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  • 1.
    Bergström, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Paul A. Gregory: Quine's Naturalism: Language, Theory, and the Knowing Subject2009In: International Studies in the Philosophy of Science, ISSN 0269-8595, E-ISSN 1469-9281, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 109-112Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Björkman, Beyza
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Language and communication.
    Linguistic Justice for Europe and for the World2012In: International Studies in the Philosophy of Science, ISSN 0269-8595, E-ISSN 1469-9281, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 354-357Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Review of Philippe Van Parijs Linguistic Justice for Europe and for the World2013In: International Studies in the Philosophy of Science, ISSN 0269-8595, E-ISSN 1469-9281, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 354-359Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Brunnander, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Natural selection and multiple realisation: A closer look2013In: International Studies in the Philosophy of Science, ISSN 0269-8595, E-ISSN 1469-9281, I, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 73-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The target of this paper is the claim that natural selection accounts for the multiple realisation of biological and psychological kinds. I argue that the explanation actually offered doesn’t provide any insight about the phenomenon since it presupposes multiple realisation as an unexplained premise, and this is what does all the work. The purported explanation mistakenly invokes the “indifference” of selection to structure as an additional explanatorily relevant factor. While such indifference can be explanatory in intentional contexts it isn’t a causal factor at all in non-intentional nature. The upshot is that once the necessary initial assumption about heterogeneity is accepted there is no further explanation to do.

  • 5. Grüne-Yanoff, Till
    Isolation is Not Characteristic of Models2011In: International Studies in the Philosophy of Science, ISSN 0269-8595, E-ISSN 1469-9281, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 119-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modelling cannot be characterized as isolating, nor models as isolations. This article presents three arguments to that effect, against Uskali Maki's account of models. First, while isolation proceeds through a process of manipulation and control, modelling typically does not proceed through such a process. Rather, modellers postulate assumptions, without seeking to justify them by reference to a process of isolation. Second, while isolation identifies an isolation basea concrete environment it seeks to control and manipulatemodelling typically does not identify such a base. Rather, modellers construct their models without reference to concrete environments, and only later seek to connect their models to concrete situations of the real world. Third, Maki argues that isolation employs idealization to control for disturbing factors, but does not affect the factors or mechanisms that are supposed to be isolated. However, models typically make idealizing assumptions about the factors and mechanisms that are the focus of investigation. Thus, even the product of modelling often cannot be characterized as isolation.

  • 6.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Cutting the Gordian Knot of Demarcation2009In: International Studies in the Philosophy of Science, ISSN 0269-8595, E-ISSN 1469-9281, Vol. 23, p. 237-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A definition of pseudoscience is proposed, according to which a statement is pseudoscientific if and only if it (1) pertains to an issue within the domains of science, (2) is not epistemically warranted, and (3) is part of a doctrine whose major proponents try to create the impression that it is epistemically warranted. This approach has the advantage of separating the definition of pseudoscience from the justification of the claim that science represents the most epistemically warranted statements. The definition is used to explain why proponents of widely divergent criteria for the demarcation between science and pseudoscience tend to be in almost complete agreement on the particular demarcations that should presumably be based on these general criteria.

  • 7.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Natural kind thingamajigs2012In: International Studies in the Philosophy of Science, ISSN 0269-8595, E-ISSN 1469-9281, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 97-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I criticize the treatment of natural kinds as some sort of object, advocated in a recent paper by Alexander Bird. The arguments he gives for regimenting an illustrative statement featuring chemical kinds in his preferred manner are not conclusive, and his criticisms of an alternative strategy involving universally quantified sentences fail. This is important because of the widespread but poorly supported assumption that expressions of natural kinds should be treated as singular referring terms.

  • 8.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Questioning the Justification of Past Science2013In: International Studies in the Philosophy of Science, ISSN 0269-8595, E-ISSN 1469-9281, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 85-93Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 8 of 8
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