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  • 1.
    Budd, Graham E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Campanamuta mantonae gen. et. sp. nov., an exceptionally preserved arthropod from the Sirius Passet Fauna (Buen Formation, lower Cambrian, North Greenland)2011In: Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, ISSN 1477-2019, E-ISSN 1478-0941, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 217-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Specimens of the paneuarthropod Campanamuta mantonae gen. et sp. nov. are described from the lower Cambrian Sirius Passet Fauna of North Greenland. It is one of the most common taxa in the present collections from the Sirius Passet Fauna, being represented by some 1700 specimens (19%) of an estimated total of perhaps 8500 fossils of the collections studied. Unusually, much internal anatomy of Campanamuta has been preserved. However, interpretation of the preserved structures has been hampered by their variable appearance in different specimens and because of the degree of compression that has occurred. This paper describes the external and internal morphology of Campanamuta, and discusses the problems involved in its reconstruction. A model for the internal architecture of the animal is proposed, which recognizes the preservation of apodemes, musculature and the gut, providing the most complete picture of the internal anatomy of any Cambrian arthropod. This morphology complements that preserved in the Chengjiang and Burgess Shale taxa and adds a new source of data for the reconstruction of basal euarthropod phylogeny.

  • 2.
    Daley, Allison C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Budd, Graham E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Caron, Jean-Bernard
    Morphology and systematics of the anomalocaridid arthropod Hurdia from the Middle Cambrian of British Columbia and Utah2013In: Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, ISSN 1477-2019, E-ISSN 1478-0941, Vol. 11, no 7, p. 743-787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Cambrian fossil Lagerstätten like the Burgess Shale, exceptionally preserved arthropods constitute a large part of the taxonomic diversity, providing opportunities to study the early evolution of this phylum in detail. The anomalocaridids, large presumed pelagic predators, are particularly relevant owing to their unique combination of morphological characters and basal position in the arthropod stem lineage. Although isolated elements and fragmented specimens were first discovered over 100 years ago, subsequent findings of more complete bodies ofAnomalocaris and Peytoia, especially in the 1980s, allowed for a better understanding of these enigmatic forms. Their evolutionary significance as stem group arthropods was further clarified by the recent discovery of a third anomalocaridid taxon, Hurdia. Here, examination of hundreds ofHurdia specimens from different stratigraphical layers within the Burgess Shale and Stephen Formation, combined with statistical analyses, provides a detailed description of the taphonomy, morphology and diversity of the genus and further elucidates anomalocaridid systematics. Hurdiais distinguished from other anomalocaridids in having mouthparts with extra rows of teeth, a large frontal carapace complex and diminutive swimming flaps with prominent setal structures. The two original species, H. victoria Walcott, 1912 and H. triangulata Walcott, 1912, are confirmed based on morphometric outline analyses of the frontal carapace components combined with stratigraphical evidence; a third species, Hurdia dentata Simonetta & Delle Cave, 1975, is synonymized with H. victoria. Morphology, preservation and stratigraphical distribution suggest that H. victoria and H. triangulata share the same type of frontal appendage; a second type of appendage, previously assigned to Hurdia (Morph A), belongs to Peytoia nathorsti. These and other morphological differences between the anomalocaridids may reflect different feeding strategies. Appendages and mouthparts of Hurdia indet. sp. are also identified from the Spence Shale Member of Utah, making Hurdia and Anomalocaris the most common and globally distributed anomalocaridid taxa.

  • 3.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Högström, Anette
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Frisk, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Gastropods and tergomyans from the Upper Ordovician (Viru–Harju) of the Fågelsång area, Scania, southern Sweden2013In: Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, ISSN 1477-2019, E-ISSN 1478-0941, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 295-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A diverse tergomyan and gastropod assemblage is described from the Global Boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP)section of the Sandbian Stage, Upper Ordovician, in the Fågelsång area, Scania, southern Sweden. Deep water graptolitic mudstone and shale comprise the succession, and previously only one gastropod species was known. The new material spans the Sularp Formation through the Lindegård Mudstone (Nemagraptus gracilisDicellograptus complanatus biozones). Fourteen species are described: two tergomyan, five bellerophontoid gastropods, and seven anisostrophically coiled gastropods.Three species are new: Peelerophon hodites, Tetranota scanica and Lophospira sandbiana. Three taxa (Tritonophon subtrilobatus,Tetranota scanica and Holopea mobergi) are found high in the Lindegård Mudstone (Vormsi–Pirgu stages). Cyrtodiscus, Peelerophon and Tritonophon are recorded for the first time in Baltoscandia. Some taxa may have been transportedfrom shallower water settings, whereas species of Peelerophon, Joleaudella, Mestoronema and Sinuites may have been partof the local benthos. Except for Bucania erratica, no species are shared with the fauna of the coeval Dalby Limestone in Sweden. Deaechospira elliptica, common in the Dalby Limestone, is not recorded at Fågelsång, although two closely relatedspecies are found (Deaechospira rotunda and Deaechospira? sp.). The Fågelsång assemblage has more in common with the older to coeval fauna of the Elnes and Arnestad formations in the Oslo Region, Norway (e.g. sharing Joleaudella, Sinuites, Mestoronema and Pararaphistoma). The Sandbian fauna of Fågelsång includes peri-Gondwanan taxa, e.g. Cyrtodiscus,Peelerophon and Deaechospira. Nevertheless, cluster analysis reveals that the faunas of Baltica and Laurentia were most similar, whereas faunas from Perunica and Baltica remained distinct and separated during the Darriwilian–Sandbian. The few similarities may result from spread of a temperate fauna supplementing rather than replacing taxa in deep water assemblages.The main Fåagelsång assemblage coincides both with the Baltoscandian Middle Caradoc Faunal Turnover and the Gutenberg Carbon Isotope Excursion.

  • 4. ENGELBRECHT, Andrea
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, Enheten för paleobiologi.
    REGUERO, Marcelo
    KRIWET, Jürgen
    Revision of Eocene Antarctic carpet sharks (Elasmobranchii, Orectolobiformes) from Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula2016In: Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, ISSN 1477-2019, E-ISSN 1478-0941Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. ENGELBRECHT, Andrea
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    REGUERO, Marcelo
    KRIWET, Jürgen
    Revision of Eocene Antarctic carpet sharks (Elasmobranchii, Orectolobiformes) from Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula2016In: Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, ISSN 1477-2019, E-ISSN 1478-0941Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Schwarzhans, Werner
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    ENGELBRECHT, Andrea
    REGUERO, Marcelo
    KRIWET, Jürgen
    Before the freeze: Otoliths from the Eocene of Seymour Island, Antarctica, reveal dominance of gadiform fishes (Teleostei)2016In: Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, ISSN 1477-2019, E-ISSN 1478-0941Article in journal (Refereed)
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