Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Carlsson, Ingela K.
    et al.
    Department of Hand Surgery, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University.
    Edberg, Anna-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Wann-Hansson, Christine
    Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö.
    Hand-injured patients' experiences of cold sensitivity and the consequences and adaptation for daily life: a qualitative study2008In: Journal of Hand Therapy, ISSN 0894-1130, E-ISSN 1545-004X, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 53-61; quiz 62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Design

    Qualitative descriptive.

    Introduction

    Cold sensitivity is a common and persistent complaint after hand injuries.

    Purpose of the Study

    To explore the experiences of severe cold sensitivity, its consequences for daily life, and the strategies for enduring and enabling occupation.

    Methods

    Fifteen hand-injured patients with abnormal cold sensitivity were interviewed. The transcribed text was analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis. Experiences of triggering factors, symptoms, and relieving strategies were described.

    Results

    The consequences and adaptation in daily life entailed a change in life roles, a struggle to maintain self-image and changed occupational performance and/or occupational patterns.

    Conclusions

    Our findings highlight the importance of a holistic approach, including a screening of patients' occupational roles and patterns as well as psychosocial needs, to obtain the information needed to support patients with severe cold sensitivity to achieve a sense of control and self-mastery.

  • 2.
    Edsfeldt, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Hand Surgery.
    Eklund, Martin
    Wiig, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Hand Surgery.
    Prognostic factors for digital range of motion after intrasynovial flexor tendon injury and repair: Long-term follow-up on 273 patients treated with active extension-passive flexion with rubber bands.2018In: Journal of Hand Therapy, ISSN 0894-1130, E-ISSN 1545-004X, article id S0894-1130(17)30093-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY DESIGN: Observational cohort study.

    INTRODUCTION: Investigating prognostic factors using population-based data may be used to improve functional outcome after flexor tendon injury and repair.

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY: The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of concomitant nerve transection, combined flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) tendon transection and the age of the patient, on digital range of motion (ROM) more than 1 year after FDP tendon transection and repair in zone I and II.

    METHODS: Two hundred seventy-three patients with a total of 311 fingers admitted for FDP injury in zone I and II were treated with active extension-passive flexion with rubber bands and followed for at least 1 year. We compared outcome by evaluating digital mobility using Strickland's evaluation system.

    RESULTS: At 12 months 72% of patients aged > 50 had fair or poor ROM compared to 17% of patients aged 0-25 years. At 24 months the results for patients aged > 50 had improved to 33% with fair or poor ROM, whereas no improvement had occurred for patients aged 0-25 (17% with fair or poor ROM). Concomitant nerve transection and FDS tendon transection had no negative effects on digital mobility.

    DISCUSSION: Age above 50 was significantly associated with impaired digital ROM during the first year after flexor tendon injury and repair but not at 2 years follow-up. Concomitant nerve transection and combined transection of FDP and FDS do not affect digital mobility.

    CONCLUSIONS: Older patients are likely to have a slower healing process and impaired digital ROM during the first year after surgery.

  • 3.
    Engstrand, Christina
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Boren, Linda
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Liedberg, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evaluation of Activity Limitation and Digital Extension in Dupuytrens Contracture Three Months after Fasciectomy and Hand Therapy Interventions2009In: Journal of Hand Therapy, ISSN 0894-1130, E-ISSN 1545-004X, JOURNAL OF HAND THERAPY, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 21-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Working while exposed to motions, physically and psychologically affects a person. Traditionally, motion sickness symptom reduction has implied use of medication, which can lead to detrimental effects on performance. Non-pharmaceutical strategies, in turn, often require cognitive and perceptual attention. Hence, for people working in high demand environments where it is impossible to reallocate focus of attention, other strategies are called upon. The aim of the study was to investigate possible impact of a mitigation strategy on perceived motion sickness and psychophysiological responses, based on an artificial sound horizon compared with a non-positioned sound source.

    Methods: Twenty-three healthy subjects were seated on a motion platform in an artificial sound horizon or in non-positioned sound, in random order with one week interval between the trials. Perceived motion sickness (Mal), maximum duration of exposure (ST), skin conductance, blood volume pulse, temperature, respiration rate, eye movements and heart rate were measured continuously throughout the trials.

    Results: Mal scores increased over time in both sound conditions, but the artificial sound horizon, applied as a mitigation strategy for perceived motion sickness, showed no significant effect on Mal scores or ST. The number of fixations increased with time in the non-positioned sound condition. Moreover, fixation time was longer in the non-positioned sound condition compared with sound horizon, indicating that the subjects used more time to fixate and, hence, assumingly made fewer saccades.

    Conclusion: A subliminally presented artificial sound horizon did not significantly affect perceived motion sickness, psychophysiological variables or the time the subjects endured the motion sickness triggering stimuli. The number of fixations and fixation times increased over time in the non-positioned sound condition.

  • 4.
    Engstrand, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Factors affecting functional recovery after surgery and hand therapy in patients with Dupuytren's disease2015In: Journal of Hand Therapy, ISSN 0894-1130, E-ISSN 1545-004X, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 255-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study design: Prospective cohort study. Introduction: The evidence of the relationship between functional recovery and impairment after surgery and hand therapy are inconsistent. Purpose of the study: To explore factors that were most related to functional recovery as measured by DASH in patients with Dupuytrens disease. Methods: Eighty-one patients undergoing surgery and hand therapy were consecutively recruited. Functional recovery was measured by the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire. Explanatory variables: range of motion of the finger joints, five questions regarding safety and social issues of hand function, and health-related quality of life (Euroqol). Results: The three variables "need to take special precautions", "avoid using the hand in social context", and health-related quality of life (EQ-5D index) explained 62.1% of the variance in DASH, where the first variable had the greatest relative effect. Discussion: Safety and social issues of hand function and quality of life had an evident association with functional recovery. Level of evidence: IV.

  • 5. Omar, Mohammed T. A.
    et al.
    Alghadir, Ahmad H.
    Zafar, Hamayun
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Department of Rehabilitation Health Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Al Baker, Shaheerah
    Hand grip strength and dexterity function in children aged 6-12 years: a cross-sectional study2018In: Journal of Hand Therapy, ISSN 0894-1130, E-ISSN 1545-004X, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 93-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Design: Cross-sectional and clinical measurement. Introduction: Assessment of hand function considers an essential part in clinical practice. Purpose of the Study: To develop normative values of hand grip strength and dexterity function for 6-12 year -old children in Saudi Arabia. Methods: Grip strength and dexterity function was measured in 525 children using Grip Track hand dynamometer (JTECH Medical, Midvale, UT, USA) and 9-hole pegboard test respectively. Results: The grip strength and dexterity function was improved as age progressed regardless of gender. Across all age groups, the hand grip strength of boys was significantly higher than girls for dominant hand (31.75 +/- 10.33 vs 28.24 +/- 9.35; P < .001) and nondominant hand (31,01 +/- 10.27 vs 27.27 +/- 9.30; P < .001). The girls performed slightly faster than boys for dominant hand (19.70 vs 20.68; P < .05) and nondominant hand (21.79 vs 23.46; P < .05). In general, girls completed a 9-HPT faster than boys in the 2 of 7 age groups: 11 years (9-HPT scores = 2.10 seconds; P < .01) and 12 years (9-HPT scores = 1.93 seconds; P < .01). Discussion: The overall patterns of hand grip strength and dexterity function observed in the present study are similar to the previous studies that established acceleration of grip strength with advanced age, and faster performance scores in older children than younger children in both genders. Conclusions: Norms of hand grip strength and dexterity enable therapists to identify some developmental characteristics of hand function among Saudi children, determine the presence of impairment, and compare scores from children in different clinical settings.

1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf