent thoughts about their childs future and (e) a special need for networking and request for professional support. These findings provide a deeper understanding of how same-sex mothers experience their parenthood and the parental support that is offered. Conclusion Child healthcare professionals need to be sensitive and recognise both mothers as equal parents and offer early parenting groups where two-mother families feel included and supported. Relevance to clinical practice Healthcare professionals need to be aware of diverse family formations and meet each parent as a unique individual without heteronormative assumptions. Same-sex mothers must be treated as equal parents and acknowledged as mothers. Healthcare professionals should offer inclusive and supportive parental groups to same-sex families. They should also inform and support nonbirth mothers about the possibility to breastfeed.

  • 44.
    Arakelian, Erebouni
    et al.
    Uppsala University Hospital,Department of Surgical Sciences, Entrance 70, SE-751 28..
    Swenne, Christine Leo
    Uppsala University, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Box 564, SE-751 22, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Susan
    Skaraborg Hospital, Department of Anaesthesia, SE-541 85, Skövde, Swede.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. Faculty of Professional Studies, University of Nordland, 8049, Bodø, Norway..
    von Vogelsang, Ann-Christin
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience,Stockholm, Sweden..
    The meaning of person-centred care in the perioperative nursing context from the patient's perspective: an integrative review2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 17-18, p. 2527-2544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To determine the meaning of person-centred care from the patient's perspective and in the context of perioperative nursing. BACKGROUND: Person-centred care (PCC) is used but not defined in the perioperative context. The concept indicates an interest in the patient's own experience of health, illness, needs and preferences. As with many terms that are frequently used, there is a tendency for person-centred care to mean different things to different people in different contexts. METHODS: A two-part search strategy was employed; firstly, a computerized database search of PubMed and CINAHL, using Medical Subject Headings and free terms to search articles dating from 2004 to 2014, and secondly, a hand-search of those articles' reference lists was performed. Twenty-three articles were selected and an integrative review was conducted. RESULTS: Four themes were discovered: 'Being recognized as a unique entity and being allowed to be the person you are', 'Being considered important by having one's personal wishes taken into account', 'The presence of a perioperative nurse is calming; prevents feelings of loneliness and promotes wellbeing, which may speed up recovery', and 'Being close to and being touched by the perioperative nurse during surgery'. CONCLUSIONS: PCC means respecting the patient as a unique individual, considering the patient's particularities and wishes, and involving the patient in their own care. PCC also implies having access to one's own nurse who is present both physically and emotionally through the entire perioperative process and who guides the patient and follows up postoperatively, guaranteeing that the patient is not alone. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: By having a common understanding of the concept of PCC, the nurse anaesthetists' and theatre nurses' caring actions or concerns will be directed towards the patient', resulting in personalization of care rather than simply defining the concept. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 45.
    Arakelian, Erebouni
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Swenne, Christine Leo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Lindberg, Susan
    Skaraborg Hosp, Dept Anaesthesia, Skovde, Sweden.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    Univ West, Dept Hlth Sci, Trollhattan, Sweden.;Univ Nordland, Fac Profess Studies, Bodo, Norway.
    von Vogelsang, Ann-Christin
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, R2 02, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    The meaning of person-centred care in the perioperative nursing context from the patient's perspective: an integrative review2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 17-18, p. 2527-2544Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To determine the meaning of person-centred care from the patient's perspective and in the context of perioperative nursing.

    BACKGROUND: Person-centred care is used, but not defined in the perioperative context. The concept indicates an interest in the patient's own experience of health, illness, needs and preferences. As with many terms that are frequently used, there is a tendency for person-centred care to mean different things to different people in different contexts.

    DESIGN: Integrative Review.

    METHODS: A two-part search strategy was employed: first, a computerised database search of PubMed and CINAHL, using Medical Subject Headings and free terms to search articles dating from 2004-2014, was performed, and second, a hand-search of those articles' reference lists was performed. Twenty-three articles were selected, and an integrative review was conducted.

    RESULTS: Four themes were discovered: 'being recognised as a unique entity and being allowed to be the person you are', 'being considered important by having one's personal wishes taken into account', 'the presence of a perioperative nurse is calming, prevents feelings of loneliness and promotes well-being, which may speed up recovery' and 'being close to and being touched by the perioperative nurse during surgery'.

    CONCLUSIONS: Person-centred care means respecting the patient as a unique individual, considering the patient's particularities and wishes and involving the patient in their own care. Person-centred care also implies having access to one's own nurse who is present both physically and emotionally through the entire perioperative process and who guides the patient and follows up postoperatively, guaranteeing that the patient is not alone.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: By having a common understanding of the concept of person-centred care, the nurse anaesthetists' and theatre nurses' caring actions or concerns will be directed towards the patient, resulting in personalisation of care rather than simply defining the concept.

  • 46.
    Arenhall, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences. Centre for Health Care Sciences, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköpings University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences. Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital,Örebro, Sweden; Centre for Health Care Sciences, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    The female partners' experiences of intimate relationship after a first myocardial infarction2011In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 20, no 11-12, p. 1677-1684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. This study aimed to explore and describe women's experience of intimate relationships in connection to and after their partner's first myocardial infarction. Background. Support from partners is important for recovery, but little is known about partners' experience of intimate relationships after myocardial infarction. Design. The study used an explorative, qualitative design. Methods. The first author interviewed 20 women having a partner who had suffered a first myocardial infarction during the preceding year. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data. Findings. Three themes emerged: 'limited life space', 'sense of life lost' and 'another dimension of life'. The women described how their self-assumed responsibility led to a more stifling and limited life. Their sense of life lost was described in terms of deficits and feeling the loss. The women also described experiencing another dimension of life characterised by three subthemes: 'uncertainty of life', 'certain of relationship' and 'share life more'. Conclusions. The partners' myocardial infarction had an impact on the interviewees' intimate relationships; they suffered a major loss and missed their 'former' partner, both emotionally and sexually. They struggled with the new asymmetry in their intimate relationship and felt compelled to adapt to their partners' lack of sexual desire or function. Also, their partner controlled them, which lead towards a stifling, more limited life space. Relevance to clinical practice. Caregivers in hospital and primary care settings could apply the findings in their efforts to help couples recover or maintain intimate relationships following myocardial infarction. 

