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  • 1.
    Barnett, R. M.
    et al.
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 50R-6008, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.
    Johansson, K. Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Kourkoumelis, C.
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Long, L.
    School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK.
    Pequenao, J.
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 50R-6008, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.
    Reimers, C.
    Department of Astronomy, University of Vienna, Austria.
    Watkins, P.
    School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK.
    Learning with the ATLAS experiment at CERN2012In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 28-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the start of the LHC, the new particle collider at CERN, the ATLAS experiment is also providing high-energy particle collisions for educational purposes. Several education projects—education scenarios—have been developed and tested on students and teachers in several European countries within the Learning with ATLAS@CERN project. These highly appreciated projects could become a new component in many teachers' classrooms. The Learning with ATLAS portal and the information on the ATLAS public website make it possible for teachers to design educational material for their own situations. To be able to work with real data adds a new dimension to particle physics explorations at school.

  • 2.
    Bogdanov, Sergey
    et al.
    Petrozavodsk State University.
    Oversby, John
    University of Reading.
    Popov, Oleg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Teteleva, Ekaterina
    Petrozavodsk State University.
    Physics insight into “The Canterbury Tales” Chronotope2015In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 462-467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many students regard physics as an isolated, sophisticated and perhaps a boring branch of science. Meanwhile, physics is embedded in most events and issues of society, culture and everyday life. To find and include such relevant contexts is one of the challenges for every physics teacher. Here we present our findings, which concern the classic The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer. Some important questions are still open and disputed, such as the dates of events in the story. In particular, physics can provide a method for an approximate estimation of the dates and places of the events in the tales. This paper provides some of the details.

  • 3.
    de Winter, James
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics. Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Airey, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics. Department of Mathematics, Science Education Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    What makes a good physics teacher?: Views from the English stakeholder community2020In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 55, no 1, article id 015017Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When qualifying as a secondary school physics teacher in England, the statutory guidance is generic and very little subject-specific detail is offered. There is a lack of a clear, shared understanding of the subject-specific attributes that newly-qualified physics teachers are expected to have. This exploratory study reports the findings of a questionnaire that asked various stakeholders—including physics teachers, trainees and teacher trainers—to identify what they regard as the attributes of a 'good' physics teacher. From our analysis we present a set of attributes of a good physics teacher and consider how these may be grouped into themes that could provide a way to explore these expectations. We pay particular attention to the subject-specific, and consider how our findings align with the existing literature base.

  • 4.
    Eriksson, Urban
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Nationellt resurscentrum för fysik, Lunds universitet.
    Pendrill, Anne-Marie
    Lund University.
    Up and down, light and heavy, fast and slow: but where?2019In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 54, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vertical amusement rides let your body experience the tickling sensation of feeling light, but also feeling much heavier than as usual, due to velocity changes as you move up and down. Family rides offer different possibilities to visualize the forces that are experienced by your accelerating body. This paper presents a number of different ways to view and experience the motion in a small vertical amusement ride. A smartphone includes an accelerometer that can provide a graph of the forces acting during the ride. A movie from the smartphone camera lets students recall the motion which can then be analysed in more detail. The complementary representations may help students develop a deeper understanding of the relation between force and motion. The affordances of these different semiotic resources are analysed in some detail. In addition, we discuss responses from a number of students to questions about where you feel light and where you feel heavy. We find that the experience of the body is an underused resource in physics teaching.

  • 5.
    Eriksson, Urban
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Nationellt resurscentrum för fysik, Lunds universitet.
    Pendrill, Ann-Marie
    Nationellt resurscentrum för fysik.
    Up and down, light and heavy, fast and slow: but where?2019In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 54, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vertical amusement rides let your body experience the tickling sensation of feeling light, but also feeling much heavier than as usual, due to velocity changes as you move up and down. Family rides offer different possibilities to visualize the forces that are experienced by your accelerating body. This paper presents a number of different ways to view and experience the motion in a small vertical amusement ride. A smartphone includes an accelerometer that can provide a graph of the forces acting during the ride. A movie from the smartphone camera lets students recall the motion which can then be analysed in more detail. The complementary representations may help students develop a deeper understanding of the relation between force and motion. The affordances of these different semiotic resources are analysed in some detail. In addition, we discuss responses from a number of students to questions about where you feel light and where you feel heavy. We find that the experience of the body is an underused resource in physics teaching.

  • 6. Graham, Gil
    et al.
    Nilsson, Örjan
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Physics.
    Motion in a Vertical Circle1997In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 313-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Gregorcic, Bor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics. University of Ljubljana.
    Exploring Kepler’s laws using an interactive whiteboard and Algodoo2015In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 511-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Combining an interactive whiteboard with the right software, and with an appropriate instructional approach, is crucial for its productive use in physics classrooms. We describe how the interactive whiteboard can be used in combination with a physics-based sandbox software program (Algodoo) to address the topic of Kepler’s laws. The proposed activity engages students in collaborative inquiry and draws on students’ experience in using touch-screen technology. Students engage in the manipulation of virtual objects on the interactive whiteboard and investigate Kepler’s laws by actively participating in the creation of planets, sending them into orbit, and representing their motion using a wide variety of virtual tools.

  • 8.
    Gyllenpalm, Jakob
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Christiansson, Ulf
    Friggebo, Patrik
    Connecting two laboratory tasks under an umbrella of uncertainty: Hooke's law and simple harmonic motion2018In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 53, no 5, article id 055023Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laboratory work in physics has traditionally focused on the verification of facts, theories and laws. In contrast, this article describes how laboratory tasks can be used to promote students understanding about the nature of science and scientific inquiry. In the project reported here, students learn about measurement uncertainties and a simplified graphical method for propagating errors. By using this knowledge to compare the precision of two common methods to determine the spring constant, Hooke's Law and simple harmonic motion, students learn about the nature of experimentation in physics. From this specific example, comparisons can then be made with authentic research to highlight more general aspects of the nature of science and scientific inquiry.

  • 9.
    Haglund, Jesper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University.
    Hedberg, David
    Realgymnasiet, Norrköping.
    Schönborn, Konrad J
    Linköping University.
    Thermal cameras in school laboratory activities2015In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 424-430Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal cameras offer real-time visual access to otherwise invisible thermodynamic phenomena, which are conceptually demanding for learners during traditional teaching. We present three studies of students’ interaction with laboratory activities that employ infrared (IR) cameras to teach challenging thermal concepts at grades 4, 7 and 10-12. Visualization of heat-related concepts in combination with predict-observe-explain (POE) experiments offers students and teachers a pedagogically powerful means for unveiling abstract yet fundamental physics concepts.

  • 10.
    Haglund, Jesper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Hedberg, David
    Realgymnasiet, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Schönborn, Konrad J
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Thermal cameras in school laboratory activities2015In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 424-430, article id 424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal cameras offer real-time visual access to otherwise invisible thermal phenomena, which are conceptually demanding for learners during traditional teaching. We present three studies of students’ conduction of laboratory activities that employ thermal cameras to teach challenging thermal concepts in grades 4, 7 and 10–12. Visualization of heat-related phenomena in combination with predict-observe-explain experiments offers students and teachers a pedagogically powerful means for unveiling abstract yet fundamental physics concepts.

  • 11.
    Hansson, Lena
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Arvidsson, Åsa
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Heering, Peter
    Germany.
    Pendrill, Ann-Marie
    Lunds universitet.
    Rutherford visits middle school: a case study on how teachers direct attention to the nature of science through a storytelling approach2019In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has long been argued that nature of science (NOS) is an important part of science teaching. In the literature, many different approaches to NOS have been suggested. This article focuses on a storytelling approach, and builds on data from audio recordings from three middle-school (school year 6) classrooms. The three science classes are run by three science teachers who have been introduced to NOS and storytelling during a oneday workshop. These three teachers chose to tell the students a story about Ernest Rutherford. The stories told by the teachers, as well as the whole-class discussions afterwards, are analysed with respect to what NOS aspects were communicated. The results show that many different NOS aspects, such as the tentative nature of scientific models, empirical aspects of the scientific knowledge process, as well as human aspects of science, emerge in the context of the story about Rutherford and his work on the atomic model. The results indicate promising possibilities for storytelling as an approach to NOS teaching.

  • 12.
    Hansson, Lena
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Lund University.
    Leden, Lotta
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Lund University.
    Working with the nature of science in physics class: turning 'ordinary' classroom situations into nature of science learning situations2016In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 51, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the science education research field there is a large body of literature on the 'nature of science' (NOS). NOS captures issues about what characterizes the research process as well as the scientific knowledge. Here we, in line with a broad body of literature, use a wide definition of NOS including also e.g. socio-cultural aspects. It is argued that NOS issues, for a number of reasons, should be included in the teaching of science/physics. Research shows that NOS should be taught explicitly. There are plenty of suggestions on specific and separate NOS activities, but the necessity of discussing NOS issues in connection to specific science/physics content and to laboratory work, is also highlighted. In this article we draw on this body of literature on NOS and science teaching, and discuss how classroom situations in secondary physics classes could be turned into NOS-learning situations. The discussed situations have been suggested by secondary teachers, during in-service teacher training, as situations from every-day physics teaching, from which NOS could be highlighted.

  • 13.
    Hansson, Lena
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Leden, Lotta
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Pendrill, Ann-Marie
    Lunds universitet.
    Contemporary science as context for teaching nature of science: teachers’ development of popular science articles as a teaching resource2019In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Lekholm, Ville
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Rämme, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Physical Chemistry.
    Thornell, Greger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Seeing the invisible with schlieren imaging2011In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 294-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Schlieren imaging is a method for visualizing differences in refractive index as caused by pressure or temperature non-uniformities within a medium, or as caused by the mixing of two fluids. It is an inexpensive yet powerful and straightforward tool for sensitive and high-resolution visualization of otherwise invisible phenomena. In this article, application of the method to liquid membranes, sonar pulses and microscopic gas flows is used to illustrate its usefulness and versatility in physics education and research.

  • 15.
    Nilsson, Örjan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Physics.
    Petersson, Lars-Olof
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer and Electrical Engineering.
    Carlsson, Per-Olof
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Physics.
    Experiments using a microcomputer in a school laboratory1992In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 42-45Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Pendrill, Ann-Marie
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Ekström, Peter
    Lund University.
    Hansson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Mars, Patrik
    Byskolan, Södra Sandby.
    Ouattara, Lassana
    Lund University.
    Ryan, Ulrika
    Byskolan, Södra Sandby.
    Motion on an inclined plane and the nature of science2014In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 180-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Friction is an important phenomenon in everyday life. All children are familiar with playground slides, which may thus be a good starting point for investigating friction. Motion on an inclined plane is a standard physics example. This paper presents an investigation of friction by a group of 11-yearolds. How did they plan their investigations? What aspects of friction could they discern? What understanding of the nature of science was revealed—and developed—during their investigation and subsequent discussion with the teacher?

  • 17.
    Pendrill, Ann-marie
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Ekström, Peter
    Lund University.
    Hansson, Lena
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Mars, Patrik
    Byskolan, Södra Sandby.
    Ouattara, Lassana
    Lund University.
    Ryan, Ulrika
    Byskolan, Södra Sandby.
    The equivalence principle comes to school: falling objects and other middle school investigations2014In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 425-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Comparing two objects falling together is a small-scale version of Galileo's classical experiment, demonstrating the equivalence between gravitational and inertial mass. We present here investigations by a group of ten-year-olds, who used iPads to record the drops. The movie recordings were essential in the follow-up discussions, enabling the students to compare the different situations and to discern situations where air resistance was essential and where it could be neglected. By considering a number of familiar situations and simple investigations that can be performed, e.g., on a playground, students may come closer to an appreciation of the deep significance of the non-influence of mass on motion under gravity.

  • 18.
    Persson, Jonas
    et al.
    Norge.
    Eriksson, Urban
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Planetarium software in the classroom2016In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 51, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students often find astronomy and astrophysics to be most interesting and exciting, but the Universe is difficult to access using only one's eyes or simple equipment available at different educational settings. To open up the Universe and enhance learning astronomy and astrophysics different planetarium software can be used. In this article we discuss the usefulness of such simulation software and give four examples of how such software can be used for teaching and learning astronomy and astrophysics.

  • 19.
    Prytz, Kjell
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    A laborative model of geomagnetism as an example of creative learning2015In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 699-705Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Creative learning is discussed with respect to a specific physics topic. A teaching example, based on an apparatus that demonstrates the standard dynamo model of geomagnetism, is presented. It features many of the basic physics concepts within the syllabus of electromagnetism at high-school and university.

    To stimulate conceptual learning and to invite student explorations, the apparatus is designed to exhibit simplicity and transparency. Due to the connection to natural phenomena and to engineering applications it promotes a holistic view of physics. The apparatus is therefore useful for practising creative learning.

  • 20.
    Prytz, Kjell
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Eineljung, Lars
    Freinetskolan Hugin, Norrtälje, Sweden.
    A functional model of the cochlea2019In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 54, no 6, p. 1-5, article id 065018Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to increase understanding of the cochlea and to illustrate its connection to basic physics, a functional model was developed. It was found to be useful in exploring the basic dynamics of the basilar membrane and its role in the frequency mapping of the cochlea.

  • 21.
    Wei, Yajun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    A simple demonstration of terminal velocity: an experimental approach based on Lenz's law2012In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 47, p. 265-Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 21 of 21
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