Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 120
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Adolfsson, Päivi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Lewin, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Foodwork among people with intellectual disabilities and dietary implications depending on staff involvement2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN ISSN 1501-7419, EISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 40-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The food provision for people with intellectual disability (ID) in Sweden is organized within their own households. The aim of this study was to describe how foodwork – planning for meals, shopping for food and cooking – is performed in different social contexts in community settings involving people with ID, staff or both. Dietary intake in the main meals in relation to foodwork practice was also studied. Four different foodwork practices could be distinguished. For some participants only one kind of foodwork practice was found, but for most of them two or more different practices. There was a tendency that food items and dishes chosen and used differed depending on what foodwork practice was performed, which, in turn, affected the nutrient intake. More attention needs to be directed to these everyday matters as a means to increase the quality of support in food for people with ID.

  • 2. Andersen, Jan
    et al.
    Hugemark, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Bjelke, Bjarne R.
    The market of personal assistance in Scandinavia: Hybridization and provider efforts to achieve legitimacy and customers2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, ISSN 1501-7419, Vol. 16, no Supplement: Personal Assistance, p. 34-47Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Andersson, Gunnel
    et al.
    FoU-Södertörn, R&D, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Denhov, Anne
    Department of Social Work, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bülow, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Department of Psychiatry, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Topor, Alain
    Department of Social Work, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Aloneness and loneliness – persons with severe mental illness and experiences of being alone2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 353-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People with severe mental illness (SMI) are often described as lonely and socially incapable – an inability resulting from the mental illness. The aim of this article is to explore experiences of being alone among persons with SMI. The article is based on interviews with 19 persons diagnosed with psychosis who were interviewed between four and nine times over a period of three years. The findings show that experiences of being alone can be identified by two concepts: aloneness and loneliness. The persons in the study appeared as socially able and active in relation to their social lives. However, a social agent does not operate in a void but in interaction with specific living conditions; the experiences of aloneness and loneliness may be viewed as the result of the interplay between the individual and the social and material environment.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Eklund, Mona
    Lunds universitet.
    Sandlund, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Markström, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Freedom of choice or cost efficiency?: the implementation of a free-choice market system in community mental health services in Sweden2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 129-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study investigates the implementation of a free-choice market system in community mental health services using the example of day centres for people with psychiatric disabilities. It was conducted in a major city that was about to implement a free-choice market system due to a new legislation that made it feasible. Eighteen semi-structured interviews were conducted. Agents situated in different parts of the organization were interviewed one year before and two years after the free-choice system was launched in 2010. Data showed a top–down political process. A majority of the intentions of the legislation advocated individual autonomy as the market system's main purpose; only one concerned organizational efficiency. Data reflected, however, that financial efficiency dominated the agents' experiences of the implemented system. The twofold market purpose was clearly reflected in the interviews. Front-line staff hoped for improvements mainly for the users, whereas managers mainly focused on the market as a resource allocator.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för socialt arbete.
    Eklund, Mona
    Lunds universitet.
    Sandlund, Mikael
    Umeå universitet, Psykiatri.
    Markström, Urban
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för socialt arbete.
    Freedom of choice or cost efficiency?: the implementation of a free-choice market system in community mental health services in Sweden2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 129-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study investigates the implementation of a free-choice market system in community mental health services using the example of day centres for people with psychiatric disabilities. It was conducted in a major city that was about to implement a free-choice market system due to a new legislation that made it feasible. Eighteen semi-structured interviews were conducted. Agents situated in different parts of the organization were interviewed one year before and two years after the free-choice system was launched in 2010. Data showed a top–down political process. A majority of the intentions of the legislation advocated individual autonomy as the market system's main purpose; only one concerned organizational efficiency. Data reflected, however, that financial efficiency dominated the agents' experiences of the implemented system. The twofold market purpose was clearly reflected in the interviews. Front-line staff hoped for improvements mainly for the users, whereas managers mainly focused on the market as a resource allocator.

  • 6.
    Anderzen-Carlsson, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    A qualitative evaluation of the National Expert Team regarding the assessment and diagnosis of deafblindness in Sweden2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 362-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deafblindness is a rare condition with multiple causes. Given its rarity, professionals generally have limited knowledge of this condition and insufficient experience managing it. Accordingly, in Sweden, a National Expert Team was established to assess and diagnose deafblindness. The aim of this study was to identify the conceptions of persons with deafblindness, parents of children with deafblindness and professionals involved in their care, rehabilitation and education regarding their participation in the assessment and diagnostic procedures performed by this national team. A phenomenographic design was employed. The main findings were illustrated by five descriptive categories: An opportunity for improvement in daily living, ability to interact with the cream of the crop, personal effort, effects of genetics beyond drawing blood and limited professional interaction.

  • 7.
    Angelov, Nikolay
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation. Swedish Natl Audit Off, SE-11490 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eliason, Marcus
    Inst Evaluat Labour Market & Educ Policy IFAU, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Factors Associated with Occupational Disability Classification2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 37-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To provide disabled people with the same opportunities to participate in working life as everyone else, certain measures, such as wage subsidies, compensating for a reduced work capacity, might be necessary. To ascertain that these measures are limited to the most needy a system that identifies the target group is required. The Swedish Public Employment Service's (PES') classification of occupational disability constitutes such a system. In this study we document how jobseekers' demographic characteristics, socioeconomic position, and health-related conditions are associated with being classified as occupationally disabled by the PES, and how this classification might be distorted by unintended incentive mechanisms. Our empirical analyses show that both previous health conditions and previous socioeconomic disadvantages were associated with a higher likelihood of being classified as occupationally disabled. To what extent these jobseekers actually had impairments that entailed reduced work capacity cannot be concluded from the available data, but our results indicate that also the goals set by the government may have influenced how the PES classified jobseekers.

  • 8.
    Antelius, Eleonor
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Would you like to use one of these or would you rather be able to talk?: facilitated and/or augmentative communication and the preference for speaking2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 257-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the concepts of identity and personhood in relation to people with severe communicative disabilities. Data gathered at a Swedish day centre for people with acquired brain damage show that three main strategies in communication between able-speaking and impaired-speaking persons can be found; (1) perfunctory, (2) jigsaw puzzle, and (3) conjectural, all three strategies being based on the act of speaking. This article shows why it seems important to talk with one’s own physical voice instead of using augmentative and/or facilitated communication, even when one has a highly impaired speech pattern. I argue that an ideology of spoken language exists within western culture and that such an ideology has practical implications for the (re-)creation of meaning-making strategies in relation to people with severe communicative disorders. Implications for health-care personnel working with communicatively impaired people are also identified, as well as implications for researchers studying this field of interest.

  • 9.
    Antonson, Sivert
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Lundström, Inger
    Importance of social support for hard-of-hearing students in pursuing their "educational careers"2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 298-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to describe different processes in what is termed the “educational career” of hard-of-hearing students. The data comprises narratives from 30 hard-of-hearing former students representing four groups: students from a special school who continued to university education or to employment; students from ordinary schools who continued to university education or to employment. The results indicate that support within the educational experience is of great importance and the social support provided by parents is of crucial importance for a student's educational trajectory or career. This support, in combination with an adjusted school environment, seems to greatly diminish the importance of the hearing impairment. The conclusion is that hard-of-hearing students should not necessarily choose a special school just because of the impairment itself. When the needs of these students are met, there seem to be more accentuated mechanisms in ordinary educational settings than in special schools that promote post-secondary education.

  • 10.
    Askheim, Ole Petter
    et al.
    Lillehammer University College, Lillehammer, Norway.
    Bengtsson, Hans
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science.
    Richter Bjelke, Bjarne
    The National Board of Social Services, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Personal assistance in a Scandinavian context: similarities, differences and developmental traits2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 16, no Suppl. 1, p. 3-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Personal assistance (PA) has been characterized as a melting pot consisting of, on the one hand, a social rights discourse with its basis among disabled people, and, on the other hand, a consumer directed market discourse increasingly putting its stamp on welfare policy in the Western world. In the realm of welfare politics, these discourses are, in many ways, opposites, but have found common ground in the demand for a more individual and consumer friendly provision of services. Within a shared welfare state model, the application of PA has developed divergently in the Scandinavian countries and relates to the two discourses in different ways. In this article, PA in Denmark, Norway and Sweden is presented and similarities and differences are discussed and analysed. Questions raised include: How can the differences between the countries be understood? What dilemmas within welfare policy do they illustrate? How do the different discourses put their marks on the different PA-models in the Scandinavian countries? How do the PA programmes seem to develop further and what kind of PA will the Scandinavian countries end up with in the future?. © 2014 Nordic Network on Disability Research.

  • 11.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Building a community: Disability and identity in the Qur’an2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 210-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article elaborates on disability and the Qur’an and accentuates how a grand narrative of moral codes held the community together and enforced a collective identity of the ummah, in which disability was interlaced with the shaping of an in-group grounded in a common set of values. This process of identity making in turn had implications for people with disabilities, since they could have trouble fulfilling religious requirements, something that was met with counter mechanisms of solidarity within the community of Muslim believers.

  • 12.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work.
    On the borderline – representations of disability in the Old Testament2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 280-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores disability in the Old Testament. The discussion takes its starting point in a number of domains and arenas where disability was visualized and investigates the significance and meaning that can be attached to these domains in relation to the problem of inclusion and exclusion. The analysis highlights complex and contradictory phenomena, where the interpretation was not given but rather dependent on the cultural context and different

  • 13.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Out of the frame: disability and the body in the writings of Karl Marx2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 151-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How disability as a phenomenon is to be understood has been widely discussed within the field of disability research. Influenced by a Marxist perspective, the social model has reinforced the view that disability results from the organization of society rather than from individual premises. This article elaborates on these issues by exploring the writings of Karl Marx and his views concerning disability. The analysis pinpoints bodily normality in Marx’s reasoning and how the economic system shapes the premises for participation and roles, but also how people with disabilities were left out of the progressive call for social change. 

  • 14.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Katsui, Hisayo
    McLaughlin, Janice
    Change and continuity in journal priorities2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 281-283Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Katsui, Hisayo
    McLaughlin, Janice
    (Dis)abling practices and theories?: exploring chronic illness in disability studies2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 1-6Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Katsui, Hisayo
    McLaughlin, Janice
    Editorial Review: Touring the Archive 1999-2017 and Mapping the Future of Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-5Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research is now an Open Access Journal from this issue onwards. We are particularly pleased that not only new articles, but also our full archive are included in the publishing agreement with Stockholm University Press. To celebrate this turning point in the Journal's history, we have revisited trends in its development, considered what recent and newly published articles say about its direction, and have explored what we see as important possibilities for our future. This editorial is our reflections on what we have found.

  • 17. Bhaskar, Roy
    et al.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Metatheory, interdisciplinarity and disability research: a critical realist perspective2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 278-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Different methodological tendencies within the field of disability research are described, and the reductionism implicit in the historically dominant models is critiqued. The advantages of critical realism over rival metatheoretical positions, including empiricism, social constructionism, neo-Kantianism and hermeneutics, is shown, demonstrating in particular what is called the “double-inclusiveness” of critical realism. A non-reductionist schema for explanation in disability research is established, and the article argues that the phenomenon of disability has the character of a “necessarily laminated system”. The fruitfulness of this approach is then illustrated with an example drawn from the field, and the case for critical realism as an ex ante explicit metatheory and methodology for disability research is further developed. The conclusion reconsiders the nature of metatheory and its role in research.

  • 18.
    Borgström, Åsa
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet, Institutionen för socialt arbete.
    Daneback, Kristian
    Göteborgs universitet, Institutionen för socialt arbete.
    Molin, Martin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Young People with Intellectual Disabilities and Social Media: A Literature Review and Thematic Analysis2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 129-140Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this review is to identify and analyse the research findings in the field of young people with intellectual disabilities and social media.Method: Twelve peer-reviewed papers published in well-established and recognized journals between 2001 and 2017 were identified from electronic database searches (Web of Science, Scopus and Google Scholar), the Internet (Facebook) and correspondence with experts.Results: Six topics were identified through thematic analysis of the texts: opportunities, risk and vulnerability, sexuality, identity, barriers and support.Conclusion: The latest research on young people with intellectual disabilities is characterized by issues of risk, vulnerability and support. The concept of positive risk-taking is suggested for the development of methodological approaches in practice and research. Furthermore, vulnerability, online and offline activities and identity formation should be examined more closely, and there is a call for new research methods in this area, for example observations and netnography.

  • 19.
    Brennan, Ciara
    et al.
    University of Iceland, ISL.
    Rice, James Gordon
    University of Iceland, ISL.
    Traustadóttir, Rannveig
    University of Iceland, ISL.
    Anderberg, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    How can states ensure access to personal assistance when service delivery is decentralized?: A multi-level analysis of Iceland, Norway and Sweden2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 334-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Article 19 of the United Nations (UN) Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities requires states to ensure that persons with disabilities have access to a range of support services, including personal assistance. The Convention is an agreement between state parties and the UN. However, in practice, disability services are often implemented at the local level. Drawing on the findings of qualitative research in Iceland, Norway and Sweden, this paper examines a paradox whereby states commit to ensure access to support services, but decentralize responsibility to autonomous and independent local governments. A multi-level governance framework is applied to analyse the findings of qualitative inquiry with policy-makers, local government officials and leaders of independent living organizations in all three Nordic countries. A multi-level analysis highlights the tensions and contradictions between decentralization and human rights commitments. © 2016 Nordic Network on Disability Research

  • 20.
    Brownlow, Charlotte
    et al.
    University of Southern Queensland, Australia.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    O'Dell, Lindsay
    The Open University, UK.
    Exploring the potential for social networking among people with autism: challenging dominant ideas of‘friendship’2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 188-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within dominant approaches to autism and relationships, people with autism are assumed to be either unable to form relationships or are in need for educational interventions to be better equipped at managing relationships in a social world dominated by non-autistic people (neurotypicals). In this paper, we argue that broader constructions of friendship are needed in order to best account for the desire and abilities of high-functioning people with autism to have satisfying friendships and that the engagement with online social networking may provide a useful tool in achieving this.

  • 21.
    Brunnberg, Elinor
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Hard-of-hearing children's sense of identity and belonging2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 179-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the process of identity construction for hard-of-hearing (HH) children in Sweden. Twenty-nine children aged 9-16 years who attended special classes for HH students were interviewed. During this longitudinal study, all classes were moved from an oral to a signing school environment. The findings support the position that a bilingual HH identity exists. HH children often construct their identity by widening their reference group to include not just HH but also those who are 'almost the same'. They can have a sense of belonging either to deaf or hearing children, or both. In the development of identity HH children make distinctions between subgroups within their reference group. There were also children in crisis or with an unclear identity. This needs to be further explored to determine if the crisis is a productive part of identity construction or a problem requiring support. Gender construction also needs to be further explored.

  • 22.
    Brunnberg, Elinor
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    The school playground as a meeting place for hard of hearing children2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 73-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The schoolyard is the main social arena for children attending classes for hard of hearing pupils, to meet and mix with other children. Their social interplay with other children is rather restricted during spare time. For the hard of hearing children, included in this study, the surrounding school environment has shifted from one being dominated by spoken language to one being dominated by the use of sign language. Observations by video camera of the children playing during breaks showed that the hearing and the hard of hearing children used the schoolyard in an unequal way. The hard of hearing children were playing in the periphery of the schoolyard and the hearing children in the central interaction areas. In the special school the hard of hearing children were playing in the central interaction areas and often with deaf schoolmates. This may be interpreted as while staying in the integrated environment the hard of hearing boys and girls were socially excluded and in the segregated environment they were socially included.

  • 23.
    Börjesson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, Department of Social Sciences.
    A Newspaper Campaign Tells: The Launch of Neuro-psychiatric Diagnoses in the Swedish Daily Press 1997-19991999In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 3-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Around the time of 1998 a number of articles about the situation of the educational system appeared in the daily Swedish press. A large proportion of the articles (concerned with science journalism as well as general debate and narratives) centered on children with the neuro-psychiatric diagnoses DAMP, AHDH, Tourettes or Aspergers Syndrome. The occurrence could be described as a launch or a campaign in favour of a medical perspective on children's problems. This article is attempting to give some explanations to the large amount of attention given to these diagnoses. The rhetorical forms used to convince readers of the accuracy and humanity of diagnosing children are also analysed. Special emphasis is placed on the commercial terms that journalism operates under, and on its tradition as an educator. We can see, on the whole, that medicine, journalism and parents' testimonies tell the same story. The material represents a wide consensus relating to the question of how diagnostics and the importance of placing these children into special areas are viewed. The study has been carried out within the framework of a socialconstructivist perspective.

  • 24.
    Bøttcher, L.
    et al.
    Department of Education, Aarhus University, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Stadskleiv, K.
    Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Berntsen, T.
    Department of Child Neurology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Christensen, K.
    The Danish Society for Cerebral Palsy, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Korsfelt, Å.
    Länssjukhuset Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Kihlgren, M.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ödman, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Systematic cognitive monitoring of children with cerebral palsy: the development of an assessment and follow-up protocol2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 304-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is associated with cognitive impairments, learning difficulties and reduced social participation. Individual assessment is necessary for individually tailored interventions. This paper describes the development of a systematic follow-up programme of cognition, and the challenges of integrating it into the regular follow-up of children with CP. Initiated by the Nordic users‘ organisations, a group of psychologists proposed a protocol of follow-up of cognition in children with CP – the CP Cog. This protocol consists of neuropsychological instruments covering general cognitive functioning, visuospatial and executive functioning. The article presents a natural experiment describing development and implementation of the cognitive protocol in three Scandinavian countries. This introduction illustrates challenges associated with implementation, especially how the success of the protocol hinges on structural backup within the different countries. In conclusion the CP Cog assessment protocol holds the promise of increasing the awareness among habilitation professionals that children with CP are in need of cognitive evaluation and educational support. © 2015 Nordic Network on Disability Research

  • 25. Bülow, Per
    et al.
    Svensson, Tommy
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Sociology.
    Stability of Diagnoses in a Cohort of Long-Term Mentally Ill Patients in sweden2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 23-40Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Cameron, David Lansing
    et al.
    Department of Education, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Persson, Bengt
    Department of Education and Behavioural Sciences, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    School district administrators' perspectives on special education policy and practice in Norway and Sweden2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 212-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to examine special education policy and practice from the perspective of school district administrators in Norway and Sweden. Administrators from 266 Norwegian and 262 Swedish municipalities completed a survey concerning: (a) reasons children need special education, (b) common and desired organizational solutions, and (c) the influence of policy on practice. Despite a number of clear differences, findings suggest that Swedish and Norwegian administrators share similar attitudes regarding the provision of special education support. It appears that in both countries inclusive practices are seen as the ideal, yet, Norwegian administrators appear to have a stronger preference for categorical or segregated solutions. However, this finding must be viewed in light of current practices in each country. In particular, we take into consideration data indicating that 17% of Swedish students receive special educational support, as compared to approximately 6% in Norway.

  • 27.
    Carlhed, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Defining dimensions of family-oriented services in early childhood intervention2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 185-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine process dimensions in a model regarding family-oriented services in early childhood intervention. The purpose was to capture a broad picture of Swedish habilitation services from a professional point of view. Professionals in habilitation from different parts of Sweden participated (n-237). A hypothesized model was tested with confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling procedures. The resulting hierarchical model had two main dimensions, the first having to do with relationships, and the second concerning involvement/information-exchange. The process of intervention comprises efforts in building relationships, enhancing effective information exchange between parents and professionals, and finding different ways of involving parents/families. The findings of this study call for multiple perspectives in order to work effectively in a family-oriented way, and they also call for a distinction between relational and participatory elements when referring to family- oriented services.

  • 28.
    Carlhed, Carina
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Defining dimensions of family-oriented services in early childhood intervention2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 185-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study is to examine process dimensions in a model regarding family-oriented services in early intervention. Professionals in habilitation from different parts of Sweden participated (n=237). A hypothesized model was tested with Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Structural Equation Modeling procedures and resulted in a hierarchical model with two main factors: a relationship dimension and an involvement/information-exchange dimension. The process of intervention comprises efforts in building relationships, enhance effective information exchange between parents and professionals, and finally find different ways of involving parents/families. The findings call for a distinction between relational and participatory elements when referring to family oriented services.

  • 29.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Hultman, Elin
    Linköpings Universitet, Linköping.
    LaRooy, David
    Scottish Institute for Policing Research, University of Abertay, United Kingdom.
    The quality of details when children and youths with intellectual disabilities are interviewed about their abuse experiences2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 113-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The question for this study is to further understand how children and youths with intellectual disabilities (IDs) elicit central and peripheral details when interviewed about their abuse experiences. Through a quantitative method we examined the police officers first formal investigative interview with 32 children and youths with IDs. We analysed their elicited details of abuse in relation to type of question asked. The findings are that few invitations and a large number of option-posing questions were asked. The children and youths tended to agree with option-posing and suggestive statements but were able to report qualitatively strong and important information about their abuse experiences without the “help” from possible contaminating question types.  Even if the sample was retrospective, ‘diagnosis’ of intellectual disability was made from examination of the case notes, and consisted of a wide range of disabilities as well as a wide range of age this study indicates that police officers need to provide children and youths with IDs greater opportunity to report details from invitations. If they are not developing their responses from invitations they should be asked open directive questions because that may facilitate their elicitation of both central and peripheral information.

     

  • 30. Coniavitis Gellerstedt, Lotta
    et al.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Hearing impairment, working life conditions, and gender2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 225-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to examine differences and similarities in working conditions and health status between men and women with hearing impairments. This article is based on a material collected with a comprehensive questionnaire, looking at psycho‐social work environments and health status and answered by a total of 406 patients at two audiological clinics in Sweden. Examination of the data reveals a pattern of unfavourable conditions for hearing‐impaired persons/employees when compared to a reference group without auditory impairments. Hearing‐impaired women frequently find themselves in extremely trying situations. Health status is worse for those who are hearing impaired as compared to the reference group, especially for hearing impaired women The concept “double workload”; is discussed as a possible notion for further theoretical development of the issues discussed in this article.

  • 31. Dag, Munir
    et al.
    Kullberg, Christian
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Can they work it out and do they get any satisfaction?: Young Swedish physically disabled men's and women's work involvement and job satisfaction2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 287-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, results are reported from a study of what value young (20-35 years) disabled men and women ascribe to a job and the job satisfaction they have. Data for the study were collected via a survey questionnaire. The results show that both the men and the women attach great psychosocial value to work and that they have a high level of job satisfaction. The results also show that the men tend to ascribe higher economic value to paid work than the women do and that the women ascribe a higher psychosocial value to paid work than the men. Finally, there is a discussion of the conclusions that can be drawn from the results of the social policy measures taken for men and women in the group in question.

  • 32. Dag, Munir
    et al.
    Kullberg, Christian
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Can they work it out and do they get any satisfaction?: Young Swedish physically disabled men’s and women’s work involvement and job satisfaction2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 287-303Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Dag, Munir
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kullberg, Christian
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Can they work it out and do they get any satisfaction?: Young Swedish physically disabled men's and women's work involvement and job satisfaction2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 287-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, results are reported from a study of what value young (20-35 years) disabled men and women ascribe to a job and the job satisfaction they have. Data for the study were collected via a survey questionnaire. The results show that both the men and the women attach great psychosocial value to work and that they have a high level of job satisfaction. The results also show that the men tend to ascribe higher economic value to paid work than the women do and that the women ascribe a higher psychosocial value to paid work than the men. Finally, there is a discussion of the conclusions that can be drawn from the results of the social policy measures taken for men and women in the group in question.

  • 34.
    Dalin, Rolf
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Rosenberg, David
    FoU Västernorrland.
    An approach to measurement and statistical description of participation in community life for people with psychiatric disabilities2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 47-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Participation has emerged as a central concept in defining the goals of disability policy in Sweden as well as internationally. Yet it has rarely been operationalized as a foundation for planning services. As part of an attempt to survey the needs of individuals experiencing psychiatric disabilities, the authors have developed a scale for measuring participation in five areas of community life. The scale uses four distinct categories as levels, specific for each area of life, and a set of statistical descriptive techniques designed to illustrate and communicate information regarding levels, capacities, and wishes related to a participatory life in the community. Based on a pilot study, the article illustrates how the collective needs of a population of individuals experiencing psychiatric disability can be described and presented to practitioners as a support for system planning.

  • 35.
    Dalin, Rolf
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Department of Information Technology and Media and Kommunförbundet Västernorrland, FoU-enheten.
    Rosenberg, David
    Kommunförbundet Västernorrland, FoU-enheten.
    An Approach to Measurement and Statistical Description of Participation in Community Life for People with Psychiatric Disabilities2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 47-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Participation has emerged as a central concept in defining the goals of disability policy in Sweden as well as internationally. Yet it has rarely been operationalized as a foundation for planning services. As part of an attempt to survey the needs of individuals experiencing psychiatric disabilities, the authors have developed a scale for measuring participation in five areas of community life. The scale uses four distinct categories as levels, specific for each area of life, and a set of statistical descriptive techniques designed to illustrate and communicate information regarding levels, capacities, and wishes related to a participatory life in the community. Based on a pilot study, the article illustrates how the collective needs of a population of individuals experiencing psychiatric disability can be described and presented to practitioners as a support for system planning.

  • 36.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Hallberg, L R-M
    Reichenberg, K
    Parents coping with caring of their asthmatic child: A grounded theory studyd2000In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, ISSN 1501-7419, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 100-113Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Ehliasson, Kent
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Ericsson, Ulf
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Ekonomi och arbetsliv. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Människa - Hälsa - Samhälle (MHS). Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Bengtsson Tops, Anita
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Sjuksköterskeutbildningarna. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Support to individuals with comprehensive disabilities: ideas in the Swedish Disability Act2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 234-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to determine and describe the ideas, that is, a mental construction of perceived reality and values, which are expressed in the Swedish Disability Act and its Government Bill. By means of text analysis, four concepts of reality and values have been identified: (1) Citizenship and justice, (2) The collective and integration, (3) The individual and autonomy, and (4) Decentralization and power shifts. The study also shows that social rights and social citizenship have been strengthened via legislation for individuals with comprehensive disabilities. It is also demonstrated that there is considerable room in the legislation for conflicts between the two concepts and values of collective/integration and the individual/autonomy. It can also be observed that there is a considerable risk that citizens are not treated in a similar manner as regards the interpretation and application of the Disability Act, which may lead to lack of legal security.

  • 38. Eriksson, L
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Participation in school activities: a comparison between students with and without disabilities2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 6, p. 206-224Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Eriksson, Lilly
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för samhälls- och beteendevetenskap.
    Granlund, Mats
    Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för samhälls- och beteendevetenskap.
    Perceived Participation: A comparison of students with disabilities and students without disabilities2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 206-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to a recent study (Almqvist & Granlund, accepted), participation is not strongly related to type and degree of disability but probably to the context of the individual as well as generic personal factors. Such diverse factors can over time become orchestrated and pull the development of individuals with disability in a certain direction. This study compares how 959 students with and without disabilities in two age‐groups 7–12 and 13–17 perceive their participation in school activities. The main method of analysis is one‐way‐ANOVA. The result indicates that students without disabilities rated their perceived participation higher, especially in unstructured “free”; activities. Further, students without disabilities experience a higher degree of autonomy and rate the availability of school activities as higher. Students with disabilities rate their interaction with teachers as better and more frequent, but their interaction with peers as less frequent. These differences increase with age and may reinforce a stigmatization process.

  • 40.
    Eriksson, Lilly
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Department of Social Sciences.
    Granlund, Mats
    Mälardalen University, Department of Social Sciences.
    Perceived Participation: A comparison of students with disabilities and students without disabilities2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 206-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to a recent study (Almqvist & Granlund, accepted), participation is not strongly related to type and degree of disability but probably to the context of the individual as well as generic personal factors. Such diverse factors can over time become orchestrated and pull the development of individuals with disability in a certain direction. This study compares how 959 students with and without disabilities in two age‐groups 7–12 and 13–17 perceive their participation in school activities. The main method of analysis is one‐way‐ANOVA. The result indicates that students without disabilities rated their perceived participation higher, especially in unstructured “free”; activities. Further, students without disabilities experience a higher degree of autonomy and rate the availability of school activities as higher. Students with disabilities rate their interaction with teachers as better and more frequent, but their interaction with peers as less frequent. These differences increase with age and may reinforce a stigmatization process.

  • 41.
    Förhammar, Staffan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of History.
    Educating through social policy: Compensation for blindness in Sweden- An example of creating norms and identities2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 211-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As industry grew around 1900, it restricted the opportunities available for employment of the blind trained in crafts. The ensuing public debate led to the 1934 decision to provide state-supported compensation for the blind. The decision reveals that politicians, experts and even the blind themselves viewed this category that was particularly dependent on public support. This article focuses on the underlying norms and identities present in the debate.

  • 42.
    Giertz, Lottie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Guardianship for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Accountant, Advocate or ‘Family’ Member?2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 256-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overarching aim of this study is to explore guardianship in terms of its impact on daily lives of adults with intellectual disabilities in Sweden. Based on qualitative interviews, the article focuses on the expected and actual role of limited guardians for people with intellectual disabilities in the context of Swedish laws. Our findings show that the legal definition of limited guardianship is unclear, and that this lack of clarity among other dilemmas creates conflict among clients, guardians, relatives, professionals and care workers. The guardian may be expected to act as an accountant, a legal advocate, or even a surrogate family member. The result is consistent with previous research in other countries on the consequences of guardianship. The current legislation on limited guardianship is in need of amendment in order to avoid legal uncertainty and ambiguity among clients and their support network.

  • 43.
    Gustafsson, Johanna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Peralta, Julia
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Supported Employment and Social Inclusion: Experiences of Workers with Disabilities in Wage Subsidized Employment in Sweden2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 26-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Labour market policies targeting people with disabilities primarily focus on establishing a working life based on reaching and procuring employment. Less attention is directed towards the qualitative aspects of working conditions or opportunities to retain employment. This study seeks to examine how people with disabilities who, with the help of Supported Employment (SE) methods, are establishing themselves in the labour market, experience social inclusion at their workplaces and how their working conditions influence their experiences with social inclusion. Data were collected in semi-structured interviews. Two themes were prominent in the interviewees’ experiences with social inclusion: the importance of being a valued worker and the sense of social belonging. Competence is important to feeling valued, as is working in fair working conditions. Disclosure of disability often helps to create fairness. The sense of social belonging arises from natural support and mattering to others. Important conditions that increase social inclusion are job-matching and natural support. The SE method can therefore contribute to the creation of social inclusion by ensuring that the matching process is well thought out and by utilizing strategies for inclusion, such as encouragement of natural support.

  • 44.
    Gustafsson, Johanna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Peralta, Julia
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    The employer's perspective: employment of people with disabilities in wage subsidized employments2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to examine employers' perspectives of the conditions of employment of people with disabilities within a context of wage subsidies. Employers in different workplaces were interviewed, and the interviews were analysed according to qualitative content analysis (Graneheim and Lundman 2004). The results show that four factors – attitude, matching, economic incentives and accommodations – are important for the employment of people with disabilities within a context of wage subsidies. Positive earlier experiences of people with disabilities serve as one of the reasons employers are willing to consider people with disabilities for jobs, but for hiring to take place, there must also be a match between the right person and the right job. Wage subsidies are seen, within this context, as an incentive to hire people who have reduced work capacity; accommodations are seen as necessary for the successful implementation of such hiring decisions. This knowledge can be applied in the design of support measures for unemployed people with disabilities.

  • 45.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Pedagogical traditions and conditions for inclusive education2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 67-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea of “a school for all” has been on the agenda for a long time both within disability research and educational practices. Experiences however show that there is a long way between idea and realization of that idea. This article looks into conditions to develop an inclusive school from the perspective of different pedagogical ideas and traditions. It argues that one roughly can distinguish between two pedagogical traditions with different ideas about such things as learning, knowledge, teaching and diversity. It also argues that there is no self-evident correspondence between pedagogical ideas manifested in today′s educational practice and pedagogical ideas the pedagogues of today hold for true.

  • 46.
    Hedegaard, Joel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Hugo, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Social dimensions of learning – the experience of young adult students with Asperger syndrome at a supported IT education2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 256-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to describe how young adults with Asperger syndrome experience an educational project called ‘the IT-track’. The methods used included participant observation and research interviews. The results were interpreted within the theoretical framework described by ‘Supported Education’ (SED). The most prominent experience among the students was social learning. Students describe that they gradually began to function better socially with others and developed various abilities, such as asking for help, and talking to groups.The teachers emerged in the interviews as the single most important source of support as they formed the basis of two key points of SED. Overall, studying at the IT-track resulted in the students extending their horizons of possibility by breaking away from their previous sense of isolation which was marked by idleness and loneliness. By participating at the IT-track, the students’ sense of participation and meaningfulness increased.