  • 47. Arenhall, Eva
    et al.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    The female partners' experiences of intimate relationship after a first myocardial infarction2011In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 20, no 11/12, p. 1677-1684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. This study aimed to explore and describe women’s experience of intimate relationships in connection to and after their partner’s first myocardial infarction (MI).

    Background. Support from partners is important for recovery, but little is known about partners’ experience of intimate relationships after MI.

    Design. The study used an explorative, qualitative design.

    Methods. The first author interviewed 20 women having a partner who had suffered a first MI during the preceding year. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data.

    Findings. Three themes emerged: ‘limited life space’, ‘sense of life lost’ and ‘another dimension of life’. The women described how their self-assumed responsibility led to a more stifling and limited life. Their sense of life lost was described in terms of deficits and feeling the loss. The women also described experiencing another dimension of life characterised by three subthemes: ‘uncertainty of life’, ‘certain of relationship’ and ‘share life more’.

    Conclusions. The partners’ MI had an impact on the interviewees’ intimate relationships; they suffered a major loss and missed their ‘former’ partner, both emotionally and sexually. They struggled with the new asymmetry in their intimate relationship and felt compelled to adapt to their partners’ lack of sexual desire or function. Also, their partner controlled them, which lead towards a stifling, more limited life space.

    Relevance to clinical practice. Caregivers in hospital and primary care settings could apply the findings in their efforts to help couples recover or maintain intimate relationships following MI.

  • 48. Arenhall, Eva
    et al.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    The female partners' experiences of intimate relationship after a first myocardial infarction2011In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 20, no 11-12, p. 1677-1684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. This study aimed to explore and describe women's experience of intimate relationships in connection to and after their partner's first myocardial infarction. Background. Support from partners is important for recovery, but little is known about partners' experience of intimate relationships after myocardial infarction. Design. The study used an explorative, qualitative design. Methods. The first author interviewed 20 women having a partner who had suffered a first myocardial infarction during the preceding year. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data. Findings. Three themes emerged: 'limited life space', 'sense of life lost' and 'another dimension of life'. The women described how their self-assumed responsibility led to a more stifling and limited life. Their sense of life lost was described in terms of deficits and feeling the loss. The women also described experiencing another dimension of life characterised by three subthemes: 'uncertainty of life', 'certain of relationship' and 'share life more'. Conclusions. The partners' myocardial infarction had an impact on the interviewees' intimate relationships; they suffered a major loss and missed their 'former' partner, both emotionally and sexually. They struggled with the new asymmetry in their intimate relationship and felt compelled to adapt to their partners' lack of sexual desire or function. Also, their partner controlled them, which lead towards a stifling, more limited life space. Relevance to clinical practice. Caregivers in hospital and primary care settings could apply the findings in their efforts to help couples recover or maintain intimate relationships following myocardial infarction.

  • 49.
    Arenhall, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Hälsohögskolan Jönköping.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Örebro universitet.
    The female partners' experiences of intimate relationship after a first myocardial infarction2011In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 20, no 11-12, p. 1677-1684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim.

    This study aimed to explore and describe women’s experience of intimate relationships in connection to and after their partner’s first myocardial infarction.

     

    Background.

    Support from partners is important for recovery, but little is known about partners’ experience of intimate relationships after myocardial infarction.

     

    Design.

    The study used an explorative, qualitative design.

     

    Methods.

    The first author interviewed 20 women having a partner who had suffered a first myocardial infarction during the preceding year. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data.

     

    Findings.

    Three themes emerged: ‘limited life space’, ‘sense of life lost’ and ‘another dimension of life’. The women described how their self-assumed responsibility led to a more stifling and limited life. Their sense of life lost was described in terms of deficits and feeling the loss. The women also described experiencing another dimension of life characterised by three subthemes: ‘uncertainty of life’, ‘certain of relationship’ and ‘share life more’.

     

    Conclusions.

    The partners’ myocardial infarction had an impact on the interviewees’ intimate relationships; they suffered a major loss and missed their ‘former’ partner, both emotionally and sexually. They struggled with the new asymmetry in their intimate relationship and felt compelled to adapt to their partners’ lack of sexual desire or function. Also, their partner controlled them, which lead towards a stifling, more limited life space.

     

    Relevance to clinical practice.

    Caregivers in hospital and primary care settings could apply the findings in their efforts to help couples recover or maintain intimate relationships following myocardial infarction.

  • 50.
    Arenhall, Eva
    et al.
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    Department of Caring Science and Sociology, University of Gävle, Gävle.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping.
    Nilsson, Ulrica K
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care and Centre for Health Care Sciences, Örebro University Hospital, School of Health and Medical Sciences,.
    The female partners’ experiences of intimate relationship after a first myocardial infarction2011In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 20, p. 1677-1684Article in journal (Refereed)
1234567 1 - 50 of 879
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf