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  • 1.
    Aasa, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics. Norrlandskliniken, Umeå.
    Lundström, Lena
    Pain Rehabilitation, Norrlands University Hospital, Umeå.
    Papacosta, Daniel
    Norrlandskliniken, Umeå.
    Sandlund, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Do we see the same movement impairments?: the inter-rater reliability of movement tests for experienced and novice physiotherapists2014In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 16, no 16, p. 173-182, article id 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study design: Inter-rater reliability study. Background: Physiotherapists (PTs) use clinical tests including movement tests to identify faulty movement patterns. Aims: To investigate the inter-rater-reliability of active movement tests in the cervical spine, shoulder joint and scapulo-thoracic joint, and to describe the reasons for judgment of a positive test. Methodology: Four PTs, two experienced and two recently educated (novice), rated performance of five movement tests for 36 participants. Twenty-one of the participants were patients under treatment because of neck and/or shoulder problems, while 15 participants declared no problem from this region of the body. All tests were video recorded and the ratings were done by observing the video recordings. First, the PTs judged the tests as negative (the movement being ideally performed) or positive (the movement not being ideally performed). Then, the PTs described why the movements that they judged positive were not being ideally performed, using a predefined protocol, which represented different movement quality aspects. The inter-rater reliability was calculated for each test using Kappa statistics between the two experienced and the two novice PTs, respectively, and between each of the experienced and each of the novice PTs. Major findings: The experienced PTs had a higher inter-rater reliability than the novice PTs. The reasons for considering a movement test being positive differed highly between the (novice) PTs. Principal conclusion: This study supports previous studies concluding that the observation of active movement tests is reliable when assessed by experienced PTs. Novice PTs might benefit from further supervision.

  • 2.
    Backåberg, Sofia
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Gummesson, Christina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Experiences of using a video-based learning model during a long-term process of movement awareness and learning – a hermeneutical study2019In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore the long-term learning process in movement awareness development supported by a video-based learning model.

    Participants: Eleven undergraduate nursing students.

    Method: The students participated in learning sessions comprising video modelling, video feedback and reflective enquiry with a focus on inter-personal interaction. Each student participated in three individual video sessions during a four-month period. Three individual interviews were carried out, the last one 12–18 months after the final session. Visual, verbal and written material were collected from the video sessions, individual interviews and diaries, and interpreted within a hermeneutical approach.

    Results: The learning process was described in three themes: motivation for change, exploring alternative perspectives and movement changes through challenges.

    Conclusions: The video-based learning model implies a challenging experience on a personal level that supports motivation and a deep approach to learning. It adds a powerful base for reflection, which encourages student-centred active learning. The facilitator’s reflective approach is essential to allow the student to explore her/his own movement, in contrast to delivering instructions. The learning model may be valuable in the physiotherapist’s clinical work in facilitating patients’ movement awareness in the process of movement improvements.

  • 3.
    Bernhardsson, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Narhalsan Res and Dev Primary Hlth Care, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Samsson, Karin S.
    Narhalsan Res and Dev Primary Hlth Care, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Maria E. H.
    Narhalsan Res and Dev Primary Hlth Care, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A preference for dialogue: exploring the influence of patient preferences on clinical decision making and treatment in primary care physiotherapy2019In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 107-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Eliciting and considering patients preferences is essential to any clinical encounter and to good, high quality health care. Little research exists on how preferences are accommodated in decision making and how they influence treatment and rehabilitation. Aims: To explore perceptions of patients with musculoskeletal pain regarding how their preferences were accommodated in clinical decision making and influenced their rehabilitation, and whether their preferences changed during their rehabilitation. Methods: Qualitative interview study. Results: Participants preferences had, for the most part, influenced both choice of treatment and rehabilitation as a whole. While preferences were expressed to various extents, and largely perceived to be accommodated in the decision process, a good dialogue was considered essential for collaborative rehabilitation. Treatment decisions were to a large extent made jointly by the physiotherapist and the patient. Regardless of the strength of the preferences, participants appreciated the dialogue with the physiotherapist and the opportunity to discuss treatment options. The participants described how the physiotherapy episode of care had influenced their perceptions of and preferences for different treatment methods. Conclusions: The findings emphasise the importance of eliciting patient preferences, two-way communication and discussing treatment options, in order to stimulate collaborative rehabilitation.

  • 4.
    Betten, Carola
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Skånevård Kryh, Division Primärvård Skurup, Sweden.
    Sandell, Christofer
    Hill, Jonathan C.
    Gutke, Annelie
    Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Swedish STarT Back Screening Tool2015In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 29-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives : The STarT Back Screening Tool (SBT) is a newly validated questionnaire that identifies modifiable risk factors of poor prognosis in patients with low back pain (LBP). The aim of this study was to cross-culturally adapt the SBT into Swedish and to test its concurrent validity in patients with LBP in primary healthcare.

    Methods: The SBT was translated according to established guidelines. Concurrent validity was tested on 62 patients by comparing the SBT with the Orebro Musculoskeletal Pain Screening Questionnaire, short form (OMPSQ-short). Analysis of correlations between the instruments' total scores and between psychosocial sub-score of SBT and OMPSQ-short was performed using Spearman's rank correlation.

    Results: A translation of the SBT into Swedish required minor semantic adaptation until the final version was acceptable. Correlation between the SBT and the OMPSQ-short was large with r = 0.61 (SBT total with OMPSQ-short total score) and r = 0.60 (SBT psychosocial subscale with OMPSQ-short total score).

    Conclusion: The original SBT was successfully translated into Swedish. Correlation between the Swedish SBT and OMPSQ- short was large. The present study supports the use of the Swedish SBT for further clinical practice and research.

  • 5.
    Bring, Johan
    et al.
    Gävle Univ, Dept Math & Stat, Gävle, Sweden.
    Bring, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy.
    Measuring gait – how the choice of measure can affect the statistical results and the clinical interpretation2017In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 8-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aim of this study was to illustrate how the choice of gait measure could affect the statistical analysis of data and the resulting clinical conclusions.

    Methodology: A descriptive design in which the results from different tests from 10 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus illustrates the potential to generate different clinical conclusions.

    Major findings and principal conclusion: The results illustrate how the choice of measure can affect the statistical results and the clinical interpretation of a study. It is possible to have the paradoxical situation in which one group has a better walking ability if the variable speed is used but the other group has a better walking ability if the variable time is used. An important message is that the choice of measurement and the transformation of data are not primarily statistical issues. If the statistical results are to be useful for clinical decisions, the variables used must be directly related to the utility for the subjects. An understanding of the clinical relevance of different outcomes is required. The distinction between when numbers are purely descriptive and when numbers represent a valuation is subtle and difficult to comprehend.

  • 6.
    Bring, Johan
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Statistics.
    Bring, Annika
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Measuring gait - how the choice of measure can affect the statistical results and the clinical interpretation2017In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 8-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aim of this study was to illustrate how the choice of gait measure could affect the statistical analysis of data and the resulting clinical conclusions. Methodology: A descriptive design in which the results from different tests from 10 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus illustrates the potential to generate different clinical conclusions. Major findings and principal conclusion: The results illustrate how the choice of measure can affect the statistical results and the clinical interpretation of a study. It is possible to have the paradoxical situation in which one group has a better walking ability if the variable speed is used but the other group has a better walking ability if the variable time is used. An important message is that the choice of measurement and the transformation of data are not primarily statistical issues. If the statistical results are to be useful for clinical decisions, the variables used must be directly related to the utility for the subjects. An understanding of the clinical relevance of different outcomes is required. The distinction between when numbers are purely descriptive and when numbers represent a valuation is subtle and difficult to comprehend.

  • 7.
    Cederbom, Sara
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Denison, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    von Heideken Wågert, Petra
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Chronic pain among older women living alone. A study focusing on disability and morale.2014In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 139-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate 1)how older women who are living alone perceive chronic musculoskeletal pain,Activities of Daily Living (ADL), physical activity, affective distress,pain-related beliefs, pain management, and rate pain-related disability andmorale,  2) the relationships betweendemographic variables, ADL, physical activity, affective distress, pain-relatedbeliefs, and pain management with pain-related disability and morale.Method: The study had across-sectional and correlational design. Sixty women, living alone with chronicpain and community support aged ≥65 years were included.Results: The women were on average 81 years old and had lived with pain forabout 21.5 years. They reported low scores of affective distress,catastrophizing thoughts and self-efficacy, high scores of fear of movement,low degrees of pain-related disability, and low levels of  morale. The multiple regression analysisshowed that only catastrophizing thoughts significantlyexplained the variation in pain-related disability, and both affective distress and catastrophizing thoughtssignificantly explained the variation in morale. Conclusion: These older women livingalone with chronic pain reported similar prevalence ofchronic pain and pain-related disability but lower morale when comparingthe results with similar studies about older people in the same age group orolder people who are in need of help to manage their daily life. The only variable that was independely associated to bothpain-related disability and morale was catastrophizing. Further researchshould focus on identifying catastrophizing thougts,and also on developing a rehabilitation program based on a biopsychosocialperspective with the goal to decrease catastrophizing, pain-relateddisability, and increase morale for this target group

  • 8.
    Ejelöv, Marina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Bergström, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Mattsson, Monica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    “Many obstacles along the way”: follow-up of rehabilitation plans after multimodal pain rehabilitation2016In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 18-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore the content of rehabilitation plans after multimodal rehabilitation (MMR) for chronic pain patients, focusing on occupation-oriented measures. A secondary aim was to study how the individual rehabilitation plans had been carried out and implemented during 1 year after MMR. A multiple methods approach with quantitative and qualitative data was used. The quantitative part was descriptive and examined whether the rehabilitation plans were carried out, the number of recommendations in each plan and the type of measures suggested. The qualitative part constituted a content analysis of interviews. Vocational rehabilitation was the second most common recommendation for the whole group. The analysis of the interviews resulted in seven categories divided into two main categories: impeding factors and facilitating factors for rehabilitation. The compliance of professionals and external parties with the patients’ rehabilitation plans, and the patients’ positive experience of their change in behaviour, contributed to the completion of the rehabilitation plans. In conclusion, lack of follow-up from the professionals and negative bodily signals inhibited the completion of rehabilitation. Flexibility on the part of professionals and external actors regarding patients’ rehabilitation plans as well as their own positive experiences of striving for change facilitated rehabilitation.

  • 9.
    Eklund, Caroline
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Elfström, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    User experiences from a web-based, self-management programme: struggling with what I need when stress management is about me2019In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, p. 39-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To explore users’ experiences of a tailored, interactive web application that supports behaviour change in stress management and to identify if and in that case what in the web-based programme that needed further development or adjustment to be feasible in a randomised controlled trial.

    Method: The design of this study was explorative with a qualitative approach. Nine individuals were recruited among the staff at a university. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted and analysed using qualitative content analysis, after the participants had completed the web-based stress management programme.

    Results: One theme was identified, Struggling with what I need when stress management is about me, describing the paradox in having a programme that is perceived as supporting stress management while also being perceived as extensive and time consuming. The theme was divided in two categories: Defining the needs, where the users expressed what they needed from the programme and their everyday environment, to be able to use the programme, and It is about me, where the programme was described as helping the users understand their own stress.

    Conclusion: The participants expressed acceptance of using a web-based programme for stress related problems. The perceived extensiveness of the programme must be considered in further development.

  • 10.
    Frykberg, Gunilla E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Vasa, Rajul
    RV Foundation, Mumbai, India.
    Neuroplasticity in action post-stroke: challenges for physiotherapists2015In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 56-65Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge regarding neuroplasticity post-stroke is increasingly expanding. In spite of this, only a few physiotherapy interventions have been able to demonstrate effectiveness in achieving recovery of lost sensorimotor control. The aims of this review article are to highlight and discuss challenges for physiotherapists working with patients post-stroke, to question some current assessment methods and treatment approaches, and to pose critical questions indicating a possible new direction for physiotherapists in stroke rehabilitation. Differentiation between recovery and compensation post-stroke is increasingly being emphasized. Implementation of this goal in the clinic is insufficient, with a lack of assessment tools with potential to discriminate between the concepts. Large-scale reviews are performed without considering whether functional gains are achieved through “more effective” compensatory strategies or through recovery. Cortical plasticity in neurorehabilitation research and voluntary control in contemporary treatment methods are in focus. Challenges for physiotherapists in stroke rehabilitation consist of rethinking, including looking upon the body under the influence of gravity, focusing on implicit factors that impact movement control and developing new assessment tools. The introduction of a new assessment and treatment concept aiming at expanding the boundaries of center of mass movements towards the paretic side is proposed. In conclusion, we need to assume our responsibilities and step forward as the experts in movement science that we have the potential to be.

  • 11.
    Gard, Gunvor
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation. Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Nyboe, L.
    Aarhus University Hospital, Risskov, Denmark.
    Gyllensten, A.L.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Clinical reasoning and clinical use of basic body awareness therapy in physiotherapy: a qualitative study?2019In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Clinical reasoning is the ability to integrate and apply different types of knowledge, weigh evidence critically and reflect upon the process to arrive at a diagnosis. Body awareness is an approach directed toward an awareness of how the body is used in terms of body function, behaviour, and interaction with self and others. Methods: In the present study, 36 physiotherapists (PTs) from 13 countries working with body awareness methods, mainly Basic Body Awareness Therapy (BBAT) in mental health were interviewed in six focus groups. Content analysis was used to analyse how the informants’ reasoned around the concept of body awareness therapy, and how they use it in their clinical work with patients. Result: Body awareness was conceived as being in contact with sensations and emotions, to be able to control symptoms, such as pain, to find a balance and to develop one’s identity by relating to oneself and others. BBAT was used as a whole body treatment, to promote balance and stability, to teach about body, movements, and coping strategies, to interact in a therapeutic approach and to be integrated with other methods and professionals. Conclusion: The present results can be used to improve the PTs clinical reasoning.

  • 12.
    Gustafsson, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Physiotherapy, Rehabilitation Centre, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Fältström, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Physiotherapy, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Futurum, Region Jönköping County, Sweden.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Futurum, Region Jönköping County, Sweden.
    Written instructions versus physiotherapist-supervised rehabilitation after acute ankle sprain2017In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 76-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of written instructions (WIs) versus physiotherapist-supervised rehabilitation on patient-rated ankle function, satisfaction and physical activity ability after an acute ankle sprain. Thirty-nine patients with an acute ankle sprain, recruited from an emergency department, received WIs on functional rehabilitation (WI group). The patients were evaluated six weeks and three months after their injury with the disease-specific Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS). The patients also rated how satisfied they were with their ankle and physical activity ability using visual analogue scales. The results from the WI group were compared with a group of patients (n ¼ 33) who received physiotherapist-supervised rehabilitation in a previous study (PT group). We found that compared with the PT group, the WI group had significantly worse scores in all of the FAOS subscales six weeks after the injury, and in three of five subscales three months after the injury. They also rated significantly lower satisfaction and significantly lower physical activity ability at both follow-ups. In conclusion, physiotherapist-supervised rehabilitation was more effective than WIs on improving patient-rated ankle function, satisfaction and physical activity ability after an acute ankle sprain.

  • 13.
    Gustavsson, Catharina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Nordlander, Jessica
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Activity and life-role targeting rehabilitation for persistent pain: feasibility of an intervention in primary healthcare.2018In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 141-151Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Gustavsson, Catharina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Dept Physiotherapy, Vasteras, Sweden;Hgsk Dalarna, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden.
    Nordlander, Jessica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Dept Physiotherapy, Vasteras, Sweden.
    Activity and life-role targeting rehabilitation for persistent pain: feasibility of an intervention in primary healthcare2018In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 141-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The activity and life-role targeting rehabilitation programme (ALAR) promotes patient's active involvement in pain rehabilitation.

    Purpose: to explore the feasibility of ALAR applied in a primary healthcare context.

    Materials and methods: An intervention was conducted at primary healthcare centres. Patients experiencing persistent pain were randomly assigned to ALAR + MMR or Multimodal pain rehabilitation (MMR). Data were collected by patient questionnaires before and after intervention (9 weeks and 1 year), medical record examination and therapist telephone interviews.

    Results: Seventy percent of ALAR +MMR participants completed the programme (n = 24). Complete data were obtained for half of the participants (ALAR +MMR n = 15, MMR n = 17). More ALAR +MMR than MMR participants perceived that they had been participating in planning their rehabilitation. The addition of ALAR to MMR induced higher costs short term, but had favourable health-economic effects in the long term.

    Conclusions: The methods for delivering ALAR in primary healthcare by specially trained physio and occupational therapists were feasible. Therapists' acceptability and perceived usability of the ALAR programme was high. More ALAR + MMR than MMR participants withdrew without completing treatment. Measures to increase patients' acceptability of the ALAR programme are warranted. Flexibility in number of treatment sessions and addressing patients' self-efficacy for undertaking rehabilitation is suggested, thus emphasising a more individualised rehabilitation plan.

  • 15.
    Kaijser Alin, Kristina
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Family Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grahn Kronhed, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala.
    Salminen, Helena
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Family Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The association between spinal curvature and balance in elderly women at high risk of osteoporotic fractures in primary health care2016In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 226-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main aim was to study the relationship between spinal curvature and balance in elderly women at high risk of osteoporotic fractures. Ninety-four women were included in this cross-sectional study. Static timed standing and dynamic balance tests were performed; spinal curvature was measured by using the Flexicurve ruler; and radiological data on vertebral fractures were gathered. The women in the hyperkyphosis subgroup had a 5.6 s longer tandem standing time eyes open (p<0.05), tandem gait forwards (p<0.05) and tandem gait backwards (p<0.01) than those without hyperkyphosis. Logistic regression with the ability to tandem walk as a dichotomous outcome (cut-off 4 steps) showed that women with a hyperkyphosis had an age-adjusted Odds ratio of 4.5 (95% CI 1.7–12.1) to perform4 tandem steps backwards and their Odds ratio to perform4 tandem steps forwards was also significantly higher with an age-adjusted Odds ratio of 2.8 (95% CI 1.1–7.4). Lordotic Index was positively correlated to one-leg standing with eyes open (p<0.05). The present study suggests an association between hyperkyphosis and a better tandem standing and tandem gait forwards and backwards.

  • 16.
    Kvist, Joanna
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Linkoping Univ, Div Physiotherapy, Dept Hlth & Med Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Div Physiotherapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden.;Malardalen Univ, Sect Physiotherapy, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Gutke, Annelie
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Dept Hlth & Rehabil, Unit Physiotherapy, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Time to stop using the term "conservative treatment" when we actually mean different physiotherapy modalities - Editorial2018In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 187-188Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Lilliecreutz, Eva Kristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Felixson, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Västervik Hospital, Västervik, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Effects of guided aerobic exercise and mindfulness after acquired brain injury: a pilot study2017In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 229-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine whether a specific guided programme of aerobic exercise together with mindfulness could have an effect on estimated health status and occupational performance in individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI). As secondary outcomes, the effects on health-related quality of life, cognition and mental fatigue were analysed.

    Methods: The study included individuals with mild to moderate ABI (n = 21) with residual cognitive impairments. Guided interventions were given three times per week for 12 weeks. Neuropsychological and physical tests as well as patient-reported outcome measures were used as outcomes.

    Results: Estimated health status, self-reported occupational performance as well as satisfaction with performance improved together with physical capacity. Improvements in cognitive functions were related to attention and information processing speed; in addition, self-reported mental fatigue was reduced after the intervention. Cognitive function related to working memory and health-related quality of life were not affected.

    Conclusions: Support to improve physical capacity combined with practicing mindfulness, bringing attention to the present moment, seems to have a positive impact on occupational performance, estimated health status, attention and information processing speed as well as mental fatigue in individuals with cognitive dysfunction after ABI.

  • 18. Lilliecreutz Huitema, Eva
    et al.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Andersson, Gunnar
    Lifestyle changes with help from Health Profile Assessment in combination with support in individual interventions for persons with aquired brain injury - a pilot study2014In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 151-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about how to support a lifestyle change for persons with acquired brain injury (ABI), who have poor health compared with the rest of the population. This study investigates whether the Health Profile Assessment (HPA) combined with individual support in individually adjusted interventions could affect the lifestyle of persons with ABI. This longitudinal prospective and quasi-experimental study has a before and after design. HPA aims to improve health habits, perceived health and physiological measurements. In addition, this study includes interventions based on individual goals and actions decided on by the participants. The intervention process was supported through various communication methods such as Motivational Interviewing (MI) and Transactional Analyses (TA). The studied group (n = 25) included persons with cognitive impairments due to ABI who were considered for outpatient rehabilitation at a specialized facility at a university hospital in south-eastern Sweden. Results at follow-up showed significant improvements in physical activity, perceived health and diet. Significant improvements were also shown in sagittal abdominal diameter, waist circumference, body mass index (BMI) and physical fitness. Consequently, this study describes a method that successfully supported lifestyle changes in persons with ABI.Read

  • 19.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Physiotherapists enabling school children's physical activity using social cognitive theory, empowerment and technology2017In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 147-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To contribute knowledge concerning how physiotherapists using social cognitive theory, empowerment and information and communication technology can promote children’s physical activity in a school context.

    Methodology: Four studies were conducted in the northern part of Sweden and a qualitative discourse analysis of the results from all four studies was performed to enable a more comprehensive understanding. Three of the studies involved children, and one study involved parents.

    Major findings: The findings formed three themes: A, Acknowledging empowerment; B, Bonded forces overcame barriers; and C, Competence and motivation enable change. The first theme includes the act of creating the intervention using an empowerment approach. The second theme concerns barriers to being physically active and social support from parents and peers regarding physical activity promotion. The third theme concerns motivation and associated personal factors, such as self-efficacy.

    Principal conclusion: This course of action might be a way for physiotherapists to promote children’s physical activity using social cognitive theory, empowerment and information and communication technology in a school context. An empowerment approach that includes the formation of partnerships with children is a promising avenue for developing physical activity interventions in schools. In addition, physical activity interventions should attempt to build on children’s self-efficacy and make physical activity opportunities fun and enjoyable.

  • 20.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Fun, feasible and functioning: Students’ experiences of a physical activity intervention2014In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 194-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe students’ experiences of participating in a physical activity (PA) intervention. Methodology: A purposive sampling was used; 14 students (four boys and 10 girls) were interviewed and the collected data was analysed using qualitative content analysis. Major findings: One main theme was identified: fun, feasible and functioning. The following two subthemes also emerged: the multi-component intervention fits several, but not all, and manageable measuring can also be motivating. The main theme elucidates that fun was an important factor for joining the study; the students also experienced he empowerment-inspired intervention and the data collection to be fun and feasible. According to the students, the intervention was functioning since they experienced that it increased their PA. Principal conclusions: An empowerment approach that includes forming partnerships with students is a promising avenue for developing PA interventions for schools, regardless of whether the person concerned is a parent, teacher, school nurse or physiotherapist, but one size will never fit all.

  • 21.
    Mahrs Träff, Annsofie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Larsson, Ann-Christine
    The Research and Development Unit for Eastern Östergötland, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Approaches to physical activity at assisted living facilities: from the perspective of older people and physiotherapists2018In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Physical activity has been described as important for the well-being of all individuals, including the very old. The aim of this study was to investigate how physical activity is performed at assisted living facilities, the situations in which older people were and wanted to be physically active and the role of the physiotherapist at each facility.

    Methods: To achieve this aim, an ethnographic study including observations and interviews was conducted at four assisted living facilities.

    Results: The results show that physical activity neither was an issue in focus at any of the assisted living facilities, nor were recommendations on physical activity followed. Individuals that were able to exercise themselves could do so, whereas those in need of assistance had but limited possibilities to be physically active. There was a need for physical activity that the staff do not necessarily and sufficiently identify.

    Conclusion: The study illustrated that there were major variations in how older people engaged in physical activity and how physical activities were part of everyday life. Physiotherapists played no clear role at the facilities, especially with regard to preventive exercise. Older individuals were not involved in determining which activities should be made available to the residents.

  • 22.
    Mahrs Träff, Annsofie
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen Åldrande och social förändring.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen Åldrande och social förändring.
    Larsson, Ann-Christine
    The Research and Development Unit for Eastern Östergötland, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen Åldrande och social förändring.
    Approaches to physical activity at assisted living facilities: from the perspective of older people and physiotherapists2018In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Physical activity has been described as important for the well-being of all individuals, including the very old. The aim of this study was to investigate how physical activity is performed at assisted living facilities, the situations in which older people were and wanted to be physically active and the role of the physiotherapist at each facility.

    Methods: To achieve this aim, an ethnographic study including observations and interviews was conducted at four assisted living facilities.

    Results: The results show that physical activity neither was an issue in focus at any of the assisted living facilities, nor were recommendations on physical activity followed. Individuals that were able to exercise themselves could do so, whereas those in need of assistance had but limited possibilities to be physically active. There was a need for physical activity that the staff do not necessarily and sufficiently identify.

    Conclusion: The study illustrated that there were major variations in how older people engaged in physical activity and how physical activities were part of everyday life. Physiotherapists played no clear role at the facilities, especially with regard to preventive exercise. Older individuals were not involved in determining which activities should be made available to the residents.

  • 23.
    Merolli, Mark
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Australia // Health and Biomedical Informatics Centre, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
    Busuttil, Maria-Louisa
    Consumer Affairs and Civil Liberties, Ministry for Social Dialogue, Valletta, Malta.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research, Karolinska Institutet, Institute for Environmental Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Green, Ann
    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Coventry University, Coventry, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
    Global communication practices of physiotherapists on Twitter2018In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Social media have offered professional communities the opportunity to be digitally connected. The hashtag #GlobalPT was conceived and promoted from 2015 and has acted as a slogan for the globally connected physiotherapy community. This study explores the global reach and dominant communication themes that emerged during a set time frame that represented the single largest period of #GlobalPT activity.

    Method: Using purposive sampling, 988 publically available tweets including the hashtag #GlobalPT were studied. Descriptive statistical analysis was conducted to quantify tweet data and qualitative, inductive phenomenological thematic content analysis to describe latent themes within the tweets.

    Results: #GlobalPT activity was noted across 24 countries (UK top represented) and four languages (929/988, 94.03% in English). Europe was the most active area (738/988, 74.70%), followed by Oceania (120/988, 12.15%). Thematic content analysis identified eight themes within the communication practices of the physiotherapy community on Twitter. The three major themes were: sharing information (108/377, 28.65%), promotional activity (93/377, 24.67%) and positive feedback (69/377, 18.30%).

    Conclusion: The professional communication practices of physiotherapists on Twitter show a global spread of communication. The themes provide preliminary evidence for social media’s unique potential to assist the World Confederation for Physical Therapy strategic vision.