  • 47.
    Helvik, Anne-Sofie
    et al.
    ENT Department, St Olavs University Hospital of Trondheim, Norway.
    Jacobsen, Geir
    Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
    Svebak, Sven
    Department of Neuromedicine, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
    Hallberg, Lillemor R.-M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hearing Impairment, Sense of Humour and Communication Strategies2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One purpose of this study was to describe sense of humour and communication strategies in a general population of adults who needed hearing aid (HA) fitting or refitting. Another purpose was to explore the correlation between characteristics of hearing impairment (HI), sense of humour, and other participant characteristics and the communication strategies as outcome. Consecutive patients (n=343) at the Department of Audiology during 1 year completed the Sense of Humour Questionnaire-6 (SHQ-6) and the Communication Strategies Scale (CSS with maladaptive behaviour, verbal and non-verbal strategies). It was found that a high sense of humour was related to female gender and younger age. In multiple regression analyses, use of non-verbal communication strategies was more prevalent among females and increased with younger age, longer duration of HI, and previous HA experience. Use of verbal communication strategies and maladaptive communication behaviour increased with increasing HI. Use of verbal strategies was further associated with younger age and previous HA experience. Frequent use of maladaptive behaviour was related to younger age, longer duration of HI and less sense of humour. Maladaptive behaviour, alternatively expressed as negative reactions to stressful events in communication, was negatively associated with sense of humour. This study may indicate a role for sense of humour in prevention of maladaptive behaviour. It may also improve our understanding of what factors influence the use of communication strategies.

  • 48.
    Helvik, Anne-Sofie
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
    Jacobsen, Geir W.
    Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
    Hallberg, Lillemor R-M
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Effects of Impaired Hearing on Perceived Health and Life Situation2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 263-277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between level of hearing loss (HL) and perceived health and life situation. A population sample of 343 outpatient adults who consulted a university hospital in Norway for hearing aids and rehabilitation was studied. Health and life situation was assessed by self-reported measures of general health, anxiety, participation in social activities, and life satisfaction. Level of HL was estimated by mean hearing threshold in the better ear, and categorized according to international standards. Subjects with normal hearing in the better ear were used as reference. Explanatory health and life situation variables were dichotomized and analysed using logistic regression models. The results showed that perception of good health was negatively affected by increasing HL before and after adjustment for potential confounders (p for trend <0.05). Compared with non-impaired individuals, the odds of perceiving their health as “not good”, were four times higher for the most severely affected subjects (p < 0.05). The odds for reporting anxiety, of abstaining from participation in social activities, and of being generally dissatisfied increased for patients with moderate and higher levels of HL. In conclusion, perception of health was negatively associated with increasing HL, while anxiety, participation in social activities, and perceived life satisfaction did not significantly correlate with the level of loss. Thus, degree of HL seems to be of quite limited importance when consequences of HL are judged.

  • 49.
    Helvik, Anne-Sofie
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
    Jacobsen, Geir W.
    Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
    Hallberg, Lillemor R.-M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Life Consequences of Hearing Loss in Terms of Activity Limitation and Participation Restriction2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 53-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The consequences of hearing loss in terms of perceived activity limitation and participation restriction were studied in a general population of 343 adults with hearing impairment using the Hearing Disability and Handicap Scale. Coping was measured by the Sense of Humour Questionnaire and the Communication Strategies Scale and combined with objective and subjective audiological variables and demographic factors (age, gender and education). In stepwise linear modelling, several variables contributed significantly to the outcome (adjusted R2=53.3% for activity limitation and 47.2% for participation restriction). Audiological factors explained most of the variance in activity limitation (R2=37.1%), while coping factors were the main predictors for participation restriction (R2=35.2%). Maladaptive behaviour in the Communication Strategies Scale was the strongest predictor and explained 13.7% and 32.4% of the variance in activity limitation and participation restriction, respectively. More frequent use of maladaptive behaviour was related to larger limitation and restriction. This study adds to the understanding of factors that negatively influence daily life in terms of activity limitation and participation restriction. This may in turn have consequences for aural rehabilitation efforts.

  • 50.
    Helvik, Anne-Sofie
    et al.
    Ear, Nose and Throat Department (ENT), St Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
    Thürmer, Hanne
    Blefjell Hospital, Notodden, Norway.
    Jacobsen, Geir W.
    Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
    Bratt, Mette
    Ear, Nose and Throat Department (ENT), St Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
    Hallberg, Lillemor R.-M.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Psychometric evaluation of a Norwegian version of the Hearing Disability and Handicap Scale2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 112-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    To evaluate the Hearing Disability and Handicap Scale (HDHS) in an unselected population of adults with hearing impairment.

    Subjects and methods:

    A total of 342 consecutive adults who consulted the outpatient unit of audiology in the ENT department of a Norwegian university hospital answered HDHS, which intends to assess the negative consequences of hearing loss. The psychometric evaluation included internal structure analyses and made use of principal factors followed by varimax rotation, construct validity by corrected item-total correlation, and internal consistency reliability by Cronbach's alpha coefficient.

    Results:

    HDHS showed good psychometric properties with three factors, i.e. speech perception (five items), non-speech sound (five items) and participation restriction (10 items). All had good internal consistency reliability. The inventory distinguished between activity limitations and other problems related to social life participation.

    Conclusion:

    HDHS was found to be adequate for research and clinical purposes in an unselected adult population with a quite different cultural background and language than the original one.

123 1 - 50 of 120
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf