Change search
Refine search result
1 - 14 of 14
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andreasson, Rebecca
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för informationsteknologi.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för informationsteknologi.
    Thorvald, Peter
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för ingenjörsvetenskap.
    Tool use and collaborative work of dock assembly in practice2017In: Production & Manufacturing Research, ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 164-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to deepen the understanding of the intrinsic interactions and interplay between humans, tools, and environment from a systems perspective, research in the wild (RITW) approaches have gained traction during recent decades as they provide a higher ecological validity of findings. This paper presents a RITW study, investigating how assembly, in this case dock assembly of forwarders, was done in practice. As our theoretical foundation, we used the framework of distributed cognition, which is one of the main pillars of RITW. The findings are presented in narrative form, describing and highlighting that the workers achieve an efficient production outcome by being integral parts of the whole production process and doing so through coordination of activities benefitting the shared goal of the distributed socio-technical system.

  • 2.
    Andreasson, Rebecca
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. Department of Information Technology, Visual Information and Interaction, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Thorvald, Peter
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Tool use and collaborative work of dock assembly in practice2017In: Production & Manufacturing Research, ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 164-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to deepen the understanding of the intrinsic interactions andinterplay between humans, tools, and environment from a systemsperspective, research in the wild (RITW) approaches have gainedtraction during recent decades as they provide a higher ecologicalvalidity of findings. This paper presents a RITW study, investigatinghow assembly, in this case dock assembly of forwarders, was donein practice. As our theoretical foundation, we used the framework ofdistributed cognition, which is one of the main pillars of RITW. Thefindings are presented in narrative form, describing and highlightingthat the workers achieve an efficient production outcome by beingintegral parts of the whole production process and doing so throughcoordination of activities benefitting the shared goal of the distributedsocio-technical system.

  • 3.
    Brolin, Anna
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Department of Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
    Thorvald, Peter
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Case, Keith
    Department of Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
    Experimental study of cognitive aspects affecting human performance in manual assembly2017In: Production & Manufacturing Research, ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 141-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigate different ways of presenting material and information at workstations while using mixed assembly mode with product variants. The experimental set up annotated an assembly line involving 36 subjects. The material presentation factor involved the use of a material rack compared to using an unstructured kit as well as a structured kit. The information presentation factor involved using a text and number instruction compared to a photograph instruction, and situations with and without component variation were considered. Results show that assembly times and workload ratings were lower when using a kit, whereas using a material rack resulted in perceived decreased workflow and increased stress and frustration. Moreover, assembly times and workload ratings were lower when using photographs, whereas using text and numbers increased mental workload. The results could be useful when planning work places and production systems in order to obtain a better workflow and an increased human performance. 

  • 4.
    Case, Keith
    et al.
    Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
    Thorvald, Peter
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Editorial2019In: Production & Manufacturing Research, ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 529-530Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    De Vin, Leo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Jacobsson, Lasse
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Karlstad Lean Factory: An instructional factory for game-based lean manufacturing training2017In: Production & Manufacturing Research, ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 268-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation for training lean manufacturing ranges from simple paper-based or LEGO®-based games to larger scale simulation environments, for instance push car assembly. Some models for game-based learning are discussed and a model for lean manufacturing training is adopted . Many types of simulation may be suitable for teaching some basic elements of Lean manufacturing to students, but they are often less suitable for training industry workers in applying Lean manufacturing in their work environment. The latter group is more used to intuitive learning than to formal instruction. Thus, it is important that a training environment for this group more realistically represents the work environment; otherwise training transfer will be limited. For this reason, a lean training environment that includes materials processing stations as well as assembly areas was created. The stations exhibit some realistic behaviour such as stochastic breakdowns. Based on a comparison between factory workers and university students, five hypotheses for testing in future work are proposed.

  • 6.
    De Vin, Leo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Jacobsson, Lasse
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Odhe, JanErik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Simulator-assisted lean production training2019In: Production & Manufacturing Research, ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 433-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Lean Production training and education, simulators are often used.These can take the form of for instance desktop games, computersimulations, or full-scale simulators. Many training participants perceivemodels for experiential learning and for continuous improvementprocesses as complex and abstract. Based on experiences from trainingsessions in a full-scale simulator Karlstad Lean Factory®, a unifiedmodelfor learning and improvementwork is presented. Thismodel stimulatestraining transfer and is perceived as intuitive. It also shows instructionalscaffolding as a learning method. Suggestions for future work includeinvestigating synergy with Smart Manufacturing and the use of LeanProduction simulators for innovative product realisation.

  • 7.
    Kolbeinsson, Ari
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Lagerstedt, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Foundation for a classification of collaboration levels for human-robot cooperation in manufacturing2019In: Production & Manufacturing Research, ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 448-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industry 4.0 aims to support the factory of the future, involving increased use of information systems and new ways of using automation, such as collaboration where a robot and a human share work on a single task. We propose a classification of collaboration levels for Human-Robot collaboration (HRC) in manufacturing that we call levels of collaboration (LoC), formed to provide a conceptual model conducive to the design of assembly lines incorporating HRC. This paper aims to provide a more theoretical foundation for such a tool based on relevant theories from cognitive science and other perspectives of human-technology interaction, strengthening the validity and scientific rigour of the envisioned LoC tool. The main contributions consist of a theoretical grounding to motivate the transition from automation to collaboration, which are intended to facilitate expanding the LoC classification to support HRC, as well as an initial visualization of the LoC approach. Future work includes fully defining the LoC classification as well as operationalizing functionally different cooperation types. We conclude that collaboration is a means to an end, so collaboration is not entered for its own sake, and that collaboration differs fundamentally from more commonly used views where automation is the focus.

  • 8.
    Lee, Tzong-Ru (Jiun-Shen)
    et al.
    Department of Marketing, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan.
    Lin, Szu-Hai
    Department of Marketing, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan.
    Liu, Yang
    Department of Production, University of Vaasa, Vaasa, Finland.
    Imeri, Shpend
    Department of Production, LEORON Professional Development Institute, Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
    Key success factors for implementing Taiwan TrainQuali System (TTQS) in Taiwanese enterprises2015In: Production & Manufacturing Research, ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 84-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Facing the change of economic environment and the need of enhancing competitive advantages, small and medium-sized enterprises in Taiwan utilize ‘Taiwan TrainQuali System (TTQS)’ on training talents. In order to maximize the benefits of TTQS implementation and increase the training efficiency, this paper aims to use ‘grey relational analysis (GRA)’ to extract key success factors (KSFs) from 46 factors, which influence the implementation of TTQS. Moreover, this study also verifies the KSFs with nine case companies which have won gold medals in TTQS evaluation and sum up 12 concrete practices as references for other enterprises in order to show how to implement the TTQS training quality system better in the future, and in turn enhance the quality and performance of human resource training.

  • 9.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Thorvald, Peter
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Manufacturing in the wild: viewing human-based assembly through the lens of distributed cognition2017In: Production & Manufacturing Research, ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 57-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interdisciplinary field of cognitive science has been and isbecoming increasingly central within human factors and ergonomics(HF&E) and, since at the same time, there has long been a call for a more systems perspective in the area with a somewhat wider unit of analysis. This paper argues that the theoretical framework of distributed cognition would greatly benefit the application of HF&E to manufacturing and would offer a more holistic understanding of the interactions between different entities within a greater context,including the social, cultural and materialistic. We aim to characterize and analyse manufacturing as a complex socio-technical system from a distributed cognition perspective; focusing on the use, mediation and integration of different forms of representations, tools and artefacts in this domain. We present illustrative examples fromauthentic manual assembly, showing the cognitively distributed nature of the work, ranging from scaffolding strategies of the individual worker to the emergent properties of a whole assembly line. The paper further proposes and provides benefits of using a distributed cognition framework as a novel approach in the toolboxfor the HF&E discipline, where it may have been found before, but the application to manufacturing has been absent.

  • 10.
    Liu, Yu
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Syberfeldt, Anna
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Strand, Mattias
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Review of simulation-based life cycle assessment in manufacturing industry2019In: Production & Manufacturing Research, ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 490-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The manufacturing industry has a duty to minimize its environmental impact, and an increasing body of legislation mandates environmental impact evaluations from a life cycle perspective to prevent burden shift. The manufacturing industry is increasing its use of computer-based simulations to optimize production processes. In recent years, several published studies have combined simulations with life cycle assessments (LCAs) to evaluate and minimize the environmental impact of production activities. Still, current knowledge of simulations conducted for LCAs is rather disjointed. This paper accordingly reviews the literature covering simulation-based LCAs of production processes. The results of the review and cross-comparison of papers are structured in terms of seven elements in line with the ISO standard definition of LCA and report the strengths and limitations of the reviewed studies. © 2019, © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 11.
    Noroozi, Sayeh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A modularized framework for sales and operations planning with focus on process industries2016In: Production & Manufacturing Research, ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 65-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper suggests a modularized sales and operations planning (S&OP) framework, consisting of content and process. The framework’s content is based on a typology of decoupling points in which the effect of decoupling points on the decision variables in S&OP is studied. The framework’s process takes a step back and addresses the need for a more elaborate design to precede the operational use of S&OP content for different production contexts. The framework supports both process industries (PIs) and discrete manufacturing industries (DIs), and recognizes their specific requirements and reflects them in their S&OP. The differentiating characteristics of PIs and DIs are emphasized through three different decoupling points, namely: discretization decoupling point, control mode decoupling point, and customer order decoupling point. The suggested framework aims to fill the gap in the literature regarding the lack of aggregate planning processes that match the PIs’ specific requirements by reflecting the differentiating characteristics of PIs in S&OP.

  • 12.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Linköping University, Department of Management & Engineering, Linköping, Sweden.
    An ontology for flow thinking based on decoupling points - unravelling a control logic for lean thinking2018In: Production & Manufacturing Research, ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 433-469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continuous flow is the guiding star for lean thinking and considered the ideal state for value streams. Despite this objective, it is seldom possible to obtain a state of continuous flow in a wider context. Decision makers face dynamic environments, and variable internal preconditions require a flow-thinking approach that provides support in response to these challenges. In the present study, the underlying logic of flow thinking is first identified as the key management layer, and thereafter the effectiveness of flow is targeted. The vision of continuous flow is challenged by different exogenous requirements that result in flow discontinuities. Flow thinking is then used to identify 10 decision categories based on these discontinuities, each related to a type of decoupling point and classified as time-based (exogenous) or conversion-based (endogenous). The flow-thinking approach is finally applied in three different contexts: a time-phased product structure, a modularized approach for planning and control, and a mixed-model value stream.

  • 13.
    Wikner, Joakim
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Triadic perspective on customization and supplier interaction in customer-driven manufacturing2018In: Production & Manufacturing Research, ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 3-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Customization and customer-driven manufacturing are both explicitly based on the focal actor’s interaction with the customer actor. The impact of these aspects on the internal operations of the focal actor is relatively well known compared to the limited number of studies performed on the impact on the focal actor’s supplier. The purpose here is therefore to investigate how the concept of customization complements the concept of customer-driven and how customer requirements affect interaction between a supplier and the supplier’s supplier in a triad. Frameworks for different perspectives are developed where match and mismatch between the actors on the perception of flow driver and flow differentiation is highlighted. The frameworks are then applied on a case company to illustrate application.

  • 14.
    Wikner, Joakim
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Johansson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Inventory classification based on decoupling points2015In: Production & Manufacturing Research, ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 218-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ideal state of continuous one-piece flow may never be achieved. Still the logistics manager can improve the flow by carefully positioning inventory to buffer against variations. Strategies such as lean, postponement, mass customization, and outsourcing all rely on strategic positioning of decoupling points to separate forecast-driven from customer-order-driven flows. Planning and scheduling of the flow are also based on classification of decoupling points as master scheduled or not. A comprehensive classification scheme for these types of decoupling points is introduced. The approach rests on identification of flows as being either demand based or supply based. The demand or supply is then combined with exogenous factors, classified as independent, or endogenous factors, classified as dependent. As a result, eight types of strategic as well as tactical decoupling points are identified resulting in a process-based framework for inventory classification that can be used for flow design.

1 - 14 of 14
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf