Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 448
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1. Agapitov, Oleksiy
    et al.
    Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir
    Khotyaintsev, Yuri V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Rolland, Guy
    A statistical study of the propagation characteristics of whistler waves observed by Cluster2011In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 38, L20103- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    VLF waves play a crucial role in the dynamics of radiation belts, and are responsible for the loss and the acceleration of energetic electrons. Modeling wave-particle interactions requires the best possible knowledge for how wave energy and wave-normal directions are distributed in L-shells and for the magnetic latitudes of different magnetic activity conditions. In this work, we performed a statistical study for VLF emissions using a whistler frequency range for nine years (2001-2009) of Cluster measurements. We utilized data from the STAFF-SA experiment, which spans the frequency range from 8.8 Hz to 3.56 kHz. We show that the wave energy distribution has two maxima around L similar to 4.5 = 6 and L similar to 2, and that wave-normals are directed approximately along the magnetic field in the vicinity of the geomagnetic equator. The distribution changes with magnetic latitude, and so that at latitudes of similar to 30 degrees, wave-normals become nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field. The observed angular distribution is significantly different from Gaussian and the width of the distribution increases with latitude. Since the resonance condition for wave-particle interactions depends on the wave normal orientation, our results indicate that, due to the observed change in the wave-normal direction with latitude, the most efficient particle diffusion due to wave-particle interaction should occur in a limited region surrounding the geomagnetic equator.

  • 2.
    Aldahan, Ala
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Hedfors, Jim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Possnert, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, För teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten gemensamma enheter, Tandem Laboratory. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Ion Physics.
    Kulan, Abdulhadi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Berggren, Ann-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Söderström, C.
    FOI, Swedish Defence Research Agency, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Atmospheric impact on beryllium isotopes as solar activity proxy2008In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 35, no L21812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reconstructing solar activity variability beyond the time scale of actual measurements provides invaluable data for modeling of past and future climate change. The 10 Be isotope has been a primary proxy archive of past solar activity and cosmic ray intensity, particularly for the last millennium. There is, however, a lack of direct high-resolution atmospheric time series on 10 Be that enable estimating atmospheric modulation on the production signal. Here we report quasi-weekly data on 10 Be and 7 Be isotopes covering the periods 1983-2000 and 1975-2006 respectively, that show, for the first time, coherent variations reflecting both atmospheric and production effects. Our data indicate intrusion of stratosphere/upper troposphere air masses that can modulate the isotopes production signal, and may induce relative peaks in the natural 10 Be archives (i.e., ice and sediment). The atmospheric impact on the Be-isotopes can disturb the production signals and consequently the estimate of past solar activity magnitude. Citation: Aldahan, A., J. Hedfors, G. Possnert, A. Kulan, A.-M. Berggren, and C. Soderstrom (2008), Atmospheric impact on beryllium isotopes as solar activity proxy, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L21812, doi: 10.1029/2008GL035189.

  • 3.
    Aldahan, Ala
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Persson, S
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, För teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten gemensamma enheter, Tandem Laboratory.
    Possnert, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Ion Physics.
    Hou, Xiaolin
    Distribution of I-127 and I-129 in preciptitation at high European latitudes2009In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 36, L11805- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     We here present the most extensive data set on the distribution of   I-127 and I-129 in precipitation (rain and snow) covering the period   2000-2006 and European latitudes 55 degrees N-68 degrees N. Our results   indicate a wide variation in the concentrations and fluxes of the two   isotopes associated with generally higher values at near coastal sites   compared to the inland ones. Total wet-related annual deposition of   I-127 and I-129 on Sweden and Denmark is estimated at about 1.2 x 10(9)   g and 60 g respectively. The average annual I-129 wet deposition   accounts for <1% and <0.05% of the total annual gaseous and liquid,   respectively, discharges from the Sellafiled and La Hague Facilities.   The I-127 annual wet deposition represents < 1% of the estimated global   oceanic iodine flux. Air mass trajectories suggest that events of   enhanced I-129 in precipitation are closely related to southwesterly weather fronts from regions of elevated concentrations.

  • 4. Alfimov, V
    et al.
    Aldahan, A
    Possnert, G
    Tracing water masses with I-129 in the western Nordic Seas in early spring 20022004In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 31, no 19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The distribution of I-129 was utilized for labeling water masses in three sections of the western Nordic Seas. An increase of the tracer in Polar Waters of the East Greenland Current was observed between the Fram Strait and 72degreesN section and attributed to either unaccounted Polar Waters and/or recirculation of cold and fresh Atlantic Waters from the West Spitzbergen Current. Recent convection homogenized I-129 in upper 1000 m of the Greenland Sea, and similar concentrations were observed in dense waters of the Denmark Strait. The densest outflow waters were not found in either the Greenland Sea or the East Greenland Current at 72degreesN.

  • 5. Anderson, L. G.
    et al.
    Jutterstrom, S.
    Hjalmarsson, S.
    Wahlstrom, I.
    Semiletov, I. P.
    Out-gassing of CO2 from Siberian Shelf seas by terrestrial organic matter decomposition2009In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Siberian shelf seas cover large shallow areas that receive substantial amounts of river discharge. The river runoff contributes nutrients that promote marine primary production, but also dissolved and particulate organic matter. The coastal regions are built up of organic matter in permafrost that thaws and result in coastal erosion and addition of organic matter to the sea. Hence there are multiple sources of organic matter that through microbial decomposition result in high partial pressures of CO2 in the shelf seas. By evaluating data collected from the Laptev and East Siberian Seas in the summer of 2008 we compute an excess of DIC equal to 10.10(12) g C that is expected to be outgassed to the atmosphere and suggest that this excess mainly is caused by terrestrial organic matter decomposition. Citation: Anderson, L. G., S. Jutterstrom, S. Hjalmarsson, I. Wahlstrom, and I. P. Semiletov (2009), Out-gassing of CO2 from Siberian Shelf seas by terrestrial organic matter decomposition, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L20601, doi:10.1029/2009GL040046.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Andreas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering. Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    Falck, E.
    Univ Ctr Svalbard, Dept Arctic Geophys, Longyearbyen, Norway.
    Sjöblom, A.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Earth Sci, Uppsala; Univ Ctr Svalbard, Longyearbyen, Norway.
    Kljun, N.
    Swansea Univ, Swansea, Wales.
    Sahlee, E.
    Uppsala Univ, Uppsala.
    Omar, A. M.
    Bjerknes Ctr Climate Res, Bergen, Norway.
    Rutgersson, A.
    Uppsala Univ, Uppsala.
    Air-sea gas transfer in high Arctic fjords2017In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 44, no 5, 2519-2526 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Arctic fjords and high-latitude seas, strong surface cooling dominates during a large part of the year, generating water-side convection (w(*w)) and enhanced turbulence in the water. These regions are key areas for the global carbon cycle; thus, a correct description of their air-sea gas exchange is crucial. CO2 data were measured via the eddy covariance technique in marine Arctic conditions and reveal that water-side convection has a major impact on the gas transfer velocity. This is observed even at wind speeds as high as 9ms(-1), where convective motions are generally thought to be suppressed by wind-driven turbulence. The enhanced air-sea transfer of CO2 caused by water-side convection nearly doubled the CO2 uptake; after scaled to open-sea conditions the contribution from w(*w) to the CO2 flux remained as high as 34%. This phenomenon is expected to be highly important for the total carbon uptake in marine Arctic areas.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Andreas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering, Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Falck, Eva
    Sjöblom, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Department of Arctic Geophysics, University Centre in Svalbard, Longyearbyen, Norway.
    Kljun, Natascha
    Sahlée, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Omar, Abdirahaman
    Rutgersson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Air-sea gas transfer in high Arctic fjords2017In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 44, no 5, 2519-2526 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Arctic fjords and high-latitude seas, strong surface cooling dominates during a large part of the year, generating water-side convection (w*w) and enhanced turbulence in the water. These regions are key areas for the global carbon cycle; thus, a correct description of their air-sea gas exchange is crucial. CO2-data were measured via the eddy covariance technique in marine Arctic conditions and reveal that water-side convection has a major impact on the gas transfer velocity. This is observed even at wind speeds as high as 9 m s-1, where convective motions are generally thought to be suppressed by wind-driven turbulence. The enhanced air-sea transfer of CO2 caused by water-side convection nearly doubled the CO2uptake, after scaled to open sea conditions the contribution from  to the CO2 flux remained as high as 34%; this phenomenon is expected to be highly important for the total carbon uptake in marine Arctic areas.

  • 8. Andre, M.
    et al.
    Li, W.
    Toledo-Redondo, S.
    Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.
    Vaivads, A.
    Graham, D. B.
    Norgren, C.
    Burch, J.
    Lindqvist, Per-Arne
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Space and Plasma Physics.
    Marklund, Göran
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Space and Plasma Physics.
    Ergun, R.
    Torbert, R.
    Magnes, W.
    Russell, C. T.
    Giles, B.
    Moore, T. E.
    Chandler, M. O.
    Pollock, C.
    Young, D. T.
    Avanov, L. A.
    Dorelli, J. C.
    Gershman, D. J.
    Paterson, W. R.
    Lavraud, B.
    Saito, Y.
    Magnetic reconnection and modification of the Hall physics due to cold ions at the magnetopause2016In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 43, no 13, 6705-6712 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Observations by the four Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft are used to investigate the Hall physics of a magnetopause magnetic reconnection separatrix layer. Inside this layer of currents and strong normal electric fields, cold (eV) ions of ionospheric origin can remain frozen-in together with the electrons. The cold ions reduce the Hall current. Using a generalized Ohm's law, the electric field is balanced by the sum of the terms corresponding to the Hall current, the vxB drifting cold ions, and the divergence of the electron pressure tensor. A mixture of hot and cold ions is common at the subsolar magnetopause. A mixture of length scales caused by a mixture of ion temperatures has significant effects on the Hall physics of magnetic reconnection.

  • 9.
    Andrews, David J.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Andersson, L.
    Lab Atmospher & Space Phys, Boulder, CO USA..
    Delory, G. T.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Space Sci Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Ergun, R. E.
    Lab Atmospher & Space Phys, Boulder, CO USA..
    Eriksson, Anders I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Fowler, C. M.
    Lab Atmospher & Space Phys, Boulder, CO USA..
    McEnulty, T.
    Lab Atmospher & Space Phys, Boulder, CO USA..
    Morooka, M. W.
    Lab Atmospher & Space Phys, Boulder, CO USA..
    Weber, T.
    Lab Atmospher & Space Phys, Boulder, CO USA..
    Jakosky, B. M.
    Lab Atmospher & Space Phys, Boulder, CO USA..
    Ionospheric plasma density variations observed at Mars by MAVEN/LPW2015In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 42, no 21, 8862-8869 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on initial observations made by the Langmuir Probe and Waves relaxation sounding experiment on board the NASA Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission. These measurements yield the ionospheric thermal plasma density, and we use these data here for an initial survey of its variability. Studying orbit-to-orbit variations, we show that the relative variability of the ionospheric plasma density is lowest at low altitudes near the photochemical peak, steadily increases toward higher altitudes and sharply increases as the spacecraft crosses the terminator and moves into the nightside. Finally, despite the small volume of data currently available, we show that a clear signature of the influence of crustal magnetic fields on the thermal plasma density fluctuations is visible. Such results are consistent with previously reported remote measurements made at higher altitudes, but crucially, here we sample a new span of altitudes between similar to 130 and similar to 300 km using in situ techniques.

  • 10.
    Andriopoulou, M.
    et al.
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, A-8010 Graz, Austria..
    Nakamura, R.
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, A-8010 Graz, Austria..
    Torkar, K.
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, A-8010 Graz, Austria..
    Baumjohann, W.
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, A-8010 Graz, Austria..
    Torbert, R. B.
    Univ New Hampshire, Inst Study Earth Oceans & Space, Durham, NH 03824 USA..
    Lindqvist, P. -A
    Khotyaintsev, Yuri V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Dorelli, J.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Burch, J. L.
    SW Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Russell, C. T.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Earth Planetary & Space Sci, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Study of the spacecraft potential under active control and plasma density estimates during the MMS commissioning phase2016In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 43, no 10, 4858-4864 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Each spacecraft of the recently launched magnetospheric multiscale MMS mission is equipped with Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) instruments, which control the spacecraft potential in order to reduce spacecraft charging effects. ASPOC typically reduces the spacecraft potential to a few volts. On several occasions during the commissioning phase of the mission, the ASPOC instruments were operating only on one spacecraft at a time. Taking advantage of such intervals, we derive photoelectron curves and also perform reconstructions of the uncontrolled spacecraft potential for the spacecraft with active control and estimate the electron plasma density during those periods. We also establish the criteria under which our methods can be applied.

  • 11. Andriopoulou, M.
    et al.
    Nakamura, R.
    Torkar, K.
    Baumjohann, W.
    Torbert, R. B.
    Lindqvist, Per-Arne
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Space and Plasma Physics.
    Khotyaintsev, Y. V.
    Dorelli, J.
    Burch, J. L.
    Russell, C. T.
    Study of the spacecraft potential under active control and plasma density estimates during the MMS commissioning phase2016In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 43, no 10, 4858-4864 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Each spacecraft of the recently launched magnetospheric multiscale MMS mission is equipped with Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) instruments, which control the spacecraft potential in order to reduce spacecraft charging effects. ASPOC typically reduces the spacecraft potential to a few volts. On several occasions during the commissioning phase of the mission, the ASPOC instruments were operating only on one spacecraft at a time. Taking advantage of such intervals, we derive photoelectron curves and also perform reconstructions of the uncontrolled spacecraft potential for the spacecraft with active control and estimate the electron plasma density during those periods. We also establish the criteria under which our methods can be applied.

  • 12.
    André, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Cully, Christopher M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Low-energy ions: A previously hidden solar system particle population2012In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 39, L03101- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ions with energies less than tens of eV originate from the Terrestrial ionosphere and from several planets and moons in the solar system. The low energy indicates the origin of the plasma but also severely complicates detection of the positive ions onboard sunlit spacecraft at higher altitudes, which often become positively charged to several tens of Volts. We discuss some methods to observe low-energy ions, including a recently developed technique based on the detection of the wake behind a charged spacecraft in a supersonic flow. Recent results from this technique show that low-energy ions typically dominate the density in large regions of the Terrestrial magnetosphere on the nightside and in the polar regions. These ions also often dominate in the dayside magnetosphere, and can change the dynamics of processes like magnetic reconnection. The loss of this low-energy plasma to the solar wind is one of the primary pathways for atmospheric escape from planets in our solar system. We combine several observations to estimate how common low-energy ions are in the Terrestrial magnetosphere and briefly compare with Mars, Venus and Titan.

  • 13.
    André, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Li, Wenya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Toledo-Redondo, S.
    European Space Agcy ESAC, Madrid, Spain..
    Khotyaintsev, Yuri V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vaivads, Andris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Graham, Daniel B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Norgren, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Burch, J.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Lindqvist, P. -A
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Marklund, G.
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ergun, R.
    Univ Colorado, LASP, Boulder, CO 80309 USA..
    Torbert, R.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA.;Univ New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 USA..
    Magnes, W.
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, Graz, Austria..
    Russell, C. T.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Earth & Space Sci, Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA..
    Giles, B.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Moore, T. E.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Chandler, M. O.
    NASA, Marshall Space Flight Ctr, Huntsville, AL USA..
    Pollock, C.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Young, D. T.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Avanov, L. A.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Dorelli, J. C.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Gershman, D. J.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.;Univ Maryland, Dept Astron, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Paterson, W. R.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Lavraud, B.
    Univ Toulouse, Inst Rech Astrophys & Planetol, Toulouse, France.;CNRS, UMR 5277, Toulouse, France..
    Saito, Y.
    Inst Space & Astronaut Sci, JAXA, Chofu, Tokyo, Japan..
    Magnetic reconnection and modification of the Hall physics due to cold ions at the magnetopause2016In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 43, no 13, 6705-6712 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Observations by the four Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft are used to investigate the Hall physics of a magnetopause magnetic reconnection separatrix layer. Inside this layer of currents and strong normal electric fields, cold (eV) ions of ionospheric origin can remain frozen-in together with the electrons. The cold ions reduce the Hall current. Using a generalized Ohm's law, the electric field is balanced by the sum of the terms corresponding to the Hall current, the vxB drifting cold ions, and the divergence of the electron pressure tensor. A mixture of hot and cold ions is common at the subsolar magnetopause. A mixture of length scales caused by a mixture of ion temperatures has significant effects on the Hall physics of magnetic reconnection.

  • 14.
    André, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vaivads, Andris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Khotyaintsev, Yu V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Laitinen, Tiera V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Nilsson, H.
    Stenberg, G.
    Fazakerley, A.
    Trotignon, J. G.
    Magnetic reconnection and cold plasma at the magnetopause2010In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 37, no 22, L22108- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on detailed observations by the four Cluster spacecraft of magnetic reconnection and a Flux Transfer Event (FTE) at the magnetopause. We detect cold (eV) plasma at the magnetopause with two independent methods. We show that the cold ions can be essential for the electric field normal to the current sheet in the separatrix region at the edge of the FTE and for the associated acceleration of ions from the magnetosphere into the reconnection jet. The cold ions have small enough gyroradii to drift inside the limited separatrix region and the normal electric field can be balanced by this drift, E approximate to -v x B. The separatrix region also includes cold accelerated electrons, as part of the reconnection current circuit.

  • 15.
    Arndt, Jan Erik
    et al.
    Alfred Wegener Inst Polar & Marine Res, Bremerhaven, Germany..
    Schenke, Hans Werner
    Alfred Wegener Inst Polar & Marine Res, Bremerhaven, Germany..
    Jakobsson, Martin
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Geol Sci, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nitsche, Frank O.
    Columbia Univ, Lamont Doherty Earth Observ, Palisades, NY USA..
    Buys, Gwen
    British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge CB3 0ET, England..
    Goleby, Bruce
    Geosci Australia, Canberra, ACT, Australia..
    Rebesco, Michele
    Ist Nazl Oceanog & Geofis Sperimentale, Sgonico, Italy..
    Bohoyo, Fernando
    Inst Geol & Minero Espana, Madrid, Spain..
    Hong, Jongkuk
    Korean Polar Res Inst, Inchon, South Korea..
    Black, Jenny
    Inst Geol & Nucl Sci, Lower Hutt, New Zealand..
    Greku, Rudolf
    Ukrainian Acad Sci, Inst Geol Sci, Kiev, Ukraine..
    Udintsev, Gleb
    Vemadsky Inst Geochem & Analyt Chem, Moscow, Russia..
    Barrios, Felipe
    Serv Hidrog & Oceanog, Valparaiso, Chile..
    Reynoso-Peralta, Walter
    Serv Hidrog Naval, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina..
    Taisei, Morishita
    Japan Coast Guard, Hydrog & Oceanog Dept, Tokyo, Japan..
    Wigley, Rochelle
    Univ New Hampshire, Ctr Coastal & Ocean Mapping, Joint Hydrog Ctr, Durham, NH 03824 USA..
    The International Bathymetric Chart of the Southern Ocean (IBCSO) Version 1.0-A new bathymetric compilation covering circum-Antarctic waters2013In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 40, no 12, 3111-3117 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The International Bathymetric Chart of the Southern Ocean (IBCSO) Version 1.0 is a new digital bathymetric model (DBM) portraying the seafloor of the circum-Antarctic waters south of 60 degrees S. IBCSO is a regional mapping project of the General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO). The IBCSO Version 1.0 DBM has been compiled from all available bathymetric data collectively gathered by more than 30 institutions from 15 countries. These data include multibeam and single-beam echo soundings, digitized depths from nautical charts, regional bathymetric gridded compilations, and predicted bathymetry. Specific gridding techniques were applied to compile the DBM from the bathymetric data of different origin, spatial distribution, resolution, and quality. The IBCSO Version 1.0 DBM has a resolution of 500 x 500 m, based on a polar stereographic projection, and is publicly available together with a digital chart for printing from the project website (www.ibcso.org) and at .

  • 16. Arndt, Jan Erik
    et al.
    Schenke, Hans Werner
    Jakobsson, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Nitsche, Frank O.
    Buys, Gwen
    Goleby, Bruce
    Rebesco, Michele
    Bohoyo, Fernando
    Hong, Jongkuk
    Black, Jenny
    Greku, Rudolf
    Udintsev, Gleb
    Barrios, Felipe
    Reynoso-Peralta, Walter
    Taisei, Morishita
    Wigley, Rochelle
    The International Bathymetric Chart of the Southern Ocean (IBCSO) Version 1.0-A new bathymetric compilation covering circum-Antarctic waters2013In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 40, no 12, 3111-3117 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The International Bathymetric Chart of the Southern Ocean (IBCSO) Version 1.0 is a new digital bathymetric model (DBM) portraying the seafloor of the circum-Antarctic waters south of 60 degrees S. IBCSO is a regional mapping project of the General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO). The IBCSO Version 1.0 DBM has been compiled from all available bathymetric data collectively gathered by more than 30 institutions from 15 countries. These data include multibeam and single-beam echo soundings, digitized depths from nautical charts, regional bathymetric gridded compilations, and predicted bathymetry. Specific gridding techniques were applied to compile the DBM from the bathymetric data of different origin, spatial distribution, resolution, and quality. The IBCSO Version 1.0 DBM has a resolution of 500 x 500 m, based on a polar stereographic projection, and is publicly available together with a digital chart for printing from the project website (www.ibcso.org) and at .

  • 17. Askebjer, P.
    et al.
    Barwick, S. W.
    Bergström, L.
    Bouchta, A.
    Carius, Staffan
    Department of Radiation Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Dalberg, E.
    Erlandsson, B.
    Goobar, A.
    Gray, L.
    Hallgren, A.
    Halzen, F.
    Heukenkamp, H.
    Hulth, P. O.
    Hundertmark, S.
    Jacobsen, J.
    Kandhadai, V.
    Karle, A.
    Liubarsky, I.
    Lowder, D.
    Miller, T.
    Mock, P.
    Morse, R.
    Porrata, R.
    Price, P. B.
    Richards, A.
    Rubinstein, H.
    Schneider, E.
    Spiering, Ch.
    Streicher, O.
    Sun, Q.
    Thon, Th.
    Tilav, S.
    Wischnewski, R.
    Walck, C.
    Yodh, G.
    UV and optical light transmission properties in deep ice at the South Pole1997In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 24, no 11, 1355-1358 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both absorption and scattering of light at wavelengths 410 to 610 nanometers were measured in the South Pole ice at depths 0.8 to 1 kilometer with the laser calibration system of the Antarctic Muon And Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA). At the shortest wavelengths the absorption lengths exceeded 200 meters - an order of magnitude longer than has been reported for laboratory ice. The absorption shows a strong wavelength dependence while the scattering length is found to be independent of the wavelength, consistent with the hypothesis of a residual density of air bubbles in the ice. The observed linear decrease of the inverse scattering length with depth is compatible with an earlier measurement by the AMANDA collaboration (at ∼515 nanometers).

  • 18.
    Backrud, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Astronomy and Space Physics.
    Tjulin, Anders
    Vaivads, Andris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    André, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Astronomy and Space Physics.
    Fazakerley, Andrew
    Interferometric Identification of Ion Acoustic Broadband Waves in the Auroral Region: CLUSTER Observations2005In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 32, no 21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [1] We determine the phase velocity and k vector for parallel and oblique broadband extremely low frequency, ELF, waves on nightside auroral magnetic field lines at altitudes around 4.6 RE. We use internal burst mode data from the EFW electric field and wave instrument onboard the Cluster spacecraft to retrieve phase differences between the four probes of the instrument. The retrieved characteristic phase velocity is of the order of the ion acoustic speed and larger than the thermal velocity of the protons. The typical wavelength obtained from interferometry is around the proton gyro radius and always larger than the Debye length. We find that in regions with essentially no suprathermal electrons above a few tens of eV the observed broadband waves above the proton gyro frequency are consistent with upgoing ion acoustic and oblique ion acoustic waves.

  • 19. Bal, S.
    et al.
    Schimanke, Semjon
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Spangehl, T.
    Cubasch, U.
    On the robustness of the solar cycle signal in the Pacific region2011In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 38, L14809Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential role of the stratosphere for the 11-year solar cycle signal in the Pacific region is investigated by idealized simulations using a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model. The model includes a detailed representation of the stratosphere and accounts for changes in stratospheric heating rates from prescribed time dependent variations of ozone and spectrally high resolved solar irradiance. Three transient simulations are performed spanning 21 solar cycles each. The simulations use slightly different ozone perturbations representing uncertainties of solar induced ozone variations. The model reproduces the main features of the 20th century observed solar response. A persistent mean sea level pressure response to solar forcing is found for the eastern North Pacific extending over North America. Moreover, there is evidence for a La Nina-like response assigned to solar maximum conditions with below normal SSTs in the equatorial eastern Pacific, reduced equatorial precipitation, enhanced off-equatorial precipitation and an El Nino-like response a couple of years later, thus confirming the response to solar forcing at the surface seen in earlier studies. The amplitude of the solar signal in the Pacific region depends to a great extent on the choice of the centennial period averaged. Citation: Bal, S., S. Schimanke, T. Spangehl, and U. Cubasch (2011), On the robustness of the solar cycle signal in the Pacific region, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L14809, doi:10.1029/2011GL047964.

  • 20.
    Baltar, Federico
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Arístegui, Javier
    Sintes, Eva
    Reinthaler, Thomas
    Gasol, Josep M.
    Herndl, Gerhard J.
    Significance of non-sinking particulate organic carbon and dark CO2 fixation to heterotrophic carbon demand in the mesopelagic Atlantic2010In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 37, L09602- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is generally assumed that sinking particulate organic carbon (POC) constitutes the main source of organic carbon supply to the deep ocean's food webs. However, a major discrepancy between the rates of sinking POC supply (collected with sediment traps) and the prokaryotic organic carbon demand (the total amount of carbon required to sustain the heterotrophic metabolism of the prokaryotes; i.e., production plus respiration, PCD) of deep-water communities has been consistently reported for the dark realm of the global ocean. While the amount of sinking POC flux declines exponentially with depth, the concentration of suspended, buoyant non-sinking POC (nsPOC; obtained with oceanographic bottles) exhibits only small variations with depth in the (sub) tropical Northeast Atlantic. Based on available data for the North Atlantic we show here that the sinking POC flux would contribute only 4-12% of the PCD in the mesopelagic realm (depending on the primary production rate in surface waters). The amount of nsPOC potentially available to heterotrophic prokaryotes in the mesopelagic realm can be partly replenished by dark dissolved inorganic carbon fixation contributing between 12% to 72% to the PCD daily. Taken together, there is evidence that the mesopelagic microheterotrophic biota is more dependent on the nsPOC pool than on the sinking POC supply. Hence, the enigmatic major mismatch between the organic carbon demand of the deep-water heterotrophic microbiota and the POC supply rates might be substantially smaller by including the potentially available nsPOC and its autochthonous production in oceanic carbon cycling models. Citation: Baltar, F., J. Aristegui, E. Sintes, J. M. Gasol, T. Reinthaler, and G. J. Herndl (2010), Significance of non-sinking particulate organic carbon and dark CO2 fixation to heterotrophic carbon demand in the mesopelagic northeast Atlantic.

  • 21. Barabash, Victoria
    et al.
    Chilson, P.
    Kirkwood, S.
    Réchou, A.
    Stebel, K.
    Investigations of the possible relationship between PMSE and tides using a VHF MST radar1998In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 25, no 17, 3297-3300 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22. Baskaran, M
    Interaction of sea ice sediments and surface sea water in the Arctic Ocean: Evidence from excess Pb-2102005In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 32, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We measured the activities of Pb-210, Ra-226, U-238 and Cs-137 in a suite of ice-rafted sediments (IRS) from the Arctic Ocean in an attempt to assess the interaction of sea ice sediments and surface water. The concentrations of these nuclides were compared to those of the benthic sediments in the coastal and shelf regions of the Arctic Ocean, which are believed to be the major source region for the IRS. The concentration factors (CF = activity of a nuclide in IRS/average activity in benthic sediments) are similar to 1 and 4-92 for Cs-137 and Pb-210, respectively. The CF values for Cs-137 are comparable to the values that can be obtained from the previously published data while we report the first set of high CF values of Pb-210. A major portion of Pb-210 in some IRS samples is likely derived from surface waters and thus, the concentrations of Pb-210 combined with another particle-reactive radionuclide (such as Be-7, Th-234) in IRS might provide information on the residence time and transit time of sea ice-laden sediments.

  • 23. Basu, N. B.
    et al.
    Destouni, G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology (INK).
    Jawitz, J. W.
    Thompson, S. E.
    Loukinova, N. V.
    Darracq, A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology (INK).
    Zanardo, S.
    Yaeger, M.
    Sivapalan, M.
    Rinaldo, A.
    Rao, P. S. C.
    Nutrient loads exported from managed catchments reveal emergent biogeochemical stationarity2010In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 37, no L23404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Complexity of heterogeneous catchments poses challenges in predicting biogeochemical responses to human alterations and stochastic hydro‐climatic drivers. Human interferences and climate change may have contributed to the demise of hydrologic stationarity, but our synthesis of a large body of observational data suggests that anthropogenic impacts have also resulted in the emergence of effective biogeochemical stationarity in managed catchments. Long‐term monitoring data from the Mississippi‐Atchafalaya River Basin (MARB) and the Baltic Sea Drainage Basin (BSDB) reveal that inter‐annual variations in loads (LT) for total‐N (TN) and total‐P (TP), exported from a catchment are dominantly controlled by discharge (QT) leading inevitably to temporal invariance of the annual, flow‐weighted concentration, = (LT/QT). Emergence of this consistent pattern across diverse managed catchments is attributed to the anthropogenic legacy of accumulated nutrient sources generating memory, similar to ubiquitously present sources for geogenic constituents that also exhibit a linear LTQT relationship. These responses are characteristic of transport‐limited systems. In contrast, in the absence of legacy sources in less‐managed catchments, values were highly variable and supply limited. We offer a theoretical explanation for the observed patterns at the event scale, and extend it to consider the stochastic nature of rainfall/flow patterns at annual scales. Our analysis suggests that: (1) expected inter‐annual variations in LT can be robustly predicted given discharge variations arising from hydro‐climatic or anthropogenic forcing, and (2) water‐quality problems in receiving inland and coastal waters would persist until the accumulated storages of nutrients have been substantially depleted. The finding has notable implications on catchment management to mitigate adverse water‐quality impacts, and on acceleration of global biogeochemical cycles.

  • 24.
    Becerra Garcia, Marley
    et al.
    Division for Electricity, Uppsala University.
    Cooray, Vernon
    Division for Electricity, Uppsala University.
    On the velocity of positive connecting leaders associated with negative downward lightning leaders2008In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 35, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A self-consistent leader propagation model is used to estimate the velocity of upward connecting positive leaders initiated from a tall tower under the influence of downward negative lightning leaders. The propagation of upward connecting leaders has been found to be influenced not only by the average velocity of the downward leader but also by the prospective return stroke current, the lateral position of the downward leader channel as well as by the ambient electric field. This result show that the velocity and propagation time of upward connecting positive leaders change from flash to flash due to the variations in these parameters.

  • 25.
    Becerra, Marley
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Electricity.
    Cooray, Vernon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Electricity.
    On the velocity of positive connecting leaders associated with negative downward lightning leaders2008In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 35, L02801- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A self-consistent leader propagation model is used to estimate the velocity of upward connecting positive leaders initiated from a tall tower under the influence of downward negative lightning leaders. The propagation of upward connecting leaders has been found to be influenced not only by the average velocity of the downward leader but also by the prospective return stroke current, the lateral position of the downward leader channel as well as by the ambient electric field. This result show that the velocity and propagation time of upward connecting positive leaders change from flash to flash due to the variations in these parameters.

  • 26.
    Behar, Etienne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Wieser, Gabriella Stenberg
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics.
    Nemeth, Zoltan
    Wigner Research Centre for Physics, 1121 Konkoly Thege Street 29-33, Budapest.
    Brolles, T.W.
    Space Science and Engineering Division, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio.
    Richter, Ingo
    Technische Universität–Braunschweig, Institute for Geophysics and Extraterrestrial Physics.
    Mass loading at 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko: A case study2016In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 43, no 4, 1411-1418 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the dynamics of the interaction between the solar wind ions and a partially ionized atmosphere around a comet, at a distance of 2.88 AU from the Sun during a period of low nucleus activity. Comparing particle data and magnetic field data for a case study, we highlight the prime role of the solar wind electric field in the cometary ion dynamics. Cometary ion and solar wind proton flow directions evolve in a correlated manner, as expected from the theory of mass loading. We find that the main component of the accelerated cometary ion flow direction is along the antisunward direction and not along the convective electric field direction. This is interpreted as the effect of an antisunward polarization electric field adding up to the solar wind convective electric field.

  • 27.
    Behlke, Rico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Astronomy and Space Physics.
    André, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Astronomy and Space Physics, Space and Plasma Physics.
    Bale, Stuart D.
    Pickett, Jolene S.
    Cattell, Cynthia A.
    Lucek, Elizabeth A.
    Balogh, Andre
    Solitary structures associated with short large-amplitude magnetic structures (SLAMS) upstream of the Earth's quasi-parallel bow shock2004In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 31, no 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [1] For the first time, solitary waves (SWs) have been observed within short large-amplitude magnetic structures (SLAMS) upstream of the Earth's quasi-parallel bow shock. The SWs often occur as bipolar pulses in the electric field data and move parallel to the background magnetic field at velocities of v = 400–1200 km/s. They have peak-to-peak amplitudes in the parallel electric field of up to E = 65 mV/m and parallel scale sizes of L ∼ 10 λD. The bipolar solitary waves exhibit negative potential structures of ∣Φ∣ = 0.4–2.2 V, i.e., eΦ/kTe ∼ 0.1. None of the theories commonly used to describe SWs adequately address these negative potential structures moving at velocities above the ion thermal speed in a weakly magnetized plasma.

  • 28. Belcher, Stephen E.
    et al.
    Grant, Alan L. M.
    Hanley, Kirsty E.
    Fox-Kemper, Baylor
    Van Roekel, Luke
    Sullivan, Peter P.
    Large, William G.
    Brown, Andy
    Hines, Adrian
    Calvert, Daley
    Rutgersson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Pettersson, Heidi
    Bidlot, Jean-Raymond
    Janssen, Peter A. E. M.
    Polton, Jeff A.
    A global perspective on Langmuir turbulence in the ocean surface boundary layer2012In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 39, L18605- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The turbulent mixing in thin ocean surface boundary layers (OSBL), which occupy the upper 100 m or so of the ocean, control the exchange of heat and trace gases between the atmosphere and ocean. Here we show that current parameterizations of this turbulent mixing lead to systematic and substantial errors in the depth of the OSBL in global climate models, which then leads to biases in sea surface temperature. One reason, we argue, is that current parameterizations are missing key surface-wave processes that force Langmuir turbulence that deepens the OSBL more rapidly than steady wind forcing. Scaling arguments are presented to identify two dimensionless parameters that measure the importance of wave forcing against wind forcing, and against buoyancy forcing. A global perspective on the occurrence of wave-forced turbulence is developed using re-analysis data to compute these parameters globally. The diagnostic study developed here suggests that turbulent energy available for mixing the OSBL is under-estimated without forcing by surface waves. Wave-forcing and hence Langmuir turbulence could be important over wide areas of the ocean and in all seasons in the Southern Ocean. We conclude that surface-wave-forced Langmuir turbulence is an important process in the OSBL that requires parameterization. Citation: Belcher, S. E., et al. (2012), A global perspective on Langmuir turbulence in the ocean surface boundary layer, Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, L18605, doi: 10.1029/2012GL052932.

  • 29.
    Bergbauer, S.
    et al.
    University of Hawaii.
    Martel, S.J.
    University of Hawaii.
    Hieronymus, C.F.
    University of Hawaii.
    Thermal stress evolution in cooling pluton environments of different geometries1998In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 25, no 5, 707-71- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermoelastic displacement potentials and fast Fourier transforms can be combined to rapidly calculate the thermal stresses in 2-D for plutons that cool by conduction. First, temperature distributions over time are computed by solving the diffusion equation. Thermal stresses are then obtained using thermoelastic stress potentials. This method can be applied to a broad range of pluton geometries and initial conditions, and requires far less computation time than finite difference or finite element analyses. Results of 2-D analyses show that pluton geometry strongly influences the thermal stresses that occur in a cooling pluton. Thermal stresses of several tens of MPa arise during cooling and are highest at the corners or where the intrusion is thin. The most tensile stress is greater inside a pluton than in the host rock. Moreover, the orientation of the most tensile stress in a cooling pluton generally changes over time. This could result in multiple fracture sets, which would significantly affect the mechanical and hydraulic behavior of a pluton.

  • 30. Berggren, A. M.
    et al.
    Beer, J.
    Possnert, G.
    Aldahan, A.
    Kubik, P.
    Christl, M.
    Johnsen, S. J.
    Abreu, J.
    Vinther, B. M.
    A 600-year annual Be-10 record from the NGRIP ice core, Greenland2009In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 36, L11801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the extensive use of Be-10 as the most significant information source on past solar activity, there has been only one record (Dye-3, Greenland) providing annual resolution over several centuries. Here we report a new annual resolution Be-10 record spanning the period 1389-1994 AD, measured in an ice core from the NGRIP site in Greenland. NGRIP and Dye-3 Be-10 exhibits similar long-term variability, although occasional short term differences between the two sites indicate that at least two high resolution Be-10 records are needed to assess local variations and to confidently reconstruct past solar activity. A comparison with sunspot and neutron records confirms that ice core Be-10 reflects solar Schwabe cycle variations, and continued Be-10 variability suggests cyclic solar activity throughout the Maunder and Sporer grand solar activity minima. Recent Be-10 values are low; however, they do not indicate unusually high recent solar activity compared to the last 600 years. Citation: Berggren, A.-M., J. Beer, G. Possnert, A. Aldahan, P. Kubik, M. Christl, S. J. Johnsen, J. Abreu, and B. M. Vinther (2009), A 600-year annual Be-10 record from the NGRIP ice core, Greenland, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L11801, doi: 10.1029/2009GL038004.

  • 31.
    Berggren, Ann-Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Beer, Juerg
    Possnert, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ion Physics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, För teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten gemensamma enheter, Tandem Laboratory.
    Aldahan, Ala
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Kubik, Peter
    ETH, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Christl, Marcus
    ETH, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Johnsen, Sigfús J.
    Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Abreu, José
    Eawag, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Vinter, Bo M.
    Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    A 600-year annual 10Be record from the NGRIP ice core, Greenland2009In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 36, L11801- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the extensive use of 10Be as the most significant information source on past solar activity, there has been only one record (Dye-3, Greenland) providing annual resolution over several centuries. Here we report a new annual resolution 10Be record spanning the period 1389-1994 AD, measured in an ice core from the NGRIP site in Greenland. NGRIP and Dye-3 10Be exhibits similar long-term variability, although occasional short term differences between the two sites indicate that at least two high resolution 10Be records are needed to assess local variations and to confidently reconstruct past solar activity. A comparison with sunspot and neutron records confirms that ice core 10Be reflects solar Schwabe cycle variations, and continued 10Be variability suggests cyclic solar activity throughout the Maunder and Spörer grand solar activity minima. Recent 10Be values are low; however, they do not indicate unusually high recent solar activity compared to the last 600 years.

  • 32. Bertucci, C.
    et al.
    Hamilton, D. C.
    Kurth, W. S.
    Hospodarsky, G.
    Mitchell, D.
    Sergis, N.
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Dougherty, M. K.
    Titan's interaction with the supersonic solar wind2015In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 42, no 2, 193-200 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After 9years in the Saturn system, the Cassini spacecraft finally observed Titan in the supersonic and super-Alfvenic solar wind. These unique observations reveal that Titan's interaction with the solar wind is in many ways similar to unmagnetized planets Mars and Venus and active comets in spite of the differences in the properties of the solar plasma in the outer solar system. In particular, Cassini detected a collisionless, supercritical bow shock and a well-defined induced magnetosphere filled with mass-loaded interplanetary magnetic field lines, which drape around Titan's ionosphere. Although the flyby altitude may not allow the detection of an ionopause, Cassini reports enhancements of plasma density compatible with plasma clouds or streamers in the flanks of its induced magnetosphere or due to an expansion of the induced magnetosphere. Because of the upstream conditions, these observations may be also relevant to other bodies in the outer solar system such as Pluto, where kinetic processes are expected to dominate.

  • 33. Bertucci, C.
    et al.
    Neubauer, F. M.
    Szego, K.
    Wahlund, Jan Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Coates, A. J.
    Dougherty, M. K.
    Young, D. T.
    Kurth, W. S.
    Structure of Titan's mid-range magnetic tail: Cassini magnetometer observations during the T9 flyby2007In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 34, no 24, L24S02- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyze the magnetic structure of Titan's mid-range magnetic tail (5-6 Titan radii downstream from the moon) during Cassini's T9 flyby. Cassini magnetometer (MAG) measurements reveal a well-defined, induced magnetic tail consisting of two lobes and a distinct central current sheet. MAG observations also indicate that Saturn's background magnetic field is close to the moon's orbital plane and that the magnetospheric flow has a significant component in the Saturn-Titan direction. The analysis of MAG data in a coordinate system based on the orientation of the background magnetic field and an estimation of the incoming flow direction suggests that Titan's magnetic tail is extremely asymmetric. An important source of these asymmetries is the connection of the inbound tail lobe and the outbound tail lobe to the dayside and nightside hemispheres of Titan, respectively. Another source could be the perturbations generated by changes in the upstream conditions.

  • 34. Bjork, G
    et al.
    Soderkvist, J
    Winsor, P
    Nikolopoulos, A
    Steele, M
    Return of the cold halocline layer to the Amundsen Basin of the Arctic Ocean: Implications for the sea ice mass balance2002In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 29, no 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [1] CTD measurements from the Arctic Ocean 2001 expedition reveal that the cold halocline layer (CHL) has returned to the Amundsen Basin at a position close to that found during the Oden’91 expedition. River water from the Siberian shelves formed a strong freshwater front in the Amundsen Basin, extending from the Gakkel Ridge to the Lomonosov Ridge. Furthermore, we show from model computations that the presence of a CHL may increase winter sea ice growth by 0.25 m over one season compared to a case with a non-existing CHL due to increased vertical heat flux from the warm Atlantic water. The difference in sea ice growth is due to a much shallower winter convection with a CHL present, which is not able to reach into the warm Atlantic layer, resulting in a considerably smaller oceanic heat flux.

  • 35.
    Block, Lars P
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Alfvén Laboratory. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Space and Plasma Physics.
    Fälthammar, Carl-Gunne
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Alfvén Laboratory. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Space and Plasma Physics.
    Lindqvist, Per-Arne
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Alfvén Laboratory. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Space and Plasma Physics.
    Marklund, Göran
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Alfvén Laboratory. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Space and Plasma Physics.
    Mozer, F.S.
    Pedersen, A.
    Potemra, T.A.
    Zanetti, L.J.
    Electric field measurements on Viking - 1st results1987In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 14, 435-438 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Blomberg, Lars G.
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Alfvén Laboratory. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Space and Plasma Physics.
    Marklund, Göran T.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Alfvén Laboratory. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Space and Plasma Physics.
    High-Latitude Convection Patterns For Various Large-Scale Field-Aligned Current Configurations1991In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 18, no 4, 717-720 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The large-scale field-aligned current system for persistent northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is typically different from that for persistent southward IMF. One characteristic difference is that for northward IMF there is often a large-scale field-aligned current system poleward of the main auroral oval. This current system (the NBZ current) typically occupies a large fraction of the region poleward of the region 1 and 2 currents. The present paper models the high-latitude convection as a function of the large-scale field-aligned currents. In particular, a possible evolution of the convection pattern as the current system changes from a typical configuration for southward IMF to a configuration representing northward IMF (or vice versa) is presented. Depending on additional assumptions, for example about the y-component of the IMF, the convection pattern could either turn directly from a two-cell type to a four-cell type, or a three-cell type pattern could show up as an intermediate state. An interesting although rather surprising result of this study is that different ways of balancing the NBZ currents has a minor influence on the large-scale convection pattern.

  • 37. Boardsen, Scott A.
    et al.
    Sundberg, Torbjorn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Space and Plasma Physics.
    Slavin, James A.
    Anderson, Brian J.
    Korth, Haje
    Solomon, Sean C.
    Blomberg, Lars G.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Space and Plasma Physics.
    Observations of Kelvin-Helmholtz waves along the dusk-side boundary of Mercury's magnetosphere during MESSENGER's third flyby2010In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 37, L12101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the third MESSENGER flyby of Mercury on 29 September 2009, 15 crossings of the dusk-side magnetopause were observed in the magnetic field data over a 2-min period, during which the spacecraft traveled a distance of 0.2 R-M (where R-M is Mercury's radius). The quasi-periodic nature of the magnetic field variations during the crossings, the characteristic time separations of similar to 16 s between pairs of crossings, and the variations of the magnetopause normal directions indicate that the signals are likely the signature of surface waves highly steepened at their leading edge that arose from the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. At Earth, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is believed to lead to the turbulent transport of solar wind plasma into Earth's plasma sheet. This solar wind entry mechanism could also be important at Mercury. Citation: Boardsen, S. A., T. Sundberg, J. A. Slavin, B. J. Anderson, H. Korth, S. C. Solomon, and L. G. Blomberg (2010), Observations of Kelvin-Helmholtz waves along the dusk-side boundary of Mercury's magnetosphere during MESSENGER's third flyby, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L12101, doi: 10.1029/2010GL043606.

  • 38. Boehm, M. H.
    et al.
    CLEMMONS, J
    WAHLUND, JE
    ERIKSSON, A
    ELIASSON, L
    Blomberg, Lars
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Alfvén Laboratory. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Space and Plasma Physics.
    KINTNER, P
    HOFNER, H
    Observations of an  upward-directed electron beam with the perpendicular temperature of the cold ionosphere1995In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 22, 2103-2106 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Freja TESP electron spectrometer has repeatedly observed similar to 100 eV - 1 keV upward-directed, anti-field-aligned electron beams near 1700 km altitude in the auroral zone. A particularly intense event, at energies up to 2 keV, is described. The beam perpendicular temperature T perpendicular to(e)), was as low as 0.1-0.2 eV at 100-200 eV parallel energy. The 10-15 s period of upward fluxes was coincident with a low density (similar to 10 cm(-3)) period and a similar to 5 keV ion conic. Strong low frequency waves and the lack of any downward motion in the simultaneously observed ion conic suggest a strong element of wave acceleration, while electric field and ion loss cone measurements provide limited evidence of potential acceleration to a fraction of the observed energies.

  • 39.
    Brandefelt, Jenny
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Otto-Bliesner, B. L.
    Equilibration and variability in a Last Glacial Maximum climate simulation with CCSM32009In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present results from a 1862 year simulation of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) with the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3). A quasi steady state is reached after approximately 100 years of integration when the initial cooling trend in the annual global mean atmospheric surface temperature (T-s) levels off and even reverses. After another 150 years of integration the climate continues to cool and reaches a new equilibrium after a total of 800 years of integration. The cause of the continued adjustment of the climate to LGM forcing and boundary conditions is found in the abyssal ocean which is cooling at a rate decreasing from 0.15 degrees C per century until the new equilibrium is reached. The new equilibrium differs substantially from the first quasi steady state with 1.1 degrees C colder global mean Ts and regional differences of 5-15 degrees C in the North Atlantic region and a 30% reduction of the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Further, the variability in the global mean Ts is significantly larger in the new equilibrium. This variability is associated with coupled ocean-atmosphere-sea ice variations in the North Atlantic region. Citation: Brandefelt, J., and B. L. Otto-Bliesner (2009), Equilibration and variability in a Last Glacial Maximum climate simulation with CCSM3, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L19712, doi: 10.1029/2009GL040364.

  • 40.
    Brethouwer, Geert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Turbulence.
    Lindborg, Erik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Turbulence.
    Passive scalars in stratified turbulence2008In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 35, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Statistics of a passive scalar (or tracer) with a horizontal mean gradient in randomly forced and strongly stratified turbulence are investigated by numerical simulations. We observe that horizontal isotropy of the passive scalar spectrum is satisfied in the inertial range. The spectrum has the form E-theta(k(h)) = C-theta epsilon theta epsilon(-1/3)(K) k(h)(-5/3), where epsilon(theta), epsilon(K) are the dissipation of scalar variance and kinetic energy respectively, and C-theta similar or equal to 0.5 is a constant. This spectrum is consistent with atmospheric measurements in the mesoscale range with wavelengths 1 - 500 km. We also calculate the fourth-order passive scalar structure function and show that intermittency effects are present in stratified turbulence.

  • 41. Breuillard, H.
    et al.
    Le Contel, O.
    Retino, A.
    Chasapis, A.
    Chust, T.
    Mirioni, L.
    Graham, D. B.
    Wilder, F. D.
    Cohen, I.
    Vaivads, A.
    Khotyaintsev, Yu V.
    Lindqvist, Per-Arne
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Space and Plasma Physics.
    Marklund, Göran T.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Space and Plasma Physics.
    Burch, J. L.
    Torbert, R. B.
    Ergun, R. E.
    Goodrich, K. A.
    Macri, J.
    Needell, J.
    Chutter, M.
    Rau, D.
    Dors, I.
    Russell, C. T.
    Magnes, W.
    Strangeway, R. J.
    Bromund, K. R.
    Plaschke, F.
    Fischer, D.
    Leinweber, H. K.
    Anderson, B. J.
    Le, G.
    Slavin, J. A.
    Kepko, E. L.
    Baumjohann, W.
    Mauk, B.
    Fuselier, S. A.
    Nakamura, R.
    Multispacecraft analysis of dipolarization fronts and associated whistler wave emissions using MMS data2016In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 43, no 14, 7279-7286 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dipolarization fronts (DFs), embedded in bursty bulk flows, play a crucial role in Earth's plasma sheet dynamics because the energy input from the solar wind is partly dissipated in their vicinity. This dissipation is in the form of strong low-frequency waves that can heat and accelerate energetic electrons up to the high-latitude plasma sheet. However, the dynamics of DF propagation and associated low-frequency waves in the magnetotail are still under debate due to instrumental limitations and spacecraft separation distances. In May 2015 the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission was in a string-of-pearls configuration with an average intersatellite distance of 160km, which allows us to study in detail the microphysics of DFs. Thus, in this letter we employ MMS data to investigate the properties of dipolarization fronts propagating earthward and associated whistler mode wave emissions. We show that the spatial dynamics of DFs are below the ion gyroradius scale in this region (approximate to 500km), which can modify the dynamics of ions in the vicinity of the DF (e.g., making their motion nonadiabatic). We also show that whistler wave dynamics have a temporal scale of the order of the ion gyroperiod (a few seconds), indicating that the perpendicular temperature anisotropy can vary on such time scales.

  • 42.
    Breuillard, H.
    et al.
    CNRS, LPP, UMR, Paris, France..
    Le Contel, O.
    CNRS, LPP, UMR, Paris, France..
    Retino, A.
    CNRS, LPP, UMR, Paris, France..
    Chasapis, A.
    Univ Delaware, Dept Phys & Astron, Newark, DE 19716 USA..
    Chust, T.
    CNRS, LPP, UMR, Paris, France..
    Mirioni, L.
    CNRS, LPP, UMR, Paris, France..
    Graham, Daniel B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Wilder, F. D.
    Univ Colorado, LASP, Boulder, CO 80309 USA..
    Cohen, I.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Appl Phys Lab, Laurel, MD USA..
    Vaivads, Andris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Khotyaintsev, Yuri V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Lindqvist, P. -A
    Royal Inst Technol, Alfven Lab, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Marklund, G. T.
    Royal Inst Technol, Alfven Lab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Burch, J. L.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Torbert, R. B.
    Univ New Hampshire, Ctr Space Sci, Durham, NH 03824 USA.;Univ New Hampshire, Dept Phys, Durham, NH 03824 USA..
    Ergun, R. E.
    Univ Colorado, LASP, Boulder, CO 80309 USA..
    Goodrich, K. A.
    Univ Colorado, LASP, Boulder, CO 80309 USA..
    Macri, J.
    Univ New Hampshire, Ctr Space Sci, Durham, NH 03824 USA.;Univ New Hampshire, Dept Phys, Durham, NH 03824 USA..
    Needell, J.
    Univ New Hampshire, Ctr Space Sci, Durham, NH 03824 USA.;Univ New Hampshire, Dept Phys, Durham, NH 03824 USA..
    Chutter, M.
    Univ New Hampshire, Ctr Space Sci, Durham, NH 03824 USA.;Univ New Hampshire, Dept Phys, Durham, NH 03824 USA..
    Rau, D.
    Univ New Hampshire, Ctr Space Sci, Durham, NH 03824 USA.;Univ New Hampshire, Dept Phys, Durham, NH 03824 USA..
    Dors, I.
    Univ New Hampshire, Ctr Space Sci, Durham, NH 03824 USA.;Univ New Hampshire, Dept Phys, Durham, NH 03824 USA..
    Russell, C. T.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Inst Geophys & Planetary Phys, Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA..
    Magnes, W.
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst IWF, Graz, Austria..
    Strangeway, R. J.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Inst Geophys & Planetary Phys, Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA..
    Bromund, K. R.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Plaschke, F.
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst IWF, Graz, Austria..
    Fischer, D.
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst IWF, Graz, Austria..
    Leinweber, H. K.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Inst Geophys & Planetary Phys, Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA..
    Anderson, B. J.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Appl Phys Lab, Laurel, MD USA..
    Le, G.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Slavin, J. A.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Climate & Space Sci & Engn, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Kepko, E. L.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Baumjohann, W.
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst IWF, Graz, Austria..
    Mauk, B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Fuselier, S. A.
    Univ Texas San Antonio, Dept Phys & Astron, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Nakamura, R.
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst IWF, Graz, Austria..
    Multispacecraft analysis of dipolarization fronts and associated whistler wave emissions using MMS data2016In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 43, no 14, 7279-7286 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dipolarization fronts (DFs), embedded in bursty bulk flows, play a crucial role in Earth's plasma sheet dynamics because the energy input from the solar wind is partly dissipated in their vicinity. This dissipation is in the form of strong low-frequency waves that can heat and accelerate energetic electrons up to the high-latitude plasma sheet. However, the dynamics of DF propagation and associated low-frequency waves in the magnetotail are still under debate due to instrumental limitations and spacecraft separation distances. In May 2015 the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission was in a string-of-pearls configuration with an average intersatellite distance of 160km, which allows us to study in detail the microphysics of DFs. Thus, in this letter we employ MMS data to investigate the properties of dipolarization fronts propagating earthward and associated whistler mode wave emissions. We show that the spatial dynamics of DFs are below the ion gyroradius scale in this region (approximate to 500km), which can modify the dynamics of ions in the vicinity of the DF (e.g., making their motion nonadiabatic). We also show that whistler wave dynamics have a temporal scale of the order of the ion gyroperiod (a few seconds), indicating that the perpendicular temperature anisotropy can vary on such time scales.

  • 43.
    Buchert, Stephan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Zangerl, Franz
    Sust, Manfred
    André, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Eriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Wahlund, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Opgenoorth, Hermann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    SWARM observations of equatorial electron densities and topside GPS track losses2015In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 42, no 7, 2088-2092 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The SWARM satellites have both upward looking GPS receivers and Langmuir probes. The receivers repeatedly lost track of the L1 band signal in January-February 2014 at postsunset hours, when SWARM was at nearly 500km altitude. This indicates that the signal was disturbed by ionospheric irregularities at this height and above. The track losses occurred right at density gradients associated with equatorial plasma bubbles and predominantly where the measured background density was highest. The signal showed strong phase scintillations rather than in amplitude, indicating that SWARM might be in the near field of an ionospheric phase screen. Density biteouts, depletions between steep gradients, were up to almost 3 orders of magnitude deep in the background of a more shallow trough centered at the magnetic equator. Comparison between satellites shows that the biteout structure strongly varied in longitude over approximate to 100km and has in north-south steep walls.

  • 44. Buehler, Stefan
    et al.
    Courcoux, N.
    Universität Bremen, Institute of Environmental Physics.
    The impact of temperature errors on perceived humidity supersaturation2003In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 30, no 14, 1759- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Monte Carlo method is used to study the propagation of temperature uncertainties into relative humidity with respect to ice (RH i ) calculated from specific humidity. For a flat specific humidity distribution and Gaussian temperature uncertainties the resulting RH i distribution drops exponentially at high RH i values—much slower than a Gaussian. This agrees well with the RH i distribution measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), which means that such remotely measured RH i distributions can be explained, at least partly, by temperature uncertainties.

  • 45. Buehler, Stefan
    et al.
    Kuvatov, M.
    Universität Bremen, Institute of Environmental Physics.
    John, V. O.
    Universität Bremen, Institute of Environmental Physics.
    Scan asymmetries in AMSU-B data2005In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 32, no 24, L2481- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A simple method of averaging measurements for different scan positions was used to quantify scan asymmetries in AMSU-B brightness temperatures for the sensors on the satellites NOAA 15, 16, and 17. The method works particularly well for the sounding channels 18 to 20. The asymmetries are small in most cases. In particular, asymmetries for Channel 18 are below 1.90, −0.53, and 0.49 K for NOAA 15, 16, and 17, respectively. On the other hand, it was found that the instrument on NOAA 15 has significant asymmetries for Channels 19 and 20, which seem to be related to the known radio frequency interference problem for this instrument. The use of the appropriate set of interference correction coefficients significantly reduces the asymmetry.

  • 46.
    Bärring, Lars
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    von Storch, H
    Scandinavian storminess since about 18002004In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 31, no 20, L20202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the history of storminess in Northern Europe, as derived from local pressure observations in Lund since 1780 and Stockholm since 1820 ( Sweden). At both stations barometer readings were made three times per day, morning, midday and evening, and after about 1850 at fixed observation hours. We use four common storminess indices: annual number of deep lows ( p < 980 hPa), the annual 95th and 99th percentile of pressure changes between two observations, and the annual number of fast absolute pressure changes (\&UDelta;p\/&UDelta;t > 16 hPa/12 h). It turns out that the 1980' s - mid 1990' s were a period of enhanced storminess, mainly seen in the Stockholm record, but his period is within the natural variability of the records. Thus, there are no robust signs of any long-term trend in the storminess indices. Storminess is during the entire historical period remarkably stable, with no systematic change and little transient variability.

  • 47. Cael, B. B.
    et al.
    Heathcote, A. J.
    Seekell, David
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Climate Impacts Research Centre, Umeå University, Abisko, Sweden.
    The volume and mean depth of Earth's lakes2017In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 44, no 1, 209-218 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global lake volume estimates are scarce, highly variable, and poorly documented. We developed a rigorous method for estimating global lake depth and volume based on the Hurst coefficient of Earth's surface, which provides a mechanistic connection between lake area and volume. Volume-area scaling based on the Hurst coefficient is accurate and consistent when applied to lake data sets spanning diverse regions. We applied these relationships to a global lake area census to estimate global lake volume and depth. The volume of Earth's lakes is 199,000km(3) (95% confidence interval 196,000-202,000km(3)). This volume is in the range of historical estimates (166,000-280,000km(3)), but the overall mean depth of 41.8m (95% CI 41.2-42.4m) is significantly lower than previous estimates (62-151m). These results highlight and constrain the relative scarcity of lake waters in the hydrosphere and have implications for the role of lakes in global biogeochemical cycles.

  • 48. Callaghan, Terry V.
    et al.
    Bergholm, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Christensen, Torben R.
    Jonasson, Christer
    Kokfelt, Ulla
    Johansson, Margareta
    A new climate era in the sub-Arctic: Accelerating climate changes and multiple impacts2010In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 37, no 14, L14705- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate warming in the Swedish sub-Arctic since 2000 has reached a level at which statistical analysis shows for the first time that current warming has exceeded that in the late 1930' s and early 1940' s, and has significantly crossed the 0 degrees C mean annual temperature threshold which causes many cryospheric and ecological impacts. The accelerating temperature increase trend has driven similar trends in the century-long increase in snow thickness, loss of lake ice, increases in active layer thickness, lake water TOC (total organic carbon) concentrations and the assemblages of diatoms, and changes in tree-line location and plant community structure. Some of these impacts were not evident in the first warm period of the 20th Century. Changes in climate are associated with reduced temperature variability, particularly loss of cold winters and cool summers, and an increase in extreme precipitation events that cause mountain slope instability and infrastructure failure. The long term records of multiple, local environmental factors compiled here for the first time provide detailed information for adaptation strategy development while dramatic changes in an environment particularly vulnerable to climate change highlight the need to adopt global mitigation strategies.

  • 49. Cao, D.
    et al.
    Fu, H. S.
    Cao, J. B.
    Wang, T. Y.
    Graham, D. B.
    Chen, Z. Z.
    Peng, F. Z.
    Huang, S. Y.
    Khotyaintsev, Y. V.
    Andre, M.
    Russell, C. T.
    Giles, B. L.
    Lindqvist, Per-Arne
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Space and Plasma Physics.
    Torbert, R. B.
    Ergun, R. E.
    Le Contel, O.
    Burch, J. L.
    MMS observations of whistler waves in electron diffusion region2017In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 44, no 9, 3954-3962 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whistler waves that can produce anomalous resistivity by affecting electrons' motion have been suggested as one of the mechanisms responsible for magnetic reconnection in the electron diffusion region (EDR). Such type of waves, however, has rarely been observed inside the EDR so far. In this study, we report such an observation by Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission. We find large-amplitude whistler waves propagating away from the X line with a very small wave-normal angle. These waves are probably generated by the perpendicular temperature anisotropy of the -300eV electrons inside the EDR, according to our analysis of dispersion relation and cyclotron resonance condition; they significantly affect the electron-scale dynamics of magnetic reconnection and thus support previous simulations.

  • 50. Capron, E.
    et al.
    Landais, A.
    Chappellaz, J.
    Buiron, D.
    Fischer, H.
    Johnsen, S. J.
    Jouzel, J.
    Leuenberger, M.
    Masson-Delmotte, V.
    Stocker, T. F.
    A global picture of the first abrupt climatic event occurring during the last glacial inception2012In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 39, L15703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The orbital-scale transition from the last interglacial to glacial climate corresponds to the progressive organization of global millennial-scale climate variability. Here, we investigate the structure and the global fingerprint of the first warming event occurring during the last glacial inception, the Greenland InterStadial 25 (GIS 25). Using centennial to decadal-resolution measurements of delta O-18 and delta D in the ice together with delta N-15, delta O-18(2) and CH4 in the trapped air, we show that GIS 25 does not coincide with large environmental changes at lower latitudes. Such an equivocal fingerprint questions whether GIS 25 is simply a smaller amplitude version of later rapid events or whether it reflects a more regional northern hemisphere origin for the initiation of the millennial-scale climatic variability. After this ambiguous first rapid event, the onset of the global millennial-scale variability - characteristic of the last glacial period-occurs as a short (300 years) event ending GIS 25.

1234567 1 - 50 of 448
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf