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  • 1.
    Brouzet, Christophe
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Mittal, Nitesh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Lundell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Size-Dependent Orientational Dynamics of Brownian Nanorods2018In: ACS Macro Letters, E-ISSN 2161-1653, Vol. 7, no 8, p. 1022-1027Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Successful assembly of suspended nanoscale rod-like particles depends on fundamental phenomena controlling rotational and translational diffusion. Despite the significant developments in fluidic fabrication of nanostructured materials, the ability to quantify the dynamics in processing systems remains challenging. Here we demonstrate an experimental method for characterization of the orientation dynamics of nanorod suspensions in assembly flows using orientation relaxation. This relaxation, measured by birefringence and obtained after rapidly stopping the flow, is deconvoluted with an inverse Laplace transform to extract a length distribution of aligned nanorods. The methodology is illustrated using nanocelluloses as model systems, where the coupling of rotational diffusion coefficients to particle size distributions as well as flow-induced orientation mechanisms are elucidated. 

  • 2.
    Carrick, Christopher
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Larsson, Per A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Immunoselective cellulose nanospheres: a versatile platform for nanotheranostics2014In: ACS Macro Letters, E-ISSN 2161-1653, Vol. 3, no 11, p. 1117-1120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a novel route for the preparation and functionalization of perfectly spherical cellulose nanospheres (CNSs), ranging from 100 to 400 nrn with a typical diameter of 160-170 nrn,for use in theranostics. The method of preparation enables both surface and interior bulk functionalization, and this presumably also makes the CNSs suitable for use in end-use applications other than theranostics. Surface functionalization was here demonstrated by antibody conjugation with an antibody specific toward the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein, i.e., facilitating interaction with cancer cells having the EGFR. Besides showing specificity, the CNS-antibody conjugates showed a very low nonspecific binding. The CNSs could easily be bulk functionalized by embedding gold nanoparticles in the cellulose sphere matrix during CNS preparation to provide imaging contrast for diagnostic purposes.

  • 3.
    Feng, Shizhen
    et al.
    South China University of Technology, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Chang
    South China University of Technology, Peoples R China.
    Xu, Xiaofeng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Liu, Xuncheng
    South China University of Technology, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Lianjie
    South China University of Technology, Peoples R China.
    Nian, Yaowen
    South China University of Technology, Peoples R China.
    Cao, Yong
    South China University of Technology, Peoples R China.
    Chen, Junwu
    South China University of Technology, Peoples R China.
    Siloxane-Terminated Side Chain Engineering of Acceptor Polymers Leading to Over 7% Power Conversion Efficiencies in All-Polymer Solar Cells2017In: ACS Macro Letters, E-ISSN 2161-1653, Vol. 6, no 11, p. 1310-1314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To investigate the influence of functional pendent groups on acceptor polymers and photovoltaic properties of all-polymer solar cells (all-PSCs), two novel acceptor polymers containing siloxane-terminated side chains are synthesized and characterized. Increasing the content of siloxane-terminated side chains can reduce pi-pi stacking distance and improve crystalline behavior, yet lead to poorer solubility of the acceptor polymers. By modulating the proper loadings of siloxane-terminated side chains on the acceptor polymers, the PBDB-T:PNDI-Si25 all-PSC attains a maximal power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.4% with an outstanding fill factor of 0.68. The results provide, new insights for developing high-performance all-PSCs through functional group engineering on the acceptor polymers, to achieve good solubility, polymer miscibility, and blend morphology.

  • 4. Hufendiek, Andrea
    et al.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Meier, Michael A. R.
    Barner-Kowollik, Christopher
    Fluorescent Covalently Cross-Linked Cellulose Networks via Light Induced Ligation2016In: ACS Macro Letters, E-ISSN 2161-1653, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 139-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A facile light-induced procedure for the covalent cross-linking of cellulose at ambient conditions employing the nitrile imine mediated tetrazole-ene cycloaddition (NITEC) reaction is presented. Cellulose-tetrazoles with 2 degrees of substitution (0.14 and 0.23) were synthesized in a solution based transesterification procedure in an ionic liquid. Two bismaleimides with either a trioxatridecane or a dithiodipropionyl backbone were used as cross-linkers to form fluorescent, covalently cross-linked cellulose networks and films, which were characterized by UV/vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, DSC, and TGA. The films showed a broad emission band from 500-700 nm and were thermally stable up to 200 degrees C. Using the bismaleimide with a disulfide moiety as the cross-linker, reductive degradation of the films can be induced. Finally, cellulose-tetrazole was cross-linked in a spatially resolved fashion, providing a strategy for the shaping of films based on renewable resources.

  • 5.
    Hynynen, Jonna
    et al.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Jarsvall, Emmy
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Kroon, Renee
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Zhang, Yadong
    Georgia Inst Technol, GA 30332 USA; Georgia Inst Technol, GA 30332 USA.
    Barlow, Stephen
    Georgia Inst Technol, GA 30332 USA; Georgia Inst Technol, GA 30332 USA.
    Marder, Seth R.
    Georgia Inst Technol, GA 30332 USA; Georgia Inst Technol, GA 30332 USA.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lund, Anja
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Mueller, Christian
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Enhanced Thermoelectric Power Factor of Tensile Drawn Poly(3-hexylthiophene)2019In: ACS Macro Letters, E-ISSN 2161-1653, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 70-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The thermoelectric power factor of a broad range of organic semiconductors scales with their electrical conductivity according to a widely obeyed power law, and therefore, strategies that permit this empirical trend to be surpassed are highly sought after. Here, tensile drawing of the conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) is employed to create free-standing films with a high degree of uniaxial alignment. Along the direction of orientation, sequential doping with a molybdenum tris(dithiolene) complex leads to a 5-fold enhancement of the power factor beyond the predicted value, reaching up to 16 mu W m(-1) K-2 for a conductivity of about 13 S cm(-1). Neither stretching nor doping affect the glass transition temperature of P3HT, giving rise to robust free-standing materials that are of interest for the design of flexible thermoelectric devices.

  • 6.
    Liu, Yingxin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Stoeckel, Daniela
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gordeyeva, Korneliya
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Agthe, Michael
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Hamburg, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, DE-22761 Hamburg, Germany..
    Schutz, Christina
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Luxembourg, Phys & Mat Res Unit, L-1511 Luxembourg, Luxembourg..
    Fall, Andreas B.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;RISE Bioecon, Box 5604, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bergstrom, Lennart
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nanoscale Assembly of Cellulose Nanocrystals during Drying and Redispersion2018In: ACS Macro Letters, E-ISSN 2161-1653, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 172-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have followed the structural evolution during evaporation-induced self-assembly of sulfonated cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) in the presence of H+ and Li+ counterions by small-angle X-ray scattering. Drying of CNC-H dispersions results in ordered films that could not be readily redispersed, while the CNC-Li films were disordered and prone to reswelling and redispersion. The scaling of the separation distance (d) between CNC particles and the particle concentration (c) shows that the CNC-H dispersions display a unidimensional contraction of the nematic structure (d alpha c(-1)) during drying, while the CNC-Li dispersions consolidate isotropically (d alpha c(-1/3)), which is characteristic for hydrogels with no preferential orientation. Temporal evolution of the structure factor and complementary dynamic light-scattering measurements show that CNC-Li is more aggregated than CNC-H during evaporation-induced assembly. Insights on the structural evolution during CNC assembly and redispersion can promote development of novel and optimized processing routes of nanocellulose-based materials.

  • 7.
    Liu, Yingxin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Sweden.
    Stoeckel, Daniela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Gordeyeva, Korneliya
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Agthe, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Schütz, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Fall, Andreas B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Nanoscale Assembly of Cellulose Nanocrystals during Drying and Redispersion2018In: ACS Macro Letters, E-ISSN 2161-1653, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 172-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have followed the structural evolution during evaporation-induced self-assembly of sulfonated cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) in the presence of H+ and Li+ counterions by small-angle X-ray scattering. Drying of CNC-H dispersions results in ordered films that could not be readily redispersed, while the CNC-Li films were disordered and prone to reswelling and redispersion. The scaling of the separation distance (d) between CNC particles and the particle concentration (c) shows that the CNC-H dispersions display a unidimensional contraction of the nematic structure (d alpha c(-1)) during drying, while the CNC-Li dispersions consolidate isotropically (d alpha c(-1/3)), which is characteristic for hydrogels with no preferential orientation. Temporal evolution of the structure factor and complementary dynamic light-scattering measurements show that CNC-Li is more aggregated than CNC-H during evaporation-induced assembly. Insights on the structural evolution during CNC assembly and redispersion can promote development of novel and optimized processing routes of nanocellulose-based materials.

  • 8.
    Liu, Yingxin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden; KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Stoeckel, Daniela
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Gordeyeva, Kornelya
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Agthe, Michael
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Schutz, Christina
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Fall, Andreas B.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, Biorefinery and Energy. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Bergstrom, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Nanoscale Assembly of Cellulose Nanocrystals during Drying and Redispersion2018In: ACS Macro Letters, E-ISSN 2161-1653, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 172-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have followed the structural evolution during evaporation-induced self-assembly of sulfonated cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) in the presence of H+ and Li+ counterions by small-angle X-ray scattering. Drying of CNC-H dispersions results in ordered films that could not be readily redispersed, while the CNC-Li films were disordered and prone to reswelling and redispersion. The scaling of the separation distance (d) between CNC particles and the particle concentration (c) shows that the CNC-H dispersions display a unidimensional contraction of the nematic structure (d alpha c(-1)) during drying, while the CNC-Li dispersions consolidate isotropically (d alpha c(-1/3)), which is characteristic for hydrogels with no preferential orientation. Temporal evolution of the structure factor and complementary dynamic light-scattering measurements show that CNC-Li is more aggregated than CNC-H during evaporation-induced assembly. Insights on the structural evolution during CNC assembly and redispersion can promote development of novel and optimized processing routes of nanocellulose-based materials.

