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  • 1. Ahlström, B H
    et al.
    Skärsäter, I
    Danielson, Ella
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Major depression in a family: what happens and how to manage - a case study2007In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 28, no 7, p. 691-706Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Major depression challenges the ways of living for both individuals and families. The aim of this study was to describe what happens and how to manage major depression in a family. The case in this paper is a family with a mother who is suffering major depression and her son and daughter. Narrative interviews and qualitative content analysis were conducted. The findings revealed six themes: "a stealthy intruder," "moving slowly to helplessness," "saving the situation," "protecting oneself and others," "conveying things that are beyond words," and the "dispersal of shadows." These themes elucidated the family members' varying views of depression and the unique ways they managed the situation.

     

     

  • 2.
    Ahlström, Britt Hedman
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    University of Gothenburg.
    Danielson, Ella
    University of Gothenburg.
    Major depression in a family: What happens and how to manage - a case study2007In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 28, no 7, p. 691-706Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Major depression challenges the ways of living for both individuals and families. The aim of this study was to describe what happens and how to manage major depression in a family. The case in this paper is a family with a mother who is suffering major depression and her son and daughter. Narrative interviews and qualitative content analysis were conducted. The findings revealed six themes: "a stealthy intruder," "moving slowly to helplessness," "saving the situation," "protecting oneself and others," "conveying things that are beyond words," and the "dispersal of shadows." These themes elucidated the family members' varying views of depression and the unique ways they managed the situation.

  • 3.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    Gothenburg University, Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences.
    Ahlström, Britt Hedman
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Sjöström, Nils
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences.
    Support for young informal carers of persons with mental illness: A mixed-method study2013In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 34, no 8, p. 611-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore how young (16-25 year old) informal carers of a person with a mental illness experience and use support. In a mixed method approach, we interviewed 12 young carers, and 241 completed a self-administered questionnaire. While the young carers strive to maintain control, their main support seems to be others in their lives, who often define the situation differently. The carers said web-support, counseling, and group counseling might be helpful, yet very few had any professional support. Young carers are greatly in need of support and it should be provided.

  • 4.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Hedman Ahlström, Britt
    University West, Trollhättan.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University.
    Sjöström, Nils
    Gothenburg University.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Support for young informal carers of persons with mental illness: a mixed-method study2013In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 34, no 8, p. 611-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore how young (16-25 year old) informal carers of a person with a mental illness experience and use support. In a mixed method approach, we interviewed 12 young carers, and 241 completed a self-administered questionnaire. While the young carers strive to maintain control, their main support seems to be others in their lives, who often define the situation differently. The carers said web-support, counseling, and group counseling might be helpful, yet very few had any professional support. Young carers are greatly in need of support and it should be provided.

  • 5.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden; Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden; Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden.
    Skarsater, Ingela
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden; Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden; Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Caring Situation, Health, Self-efficacy, and Stress in Young Informal Carers of Family and Friends with Mental Illness in Sweden2015In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 407-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study compared the caring situation, health, self-efficacy, and stress of young (16-25) informal carers (YICs) supporting a family member with mental illness with that of YICs supporting a friend. A sample of 225 carers, assigned to a family group (n = 97) or a friend group (n = 128) completed the questionnaire. It was found that the family group experiences a lower level of support and friends experienced a lower positive value of caring. No other differences in health, general self-efficacy and stress were found. YICs endure different social situations, which is why further study of the needs of YICs, especially those supporting friends, is urgently needed.

  • 6.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden & Vårdal Institute, The Swedish Institute for Health Science, Lund & Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Vårdal Institute, The Swedish Institute for Health Science, Lund & Gothenburg, Sweden & Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Vårdal Institute, The Swedish Institute for Health Science, Lund & Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Psychiatry, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Caring Situation, Health, Self-efficacy, and Stress in Young Informal Carers of Family and Friends with Mental Illness in Sweden2015In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 407-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study compared the caring situation, health, self-efficacy, and stress of young (16–25) informal carers (YICs) supporting a family member with mental illness with that of YICs supporting a friend. A sample of 225 carers, assigned to a family group (n = 97) or a friend group (n = 128) completed the questionnaire. It was found that the family group experiences a lower level of support and friends experienced a lower positive value of caring. No other differences in health, general self-efficacy and stress were found. YICs endure different social situations, which is why further study of the needs of YICs, especially those supporting friends, is urgently needed.

  • 7.
    Antonsson, Helena
    et al.
    University of Umeå , Department of Nursing , Umeå , Sweden.
    Hällgren Graneheim, Ulla
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. University of Umeå , Department of Nursing , Umeå , Sweden.
    Isaksson, Ulf
    University of Umeå , Department of Nursing , Umeå , Sweden.
    Åström, Sture
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. University of Umeå , Department of Nursing , Umeå , Sweden.
    Lundström, Mats O
    University of Umeå , Department of Nursing , Umeå , Swede.
    Evaluation of a Web-Based Training Program for Professional Carers Working With People With Learning Disabilities and Challenging Behavior: A Pilot Study with SSED-Design.2016In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 37, no 10, p. 734-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interaction between people with intellectual disabilities and professional carers is often influenced by communicative difficulties contributing challenging behaviours. The aims of this study were to evaluate to a web-based training program aimed at improving carers' abilities to interact with people with learning disabilities who exhibit challenging behaviours and to explore carers' experiences of participating in such a program. A single-subject experimental design and mixed methods were used to integrate qualitative and quantitative data. Triangulation of questionnaires, interviews with carers, and assessments of one woman's behaviour was performed. The participants were professional carers aged 20 to 55 years. The web-based training program increased carers' abilities to handle challenging behaviours and decreased challenging behaviours in daily care. The program improved the opportunities to offer training to carers who work in community-based accommodations with limited time to receive training.

