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  • 1. Ahlers, R.
    et al.
    Cleaver, F
    Rusca, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Schwartz, K.
    Unleashing Entrepreneurs or Controlling Unruly Providers?: The Formalisation of Small-scale Water Providers in Greater Maputo, Mozambique2013In: Journal of Development Studies, ISSN 0022-0388, E-ISSN 1743-9140, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 470-482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The existing legal and policy framework regulating water service provision in Greater Maputo, Mozambique appears fixated on the official service areas. In doing so it inadequately addresses the geographically varied service provision modalities which characterise the city. We argue that the predominant legal and policy framework does little to support development of improved services in areas unserved by the formal utility. Although ad hoc measures recognising small-scale providers as a temporary alternative to service provision by a formal utility have been implemented, these measures appear designed to increase control over these providers rather than support the service delivery capacity of small-scale providers.

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  • 2.
    Bali Swain, Ranjula
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Floro, Maria
    Assessing the Effect of Microfinance on Vulnerability and Poverty among Low Income Households2012In: Journal of Development Studies, ISSN 0022-0388, E-ISSN 1743-9140, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 605-618Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Bali Swain, Ranjula
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Floro, Maria
    Assessing the Effect of Microfinance on Vulnerability and Poverty among Low Income Households2012In: Journal of Development Studies, ISSN 0022-0388, E-ISSN 1743-9140, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 605-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We empirically investigate whether participation in the Indian Self Help Group (SHG) microfinance programme has helped reduced poverty and household vulnerability using cross-sectional SHG rural household survey data. The potential selection bias is eliminated by propensity score matching to estimate the average treatment on treated effect using nearest neighbour matching and a local linear regression algorithm. We find that vulnerability in SHG members is not significantly higher than in non-SHG members, even though the SHG members have a high incidence of poverty. However, vulnerability declines significantly for those that have been SHG members for more than one year. These results are found to be robust using sensitivity analysis and the Rosenbaum bounds method.

  • 4.
    Bali Swain, Ranjula
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Economics. Stockholm School of Economics.
    Wallentin, Fan Yang
    Uppsala University.
    The impact of microfinance on factors empowering women: Differences in regional and delivery mechanisms in India’s SHG programme2017In: Journal of Development Studies, ISSN 0022-0388, E-ISSN 1743-9140, Vol. 53, no 5, p. 684-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine how the impact on women empowerment varies with respect to the location and type of group linkage of the respondent. Using household survey data from five states in India, we correct for selection bias to estimate a structural equation model. Our results reveal that in the southern states of India empowerment of women takes place through economic factors. For the other states, we find a significant correlation between women empowerment and autonomy in women’s decision-making and network, communication and political participation respectively. We do not however find any differential causal impact of different delivery methods (linkage models).

  • 5.
    Bali Swain, Ranjula
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. MISUM, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden;Department of Economics, Södertörn University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wallentin, Fan Yang
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    The impact of microfinance on factors empowering women: Differences in regional and delivery mechanisms in India's SHG programme2017In: Journal of Development Studies, ISSN 0022-0388, E-ISSN 1743-9140, Vol. 53, no 5, p. 684-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine how the impact on women empowerment varies with respect to the location and type of group linkage of the respondent. Using household survey data from five states in India, we correct for selection bias to estimate a structural equation model. Our results reveal that in the southern states of India empowerment of women takes place through economic factors. For the other states, we find a significant correlation between women empowerment and autonomy in women’s decision-making and network, communication and political participation respectively. We do not however find any differential causal impact of different delivery methods (linkage models).

  • 6. Bezabih, Mintewab
    et al.
    Holden, Stein
    Mannberg, Andrea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    The Role of Land Certification in Reducing Gaps in Productivity between Male- and Female-Owned Farms in Rural Ethiopia2016In: Journal of Development Studies, ISSN 0022-0388, E-ISSN 1743-9140, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 360-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the impact of a low-cost land certification programme on the productivity of female-headed households. The hypotheses tested in the paper emphasise on the interaction between the constraints that female-headed households face in terms of insecure land tenure, lack of productive resources and suboptimal land market participation, on the one hand, and the tenure security benefits of certification on the other. Our findings show that land certification has a positive effect on land market participation and productivity. Our analysis also suggests higher marginal effects of certification on female-headed households' productivity, compared to the male ones.

  • 7.
    de Bont, Chris
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Veldwisch, Gert Jan
    State Engagement with Farmer-led Irrigation Development: Symbolic Irrigation Modernisation and Disturbed Development Trajectories in Tanzania2020In: Journal of Development Studies, ISSN 0022-0388, E-ISSN 1743-9140, Vol. 56, no 12, p. 2154-2168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Farmer-led irrigation development, a process in which farmers initiate the establishment of irrigation, is increasingly recognised as the driving force behind irrigation expansion, agricultural intensification, and commercialisation in sub-Saharan Africa. Governments and development agencies aim to build upon these practices to further stimulate agricultural production and expand the irrigated area. In what seems the recognition of farmers’ ability to take the lead, various African states have developed policies for ‘demand-driven irrigation development’. This article scrutinises the actual practices of such a policy through a case analysis of an intervention in Northern Tanzania. The analysis demonstrates how even demand-driven policies can disturb the development trajectory of farmer-led irrigation development by reinforcing modernisation ideals adhered to by both farmers and government employees. An emphasis on the aesthetics of modernity leads to symbolic modernisation, cementing the dominant role of the state and formal expertise and paralysing farmers’ irrigation development initiatives. This does not necessarily lead to agricultural intensification and commercialisation, which the formal policies seem to aim for and which is central to processes of farmer-led irrigation development.

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  • 8.
    Juselius, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Reshid, Abdulaziz
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Economics and Statistics (NS).
    Tarp, Finn
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark ; United Nations University World Institute of Development Research (UNU-WIDER), Finland.
    The real exchange rate, foreign aid and macroeconomic transmission mechanisms in Tanzania and Ghana2017In: Journal of Development Studies, ISSN 0022-0388, E-ISSN 1743-9140, Vol. 53, no 7, p. 1075-1103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A recent study of 36 sub-Saharan African countries found a positive impact of aid in the majority of these countries. However, for Tanzania and Ghana, two major aid recipients, aid did not seem to have been equally beneficial. This study singles out these two countries for a more detailed empirical investigation. The focus is on the effect of aid when allowing external and nominal factors to play a role in the macroeconomic transmission mechanism. We conclude that when monetary and external factors are properly accounted for, then aid has been pivotal to growth in both real GDP and investment.

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  • 9.
    Kolk, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Government Transfers to Parents and Population Policy in a Global Perspective: An Economic Demographic Perspective2021In: Journal of Development Studies, ISSN 0022-0388, E-ISSN 1743-9140, Vol. 57, no 9, p. 1483-1498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The world is rapidly converging towards lower fertility: in 2020, countries with a total fertility rate of less than 2.25 will encompass more than three-quarters of the world population. This implies that the determinants of childbearing will be increasingly similar in high-income and middle-income regions of the world. In this article, I discuss economic demography in relation to levels of childbearing. How do different societies distribute resources across the life course and between generations, and to what extent is this done through governmental transfers? The extent of such transfers varies considerably between low-income, middle-income, and high-income countries, which I explored through data from the National Transfers Account project. I argue that in low-fertility societies, the extent to which the costs of childrearing are socialised is important for fertility. The extent to which childrearing is socialised will be an important determinant of future fertility levels and, if used as a population policy, offers a straightforward pathway to achieve a desirable population size. As the global fertility decline continues, such policies will be relevant to most societies and a tool for governments to affect fertility levels across many contexts.

  • 10.
    Kratou, Hajer
    et al.
    College of Business Administration, Finance Department, Ajman University, Ajman, United Arab Emirates (UAE).
    Laakso, Liisa
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    The impact of academic freedom on democracy in Africa2021In: Journal of Development Studies, ISSN 0022-0388, E-ISSN 1743-9140Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Muchapondwa, Edwin
    et al.
    Department of Economics, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Nielson, Daniel
    Department of Political Science, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, USA.
    Parks, Bradley
    AidData Center for Development Policy, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, USA.
    Strange, Austin M.
    Zhejiang University, China.
    Tierney, Michael J.
    Government, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, USA.
    ‘Ground-Truthing’ Chinese Development Finance in Africa: Field Evidence from South Africa and Uganda2016In: Journal of Development Studies, ISSN 0022-0388, E-ISSN 1743-9140, Vol. 52, no 6, p. 780-796Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Nilsson, Pia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    The role of land use consolidation in improving crop yields among farm households in Rwanda2019In: Journal of Development Studies, ISSN 0022-0388, E-ISSN 1743-9140, Vol. 55, no 8, p. 1726-1740Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relative to other developing regions, the role of land consolidation in increasing crop yields is poorly understood in sub-Saharan Africa. This paper examines the role of land use consolidation on agricultural productivity among smallholder farmers in Rwanda. Household-level data are used to estimate a fixed-effects model with matched control groups to mitigate selection bias. The study finds a positive association between land use consolidation and crop yields, but only among farm households with landholdings greater than one hectare, which is well above the average farm size in Rwanda. Findings also point to the importance of non-organic fertilisers and irrigation as there appear to be significant benefits associated with further increases in their use among the consolidated farms. 

  • 13.
    Oppenheim, Ben
    et al.
    New York University, Center on International Cooperation, New York, NY, USA.
    Söderström, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government. Univ Bergen, Dept Comparat Polit, Bergen, Norway.
    Citizens by Design?: Explaining Ex-Combatant Satisfaction With Reintegration Programming2018In: Journal of Development Studies, ISSN 0022-0388, E-ISSN 1743-9140, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 133-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After armed conflict, there is often a surge in programmes designed to consolidate the peace. During the transition to peace, the quality of programme management has been argued to shape public perceptions about government and citizenship. What aspects of programme management are most important? What implementation failures have the greatest negative effects? We study these questions in the context of a reintegration programme for former combatants in Colombia. We find evidence that programme implementation has strong impacts on participant satisfaction, regardless of programme outcomes. This suggests that how benefits are delivered matters as much as what is delivered.

  • 14.
    Oskarsson, Sven
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Ottosen, Eric
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Does Oil Still Hinder Democracy?2010In: Journal of Development Studies, ISSN 0022-0388, E-ISSN 1743-9140, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 1067-1083Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to re-examine the support for the 'oil hinders democracy' hypothesis. Following Michael Ross' seminal article 'Does oil hinder democracy?' (2001), the hypothesis has been supported by a number of cross-national empirical tests. We will proceed along two routes, one conceptual and one temporal/contextual. Using time-series cross-section data from 132 countries between 1977-2006 we find that Ross' theory does not stand the test of time, and that a broader conceptual take on the notion of democracy has left the theory more inconclusive than in previous studies. The jury appears to be out concerning the generality of the 'oil hinders democracy' hypothesis.

  • 15.
    Skyrman, Viktor
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    Zylinski, Stefan
    University of Bristol, UK.
    Book Review; The Case for a New Bretton Woods By Kevin P. Gallagher & Richard Kozul-Wright: Cambridge : Polity , 2022, 140 pp. ISBN: 978-1-509-54653-42023In: Journal of Development Studies, ISSN 0022-0388, E-ISSN 1743-9140, Vol. 59, no 11, p. 1780-1781Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Sommer, Jamie M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Restivo, Michael
    Shandra, John M.
    The United States, Bilateral Debt-for-Nature Swaps, and Forest Loss: A Cross-National Analysis2020In: Journal of Development Studies, ISSN 0022-0388, E-ISSN 1743-9140, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 748-764Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We engage with the theoretical and empirical literature on the effectiveness of debt-for-nature swaps in promoting environmental protection. We present cross-national evidence that US bilateral debt-for-nature swaps are associated with less forest loss. Using a two-stage instrumental variable regression model to analyse a sample of 85 low- and middle-income countries from 2001 to 2014, we find that higher amounts of debt reduction and higher amounts of conservation funds generated as a result of such swaps are associated with lower rates of forest loss.

  • 17.
    Sundberg, Molly
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Local Recruits in Development Finance Institutions: Relocating Global North-South Divides in the International Aid Industry2023In: Journal of Development Studies, ISSN 0022-0388, E-ISSN 1743-9140, Vol. 59, no 11, p. 1635-1651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This text explores locally recruited staff within a growing category of organisations in the international aid industry: Development Finance Institutions (DFIs). DFIs are banks that offer risk capital to development projects in the global South, increasingly using tax-funded aid money. Based on interviews with 13 DFI investment managers, I show how Kenyan DFI staff challenge three of the signature attributes commonly assigned to local development professionals: their 'local' expertise does not contrast with or preclude international expertise, but rather overlaps with it; their formal authority and career ladders are not restricted to technical or support positions - many field offices are headed by local employees; and they rarely face job insecurity given their competitive qualifications and permanent employment contracts. Meanwhile, decisions on investments are rarely taken by these field office staff but by their colleagues at headquarters, and unlike the latter, even those local recruits who head their field offices usually lack a secure place in the global organisation of their DFIs. This suggests that structural inequalities between donor and recipient country staff - integral to the development industry - have not disappeared in DFIs but rather relocated: from within the walls of field offices to the relationship between these offices and headquarters.

  • 18.
    Wangel, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Blomkvist, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Rural Forest Management in Sierra Leone: The Role of Economic (In)Equality in Facilitating Collective Action2013In: Journal of Development Studies, ISSN 0022-0388, E-ISSN 1743-9140, Vol. 49, no 11, p. 1564-1578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While significant theoretical developments have been made in the research on common pool resources, heterogeneity remains a contested issue. Focusing on economic inequality, one particular aspect of heterogeneity, we examine its impact in facilitating cooperation in two rural forest communities in Sierra Leone. The findings reinforce prevalent ambiguities in the literature: in the context of economic inequality cooperation was thriving, while in the setting of uniform poverty cooperation was largely absent. Though further research is imperative, the key recommendation is that policies directed towards rural communities should take into account their ability to craft robust self-governing systems.

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