  • 24.
    Mikaelsson, Katarina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Rutberg, Stina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Michaelson, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Physically inactive adolescents’ experiences of engaging in physical activity2019In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study aimed to describe physically inactive adolescents’ experiences and reflections about engaging in physical activity. Methods: Nine graduate students from the third year of upper secondary school (six women and three men) participated in this study. Narrative interviews were used for data collection and qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the interviews. Results: The analysis revealed three themes ‘Acknowledging resistance and barriers to performing physical activity’, ‘Knowing that it is good is not enough’, and ‘Feeling included and accepted is fun and motivating’. These themes show that the adolescent’s experienced barriers, acknowledged pros and cons and identified possibilities to be physically active. Conclusions: Identifying experiences that impact on inactive adolescents’ attitude and willingness to perform physical activity can be useful to understand the needs of the individual. By relating these experiences to the different stages of the transtheoretical model, this study could provide valuable knowledge for designing future interventions to enhance physical activity in this target group.

  • 25.
    Nordin, Catharina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    In search of recognition: patients’ experiences of patient participation prior to multimodal pain rehabilitation2014In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 49-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore primary healthcare patients’ experiences of patient participation prior to multimodal pain rehabilitation. Data was collected from interviews with 17 patients, aged 23–59 years, after completing multimodal rehabilitation. Data was analysed using qualitative content analysis. The theme, In search of recognition, depicted patient participation prior to the multimodal pain rehabilitation as a lack of recognition in the healthcare system. A demand for medical help and the healthcare professionals’ preferential right to interpret the patients’ condition formed the category Need for medical affirmation. In the category Emotional and cognitive alienation, patients emphasized distress when being unconfirmed. This entailed an emotional and cognitive distance between the patients and the healthcare professionals. Situational factors, together with patients’ emotional and cognitive prerequisites and patients’ strategies to be included in dialogue represented the category Need to communicate, which influenced the opportunities to participate. For healthcare professionals, it is important to understand that patients in multimodal pain rehabilitation may have experiences of a clinician-centred behaviour in the past. Patients may have been unconfirmed and their point of view disregarded. For the future, greater effort for dialogue and patients’ involvement in decision-making and rehabilitation planning is needed.

  • 26.
    Nordin, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Nyberg, Andre
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Sandberg, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Concurrent validity of a fixated hand-held dynamometer for measuring isometric knee extension strength in adults with congenital heart disease2019In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the concurrent validity of a fixated hand-held dynamometer (HHD) in comparison to a load cell in measurement of maximal isometric knee extension force in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) and healthy adults.

    Methods: Fourteen adults with CHD and fourteen healthy adults were included. Each participant was tested three times with each method and the mean of the top two results for each participant and method was used in analysis.

    Results: The agreement between the two methods was excellent in both groups (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC], 95% confidence interval [CI]) 0.98 (0.92–1.00) in the CHD group and ICC 0.99 (0.96–1.00) in the healthy group). There was a small difference of 19.5 Newton or 4.8% (p<.05) between the two methods in the CHD group. No significant difference was seen between the two methods in the healthy group (p>.05).

    Conclusions: The fixated HHD demonstrated excellent concurrent validity when compared to a load cell among adults with CHD as well as in healthy adults. Thus, in a healthy population the methods can be used interchangeably, however, a small difference between the methods is seen in the CHD group.

  • 27.
    Norlin, Therese
    et al.
    Department of Sports Science, Linnaeus University.
    Tranaeus Fitzgerald, Ulrika
    Stockholm Sports Trauma Research Center, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet.
    Alricsson, Marie
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Kalmar.
    Barriers to and possibilities of returning to play after a severe soccer injury: a qualitative study2016In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 179-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Soccer is the biggest sport in the world, resulting in a large number of injuries occurring in this game.Many soccer players today are ready physically, but not mentally, to return to play. The aim of thisstudy was to investigate injured players’ perception of their time after a sports injury has occurred. Thestudy was conducted using a qualitative approach. Eight soccer players, four male and four female,aged 14–25 years, were interviewed individually. The material was analysed using manifest content ana-lysis. The participants reported on various psychological aspects that affected them both positively andnegatively during the rehabilitation period. Individual factors included the injured players’ reaction,motivation and fear. Situational factors, such as their coach, the team, their family and the physiother-apist, also influenced the participants. In conclusion, several psychological factors affect young soccerplayers’ perception of rehabilitation after a severe injury. This study found that support from the teamand the coach is often lacking in a soccer player’s rehabilitation.

  • 28.
    Norlin, Therese
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Traneus Fitzgerald, Ulrika
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Alricsson, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Mid Sweden University.
    Barriers to and possibilities of returning to play after a severe soccer injury: A qualitative study2016In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 179-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Soccer is the biggest sport in the world, resulting in a large number of injuries occurring in this game. Many soccer players today are ready physically, but not mentally, to return to play. The aim of this study was to investigate injured players’ perception of their time after a sports injury has occurred. The study was conducted using a qualitative approach. Eight soccer players, four male and four female, aged 14–25 years, were interviewed individually. The material was analysed using manifest content analysis. The participants reported on various psychological aspects that affected them both positively and negatively during the rehabilitation period. Individual factors included the injured players’ reaction, motivation and fear. Situational factors, such as their coach, the team, their family and the physiotherapist, also influenced the participants. In conclusion, several psychological factors affect young soccer players’ perception of rehabilitation after a severe injury. This study found that support from the team and the coach is often lacking in a soccer player’s rehabilitation. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 29.
    Rehn, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Clinical exercise pathophysiology for physical therapy: Examination, testing, and exercise prescription for movement-related disorders2017In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 116-116Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Romé, Åsa
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy, Lund University.
    Persson, Ulf
    Swedish Institute for Health Economics (IHE).
    Ekdahl, Charlotte
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy, Lund University.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Costs and outcomes of an exercise referral programme: A 1-year follow-up study2014In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 82-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To analyse, at a 1-year follow-up, cost offset and outcomes of changing the physical activity behaviour due to a primary care intervention. Methodology: Participants were 528 inactive individuals with lifestyle-related health problems, 18–84 years, and randomized into a high-dose intervention group (n = 270) or a low-dose intervention group (n = 257). The 4-month lasting intervention “Physical Activity on Prescription” (PAP) contained exercise, education and motivational counselling. At the 1-year follow-up, 178 individuals (95 in the high-dose group, 83 in the low-dose group) were assessed with the IPAQ (International Physical Activity Questionnaire) short form, perceived physical activity and functional ability (Six Minute Walk Test). Motivation and attitudes towards physical activity were assessed with a questionnaire, and analysed based on factor analysis. Major findings: physical activity increased significantly, but without differences between high-dose and low-dose groups. The rate of inactive individuals decreased from 75% to 53%. Analysis of motivation showed no differences between the groups. Principal conclusion: The PAP-program significantly improved physical activity behaviour at the 1-year follow-up, and reduced costs for inactivity by 22%. Economic incentives, i.e. expenditures and individuals’ own valuation of leisure time, seem to influence preferences for participation in the PAP-program. Social–cognitive factors seem important when changing physical activity behaviour. Prescribed exercise may work pre-motivational for changed physical activity behaviour

  • 31.
    Skjaerven, Liv H.
    et al.
    Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Bergen University College, Bergen University College, Department of Physical Therapy.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Sundal, Mary Anne
    Department of Occupational Therapy, Physiotherapy and Radiography, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Bergen University College.
    Strand, Liv Inger
    Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, Physiotherapy Research Group, University of Bergen.
    Reliability and validity of the Body Awareness Rating Scale (BARS), an observational assessment tool of movement quality2015In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 19-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Movement quality assessed by the Body Awareness Rating Scale (BARS) is used as an indicator of health and self-efficacy in patients with long-lasting musculoskeletal and mental health problems. The objective of the study was to examine reliability and construct validity of the movement quality scale. 25 patients and 25 healthy persons were included. Internal consistency was examined by Cronbach's α, reliability by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICCagreement) and measurement error reported by standard error of measurement (SEM) and smallest detectable change (SDC). Construct validity was examined by testing hypotheses of moderate association between the observational scale and the self-report Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) subscales and the General Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale (GPSES). A hypothesis about the difference in scores between groups being expected to differ in health states was tested. Internal consistency (α) was 0.92. Inter-tester reliability was ICC = 0.99 and SEM = 0.8. The test–retest reliability was ICC = 0.96 and SEM = 1.4, implying that improvement should be above 3.3 (SDC) to claim a treatment effect. BARS was moderately correlated (0.30 ≤ rs < 0.60) with most SF-36 subscales and GPSES. The patients demonstrated less movement quality than healthy persons. Evidence was provided of high internal consistency and reliability in qualified testers. Construct validity was indicated, as BARS reflected various aspects of health and self-efficacy.

  • 32.
    Stensdotter, Ann-Katrin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Department of Health Education and Social Work Physiotherapy, Sör-Trönderlag University College Trondheim.
    Tengman, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Brax Olofsson, Lisbeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Häger, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Deficits in single-limb stance more than 20 years after ACL injury2013In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 78-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate the long-term effect on balance during single-limb stance after unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury across two groups who had rehabilitation including ACL reconstruction (ACLR) or a tailored physiotherapy program (ACLTPP), compared with knee-healthy controls.

    Methods: Single-limb stance was monitored for floor-supports with the contralateral foot. Single-limb stance without floor-supports was assessed with analyses of center of pressure (CoP) for further discrimination. Comparisons were made between ACLR (n = 28) and ACLTPP (n = 28) and with controls (n = 18). The injured and uninjured legs were compared within ACL-injured subjects.

    Results: Single-limb balance was equally inferior in both ACL-injured groups and on both legs compared with knee-healthy controls. In ACLR and ACLTPP, 39% and 50%, respectively, failed to stand on one leg without floor-supports with the contralateral foot. No contralateral supports occurred in knee-healthy controls. CoP measures for subjects who stood without contralateral floor-supports did not reveal any further differences. Older age and higher body mass index (BMI) correlated with larger migration of CoP.

    Conclusion: Inability to stand without contralateral supports showed that balance in single-limb stance was inferior in ACL-injured subjects, independently of which initial treatment that was given. Age and BMI need consideration in studies assessing balance in single-limb stance.

  • 33.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Artificial intelligence and physiotherapy - editorial2019In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 1-1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Development of the EJPT during the last year.2016In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 77-77Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Editorial2013In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 15, p. 1-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Editorial2014In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 1-1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Editorial2013In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 42-45Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Editorial2016In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 201-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Editorial2014In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 129-129Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Health promotion for older persons by decreasing sedentary behaviour–Editorial2019In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 21, no 3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Positive changes in the European Journal of Physiotherapy during the past couple of years.2017In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 1-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Time for more focus on co-production/co-creation in physiotherapy research?2015In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 55-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    WHO's sustainable development goals and physiotherapy in 2018: editorial2018In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Söderlund, Anne
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Thunborg, Charlotta
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Wickford, Jenny
    Univ Hosp, Linköping, Sweden.
    The case of the missing body2017In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 177-177Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Tapani, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Singh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Markova, Magdalena
    Koncalova, Martina
    Aasa, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    An inter-tester reliability and feasibility study of the Manual Physiotherapeutic Correction (MFK) method2017In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 2-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Czech Manual Physiotherapeutic Correction (MFK) Method® was introduced to Swedish physiotherapists. This study evaluated the inter-tester reliability of the manual muscle testing procedure included in the method. The feasibility of the MFK Method®, when used in Sweden, was also investigated.

    Methods: Two Czech physiotherapists, experienced in the MFK Method®, rated performance of the 41 tests included in the manual muscle testing procedure for 20 participants. Cohen’s kappa statistics were performed to evaluate agreement between the raters. When investigating the feasibility of the method, two Swedish physiotherapists used the MFK Method® in the rehabilitation of 10 patients.

    Results: Kappa values varied from −0.06 to 0.84. After adjusting for prevalence of failed tests, 15 of the 41 muscle tests demonstrated values of >0.40. When using the MFK Method® in Sweden, several practical obstacles were found.

    Conclusion: Most of the tests showed low inter-tester reliability. The testing procedure needs to be further standardized and the practical issues solved before the feasibility of the method, when used in Sweden and/or other countries, can be investigated again.

  • 46.
    Vikman Lostelius, Petra
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Psychosomatic Medicine Clinic, Västmanland County Council, Västerås, Sweden.
    Ståhle-Öberg, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Habilitation, Västerbotten County Council, Umeå, Sweden.
    Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Pain in children with cerebral palsy: adolescent siblings’ awareness of pain and perceived influence on their family2019In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 164-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To elucidate the experiences of being an adolescent sibling in a family that includes a child with cerebral palsy (CP) and pain, from the perspectives of siblings and parents.

    Methods: Seven siblings and 10 parents were individually interviewed to systematically analyse the experiences of siblings and parents with children with CP and pain. The interviews were analysed by using qualitative content analysis according to Graneheim and Lundman.

    Results: The theme ‘Making pain common ground for support’ and three categories combined the non-disabled adolescent sibling and parental experiences of the child’s pain, and point to the need for support of the non-disabled siblings. Dysfunctional coping influences the siblings’ daily life and future health. Siblings wanted closer contact with the Development Centre in order to alleviate their negative emotions.

    Conclusions: As Development Centre physiotherapists meet the families to the child with CP, they can be a link to the sibling. Physiotherapists can educate siblings on pain and how to better cope with stress and emotional discomfort caused by their sibling’s CP and pain.

  • 47.
    von Heideken Wågert, Petra
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Editorial2014In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 193-193Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Wahlberg, Martina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Zingmark, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Municipality of Östersund, Health and Social Care Administration, Östersund, Sweden.
    Stenberg, Gunilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Munkholm, Michaela
    Rasch analysis of the EQ-5D-3L and the EQ-5D-5L in persons with back and neck pain receiving physiotherapy in a primary care context2019In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the EQ-5D-3L and the EQ-5D-5L in patients with back and neck pain.

    Materials and methods: Participants from two independent clinical survey studies was included in this study. In total 164 participants were answering either the EQ-5D-3L or the EQ-5D-5L after their visit to a physiotherapist in primary care for back and neck pain. Rasch analysis was performed to measure the psychometric properties of the two instruments.

    Main findings: Overall, the EQ-5D-5L showed preliminary evidence of good psychometric properties. The items in both the EQ-5D-5L and the EQ-5D-3L showed acceptable goodness-of-fit indicating unidimensionality for both instruments measuring the concept health-related quality of life. All test persons fit the model, but the person separation reliability and person separation index were only barely acceptable for the EQ-5D-5L.

    Conclusions: The results indicate that the EQ-5D-5L should be the preferred option when evaluating health-related quality of life with the EQ-5D, especially for patients with back and neck pain.

  • 49.
    Wåhlin, C.
    et al.
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute for Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kvarnström, S.
    Region Östergötland County, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Öhrn, A.
    Region Östergötland County, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Nilsing Strid, Emma
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Region Östergötland County, Linkoping, Sweden; University Healthcare Research Centre, Region Örebro County and School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Patient and healthcare worker safety risks and injuries. Learning from incident reporting2019In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Learning from incident reporting systems is one core strategy to develop a culture of safety for healthcare workers and patients. The aim of this retrospective study was to explore patient injuries focussing on falls. Furthermore, on healthcare workers incidents, injuries and the situations they occurred.

    Method: A total of 65,749 patient risks and incidents were registered in the incident reporting system between 2011 and 2014. Of these, 11,006 were classified as an injury to a patient. Risks and incidents were registered and analysed for 1702 healthcare workers.

    Results: Fifteen percent of the patient injuries required treatment. Falls were reported in 17% of the cases. Patients fell mainly in unassisted situations. Healthcare workers’ incidents and injuries were registered mainly by nurses and assistant nurses. Sixteen percent of the injuries required treatment. Prevalence of incidents was on an average 3.5% each year. Common injuries were: needle stick, workplace violence, injuries during patient manual handling. The patient was present in 74% of all incidents.

    Conclusion: Patient and healthcare workers injuries are still prevalent in Swedish healthcare and a substantial part of the incidents involved a patient situation. Collaboration between employers, employees and patient representatives is needed to increase awareness of safety in healthcare.

  • 50.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Institute for Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Using social media to connect, facilitate communication, and practice knowledge translation2018In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 65-66Article in journal (Other academic)
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