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  • 1.
    Allern, Sigurd
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    PR, politics and democracy2011In: Central European Journal of Communication, ISSN 1899-5101, Vol. 4, no 1 (6), p. 125-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the relationship between politics and public relations, based on recent developments in Sweden and Norway. It has become increasingly common for PR firms to offer well-paid job opportunities for former politicians. Then, after some years as advisors in public affairs, including lobbying activity, some of them return to politics as members of the government, press officers or advisors. The article discusses the background for this development, and poses some questions concerning integrity and the possible consequences for democracy.

  • 2.
    Andersson Schwarz, Jonas
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Palmås, Karl
    Introducing the panspectric challenge: A reconfiguration of regulatory values in a multiplatform media landscape2013In: Central European Journal of Communication, ISSN 1899-5101, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 219-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Taking Sweden as a case study, the role of public service broadcasting (PSB) is explored, with a focus on issues of data retention and innovation that accompany web distribution. The issue of predicting audience preferences by means of data retention is investigated, and the related problem of organizational autonomy when interacting with commercial actors in the digital sphere. We hypothesize that previous tendencies towards paternalism might be equally supplemented by tendencies towards so-called “panspectric” surveillance and tracking, given a technological environment where such practices are increasingly common. We argue that the absence of advertising partially helps keep these broadcasters from panspectric temptation. Still, practices such as Facebook integration entail a panspectric element. We ask whether the potential increase in the efficacy of targeting audiences promised by panspectric practices might be offset by its negative impact on civic accountability. Is there a possibility for a “benign,” democratically accountable panspectrocism?

  • 3.
    Jensen, Mikael
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    The purposes of interpersonal communication. A survey to find the most likely general reasons why people engage in communication2018In: Central European Journal of Communication, ISSN 1899-5101, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 25-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose underlying this paper is to find out what purposes/functions people from a diverse background assess to be more important and central to human interpersonal communication. A list of 17 possible purposes and functions of interpersonal communication was derived from a literature review and used in a survey study. The questionnaire was filled out by 313 participants (international students being in Sweden) from diverse cultural backgrounds. The findings from this study suggest that the participants acknowledge very central aspects of human life to be the reasonfor communicating. The most agreed upon reasons why we communicate is to share and enhance enjoyment (share positive emotions) and to create and strengthen social bonds (manage relationships).

  • 4.
    Johansson, Elena
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Nygren, Gunnar
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Russian journalists and social media: updated traditions and new challenges2014In: Central European Journal of Communication, ISSN 1899-5101, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 273-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Russian journalism has certain peculiarities based on deeply rooted traditions and state of the modern media system. It has developed a double professional culture; on the one hand it has been serving the state interests and on the other hand journalism has been a mission of enligthment and education in the tradition of the “intelligentia”. New technologies drastically affect media work. Since the mid of 2000s the introduction of social media challenged journalists’ role in society as well as professional practices and norms. This paper discusses an existence of pattern of using social media by Russian journalists based on historical roots and socio-cultural and political background. 

  • 5.
    Kiriya, Ilya
    et al.
    National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia.
    Degtereva, Elena
    Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia.
    Russian TV market: Between state supervision, commercial logic and simulacrum of public sphere2010In: Central European Journal of Communication, ISSN 1899-5101, no 1, p. 37-51Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Nygren, Gunnar
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Guest Editor's introduction2016In: Central European Journal of Communication, ISSN 1899-5101, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 162-163Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Strömbäck, Jesper
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Changes in the Mediatization of Politics: Interview with Professor Jesper Strömbäck2017In: Central European Journal of Communication, ISSN 1899-5101, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 130-136Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Nina on the Net: A Study of a Politician Campaigning on Social Networking Sites2011In: Central European Journal of Communication, ISSN 1899-5101, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 190-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I will attend to contemporary individualization and digitalization of politics from an in-depth study of a Swedish politician, Nina Larsson, campaigning on social networking sites for re-election to the Swedish Parliament in the 2010 general elections. The aim of this paper is to contribute to the discussion on social networking sites and their potential for representative democratic and broaden the analysis beyond perspectives of strategic political communication and deliberative democracy. The research questions I will attend to are how Nina uses social networking sites in her election campaign, and if social networking sites have an influence over the electorates information gathering and opinion formation. The method for empirical data gathering is (n)ethnographic, complemented with data from a regional quantitative study. The results suggest that Nina uses of social networking sites mostly for negotiating her political persona

  • 9.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Journalists, PR Professionals and the Practice of Paid News in Central and Eastern Europe: An Overview2016In: Central European Journal of Communication, ISSN 1899-5101, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 5-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Review of Boguslawa Dobek-Ostrowska & Gunnar Nygren (eds.) Journalism in Change: Journalistic Culture in Poland, Russia and Sweden2016In: Central European Journal of Communication, ISSN 1899-5101, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 137-140Article, book review (Other academic)
1 - 10 of 10
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