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  • 1.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, USA.
    Cheah, Charissa S. L.
    Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, USA.
    Turkish mothers’ parenting beliefs in response to preschoolers’ aggressive and socially withdrawn behaviors2015In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 687-702Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aimed to examine Turkish mothers’ reactive parenting beliefs (reactive emotional appraisals, causal attributions, anticipated strategies, and underlying goals for their anticipated strategies) in response to children’s aggressive and socially withdrawn behaviors. Participants included 84 mothers with preschool-aged children residing in Ankara, Turkey. Supporting our expectations, the results showed that the degree of mothers’ negative emotional responses varied based on the child maladaptive behaviors. Moreover, mothers perceived aggressive behaviors as more temporary and contextually dependent, but intentional than withdrawn behaviors. More directive strategies and parent-centered goals were reported for aggression, whereas more indirect strategies and emphatic goals were reported for social withdrawal. Overall, the present study provided evidence that Turkish mothers’ perceptions and evaluations of maladaptive behaviors may have universal characteristics as well as aspects that are particular to the Turkish socio-cultural context.

  • 2. Clefberg Liberman, Lisa
    et al.
    Larsson, Karolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Paz Altuzarra, Maria
    Öst, Lars-Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Ollendick, Thomas
    Self-reported Life Satisfaction and Response Style Differences Among Children in Chile and Sweden2015In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 66-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the current study was to assess self-perceived life satisfaction in Chilean and Swedish children. The total sample consisted of a non-clinical sample of 1,352 school children between 8 and 14 years of age. Analyses were carried out to compare the children's subjective quality of life and life satisfaction. In addition, possible response style differences across the two countries were explored. Based on our findings, no difference was found between the two countries for the total life satisfaction score, and the only area on which the Swedish children had a significantly higher rating than the Chilean children was on their satisfaction with their friends. However, the Chilean children reported a higher satisfaction with their siblings, school and health than the Swedish children. Moreover, an interaction effect was found between country and age group on the school variable, with the three age groups in the Swedish sample being significantly different, whereas no significant difference was found between the age groups on this variable among the Chilean children. Overall, the satisfaction with the children's different life areas decreased, as they grew older, whereas gender differences were only found on three variables. Small significant response style differences were found between the Chilean and Swedish children. As the effect sizes of these differences were quite small, they should be viewed with caution, and are not likely to explain the few differences found between the children. How I Feel about Things seems fully adequate for use across normal non-clinical boys and girls belonging to different age groups and living in different countries in order to assess their self-reported life satisfaction.

  • 3.
    Evans, Brittany
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health (from 2013). Radboud UniversityNijmegenThe Netherlands, VU University AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherland.
    Buil, J. M.
    VU University AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands; Erasmus University RotterdamRotterdamThe Netherlands.
    Burk, W. J.
    Radboud UniversityNijmegenThe Netherlands.
    Cillessen, A. H. N.
    Radboud UniversityNijmegenThe Netherlands.
    van Lier, P. A. C.
    VU University AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands ; Erasmus University RotterdamRotterdamThe Netherlands.
    Urbanicity is Associated with Behavioral and Emotional Problems in Elementary School-Aged Children2018In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 2193-2205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: Adults are 38% more likely to suffer from a psychiatric disorder when they live in an urban compared to a rural area. Urban upbringing may be particularly important. The aim of the present study was to examine whether urbanicity was independently associated with mental health in elementary school-aged children. Specifically, we investigated whether living in a more urban area was associated with exhibiting more behavioral and emotional problems, and whether this remained while controlling for other major risk factors for mental health problems in children. Data came from a Dutch general population study of children (n = 895). Information from four waves was used, in which children were aged approximately 8, 9, 11, and 12 years old. We used mixed effects models to assess the association between urbanicity and the outcomes of behavioral problems and emotional problems separately, while controlling for other major risk factors. The analyses showed that children who lived in more urban areas were significantly more likely to exhibit behavioral (p < .001) and emotional (p < .001) problems. This effect remained when controlling for neighborhood socioeconomic status, gender, ethnicity, family socioeconomic status, parental symptoms of psychopathology, parenting stress, and parenting practices (behavioral: p = .02, emotional: p = .009). In line with research in adults, urbanicity seems to be independently associated with behavioral and emotional problems in children. A possible underlying mechanism is that the city is a stressful environment for children to grow up in, which contributes to an increased risk for mental health problems.

  • 4.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Cotter, Allison
    Department of Psychology, Auburn University, Auburn AL, USA.
    Buchanan, Christy M.
    Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC, USA.
    Adolescents' Behaviors as Moderators for the Link between Parental Self-Efficacy and Parenting Practices2017In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 989-997Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on theory that parents with higher levels of self-efficacy (PSE) should find it easier to parent effectively in the face of challenging child behaviors than should parents with lower levels of PSE, this study examines the link between PSE and parenting using children's behaviors as potential moderators. Participants were 130 parents who had an older adolescent (M (age) = 17.58) in addition to the target adolescent (M (age) = 11.79), and both adolescents' externalizing behaviors were used as moderators for the link between PSE and parenting of the target adolescent. Path analysis in Mplus showed that higher PSE was linked to more promotive parenting but only among parents who had an older adolescent with lower levels of externalizing behaviors. Among parents of adolescents with higher levels of externalizing behaviors, whose promotive parenting was significantly lower than other parents overall, PSE did not predict promotive parenting. The link between PSE and parenting did not differ depending on the target adolescents' behavior. Findings suggest that the link between parents' beliefs and parenting depends on the broader family context. More specifically, how PSE is linked to parenting practices depends at least partly on the experiences that parents bring from parenting an older adolescent to their interactions with a later-born adolescent. From a clinical perspective, parents might need guidance in how to think about their earlier parenting experiences when parenting a younger adolescent.

  • 5.
    Hein, Sascha
    et al.
    Univ Houston, Houston, TX 77204 USA..
    Tan, Mei
    Univ Houston, Houston, TX 77204 USA..
    Rakhlin, Natalia
    Wayne State Univ, Detroit, MI USA..
    Doyle, Niamh
    SUNY Upstate Med Univ, Syracuse, NY 13210 USA..
    Hart, Lesley
    Univ Houston, Houston, TX 77204 USA..
    Macomber, Donna
    Yale Univ, New Haven, CT 06520 USA..
    Ruchkin, Vladislav V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Yale Univ, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.
    Grigorenko, Elena L.
    Univ Houston, Houston, TX 77204 USA.;Yale Univ, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.;Moscow State Univ Psychol & Educ, Moscow, Russia.;St Petersburg State Univ, St Petersburg, Russia..
    Psychological and Sociocultural Adaptation of Children Adopted from Russia and their Associations with Pre-Adoption Risk Factors and Parenting2017In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 26, no 10, p. 2669-2680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated academic and behavioral outcomes of internationally adopted children and the associations between these outcomes and age at adoption, time spent in the adoptive family, and parenting. At two time points (T1 and T2, similar to 15 months apart), we examined early academic skills (school readiness), and parent-reported behavioral adjustment (internalizing and externalizing behavior) and adaptive functioning of a sample of 75 children (45.9% boys, mean age = 5.17 years) adopted from Russia into US families. We also collected parents' self-assessments of their parenting at T1. Children who were adopted at a younger age showed higher levels of early academic skills. Correlations between age at adoption and other outcomes were overall small and mostly non-significant. However, adoptees' academic and behavioral progress differed notably in several respects. Specifically, adoptees improved in early academic skills over time, whereas, as a group, their adaptive functioning and behavioral adjustment remained stable within the normal range. Early academic skills were not related to behavioral adjustment at each time point and over time. The time spent in the adoptive family was positively related to early academic skills at T2. Whereas outcomes showed little to no relation to parenting as reported by mother and father separately, higher discrepancies between mothers' and fathers' reports of positive parenting were related to higher levels of behavioral symptoms and lower levels of adaptive skills at T2. These differential results may be explained in part by drawing upon the notion of dissociated domains of psychological and sociocultural adaptation and acculturation, outlined in the immigration literature. These results also bring to light the possible importance of between-parent consistency in parenting for adoptees' behavioral outcomes.

  • 6.
    Jungert, Tomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Landry, Renee
    McGill University, Canada.
    Joussemet, Mireille
    University of Montreal, Canada.
    Mageau, Genevieve
    University of Montreal, Canada.
    Gingras, Isabelle
    McGill University, Canada.
    Koestner, Richard
    McGill University, Canada.
    Autonomous and Controlled Motivation for Parenting: Associations with Parent and Child Outcomes2015In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 1932-1942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present investigation examined motivation for parenting and some of its correlates in parents and children. The data came from samples of 151 first-time mothers of infants, 153 mothers of middle school children, and 260 mothers and fathers of high school children. Parents provided self-report data about their motivation in their parenting role as well as reports of role satisfaction, parental competence, child temperament, and parenting styles. Using three samples, factor analyses confirmed the distinction between autonomous and controlled forms of parenting motivation. Autonomous motivation refers to investing in the parenting role because it is interesting and meaningful whereas controlled motivation refers to investment based on external or internal pressures. Results showed that autonomous motivation was associated concurrently with parenting satisfaction and competence as well as with authoritative and autonomy-supportive parenting styles. Child temperament was unrelated to parenting motivation, but mothers reported greater autonomous motivation for girls than boys and for younger children rather than older children. Autonomous parenting motivation was associated with children reporting autonomy supportive parenting and high levels of well-being. A prospective analysis showed that controlled parenting motivation in first time mothers was associated with reductions in parenting satisfaction as infants became toddlers. A similar analysis showed that autonomous parenting motivation was associated with children developing fewer behavior problems whereas controlled motivation was associated with children developing more behavioral problems. The present findings highlight the heuristic value of assessing why parents invest themselves in the parenting role.

  • 7.
    Källquist, A.
    et al.
    Löwenströmska Hospital, Section North, Forensic Psychiatry Care, Upplands Väsby, Sweden.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.
    Experiences of Having a Parent with Serious Mental Illness: An Interpretive Meta-Synthesis of Qualitative Literature2019In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 2056-2068Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Previous research found that burdens are put on relatives to patients with serious mental illness. A majority of the studies have described the situation of being a husband/wife or parent of someone who is mentally ill. However, little is known about the perspective of childhood experiences and the effect on adult life from having a parent with mental illness. Hence, the purpose of this review was to investigate experiences of having a parent with serious mental illness. Methods: We used a qualitative interpretive meta-synthesis. Five relevant databases were chosen: Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed and Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection. We found 4302 studies in our initial search. Fourteen met the inclusion criteria and the quality assessment. Results: The findings are presented in four themes: (1) Growing up in a dysfunctional home environment; (2) The child’s feelings and thoughts; (3) The need of support; and (4) The lingering effects in adult life. Conclusions: We found that experiences of growing up in a dysfunctional home can result in relational issues later in life and that the need for support can persist into adult life. This has implications for clinical practice when encountering these patients. 

  • 8. Livheim, Fredrik
    et al.
    Hayes, Louise
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Magnusdottir, Thora
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Högfeldt, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Rowse, Julie
    Turner, Simone
    Hayes, Steven C.
    Tengstrom, Anders
    The Effectiveness of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Adolescent Mental Health: Swedish and Australian Pilot Outcomes2015In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 1016-1030Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Depression, anxiety and stress are common problems among adolescents. Teaching young people coping strategies in school-based intervention programs is one promising approach hoped to remedy the negative consequences of distress in adolescence. The aim of the two pilot studies was to examine the effect of a brief intervention based on the principles of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) on depressive symptomatology (Australian study, N = 66) and stress (Swedish study, N = 32) among adolescents screened for psychosocial problems in school settings. In both studies, subjects were assigned to receive the ACT-group-intervention, or a control intervention featuring individual support from the school health care. The Australian study was a planned comparison, with random allocation for girls, plus one replication of a boys group. The Swedish study used a randomized controlled design. The ACT-intervention was an 8-session manualized group program. The Australian study showed significant reductions in depressive symptoms with a large effect, and significant reductions in psychological inflexibility with a medium effect when compared to the control group who received standard care. In the Swedish study, the ACT-intervention group, when compared to the control group, reported significantly lower levels of stress with a large effect size, and marginally significant decrease of anxiety, and marginally significant increased mindfulness skills. Taken together, the ACT-intervention seems to be a promising intervention for reducing stress and depressive symptoms among young adolescents in school and should be tested in full-sized studies. Limitations of these two pilots include small samples.

  • 9.
    Maria, Cederblad
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Engsheden, Natalie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Gaderi, Ata
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Enebrink, Pia
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Engvall, Gunn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Nevéus, Tryggve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    No difference in relationship satisfaction between parents of children with enuresis and normative data2016In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 1345-1351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate relationship satisfaction in parents of children with nocturnal enuresis and put it in context by comparisons with normative data. The secondary aim was to investigate the potential differences in feelings of incompetence in the parenting role and parental conflict among parents of children with enuresis of varying severity. Parents (n = 52) of 41 children with enuresis aged between 6 and 12 years participated. The questionnaire consisted of five components: demographic background, The Dyadic Adjustment Scale, The Swedish Parent Stress Questionnaire, The Parent Problem Checklist, and The Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale. Normative data was used to provide an age- and gender-stratified sample, with adequate distribution and representation of both sexes and all ages. This sample consisted 1411 parents of 1411 children aged 6-9 years. Parents of children with enuresis reported similar relationship quality as a representative sample of parents with children of the same age. The parents' report of feeling of incompetence and parental conflict were similar among children with enuresis of varying frequency. Mothers reported more problematic areas related to child rearing than fathers. This study shows that to have a child with enuresis doesn't necessarily affect the parents' feeling of competence or the quality of the intra-parental relationship.

  • 10.
    Nishikawa, Saori
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Hägglöf, Bruno
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Sundbom, Elisabet
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Contributions of attachment to self-concept and internalizing and externalizing problems among Japanese adolescents2010In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 334-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined the associations and likely pathways underlying the relationships between peer attachment style, self-concept, and Internalizing/Externalizing Problems among high school students in Japan. A total of 228 senior high school students (186 boys and 82 girls; mean age = 16.4) completed the Attachment Questionnaire for Children, Self-Description Questionnaire II-Short, and Youth Self-Report. The main results were that securely attached adolescents reported fewer mental health problems and more positive self-concept than those who reported insecure attachment. Some patterns of associations among variables appeared to be different across gender. The Structural Equation Modeling provided a support for the mediating role of self-concept in influencing the relationships between Attachment and Internalizing Problems, but not Externalizing Problems. The paths for the model were significant across gender. The results promote understanding of psychological processes that influence the relationships between attachment and psychological well-being among high school adolescents in Japan.

  • 11.
    Nishikawa, Saori
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Sundbom, Elisabet
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Hägglöf, Bruno
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Influence of parental rearing on adolescent self-concept and mental health in Japan2010In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 57-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined the associations between perceived parental rearing, attachment style, self-concept, and mental health problems among Japanese adolescents. About 193 high school students (143 boys and 50 girls, mean = 16.4) completed a set of self-report questionnaires including EMBU-C (My Memories of Child Upbringing for Children), AQC (Attachment Questionnaire for Children), SDQII-S (Self-Description Questionnaire II-Short) and YSR (Youth Self-Report). There seems to be a unique influence on mental health problems from parent–adolescent relations depending on the gender of parents and adolescents. PLS (Partial Latent Squares Regression) analysis showed that insecure attachments (Avoidant and Ambivalent) and Rejection from parents were predictors of Internalizing and Externalizing Problems among boys, while all dysfunctional parenting (Rejection, Overprotection and Anxious Rearing) were determinants of these problems among girls. Non academic self-concept (social, emotional, and physical) was a predictor of Internalizing and Externalizing Problems. Power of the prediction of these problems was greater for girls than boys.

  • 12.
    Rahmqvist, Johanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Wells, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Conscious Parenting: A Qualitative Study on Swedish Parents’ Motives to Participate in a Parenting Program2014In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 934-944Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Triple P is a parenting program that aims to prevent behavioral, emotional, and developmental problems in children. Because Triple P is a new parenting program in Sweden, it is important to see how parents felt about the intervention. The aim of this study was to find out why parents of preschool children chose to participate in Triple P in Sweden, what they thought of the Triple P curriculum, and how the program related to their parenting philosophy in general. This is a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews with seven mothers and three fathers who participated in Triple P. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and were analysed using Malterud's method of Systematic Text Condensation. Parents chose to participate in Triple P for several reasons: they wanted to learn more about the intervention; they had specific problems that they sought help for; or they felt encouraged to participate due to advertisements and recommendations from friends. Of the Triple P curriculum, the participants especially enjoyed the "directed discussion" technique, the positive reinforcement sections, and the instructions on how to communicate effectively with their child by staying calm, close, and maintaining eye contact. It was important for many of the parents to feel validated and respected, and they liked having discussions with the preschool teacher rather than being told what to do. Parents in this Swedish sample generally liked and selectively used the strategies they learned from participating in Triple P, depending on how well these fit with their own parenting experiences and philosophy.

  • 13.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Dahlén, Jeanette
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Stockholms läns landsting.
    Nurses' Establishment of Health Promoting Relationships: A Descriptive Synthesis of Anorexia Nervosa Research.2017In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Qualitative values that address personal and interpersonal dimensions are often overlooked in research that examines mental well-being among young patients with anorexia nervosa. The aim of this review was to identify and describe factors that promote and impede the relationships between nurses and the children, adolescents and young adults who are diagnosed with anorexia nervosa and also to explore and describe how those relationships benefit the patients' processes toward increased health and well-being. A descriptive literature synthesis was conducted following the four steps as described by Evans. The three databases CINAHL, PsycINFO and PubMed were used to search for qualitative articles. Fourteen articles met the criteria for inclusion and were analysed. Key findings were identified, and categories and themes were formulated and compared across the studies. Four themes are presented in the results: (1) The essentials in a relationship; (2) The person at the centre; (3) The nurses' attitudes; and (4) Knowledge. In addition to the contribution to the knowledge of how anorexia is manifested, our findings demonstrate the necessity for nurses to be person-centred in their relationships with patients and to have attitudes characterised by presence, genuine commitment and motivation. Nurses are more likely to convey a sense of trust and safety when they communicate with openness and honesty. Our review suggests that the motivation for patients to adhere to treatment is likely to increase when nurses approach patients with these characteristics and attitudes. We argue that the findings are relevant for nurses in their everyday practices.

  • 14.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Dahlén, Jeanette
    Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Outpatient Clinic, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden; Ersta Sköndal University College, Institution for Caring Science, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nurses' establishment of health promoting relationships: a descriptive synthesis of anorexia nervosa research2017In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 26, no 1Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Qualitative values that address personal and interpersonal dimensions are often overlooked in research that examines mental well-being among young patients with anorexia nervosa. The aim of this study was to identify and describe factors that promote and impede the relationships between nurses and the children, adolescents and young adults who are diagnosed with anorexia nervosa and also to explore and describe how those relationships benefit the patients' processes toward increased health and well-being. A descriptive literature synthesis was conducted following the four steps as described by Evans. The three databases Cinahl, PsycINFO and PubMed were used to search for qualitative articles. Fourteen articles met the criteria for inclusion and were analyzed. Key findings were identified, and categories and themes were formulated and compared across the studies. Four themes are presented in the results: 1) The essentials in a relationship; 2) The person at the centre, 3) The nurses' attitudes; and 4) Knowledge. In addition to the contribution to the knowledge of how anorexia is manifested, our findings demonstrate the necessity for nurses to be person-centred in their relationships with patients and to have attitudes characterised by presence, genuine commitment and motivation. Nurses are more likely to convey a sense of trust and safety when they communicate with openness and honesty. Our study suggests that the motivation for patients to adhere to treatment is likely to increase when nurses approach patients with these characteristics and attitudes. We argue that the findings are relevant for nurses in their everyday practices.

  • 15.
    Seo, You Jung
    et al.
    University of Maryland, Baltimore MD, United States.
    Cheah, Charissa S. L.
    University of Maryland, Baltimore MD, United States.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hart, Craig H.
    Brigham Young University, Provo UT, United States.
    Leung, Christy Y. Y.
    University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago IL, United States.
    Sun, Shuyan
    University of Maryland, Baltimore MD, United States.
    The Mediating Role of Korean Immigrant Mothers' Psychological Well-Being in the Associations between Social Support and Authoritarian Parenting Style2018In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 979-989Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined the mediating role of Korean immigrant mothers' psychological well-being in the associations between mothers' emotional vs. instrumental support received from their kin, and their authoritarian parenting style with their preschoolers using longitudinal data. First-generation Korean immigrant mothers with preschool-aged children (N = 158; M (maternal age) = 36.11 years, SD = 3.90; M (child age) = 4.43 years, SD = 1.10) residing in Maryland, U.S., participated in three assessment waves. Each assessment wave was 6 months apart. Mothers reported on the amount of perceived emotional and instrumental support they received from their kin, their behavioral acculturation towards the American culture, and their family demographic information at Wave 1, their psychological well-being at Wave 2, and their authoritarian parenting style at Wave 3. The results revealed that higher levels of perceived instrumental support (but not emotional support) received from kin predicted higher levels of maternal psychological well-being 6 months later, which in turn predicted lower levels of reported authoritarian parenting style 6 months later. Our findings highlighted the importance of psychological well-being as a mechanism that explains how instrumental support can impact Korean immigrant mothers' parenting style, and the importance of distinguishing between types of support. Services providing instrumental support (e.g., childcare assistance) for first-generation immigrant mothers, particularly those with smaller or less effective kin networks, appear important to implement.

  • 16. Seo, You Jung
    et al.
    Cheah, Charissa S. L.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hart, Craig
    Leung, Christy
    Sun, Shuyan
    A longitudinal examination of Korean immigrant mothers’ social support, psychological well-being, and authoritarian parenting styleIn: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Thomas, Jan
    et al.
    Kenyon College, Department of Sociology.
    Hildingsson, Ingegerd
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Who’s bathing the baby? The division of domestic labour in Sweden2009In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 139-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden the government has enacted specific policies, such as generous parental leave, to encourage couples to share in both economic and domestic labour. Using data from a national survey of Swedish women I year after childbirth, we assess whether the division of labour varies depending on women parental leave status, education or number of children. We move beyond the most common measures of domestic labour (housework) and include several measures of daily child-care tasks. Our findings indicate that men share fairly equally only if their partner has returned to work full-time. This pattern remained regardless of women level of education and number of children. We suggest that parental leave policies are necessary but not sufficient tools for encouraging gender equity at home.

  • 18.
    Wells, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Do Father-Friendly Policies Promote Father-Friendly Child-Rearing Practices?: A Review of Swedish Parental Leave and Child Health Centers2012In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 25-31Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By reviewing the literature, we looked at how parental leave policies in Sweden have influenced two well-defined areas of early father involvement: participating in parental leave and at visits/activities at the Child Health Centers. Sweden has one of the most comprehensive and egalitarian parental leave policies in the world, permitting parents to take 480 days off of work, receive 80% of their pay for the first 15 months, and divide their leave however they see fit, barring that both parents receive 2 months of parental leave that is exclusive to them. Additionally, fathers are permitted to take the first ten working days off to be at home with his family. Most parents, especially mothers, use parental leave throughout their infant's first year. During the parents' time off from work, nearly all Swedish parents (95-99%) utilize the Child Health Centers between 11 and 13 times during the infant's first year of life. The Child Health Centers help to monitor a child's growth and development, provide parenting support, immunizations, health education, health screenings, and provide referral sources if the child has any special needs. However, fathers only use 22% of all parental leave days. Studies have pointed out that fathers may not use parental leave because of corporate, maternal, and financial attitudes. Despite the Child Health Centers' policy of including both parents, fathers do not utilize the Child Health Centers to the same extent as mothers. Research has shown that fathers may not use Child Health Centers as they are mainly only open during normal working hours, they are dominated by females (staff and mothers), and many conversations during the child's first year are directed towards mothers. Barriers for why father involvement is lower than mothers are discussed.

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