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  • 1.
    Bidan, M.
    et al.
    LEMNA, Université de Nantes, France.
    Rowe, F
    LEMNA, Université de Nantes, France.
    Truex, Duane
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media. Georgia State Univ, CIS Dept, J Mack Robinson Coll Business, Atlanta, GA 30303 USA.
    An empirical study of IS architectures in French SMEs: Integration approaches2012In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 287-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper, based on a cross-sectional empirical study of information system (IS) architectures within 143 small to medium enterprises (SMEs) in France, reports findings on how SMEs architect to achieve IS integration and interoperability. This research provides an empirically derived taxonomy of enterprise architectural variants of the types often described in the literature for large firms. This study finds indications that for SMEs the immediate goal of interoperability prevailed over fuller and more formal system integration. The most common means for approaching enterprise architecture and any form of integration is via the construction of software bridges and interfaces. Partially standardized architectures based on Enterprise Systems (ERP) are the next most common type. Hybrid architectures- mixed Enterprise Applications Integration and ERP- are the third most common. The contribution of this paper lies not in the identification of the three types but resides (1) in the description of their distribution in SMEs; (2) in the absence of other integration/interoperability types in this population; and (3) most importantly in the interpretation of the organizational and historical rationale explaining the emergence of these types in this organizational context. © 2012 Operational Research Society Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Feller, J.
    et al.
    Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems, University College Cork, Ireland.
    Finnegan, P.
    University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Nilsson, Olof
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Open innovation and public administration: Transformational typologies and business model impacts2011In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 358-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extant research demonstrates that e-Government initiatives often fall short of achieving innovative forms of government and governance due to a techno-centric focus that limits such initiatives to minor improvements in service delivery. While it is evident that innovation is central to modernising and transforming governmental organisations, and that the co-creation of services by public authorities and community groups is an essential component of realising the benefits of investment in information and communication technology, there is little research focusing on the nature of innovation in transforming governmental organisations and services. Addressing this gap in the literature, this paper explores how open innovation strategies can transform public administration by examining how a network of municipalities in Sweden transforms value creation and service delivery by collaborating with each other and with external parties to accelerate the creation and exploitation of innovation. Using a case study with embedded units of analysis, four emerging typologies of governmental transformation based on open innovation are identified. The paper illustrates how these open innovation typologies (i) transform the organisation of the municipalities and (ii) help them deliver high quality co-created services to citizens. By examining the strategic and operational aspects that facilitate such activities, the analysis reveals the impact of open innovation on the business models of public authorities. The paper concludes that open innovation practices represent a more radical manifestation of transformational government than previously envisaged; signalling not only fundamental change in the nature of value creation and service delivery by public authorities, but potentially in the nature of their organisation. © 2011 Operational Research Society Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Goldkuhl, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, VITS - Development of Informations Systems and Work Context. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Pragmatism vs interpretivism in qualitative information systems research2012In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 135-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Qualitative research is often associated with interpretivism, but alternatives do exist. Besides critical research and sometimes positivism, qualitative research in information systems can be performed following a paradigm of pragmatism. This paradigm is associated with action, intervention and constructive knowledge. This paper has picked out interpretivism and pragmatism as two possible and important research paradigms for qualitative research in information systems. It clarifies each paradigm in an ideal-typical fashion and then conducts a comparison revealing commonalities and differences. It is stated that a qualitative researcher must either adopt an interpretive stance aiming towards an understanding that is appreciated for being interesting; or a pragmatist stance aiming for constructive knowledge that is appreciated for being useful in action. The possibilities of combining pragmatism and interpretivism in qualitative research in information systems are analysed. A research case (conducted through action research (AR) and design research (DR)) that combines interpretivism and pragmatism is used as an illustration. It is stated in the paper that pragmatism has influenced IS research to a fairly large extent, albeit in a rather implicit way. The paradigmatic foundations are seldom known and explicated. This paper contributes to a further clarification of pragmatism as an explicit research paradigm for qualitative research in information systems. Pragmatism is considered an appropriate paradigm for AR and DR.

  • 4.
    Goldkuhl, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Pragmatism vs interpretivism in qualitative information systems research2012In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 135-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Qualitative research is often associated with interpretivism, but alternatives do exist. Besides critical research and sometimes positivism, qualitative research in information systems can be performed following a paradigm of pragmatism. This paradigm is associated with action, intervention and constructive knowledge. This paper has picked out interpretivism and pragmatism as two possible and important research paradigms for qualitative research in information systems. It clarifies each paradigm in an ideal-typical fashion and then conducts a comparison revealing commonalities and differences. It is stated that a qualitative researcher must either adopt an interpretive stance aiming towards an understanding that is appreciated for being interesting; or a pragmatist stance aiming for constructive knowledge that is appreciated for being useful in action. The possibilities of combining pragmatism and interpretivism in qualitative research in information systems are analysed. A research case (conducted through action research (AR) and design research (DR)) that combines interpretivism and pragmatism is used as an illustration. It is stated in the paper that pragmatism has influenced IS research to a fairly large extent, albeit in a rather implicit way. The paradigmatic foundations are seldom known and explicated. This paper contributes to a further clarification of pragmatism as an explicit research paradigm for qualitative research in information systems. Pragmatism is considered an appropriate paradigm for AR and DR.

  • 5. Holmqvist, Magnus
    et al.
    Pessi, K.
    Agility through scenario development and continuous implementation: A global aftermarket logistics case2006In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 146-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines a business and ISIT initiative at Volvo that involves managing the development and implementation of an agile aftermarket supply chain. The case is based on Volvo's global initiative to create a platform, Web services, and a Web portal for selling spare parts over the Internet. Creating and integrating a new platform is difficult, and establishing new relations in global aftermarket logistics is even more challenging. Agility relates to an organisation's ability to sense and respond rapidly to unpredictable events in order to satisfy changing customer demands. Volvo's effort illustrates agility as achieved by working continuously with scenario development and keeping implementation projects to a comprehendible size in order to nurture learning. The effort involved direct actions to manage both the technology and the relations among supply chain actors. As this case shows, continuous implementation projects can deliver innovation in new relations and through new channels - particularly if projects address agility from the start.

  • 6.
    Holmström, Jonny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Sawyer, Steven
    Syracuse University.
    Requirements engineering blinders: exploring information systems developers’ black-boxing of the emergent character of requirements2011In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 20, p. 34-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we focus empirical and conceptual attention on the social construction of information systems (IS) requirements, and illustrate that IS developers too often choose to ignore, and thus effectively black-box, the complexities of gathering requirements in order to simplify both the difficulties of their work and their relations with customers. The empirical contribution of this paper is evidence drawn from a study of how IS developers pursue requirements engineering and how they conceive its value. The factors we found to be important in this process include: the changing needs of the organization, the ways in which structured IS methods are enacted via experience and social competency, the formation of project groups, and finally engagement in interpersonal conflict and negotiations. Our conceptual contribution is theorization on the nature of developing requirements as a process of social learning.

  • 7.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Longitudinal use of method rationale in method configuration: an exploratory study2013In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 690-710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizations that implement a company-wide method to standardize the way that systems development is carried out still have a need to adapt this method to specific projects. When adapting this method the end results should align with the basic philosophy of the original method. To this end, goal-driven situational method engineering has been proposed. However, there are no longitudinal studies on systems developers’ use of such approaches and their intentions to balance their need of adaptation with the basic philosophy of the original method. This paper explores how goal-driven method configuration has been used by two project teams in six successive systems development projects, with the intention to balance the goals and values of a specific method with the systems developers’ need for method adaptation. We do that through the use of method rationality resonance theory. Through content examples of method configurations, we report on (a) lessons learned from the project teams’ work on balancing the goals of the company-wide method with their needs and (b) theoretical development of the method rationality resonance theory.

  • 8.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Wistrand, Kai
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Combining method engineering with activity theory: theoretical grounding of the method component concept2006In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 82-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complex and demanding business of developing information systems often involves the use of different systems development methods such as the Rational Unified Process or the Microsoft Solution Framework. Through these methods the development organisation can be viewed as a collective of actors following different rules in the form of prescribed actions in order to guide a work process in accord with activity theory. Very often standardised systems development methods need tailoring for unique projects and strategies for this process have been labelled method engineering. Method configuration, a sub-discipline to method engineering, is applicable in situations where a single base method is used as a starting point for the engineering process. A meta-method (method for method configuration) has been developed addressing these issues. A fundamental part of this meta-method is the method component construct as a means to facilitate efficient and rationally motivated modularisation of systems development methods. This paper is an exploration of possible benefits of combining activity theory and method engineering as theoretical grounding of the method component concept.

  • 9.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Exploring agile values in method configuration2009In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 300-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Method for Method Configuration (MMC) has been proposed as a method engineering approach to tailoring information systems development methods. This meta-method has been used on a variety of methods, but none of these studies have focused on the ability to manage method tailoring with the intention to promote specific values and goals, such as agile ones. This paper explores how MMC has been used during three software development projects to manage method tailoring with the intention to promote agile goals and values. Through content examples of method configurations we have shown that it is possible to use MMC and its conceptual framework on eXtreme Programming and we report on lessons learned with regard to maintaining coherency with the overall goals of the original method.

  • 10.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala universitet.
    Exploring agile values in method configuration2009In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 300-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Method for Method Configuration (MMC) has been proposed as a method engineering approach to tailoring information systems development methods. This meta-method has been used on a variety of methods, but none of these studies have focused on the ability to manage method tailoring with the intention to promote specific values and goals, such as agile ones. This paper explores how MMC has been used during three software development projects to manage method tailoring with the intention to promote agile goals and values. Through content examples of method configurations we have shown that it is possible to use MMC and its conceptual framework on eXtreme Programming and we report on lessons learned with regard to maintaining coherency with the overall goals of the original method.

  • 11.
    Kositanurit, B.
    et al.
    Fiscal Policy Office, Information and Communication Technology Center, Ministry of Finance, Thailand.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    Research Institute for Technology Management and Organizational Learning, School of Information Technology Management, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.
    Osei-Bryson, K-M
    Department of Information Systems, Information Systems Research Institute, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, United States.
    An Exploration of Factors that Impact Individual Performance in an ERP Environment: An Analysis Using Multiple Analytical Techniques2006In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 556-568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the factors that can impact individual performance when using enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. Starting from the proposition that organizational performance depends on individuals' task accomplishments, we test a structural model of task-technology fit, ERP user satisfaction, and individual performance in ERP environments. This research utilizes a survey method to examine the perceptions of ERP users. We performed factor and reliability analyses to assess the validity of the survey instrument. Six factors were identified as having an impact on individual performance: System Quality, Documentation, Ease of use, Reliability, Authorization, and Utilization. To explore the relationships among these factors, we conducted regression and multivariate adaptive regression splines analysis, and compared the findings from these two analytical techniques. The study provides evidence that System Quality, Utilization, and Ease of Use are the most important factors bearing on individual performance in ERP environments. Our findings also provide IT managers and researchers with knowledge of how these factors can be manipulated to improve individual performance when using ERP systems.

  • 12.
    Lindgren, Rikard
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Stenmark, Dick
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Ljungberg, Jan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Rethinking competence systems for knowledge-based organizations2003In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 18-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Existing competence systems are based on a rationalistic view of competence. While these competence systems might work in job-based organizations, we argue that in more dynamic settings, such as in knowledge-based organizations, the interest-informed actions that capture the emergent competencies of tomorrow require different types of information technology support. The main objective of this paper is to elaborate on the possibilities and implications of using interest-activated technology as a design rationale for competence systems. This paper is based on an action case study of an implemented interest-activated Intranet recommender system prototype at Volvo Information Technology AB in Gothenburg, Sweden. On the basis of how organizational members used this prototype to find information they were interested in, our research team was able to inquire into how personal interest, embodied in information-seeking activities, could be a means for identifying competence. Building on the relation between personal interest and competence, we discuss competence systems design and spell out explicit implications for managerial practice in knowledge-based organizations.

  • 13.
    Ljungberg, J.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Open source movements as a model for organising2000In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 208-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Open source software such as the operating system Linux has in a few years created much attention as an alternative way to develop and distribute software. Open source is to let anyone have access to the source code, so that they can modify it. Open source can be seen as a movement, where communities of highly skilled programmers collectively develop software, often of a quality that outperforms commercial proprietary software. These movements are based on virtual networking on the Internet and the web. They are loosely coupled communities kept together by strong common values related to hacker culture. Work seems to be totally distributed, delegated and loosely coupled. The highly skilled members contribute to the collective effort of free software development. In this paper the open source phenomenon is investigated from different perspectives. It is claimed that the open source movement is one key to the understanding of future forms of organizations, information work and business.

  • 14.
    Moe, Carl Erik
    et al.
    Department of Information Systems, University of Agder, Kristiansand.
    Newman, Mike
    Department of Accounting and Finance, Manchester Business School.
    Sein, Maung K.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    The public procurement of information systems: dialectics in requirements specification2017In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 143-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When acquiring information systems, public entities face a dilemma. On the one hand, they want to procure the system that best suits their needs, which often requires lengthy dialogues with vendors. At the same time, they are restricted by government regulations that mandate limited dialogue in the interests of transparency and equal opportunities for all vendors. To examine how public entities deal with this, we followed three procurement projects in Norway. We show that this dilemma manifests itself as a dialectic between the thesis of getting the system requirements right and the antithesis of strictly adhering to regulations. Public entities search for a resolution of this dialectic through two syntheses: selecting an appropriate tendering procedure, and learning how to specify requirements through networks of peer public entities. Our findings reveal that the syntheses are possible because the dialectic is actually complimentary, both the thesis and the antithesis are needed to create the joint outcome that satisfies both. The resolution of the dialectic unfolds differently over time. Our study contributes to the relatively neglected stream of IS research on dialectics that explicitly searches for a synthesis while revealing the complementarity of the dialectic. We show how time plays a nuanced role in the resolution of the dialectic situation.

  • 15.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    et al.
    Ryerson Univ, Inst Innovat & Technol Management, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Nørbjerg, Jacob
    Copenhagen Sch Econ & Business Adm, Dept Informat, DK-2000 Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Software Process Improvement with Weak Management Support: An analysis of the Dynamics of Intra-organizational Alliances in IS Change Initiatives2010In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 303-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Software Process Improvement (SPI) projects are large-scale, complex organization-wide change initiatives. They require considerable investments in personnel, time and money and impact just about every aspect of software firms. The group charged with conducting an SPI project has, however, little formal authority to influence or force software professionals to engage in SPI work or to define and implement changes. The SPI literature suggests that successful SPI initiatives depend on strong commitment from top management. But what should the SPI group do if management support is weak? In this paper, we present an analysis of how an SPI group can use alliances to obtain influence and succeed when management support is weak. Our study is based on a 3-year longitudinal field study of SPI change initiatives at Denmark Electronics. Our findings show that a lack of top management support is not necessarily incompatible with success. This research opens an important new area of research on intra-organizational alliances and information system (IS) implementation. It has the potential to offer new theories and practical advice on how IS implementation projects can be more effectively managed.

  • 16.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki
    et al.
    Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada & Faculty of Commerce, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Nielsen, Peter Axel
    Department of Computer Science, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark & Department of Information Systems, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Using organizational influence processes to overcome IS implementation barriers: lessons from a longitudinal case study of SPI implementation2014In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 205-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A fundamental tenet of the information systems (IS) discipline holds that: (a) a lack of formal power and influence over the organization targeted for change, (b) weak support from top management, and (c) organizational memories of prior failures are barriers to implementation success. Our research, informed by organization influence, compellingly illustrates that such conditions do not necessarily doom a project to failure. In this paper, we present an analysis of how an IS implementation team designed and enacted a coordinated strategy of organizational influence to achieve implementation success despite these barriers. Our empirical analysis also found that technology implementation and change is largely an organizational influence process (OIP), and thus technical-rational approaches alone are inadequate for achieving success. Our findings offer managers important insights into how they can design and enact OIPs to effectively manage IS implementation. Further, we show how the theory of organizational influence can enhance understanding of IS implementation dynamics and advance the development of a theory of effective IS change agentry. © 2014 Operational Research Society Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 17.
    Scheepers, R.
    et al.
    Department of Information Systems, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Scheepers, H.
    Caulfield School of Information Technology, Monash University, Victoria, Australia.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    School of Information Technology Management, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.
    Contextual Influences on User Satisfaction with Mobile Computing: Findings from Two Healthcare Organizations2006In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 261-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile information technologies (IT) are transforming individual work practices and organizations. These devices are extending not only the boundaries of the 'office' in space and time, but also the social context within which use occurs. In this paper, we investigate how extra-organizational influences can impact user satisfaction with mobile systems. The findings from our longitudinal study highlight the interrelatedness of different use contexts and their importance in perceptions of user satisfaction. The data indicate that varying social contexts of individual use (individual as employee, as professional, as private user, and as member of society) result in different social influences that affect the individual's perceptions of user satisfaction with the mobile technology. While existing theories explain user satisfaction with IT within the organizational context, our findings suggest that future studies of mobile IT in organizations should accommodate such extra-organizational contextual influences.

  • 18.
    Schlichter, Bjarne Rerup
    et al.
    Department of Business Administration, Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Rose, Jeremy
    Department of Computing Science, Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Trust Dynamics in a Large System Implementation: Six Theoretical Propositions2013In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 455-474Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Sein, Maung
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science. Information Systems, Universitetet i Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Rossi, Matti
    Information and Service Management, Aalto-yliopisto kauppakorkeakoulu, Aalto, Finland.
    Elaborating ADR while drifting away from its essence: a commentary on Mullarkey and Hevner2019In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 21-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In their insightful critique of Action Design Research, Hevner and Mullarkey (this issue) proposed an enhancement of ADR by juxtaposing concepts from a well cited framework of Design Science Research (DSR) developed by Peffers et al. (2007). In this commentary, we argue that while we agree with some of their elaborations, such as unpacking the specific stages of ADR to make them more transparent and accessible and incorporating formalization of learning in every stage, we also disagree with Hevner and Mullarkey on two key areas. The first is depicting multiple different entry points to an ADR project, which goes against the essential spirit of ADR’s single entry point, problem formulation. More importantly, in juxtaposing the Peffers et al. framework of DSR on to ADR, they are combining two approaches that are epistemologically incommensurate. Peffers et al. take a deductive design approach while ADR employs principally an inductive epistemology by giving primacy to the guided emergence of the artifact. In spite of our disagreements, we conclude that both approaches are premised upon pragmatism where researchers are guided more by utility and usefulness rather than an abstract notion of truth. Our disagreements are essential characteristics of a healthy academic discourse.

  • 20. Te'eni, Dv
    et al.
    Rowe, Frantz
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Lee, Jong Seok
    Publishing and getting published in EJIS: marshaling contributions for a diversity of genres2015In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 559-568Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Truex, Duane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Cuellar, Michael
    N Carolina Cent Univ, Sch Business, Durham, NC, USA .
    Takeda, Hirotoshi
    Univ Paris 09, Ctr Rech Management & Org, Ctr Rech Econ, Paris, France .
    Vidgen, Richard
    Univ New S Wales, Sch Informat Syst Technol & Management, Australian Sch Business, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia.
    The scholarly influence of Heinz Klein: ideational and social measures of his impact on IS research and IS scholars2011In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 422-439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heinz Klein was a fine scholar and mentor whose work and life have inspired us to explore the notion of 'scholarly influence' which we cast as 'ideational' and 'social influence'. We adopt a portfolio of measures approach, using the Hirsch family of statistics to assess ideational influence and Social Network Analysis centrality measures for social influence to profile Heinz Klein's contribution to information systems (IS) research. The results show that Heinz was highly influential in both ideational terms (a significant body of citations) and social terms (he is close to the heart of the IS research community). Reflecting on the major research themes and scholarly values espoused by Klein we define a 'Kleinian view of IS research', grounded in Habermas' Theory of Communicative Action, and use that to frame four affirmative propositions to address what we observe to be a distortion and attenuation of the academic discourse on the evaluation of scholarly production. This paper argues that focus should be shifted from the venue of publication of the research to the uptake of the ideas contained in it, thus increasing the openness of the discourse, participation in the discourse, truthfulness, and reduction of the inequities in power distribution within academia. European Journal of Information Systems (2011) 20, 422-439. doi:10.1057/ejis.2011.16; published online 10 May 2011

  • 22.
    van Laere, Joeri
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Aggestam, Lena
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Understanding champion behaviour in a health-care information system development project – how multiple champions and champion behaviours build a coherent whole2016In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 47-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Champions are commonly suggested as a means of promoting the adoption of information systems. Since there are many different definitions of the concepts of champion and champion behaviour in the literature, practitioners and researchers may be confused about how to exactly use these concepts. A qualitative analysis of a single case study in a Swedish health-care organisation enabled us to explain how different champion behaviours relate to each other and how multiple champions interact. Combining our rich case observations with an analysis of champion literature reveals how champion behaviours form a coherent and meaningful whole in which networks of different types of champions at different levels in an organisation utilise their network of relations, their knowledge of the organisation and their insight into strategic decision-making politics to time and orchestrate the framing of innovations and the involvement of the right people. In conclusion, championing is a complex performance of contextually dependent collective social interaction, varying over time, rather than a heroic act of one individual promoting an idea. Future studies need to focus more on how the relations between different champions and their behaviours develop across innovations and over time, in order to develop a richer understanding of championing.

  • 23. Wilson, M.
    et al.
    Howcroft, Debra
    Re-conceptualising failure: Social shaping meets IS research2002In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 236-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to illustrate the interplay of the social studies of technology (SST) approach with IS research to further our conceptualisation of failure. It is intended that this cross-fertilisation of disciplinary backgrounds will produce a critique of traditional conceptions of information technology and help to further our understanding of the IS development, implementation and use process. We begin by providing a commentary on the IS failure literature, highlighting the variety of descriptions and noting the lack of consensus regarding how success/failure is constituted. We then go on to delineate the contribution of the SST approach to enlightening our study of failure, since it has as its core concern an understanding of the dynamics of the society technology relationship. This approach is applied to a case study where the intention is to demonstrate the moving line between success and failure among different groups as well as over different periods of time. The study shows how the success/failure factors can be equally applied to construct an account as and when required, depending upon how legitimacy is ascribed to different 'voices'. The SST themes are then revisited to enable a deconstruction of the stages that were undertaken before failure was finally declared. Finally, conclusions are drawn on the contribution of SST for aiding our understanding of how failures occur within their social and organisational context

  • 24.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Getting Pragmatic2010In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 251-256Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Going through changes2018In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems.
    Stimulating academic discourse: a call for response2019In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 1-5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, VITS - Development of Informations Systems and Work Context.
    Goldkuhl, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, VITS - Development of Informations Systems and Work Context.
    Fitzgerald, Brian
    Bannon, Liam
    Reflecting on action in language, organisations and information systems2006In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 4-8Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Ågerfalk, Pär J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Embracing diversity through mixed methods research2013In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 251-256Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Ågerfalk, Pär J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Insufficient theoretical contribution: a conclusive rationale for rejection?2014In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 593-599Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Ågerfalk, Pär J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Whither design science research?2018In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 127-128Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31. Ågerfalk, Pär J
    et al.
    Eriksson, Owen
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.
    Action-Oriented Conceptual Modelling2004In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 80-92Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 31 of 31
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