  • 9.
    Radiom, Milad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE). Univ Geneva, Dept Inorgan & Analyt Chem, Quai Ernest Ansermet 30, CH-1205 Geneva, Switzerland.
    Maroni, Plinio
    Univ Geneva, Dept Inorgan & Analyt Chem, Quai Ernest Ansermet 30, CH-1205 Geneva, Switzerland..
    Borkovec, Michal
    Univ Geneva, Dept Inorgan & Analyt Chem, Quai Ernest Ansermet 30, CH-1205 Geneva, Switzerland..
    Influence of Solvent Quality on the Force Response of Individual Poly(styrene) Polymer Chains2017In: ACS Macro Letters, E-ISSN 2161-1653, Vol. 6, no 10, p. 1052-1055Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Single molecule mechanics of poly(styrene) polymer chains is investigated in different organic solvents with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The acquired force extension profiles can be well fitted with a modified freely jointed chain (FJC) model. The model describes the force extension profiles in terms of an apparent Kuhn length and an elasticity constant. The elasticity constant is found to be the same for all different solvents investigated. Best fit of the force extension profiles with the FJC model reveals that the Kuhn length varies systematically with solvent quality. In fact, one can establish a good correlation between the Kuhn length and the Flory Huggins interaction parameter. The increase in the Kuhn length with increasing solvent quality reflects the larger extent of swelling of the polymer in good solvents.

  • 10.
    Reid, Michael S.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Interfacial Polymerization of Cellulose Nanocrystal Polyamide Janus Nanocomposites with Controlled Architectures2019In: ACS Macro Letters, E-ISSN 2161-1653, Vol. 8, no 10, p. 1334-1340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The widespread use of renewable nanomaterials has been limited due to poor integration with conventional polymer matrices. Often, chemical and physical surface modifications are implemented to improve compatibility, however, this comes with environmental and economic cost. This work demonstrates that renewable nanomaterials, specifically cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), can be utilized in their unmodified state and presents a simple and versatile, one-step method to produce polyamide/CNC nanocomposites with unique Janus-like properties. Nanocomposites in the form of films, fibers, and capsules are prepared by dispersing as-prepared CNCs in the aqueous phase prior to the interfacial polymerization of aromatic diamines and acyl chlorides. The diamines in the aqueous phase not only serve as a monomer for polymerization, but additionally, adsorb to and promote the incorporation of CNCs into the nanocomposite. Regardless of the architecture, CNCs are only present along the surface facing the aqueous phase, resulting in materials with unique, Janus-like wetting behavior and potential applications in filtration, separations, drug delivery, and advanced fibers.

  • 11.
    Yahia, Mohamed
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Helwan University, Egypt.
    Mei, Shilin
    Mathew, Aji P.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Yuan, Jiayin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Linear Main-Chain 1,2,4-Triazolium Poly(ionic liquid)s: Single-Step Synthesis and Stabilization of Cellulose Nanocrystals2019In: ACS Macro Letters, E-ISSN 2161-1653, Vol. 8, no 10, p. 1372-1377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Linear main-chain 1,2,4-triazolium-based poly(ionic liquid)s (PILs) were synthesized in this contribution. The polymerization process is experimentally very simple and involves only a single-step polycondensation of a commercially available monomer in DMSO as solvent at 120 degrees C. Their thermal stability and solubility were analyzed in terms of different counteranions. Due to the ease of this synthetic route, it was readily applied to graft onto sulfonated cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) via a one-step in situ polymerization. The as synthesized PIL@CNC hybrid colloids exhibit adaptive dispensability in water and organic solvents.

  • 12.
    Zheng, Jukuan
    et al.
    University of Akron, United States .
    Hua, Geng
    University of Akron, United States .
    Yu, Jiayi
    University of Akron, United States .
    Lin, Fei
    University of Akron, United States .
    Wade, Mary Beth
    University of Akron, United States .
    Reneker, Darrell H.
    University of Akron, United States .
    Becker, Matthew L.
    University of Akron, United States .
    Post-Electrospinning “Triclick” Functionalization of Degradable Polymer Nanofibers2015In: ACS Macro Letters, E-ISSN 2161-1653, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 207-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    4-Dibenzocyclooctynol (DIBO) was used as an initiator for the ring-opening copolymerization of ε-caprolactone and 1,4,8-trioxaspiro[4.6]-9-undecanone (TOSUO) resulting in a series of DIBO end-functionalized copolymers. Following deprotection of the ketone group, the polymers were derivatized with aminooxyl-containing compounds by oxime ligation. Mixtures of keto- and alkyne-derivatized polymers were co-electrospun into well-defined nanofibers containing three separate chemical handles. Strain-promoted azide alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC), oxime ligation, and copper-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) were used to sequentially functionalize the nanofibers first with fluorescent reporters and then separately with bioactive Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (GRGDS), BMP-2 peptide, and dopamine. This translationally relevant approach facilitates the straightforward derivatization of diverse bioactive molecules that can be controllably tethered to the surface of nanofibers.

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