  • 8.
    Antonsson, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Hällgren Graneheim, Ulla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. University West, Department of Health Sciences, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Åström, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. University West, Department of Health Sciences, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Lundström, Mats O.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Evaluation of a Web-Based Training Program for Professional Carers Working With People With Learning Disabilities and Challenging Behavior: A Pilot Study with SSED-Design2016In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 37, no 10, p. 734-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interaction between people with intellectual disabilities and professional carers is often influenced by communicative difficulties contributing challenging behaviours. The aims of this study were to evaluate to a web-based training program aimed at improving carers' abilities to interact with people with learning disabilities who exhibit challenging behaviours and to explore carers' experiences of participating in such a program. A single-subject experimental design and mixed methods were used to integrate qualitative and quantitative data. Triangulation of questionnaires, interviews with carers, and assessments of one woman's behaviour was performed. The participants were professional carers aged 20 to 55 years. The web-based training program increased carers' abilities to handle challenging behaviours and decreased challenging behaviours in daily care. The program improved the opportunities to offer training to carers who work in community-based accommodations with limited time to receive training.

  • 9.
    Baxter, Rebecca
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Björk, Sabine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Commentary on: Sullivan and Willis (2018). Towards Changing the Long-Term Care (LTC) Paradigm: Explicating the Concept of Thriving in Older Adults Living in LTC2019In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 40, no 7, p. 639-640Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Berglund, Sara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Åström, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindgren, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Patients' Experiences After Attempted Suicide: A Literature Review2016In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 37, no 10, p. 715-726Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study has been to synthesize research on suicidal patients' experiences of the suicide process. A literature search was performed in CINAHL, PubMed, and PsycINFO, and the analysis of the 15 articles covered was based on meta-synthesis. Patients experience a wide variety of feelings regarding their situation during the suicide process, and these exist on two levels: they relate to the different aspects of care that the patients receive and the patients' need to communicate with others and regain hope. The patients in this study described the struggle to maintain hope when life became too difficult and their suffering despite a sense of security, and they sought to achieve emotional balance. A good understanding of how suicidal individuals live with and manage suicidal ideation, while maintaining hope is important for planning effective nursing care. Further research from the patient perspective is needed to further develop psychiatric care for people at risk of suicide.

  • 11.
    Bergqvist, Anette
    et al.
    Psykiatriska kliniken, Länssjukhuset Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Karlsson, Maria
    Psykiatriska kliniken, Länssjukhuset Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Foldemo, Anniqa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wärdig, Rikard
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultsjö, Sally
    Psykiatriska kliniken, Länssjukhuset Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Preventing the development of metabolic syndrome in people with psychotic disorders-difficult, but possible: experiences of staff working in psychosis outpatient care in sweden2013In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 350-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore mental health staffs' experiences of assisting people with psychotic disorders to implement lifestyle changes in an effort to prevent metabolic syndrome. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 12 health care professionals working in psychosis outpatient care in Sweden. Data were analysed using a qualitative content analysis. The results illustrate that implementation of lifestyle changes among people with psychotic disorders was experienced as difficult, but possible. The greatest obstacles experienced in this work were difficulties due to the reduction of cognitive functions associated with the disease. Guidelines available to staff in order to help them identify and prevent physical health problems in the group were not always followed and the content was not always relevant. Staff further described feelings of uncertainty about having to motivate people to take anti-psychotic medication while simultaneously being aware of the risks of metabolic deviations. Nursing interventions focusing on organising daily routines before conducting a more active prevention of metabolic syndrome, including information and practical support, were experienced as necessary. The importance of healthy eating and physical activity needs to be communicated in such a way that it is adjusted to the person's cognitive ability, and should be repeated over time, both verbally and in writing. Such efforts, in combination with empathic and seriously committed community-based social support, were experienced as having the best effect over time. Permanent lifestyle changes were experienced as having to be carried out on the patient's terms and in his or her home environment.

  • 12.
    Bjorkman, Annica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research. Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Gavle, Sweden.
    Andersson, Kajsa
    Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Gavle, Sweden.
    Bergström, Jenny
    Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Gavle, Sweden.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Gavle, Sweden.
    Increased Mental Illness and the Challenges This Brings for District Nurses in Primary Care Settings2018In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 39, no 12, p. 1023-1030Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with mental illness generally make their initial healthcare contact via a registered nurse. Although studies show that encountering and providing care to care-seekers with mental illness might be a challenge, little research exists regarding Primary Care Nurses' (PCN) view of the challenges they face. The aim of this study was to qualitatively explore PCNs' reflections on encountering care-seekers with mental illness in primary healthcare settings. The results consist of three themes: constantly experiencing patients falling through the cracks, being restricted by lack of knowledge and resources, and establishing a trustful relationship to overcome taboo, shame, and guilt.

  • 13.
    Björkman, Annica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Andersson, Kajsa
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Bergström, Jenny
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Increased Mental Illness and the Challenges This Brings for District Nurses in Primary Care Settings2018In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 39, no 12, p. 1023-1030Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with mental illness generally make their initial healthcare contact via a registered nurse. Although studies show that encountering and providing care to care-seekers with mental illness might be a challenge, little research exists regarding Primary Care Nurses' (PCN) view of the challenges they face. The aim of this study was to qualitatively explore PCNs' reflections on encountering care-seekers with mental illness in primary healthcare settings. The results consist of three themes: constantly experiencing patients falling through the cracks, being restricted by lack of knowledge and resources, and establishing a trustful relationship to overcome taboo, shame, and guilt.

  • 14.
    Blomqvist, Marjut
    et al.
    Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Health Effects of an Individualized Lifestyle Intervention for People with Psychotic Disorders in Psychiatric Outpatient Services: A Two Year Follow-up2019In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People with psychotic disorders experience to a great extent avoidable physical illnesses and early mortality. The aim of the study was to investigate the potential effects for this group of participating in a lifestyle intervention. A multi-component nurse-led lifestyle intervention using quasi-experimental design was performed. Changes in biomedical and clinical measurements, self-reported health, symptoms of illness and health behavior were investigated. Multilevel modeling was used to statistically test differences in changes over time. Statistically significant changes were found in physical activity, HbA1c and waist circumference. A lifestyle intervention for people with severe mental illness can be beneficial for increasing physical activity.

  • 15.
    Blomqvist, Marjut
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Center for Collaborative Palliative Care , Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Växjö, Sweden.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Health Risks among People with Severe Mental Illness in Psychiatric Outpatient Settings2018In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 585-591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Life expectancy is greatly reduced in patients with schizophrenia, and cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of mortality. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of overweight, obesity, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and to investigate the relationships between self-rated health, sense of coherence, CVD risk, and body mass index (BMI) among people with severe mental illness (SMI) in psychiatric outpatient settings. Nearly 50% of the participants were exposed to moderate/high risk of CVD and over 50% were obese. The results showed no statistically relationships between the subjective and objective measures (Bayes factor <1) of health. The integration of physical health into clinical psychiatric nursing practice is vital. © 2018 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  • 16.
    Blomqvist, Marjut
    et al.
    Halmstad University.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University.
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University.
    Health risks among people with severe mental illness in psychiatric outpatient settings2018In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 585-591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Life expectancy is greatly reduced in patients with schizophrenia, and cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of mortality. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of overweight, obesity, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and to investigate the relationships between self-rated health, sense of coherence, CVD risk, and body mass index (BMI) among people with severe mental illness (SMI) in psychiatric outpatient settings. Nearly 50% of the participants were exposed to moderate/high risk of CVD and over 50% were obese. The results showed no statistically relationships between the subjective and objective measures (Bayes factor <1) of health. The integration of physical health into clinical psychiatric nursing practice is vital.

  • 17.
    Brolin, Rosita
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Syrén, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Baigi, Amir
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Satisfaction with housing and housing support for people with psychiatric disabilities2015In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 21-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the degree of satisfaction with housing and housing support for people with psychiatric disabilities in Sweden. A total of 370 residents, in supported housing and in ordinary housing with housing support, completed a new questionnaire and reported a high degree of overall satisfaction, but many of them wanted to move somewhere else. Differences were found between the two different types of housing concerning satisfaction with housing support, social life and available choices. Security and privacy, as well as other's influence on the choice of residential area and dwelling proved to be important predictors for satisfaction.

  • 18.
    Brolin, Rosita
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Syrén, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Validity and reliability of a Swedish questionnaire for assessing satisfaction with housing and housing support for persons with psychiatric disabilities2013In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 34, no 10, p. 731-738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability and validity of a questionnaire for studying satisfaction with housing and housing support for people with psychiatric disabilities. Most items were gathered from English language questionnaires. These were translated and adapted to a Swedish context and items concerning housing support were added. Two studies were conducted. The first, a test-retest reliability analysis, was performed in a pilot study with 53 participants; in the second study, which had 370 participants, a five factor solution with good internal consistency emerged. Further development of the questionnaire is discussed.

  • 19.
    Brunt, David
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    The ward atmosphere of single-sex wards in a maximum-security forensic psychiatric hospital in Sweden2008In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 221-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This exploratory study aims to investigate the ward atmosphere of single-sex wards in a forensic psychiatric context in the light of Moos’ conceptualization of the treatment setting.

    The wards for female patients bore similarities to Relationship-Oriented and Insight-Oriented programmes and had a generally positive ward atmosphere. On the other hand the wards for male patients did not resemble any treatment programme and had a more mixed diagnosis profile than those for female patients. Comparisons of the two types of wards are made and implications of the findings in terms of the overriding principle of normalization are discussed.

  • 20.
    Brunt, David
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    A suggested revision of the Community Oriented Program Environmental Scale (COPES) for measuring the psychosocial environment of supported housing facilities for persons with psychiatric disabilities.2012In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 24-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study is to address issues of construct validity and reliability of a revised short version of the COPES instrument to measure the psychosocial environment of supported housing facilities for persons with psychiatric disabilities. The results revealed that the division into subscales is not sufficiently reliable for use in measuring the psychosocial environment, although the three higher order dimensions can possibly be used for the descriptive and comparative purposes. A factor analysis based on the revised short version generated new factor solutions, differing from the COPES subscales, but with sufficient psychometric properties.

  • 21.
    Brunt, David
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Schroder, Agneta
    Örebro University, Sweden;Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol NTNU, Norway.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Residents' Perceptions of Quality in Supported Housing for People with Psychiatric Disabilities2019In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 40, no 8, p. 697-705Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The residents' perspective of the quality of housing support for people with psychiatric disabilities living in congregate supported housing has been studied and a comparison has been made with the findings from those from a previous study in ordinary housing with outreach support. One-hundred and seventy-eight residents from 27 supported housing facilities in eight Swedish municipalities completed the Quality of Psychiatric Care-Housing (QPC-H) instrument. The highest quality ratings were found for: Secluded Environment, Encounter and Support, while Participation, Housing Specific and Secure Environment were rated at lower levels. Despite relatively high ratings, a majority of items did not attain the 80% cutoff point deemed as defining satisfactory quality of service. The residents in ordinary housing with outreach support rated higher levels for the majority of the QPC-H dimensions in comparison with those in supported housing. A conclusion is that the quality of care in supported housing facilities has a number of deficiencies that need to be addressed. Supported housing is generally rated as having a lower quality of care than in ordinary housing with outreach support. Suggestions for the content of staff training are made based on the results.

  • 22.
    Brunt, David
    et al.
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjövik, Norway.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Rask, Mikael
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Residents' Perceptions of Quality in Supported Housing for People with Psychiatric Disabilities2019In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 40, no 8, p. 697-705Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The residents' perspective of the quality of housing support for people with psychiatric disabilities living in congregate supported housing has been studied and a comparison has been made with the findings from those from a previous study in ordinary housing with outreach support. One-hundred and seventy-eight residents from 27 supported housing facilities in eight Swedish municipalities completed the Quality of Psychiatric Care-Housing (QPC-H) instrument. The highest quality ratings were found for: Secluded Environment, Encounter and Support, while Participation, Housing Specific and Secure Environment were rated at lower levels. Despite relatively high ratings, a majority of items did not attain the 80% cutoff point deemed as defining satisfactory quality of service. The residents in ordinary housing with outreach support rated higher levels for the majority of the QPC-H dimensions in comparison with those in supported housing. A conclusion is that the quality of care in supported housing facilities has a number of deficiencies that need to be addressed. Supported housing is generally rated as having a lower quality of care than in ordinary housing with outreach support. Suggestions for the content of staff training are made based on the results.

  • 23.
    Bülow, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Psychiatric Clinic, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gunnel
    Research and Development Unit, FoU Södertörn, Tumba, Sweden.
    Denhov, Anne
    Research and Development Unit, Psychiatry South Stockholm, Johanneshov, Sweden.
    Topor, Alain
    Research and Development Unit, Psychiatry South Stockholm, Johanneshov, Sweden.
    Experience of psychotropic medication – An interview study of persons with psychosis2016In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 37, no 11, p. 820-828Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychotropic drugs, particularly antipsychotic types, are a cornerstone of the treatment of people with psychosis. Despite numerous studies showing that drug treatment with psychotropic drugs initially alleviates psychiatric symptoms, the proportion of people with mental health problems and symptoms that do not follow doctors' prescriptions, thus exhibiting so-called non-adherence, is considerable. Non-adherence is predominantly seen as a clinical feature and as a patient characteristic that is especially due to patients' poor understanding that they are ill. There is also a widespread notion that non-adherence is of great disadvantage to the patient. This article is based on interviews with 19 persons diagnosed with psychosis. It challenges the notion of patients being either adherent or non-adherent to the doctor's orders. The findings show that persons with psychosis are active agents when it comes to adjusting medication. The interviewees created their own strategies to gain power over treatment with psychotropic drugs. The most common strategies were to adjust the doses or take breaks of varying lengths from the medication. These deviations from prescriptions were important to conceal, not only from their own psychiatrists, but from all psychiatric staff.

  • 24. Bülow, Per
    et al.
    Andersson, Gunnel
    Denhov, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Research and Development Unit, Psychiatry South Stockholm, Sweden.
    Topor, Alain
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Research and Development Unit, Psychiatry South Stockholm, Sweden; University of Agder, Norway.
    Experience of Psychotropic Medication - An Interview Study of Persons with Psychosis2016In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 37, no 11, p. 820-828Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychotropic drugs, particularly antipsychotic types, are a cornerstone of the treatment of people with psychosis. Despite numerous studies showing that drug treatment with psychotropic drugs initially alleviates psychiatric symptoms, the proportion of people with mental health problems and symptoms that do not follow doctors' prescriptions, thus exhibiting so-called non-adherence, is considerable. Non-adherence is predominantly seen as a clinical feature and as a patient characteristic that is especially due to patients' poor understanding that they are ill. There is also a widespread notion that non-adherence is of great disadvantage to the patient. This article is based on interviews with 19 persons diagnosed with psychosis. It challenges the notion of patients being either adherent or non-adherent to the doctor's orders. The findings show that persons with psychosis are active agents when it comes to adjusting medication. The interviewees created their own strategies to gain power over treatment with psychotropic drugs. The most common strategies were to adjust the doses or take breaks of varying lengths from the medication. These deviations from prescriptions were important to conceal, not only from their own psychiatrists, but from all psychiatric staff.

  • 25. Carlbo, Adam
    et al.
    Claesson, Hanna Persic
    Åström, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Nurses' experiences in using physical activity as complementary treatment in patients with schizophrenia2018In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 600-607Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Schizophrenia is a common disease with a high risk of comorbidity in both psychiatric and somatic diseases. Physical activity is proven effective in reducing symptoms of schizophrenia and increasing overall health. Still it is not used systematically in the care of persons with schizophrenia.

    Aim: The aim of this study is to describe nurses' experience, including personal motivation, in using physical activity as complementary treatment in patients with schizophrenia.

    Method: Interviews in three focus groups with 12 participating nurses were conducted. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze data.

    Results: Physical activity was commonly used. Although several nurses signaled positive patient response, i.e. less anxiety and better quality of sleep, the overall consensus was an uncertainty regarding the benefits. It was perceived as non-evidence based form of intervention.

    Conclusion: The uncertainty of the benefits of physical activity is evident in nursing staff and poses a resistance to implement systematic physical activity as a complementary treatment in schizophrenia. A new awareness of evidence based nursing is suggested to promote a wider and more receptive attitude to reduce patient vulnerability in persons with schizophrenia.

  • 26.
    Carlbo, Adam
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Claesson, Hanna Persic
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Åström, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Nursing, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nurses' Experiences in using Physical Activity as Complementary Treatment in Patients with Schizophrenia.2018In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 600-607Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Schizophrenia is a common disease with a high risk of comorbidity in both psychiatric and somatic diseases. Physical activity is proven effective in reducing symptoms of schizophrenia and increasing overall health. Still it is not used systematically in the care of persons with schizophrenia.

    AIM: The aim of this study is to describe nurses' experience, including personal motivation, in using physical activity as complementary treatment in patients with schizophrenia.

    METHOD: Interviews in three focus groups with 12 participating nurses were conducted. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze data.

    RESULTS: Physical activity was commonly used. Although several nurses signaled positive patient response, i.e. less anxiety and better quality of sleep, the overall consensus was an uncertainty regarding the benefits. It was perceived as non-evidence based form of intervention.

    CONCLUSION: The uncertainty of the benefits of physical activity is evident in nursing staff and poses a resistance to implement systematic physical activity as a complementary treatment in schizophrenia. A new awareness of evidence based nursing is suggested to promote a wider and more receptive attitude to reduce patient vulnerability in persons with schizophrenia.

  • 27. Carlsson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Dahlberg, Helena
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Patients longing for authentic personal care: A phenomenological study of violent encounters in psychiatric settings.2005In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 287-305Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Drew, N
    Nyström, Maria
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Violent encounters in psychiatric care: a phenomenological study of embodied caring knowledge2004In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 191-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on encounters that become violent, a problem in health care that has been the issue of many debates but is still not fully understood. Violent encounters refer to events where the patient expresses an aggressive and hostile attitude toward the caregiver. This study is part of a bigger project that aims to elucidate violent encounters from the caregivers' as well as the patients' perspectives. The purpose of this particular study was to describe the essence of violent encounters from the caregivers' perspective. Guided by a phenomenological method, data were analyzed within a reflective lifeworld approach. The essence of a violent encounter between caregivers and patients, as experienced by the caregivers, is a critical moment characterized by a tension between presence and distance, a moment where everything is happening at the same time. There are important meaning differences in relation to the violent encounter being viewed as positive rather than negative, based on the caregivers' ability to be present and their capacity in these trying situations to manage their fear. The findings also make explicit the particular knowledge that is needed for the caregiver to manage the threat of violence in a creative way.

  • 29.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Drew, Nancy
    Encountering Violence and Aggression in Mental Health Nursing: A Phenomenological Study of Tacit Caring Knowledge2000In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 533-545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Violence is a growing psychosocial problem in the health care working environment. Literature shows that nurses are physically assaulted, threatened, and verbally abused more often than other professionals. However, some nurses are able to relate to clients in a way that produces positive resolution. This study explored the phenomenon of positive encounters with aggressive and violent clients. Guided by a phenomenological method, data were analyzed within a lifeworld perspective. The essential meaning of the phenomenon of caregivers' experiences of encountering violent clients is described as an "embodied moment," which is explicated by seven themes of meaning, "respecting one's fear and respecting the client," "touch," "dialogue," "situated knowledge," "stability," "mutual regard," and "pliability." The authors discuss the meaning of the outcome and propose both theory and praxis-oriented activities toward decreasing aggression and violence in health care.

  • 30.
    Eivergard, Kristina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden Univ SE, Sweden; Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden.
    Enmarker, Ingela
    Univ Gavle, Sweden.
    Livholts, Mona
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Alex, Lena
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Hellzen, Ove
    Mid Sweden Univ SE, Sweden.
    The Importance of Being Acceptable - Psychiatric Staffs Talk about Women Patients in Forensic Care2019In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 124-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, women comprise about ten percent of those sentenced to psychiatric forensic clinics in Sweden. Those who are sentenced to forensic care because of offending and violent behaviour have already taken a step away from the usually expected female behaviour. On the other hand, there are many women in forensic care who have not committed crimes, but who instead self-harm. Studies have identified a gender bias in diagnosing and care in psychiatric settings, but there are few studies conducted on women in forensic care. The present study therefore examined how the situation of women patients and female norms are expressed in the staffs talk about these women during verbal handovers and ward rounds at a forensic clinic in Sweden. The aim was to explore how psychiatric staff, in a context of verbal handovers and ward rounds, talk about women who have been committed to forensic psychiatric care, and what consequences this might have for the care of the patients. The content of speech was examined using audio recordings and a method of analysis that was inspired by thematic analysis. The analysis identified that the staff talked about the women in a way that indicates that they expected the women to follow the rules and take responsibility for their bodies in order to be regarded as acceptable patients.

  • 31.
    Eivergård, Kristina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Enmarker, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences. Högskolan i Gävle.
    Hellzen, Ove
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    The Talk About the Psychiatric Patient2016In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 37, no 10, p. 756-764Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Essential to psychiatric nursing practice and care, verbal handovers and ward rounds are reporting systems for communication that shapes psychiatric staff's ability to recognize, understand, and construct patients, as well as patients' ability to construct themselves. Given the centrality of such language in psychiatric practice, the aim of this study was to describe how psychiatric staff talk about patients in psychiatric wards, what their talk encompasses, and what consequences it might pose for patient care. Empirical data were collected from audio recordings of staff discussions of patients during nine verbal handovers and three ward rounds in six different general psychiatric wards in mid and southern Sweden. Findings showed that to describe patients' mood, characteristics, and behavior, nurses used culturally common words and concepts related to three themes-good patients, bad patients, and to stay or be discharged-and six subthemes-looking well, looking poorly, desirable patients, undesirable patients, continuing work, and being discharged. However, since assessments of and decisions about patients' conditions and care used everyday language and did not involve patients' participation, opportunities for patients to participate in their own care were rare.

  • 32.
    Eivergård, Kristina
    et al.
    Mid-Sweden University, Department of Nursing Sciences, SE- Östersund, Sweden.
    Enmarker, Ingela
    Mid-Sweden University, Department of Nursing Sciences, SE- Östersund, Sweden.
    Hellzén, Per Ove
    Mid-Sweden University, Department of Nursing Sciences, SE- Östersund, Sweden.
    The Talk About the Psychiatric Patient2016In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 37, no 10, p. 756-764Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Essential to psychiatric nursing practice and care, verbal handovers and ward rounds are reporting systems for communication that shapes psychiatric staff's ability to recognize, understand, and construct patients, as well as patients’ ability to construct themselves. Given the centrality of such language in psychiatric practice, the aim of this study was to describe how psychiatric staff talk about patients in psychiatric wards, what their talk encompasses, and what consequences it might pose for patient care. Empirical data were collected from audio recordings of staff discussions of patients during nine verbal handovers and three ward rounds in six different general psychiatric wards in mid and southern Sweden. Findings showed that to describe patients’ mood, characteristics, and behavior, nurses used culturally common words and concepts related to three themes—good patients, bad patients, and to stay or be discharged—and six subthemes—looking well, looking poorly, desirable patients, undesirable patients, continuing work, and being discharged. However, since assessments of and decisions about patients’ conditions and care used everyday language and did not involve patients’ participation, opportunities for patients to participate in their own care were rare.

  • 33.
    Eivergård, Kristina
    et al.
    Department of Nursing Sciences, Mid-Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden; Department of Health Care Science, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Enmarker, Ingela
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.
    Livholts, Mona
    Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Aléx, Lena
    Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hellzén, Ove
    Department of Nursing Sciences, Mid-Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    The Importance of Being Acceptable - Psychiatric Staffs' Talk about Women Patients in Forensic Care2019In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 124-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, women comprise about ten percent of those sentenced to psychiatric forensic clinics in Sweden. Those who are sentenced to forensic care because of offending and violent behaviour have already taken a step away from the usually expected female behaviour. On the other hand, there are many women in forensic care who have not committed crimes, but who instead self-harm. Studies have identified a gender bias in diagnosing and care in psychiatric settings, but there are few studies conducted on women in forensic care. The present study therefore examined how the situation of women patients and female norms are expressed in the staff's talk about these women during verbal handovers and ward rounds at a forensic clinic in Sweden. The aim was to explore how psychiatric staff, in a context of verbal handovers and ward rounds, talk about women who have been committed to forensic psychiatric care, and what consequences this might have for the care of the patients. The content of speech was examined using audio recordings and a method of analysis that was inspired by thematic analysis. The analysis identified that the staff talked about the women in a way that indicates that they expected the women to follow the rules and take responsibility for their bodies in order to be regarded as acceptable patients.

  • 34.
    Eivergård, Kristina
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Mittuniversitetet.
    Enmarker, Ingela
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Livholts, Mona
    Linköpings universitet.
    Aléx, Lena
    Umeå universitet.
    Hellzén, Ove
    Mittuniversitetet.
    The Importance of Being Acceptable: Psychiatric Staffs' Talk about Women Patients in Forensic Care.2018In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, women comprise about ten percent of those sentenced to psychiatric forensic clinics in Sweden. Those who are sentenced to forensic care because of offending and violent behaviour have already taken a step away from the usually expected female behaviour. On the other hand, there are many women in forensic care who have not committed crimes, but who instead self-harm. Studies have identified a gender bias in diagnosing and care in psychiatric settings, but there are few studies conducted on women in forensic care. The present study therefore examined how the situation of women patients and female norms are expressed in the staff's talk about these women during verbal handovers and ward rounds at a forensic clinic in Sweden. The aim was to explore how psychiatric staff, in a context of verbal handovers and ward rounds, talk about women who have been committed to forensic psychiatric care, and what consequences this might have for the care of the patients. The content of speech was examined using audio recordings and a method of analysis that was inspired by thematic analysis. The analysis identified that the staff talked about the women in a way that indicates that they expected the women to follow the rules and take responsibility for their bodies in order to be regarded as acceptable patients.

  • 35. Eivergård, Kristina
    et al.
    Enmarker, Ingela
    Livholts, Mona
    Aléx, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Hellzén, Ove
    The Importance of Being Acceptable: psychiatric Staffs' Talk about Women Patients in Forensic Care2019In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 124-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, women comprise about ten percent of those sentenced to psychiatric forensic clinics in Sweden. Those who are sentenced to forensic care because of offending and violent behaviour have already taken a step away from the usually expected female behaviour. On the other hand, there are many women in forensic care who have not committed crimes, but who instead self-harm. Studies have identified a gender bias in diagnosing and care in psychiatric settings, but there are few studies conducted on women in forensic care. The present study therefore examined how the situation of women patients and female norms are expressed in the staff's talk about these women during verbal handovers and ward rounds at a forensic clinic in Sweden. The aim was to explore how psychiatric staff, in a context of verbal handovers and ward rounds, talk about women who have been committed to forensic psychiatric care, and what consequences this might have for the care of the patients. The content of speech was examined using audio recordings and a method of analysis that was inspired by thematic analysis. The analysis identified that the staff talked about the women in a way that indicates that they expected the women to follow the rules and take responsibility for their bodies in order to be regarded as acceptable patients.

  • 36.
    Eivergård, Kristina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences. Ersta Sköndal .
    Enmarker, Ingela
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Livholts, Mona
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Aléx, Lena
    Umeå Universitet.
    Hellzén, Ove
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    The Importance of Being Acceptable: Psychiatric Staffs’ Talk about Women Patients in Forensic Care2019In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 124-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, women comprise about ten percent of those sentenced to psychiatric forensic clinics in Sweden. Those who are sentenced to forensic care because of offending and violent behaviour have already taken a step away from the usually expected female behaviour. On the other hand, there are many women in forensic care who have not committed crimes, but who instead selfharm. Studies have identified a gender bias in diagnosing and care in psychiatric settings, but there are few studies conducted on women in forensic care. The present study therefore examined how the situation of women patients and female norms are expressed in the staff’s talk about these women during verbal handovers and ward rounds at a forensic clinic in Sweden. The aim was to explore how psychiatric staff, in a context of verbal handovers and ward rounds, talk about women who have been committed to forensic psychiatric care, and what consequences this might have for the care of the patients. The content of speech was examined using audio recordings and a method of analysis that was inspired by thematic analysis. The analysis identified that the staff talked about the women in a way that indicates that they expected the women to follow the rules and take responsibility for their bodies in order to be regarded as acceptable patients.                        

  • 37.
    Ejneborn-Looi, Git-Marie
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Sävenstedt, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    A self-destructive care: Self-reports of people who experienced coercive measures and their suggestions for alternatives2015In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 96-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coercive measures are commonly used as a method of intervention, despite insufficient evidence for their effectiveness and benefits. The aim of this study was to describe how people who self-harm perceive alternatives to coercive measures in relation to actual experiences of psychiatric care. A total of 19 self-reports have been analysed with qualitative content analysis, resulting in three categories: a wish for understanding instead of neglect; a wish for mutual relation instead of distrust; a wish for professionalism instead of a counterproductive care. In conclusion, if the caregivers can understand and collaborate with the patient, there is seldom any need for coercive measures

  • 38.
    Ejneborn-Looi, Git-Marie
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Gabrielsson, Sebastian
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Sävenstedt, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Zingmark, Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Solving the Staff's Problem or Meeting the Patients’ Needs: Staff Members’ Reasoning about Choice of Action in Challenging Situations in Psychiatric Inpatient Care2014In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 470-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coercion in challenging situations is often seen as a necessary component of psychiatric care. This study aims to describe staff members’ reasoning about their choice of action in challenging situations in inpatient psychiatric care. Focus group interviews with 26 staff members were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The results provide an overview of the integrated structure of participants’ reasoning and suggest that staff members’ reasoning about choice of action can be described as a matter of either solving the staff's problems or meeting the patients’ needs. These results can be of use in further research, educational interventions, and staff development activities.

  • 39.
    Ejneborn-Looi, Git-Marie
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Sävenstedt, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Easy but not simple: Nursing students’ descriptions of the process of care in a psychiatric context2016In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 34-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The nurse-patient interaction is the cornerstone of psychiatric care, yet the concept “mental health nursing” is difficult to describe. This article aims to address this problem through the experiences of nursing students. Online journals from 14 nursing students were analyzed using qualitative content analysis, resulting in three categories: Trusting the Trusting Relationship, Voicing the Unspoken Needs, and Balancing the Dynamics of Doing and Being. This study demonstrates that providing nursing care based on trusting relationships is not a demanding task, but it takes place in a complex environment that has a tendency to make easy things complicated.

  • 40.
    Engqvist, Inger
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Ferszt, Ginette
    College of Nursing, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, United States.
    Åhlin, Arne
    Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden / Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institute, Solna, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Psychiatric Nurses' Descriptions of Women with Postpartum Psychosis and Nurses' Responses: An Exploratory Study in Sweden2009In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 23-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Postpartum psychosis is the most serious type of psychiatric illness related to childbirth. This interview study with nine psychiatric nurses in Sweden explored psychiatric nurses’ descriptions of women with psychosis occurring in the postpartum period and nurses’ responses when providing care to these women. Content analysis was used to analyze the data. The nurses described delusions, disconnection, aggression, changed personality, self-absorption, insomnia, chaos, quietness, suicidal ideation, and ‘strange eyes.’ The description of strange eyes noted by the nurses has not been found in the literature, warranting further investigation. When providing care, the nurses responded with sadness, sympathy, empathy and compassion, discomfort, anger, anxiety, and happiness. These findings underscore the importance of nurses recognizing their negatively charged emotions which could interfere with providing compassionate and effective nursing care to this population.

     

  • 41.
    Engqvist, Inger
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Institute of Health and Caring Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Experiences of the first days of postpartum psychosis: An interview study with women and next of Kin in Sweden2013In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 82-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore accounts of the first days of postpartum psychosis from different perspectives, that is, that of the women and their next of kin. Interviews were conducted with seven women with postpartum psychosis and six interviews were done with the next of kin. The overall theme was Shades of Black with A Ray of Light, revealing a difficult experience of darkness, despair, and suffering. For the women, the experience cannot be shared fully other than with those who have lived through it themselves. For the next of kin, the illness is incomprehensible and it proved difficult to express in words what these relatives believe the women were going through. The women and their next of kin spoke about loss of sleep, being in an unreal world, thoughts that moved from having a wanted to an unwanted baby, being infanticidal, and having suicidal ideation. The women and their next of kin described the situations in different ways. The women gave an account of their illness in the strongest of terms, while the language used by the next of kin was much milder. The findings underscore the importance of recognizing the next of kin as key sources in early recognition of the disorder, which would make early treatment possible and support recovery. © 2013 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.

  • 42.
    Erdner, Anette
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Magnusson, Annabella
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Physical activities and their importance to the health of people with severe mental illness in Sweden2012In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 33, no 10, p. 676-679Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that people with severe mental illness often suffer from constant fatigue, insomnia, and somatic complaints that are too often overlooked. In addition, these persons die earlier in life than others in the population. The purpose of this study was to investigate patients' descriptions of activities and the importance of these activities for their health. Eight persons living in their own home were interviewed about both their views about exercise and their exercising activities. Two themes emerged: Getting Control over One's Life and The Need for Contact with Family & Friends. All of the informants were aware of the importance of physical activity to feel good. The informants described three different forms of activities: daily activities in the home, activities in a rehabilitation centre, and various forms of jogging. These different forms of activity were important to the informants since they reduced their anxiety and stress.

  • 43.
    Erdner, Anette
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Magnusson, Annabella
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Lützén, Kim
    Basic Attitudes toward Life Expressed by Persons with Long-Term Mental Illness Living in a Swedish Community.2012In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Issues in mental health nursing, ISSN 1096-4673 (electronic), Vol. 33, no 6, p. 387-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has shown that persons with long-term mental illness who require prolonged treatment and social support wish to, yet find it difficult to, find meaning or quality in life. A descriptive qualitative design using self-photography and in-depth interviews was used for data collection. The aim of this study was to explore basic attitudes to life as expressed by nine persons with long-term mental illness living in the community. The findings provide insight into the values of relationships, work, and the home for persons with long-term mental illness and indicate that they are cognizant of social norms yet have difficulty integrating these in their daily lives. The study also illuminates the informants' difficulties in creating satisfying and supporting relationships with others.

  • 44.
    Erdner, Anette
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Piskator (Eneström), Ragnar
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Police experiences of committing people with mental illness to a hospital2013In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 550-555Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To a large extent today, caring for people with mental illness takes place outside of institutional care. Sometimes, assistance from a special police group may be required to commit the patient to a hospital for continued psychiatric treatment. The aim of this study was to describe a group of police officers and their experiences of committing individuals with mental illness to the hospital for treatment. Two specialised commitment groups within the police were interviewed. A qualitative content analysis was used to identify topics of greater significance in the data. The interviews show that the informants desire greater cooperation with psychiatric care personnel and want to know more about mental illness and how to approach those with mental illness.

  • 45.
    Ewalds-Kvist, Béatrice
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Algotsson, Martina
    Bergström, Annelie
    Lützén, Kim
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Psychiatric Nurses’ Self-Rated Competence2012In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 33, no 7, p. 469-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored the self-rated competence of 52 Swedish psychiatric nurses in three clinical environments: forensic psychiatry, general psychiatric inpatient care, and clinical non-residential psychiatric care. A questionnaire wtih 56 statements from nine areas of expertise was completed. Forensic nurses were more skilled in safety and quality and in dealing with violence and conflicts. Non-specialist nurses appreciated their skills more so than specialist nurses in health promotion and illness prevention and conduct, information, and education. Women were inclined to invite patients’ relatives for education and information. Men attended to a patients’ spiritual needs; they also coped with violence and managed conflicts.

  • 46.
    Ewertzon, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro universitet. ; Högskolan Dalarna.
    Cronqvist, Agneta
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Lützén, Kim
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Reserch Centre, PRC.
    A lonely life journey bordered with struggle: being a sibling of an individual with psychosis 2012In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 157-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research suggests that siblings of individuals with severe mental illness are affected by the situation of their affected sibling and that the health care services seem to partly fail in meeting their needs for support. The aim of this study was therefore to explore how siblings of individuals with a psychotic illness, and who have participated in a support group, experience their situation. Thirteen informants participated in focus group interviews, which were analysed by inductive content analysis. The findings were interpreted in an overall single theme: A lonely life journey bordered with struggle. This theme consists of three categories: facing existential thoughts, facing ambiguity in approach and engagement, and facing disparate attitudes and expectations.

  • 47.
    Ewertzon, Mats
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Cronqvist, Agneta
    Lützén, Kim
    Andershed, Birgitta
    A lonely life journey bordered with struggle: Being a sibling of an individual with psychosis2012In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 157-164Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Ewertzon, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Cronqvist, Agneta
    Department of Health Care Sciences, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lützén, Kim
    Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Department of Palliative Care Research, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Nursing, Gjövik University College, Gjövik, Norway.
    A lonely life journey bordered with struggle: being a sibling of an individual with psychosis2012In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 157-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research suggests that siblings of individuals with severe mental illness are affected by the situation of their affected sibling and that the health care services seem to partly fail in meeting their needs for support. The aim of this study was therefore to explore how siblings of individuals with a psychotic illness, and who have participated in a support group, experience their situation. Thirteen informants participated in focus group interviews, which were analysed by inductive content analysis. The findings were interpreted in an overall single theme: A lonely life journey bordered with struggle. This theme consists of three categories: facing existential thoughts, facing ambiguity in approach and engagement, and facing disparate attitudes and expectations.

  • 49.
    Ewertzon, Mats
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Nationellt kompetenscentrum anhöriga.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Linnéuniversitetet & Nationellt kompetenscentrum anhöriga.
    Support Interventions for Family Members of Adults with Mental Illness: A Narrative Literature Review.2019In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this review was to describe research related to support interventions for adult family members of people with mental illness and the significance that support may have. The results indicate the importance of flexible and individualized forms of support from both professionals and people with personal experience as a family member of someone with mental illness. In many cases, the intervention studies revealed that family members' burden decreased, their knowledge of the disease and treatment increased, and their ability to cope with the situation was improved. The results highlight the importance of support both from professionals and peers.

  • 50.
    Ewertzon, Mats
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College;Swedish Family Care Competence Centre, Sweden.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Swedish Family Care Competence Centre, Sweden.
    Support interventions for family members of adults with mental illness: a narrative literature review2019In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 40, no 9, p. 768-780Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this review was to describe research related to support interventions for adult family members of people with mental illness and the significance that support may have. The results indicate the importance of flexible and individualized forms of support from both professionals and people with personal experience as a family member of someone with mental illness. In many cases, the intervention studies revealed that family members' burden decreased, their knowledge of the disease and treatment increased, and their ability to cope with the situation was improved. The results highlight the importance of support both from professionals and peers.

1234 1 - 50 of 158
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