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  • 1.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Family therapy and accountability2012In: Journal of Applied Linguistics and Professional Practice, ISSN 2040-3658, E-ISSN 2040-3666, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 193-212Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Accounting for and (re)visiting special needs and “deaf bilingualism”: The identity of language and the language of identity2015In: Journal of Applied Linguistics and Professional Practice, ISSN 2040-3658, E-ISSN 2040-3666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    My interest in this paper is twofold: first, to make visible the work that participants and institutions do through analyses of naturally occurring communication, including policy texts over time. Second, by using a range of representational techniques, illustrate how multimodal analyses across time and space allows for revisiting the ways in which language categories get talked-and-written-into-being and how identity positions become framed in and through social practices. This data-driven contribution takes both a socially oriented perspective and a postcolonial framework on human ways-with-words and human ways-of-being. It is based upon analyses of ethnographically framed video-recordings of mundane activities, naturally occurring or data-prompted discussions and policy texts vis-à-vis different institutional settings in Sweden where Swedish Sign Language, SSL is used in addition to Swedish and English.

    My previous studies in a range of settings inside and outside schools across time in Sweden have highlighted the need for “Going beyond the great divide” (Bagga-Gupta 2004, 2007) in both research and education for students with hearing impairment. This divide points to the highly dichotomized state of deaf research, institutional fields and discussions therein vis-à-vis oralism-signing, integration-segregation, normality-disability, medical/psychological-cultural, monolingualism-bilingualism etc. Transcending these dichotomies (and the concomitant normative positions that they are tagged with), I juxtapose ethnographic data from primarily two areas brought together under the umbrella concepts “languaging” and “diversity/identity” research with the intention of exploring how special needs are accounted for through the systematic analysis of data-sets from two large scale Swedish national research projects where fieldwork was conducted in deaf schools since 1996. Data includes video-taped classroom life in signing environments, video-data prompted oral reflections and policy data including discussions during the 1990s that lead to the establishment of some of these projects.

    Analysis focuses upon exploring the ways in which individuals and institutions account for the special needs of pupils with a functional disability. What are the ways in which language use in itself frames identity positions in different sites (and across time)? How do micro-interactional analysis and the use of time and space in institutional settings inform issues related to inclusion/exclusion? What is the status that is accorded different language varieties in these settings and how does this status frame accounting practices related to special needs?

    The preliminary findings in this study challenge current understandings attributed to identity and language generally and the organization of (segregated) education for the deaf in Sweden more specifically. Issues are also raised with regards to the ways in which individuals and both SSL and Swedish become “technified”. This paper presents evidence that questions the polarized positions between linguistic-medical, signed-spoken/written language varieties, mono-bilingualism and deaf-hearing worlds. The analysis contributes to the growing research literature where detailed analyses of textual discourses and signing-oral-written interaction can both provide an emic understanding of how narratives and accounting are a core aspect of the negotiationof identity positions as well as illustrate the Third Position in the area of special needs.

    ________________________________

    Bagga-Gupta, S (2007): Going beyond the Great Divide. Reflections from Deaf Studies, Örebro, Sweden. Deaf Worlds. International Journal of Deaf Studies. Special theme issue: The meaning and place of “Deaf Studies”. 23(2 & 3), 69-87.

    Bagga-Gupta, S (2004): Visually oriented bilingualism. Discursive and technological resources in Swedish Deaf pedagogical arenas. In V Herreweghe & M Vermeerbergen (eds) To the Lexicon and Beyond. Sociolinguistics in European Deaf Communities, Volume 10 – The Sociolinguistics in Deaf Communities Series. Editor C Lucas. pp 171-207. Washington DC: Gallaudet University Press.

  • 3.
    Bülow, Pia H.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work.
    Blended voices and co-narration in lay– interprofessional talk about return-to-work2013In: Journal of Applied Linguistics and Professional Practice, ISSN 2040-3658, E-ISSN 2040-3666, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 289-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the co-production of narratives based on an analysis of audio recordings from 12 statutory lay–interprofessional meetings involving clients and concerning rehabilitation for return-to-work. Using Bakhtin’s (1981) notion of voice in a similar vein to Mishler (1984), it is argued that a voice represents a specific normative order, displayed in the way of speaking. The premises of the approach taken is that citizens’ problems and needs are often presented as stories and that this particular type of meeting opens up the possibility for what Wertsch (1991) calls multi-voicedness. Three patterns of co-narrating the client’s story of illness and the process of rehabilitation were found. In the most frequently recurring form, there was one primary storyteller and another participant who joined in as a co-teller. Another pattern was that dyadic co-narrated episodes commonly drew on prior contacts between the two storytellers. A third salient feature was how storytelling episodes involved revoicing an absent expert – that is, the interactional move when a speaker makes use of someone else’s words, and what Bakhtin (1981) calls rhetorical double-voicedness. Due to the multi-voicedness character, co-narrated stories in lay–interprofessional meetings often represent two or more perspectives and are founded on the blending of voices.

  • 4.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Tholander, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Morality in professional practice2014In: Journal of Applied Linguistics and Professional Practice, ISSN 2040-3658, E-ISSN 2040-3666, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 155-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
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  • 5. Karlsson, Anna-Malin
    et al.
    Nikolaidou, Zoe
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Swedish Language.
    Writing about caring: Discourses, genre and remediation in elder care2013In: Journal of Applied Linguistics and Professional Practice, ISSN 2040-3658, E-ISSN 2040-3666, Vol. 8 (2011), no 2, p. 123-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we discuss the results of a study within the project Language work as care work. The study focuses on the documentation practices of carers and assistant nurses within three elder care facilities in Sweden. The aim is to explore how representations of work and work content are remediated and recontextualised in some of the key written genres in the nursing home. In this process different discourses, and thus different versions of the practice of caring, are promoted and restrained. In order to show how the literacy practices and written text genres of elder care construe different meanings of caring we closely examine four key genres in the communicative chain and analyse them in terms of genre and discourse. The data discussed here was collected in an eighteen months ethnographic study, using participant observation, qualitative interviews and collection of key texts as the main tools.

  • 6.
    Karlsson, Anna-Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Nikolaidou, Zoe
    Södertörns högskola.
    Writing about caring: Discourses, genres and remediation in elder care2011In: Journal of Applied Linguistics and Professional Practice, ISSN 2040-3658, E-ISSN 2040-3666, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 123-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we discuss the results of a study within the project Language work as care work. The study focuses on the documentation practices of carers and assistant nurses within three elder care facilities in Sweden. The aim is to explore how representations of work and work content are remediated and recontextualised in some of the key written genres in the nursing home. In this process different discourses, and thus different versions of the practice of caring, are promoted and restrained. In order to show how the literacy practices and written text genres of elder care construe different meanings of caring we closely examine four key genres in the communicative chain and analyse them in terms of genre and discourse. The data discussed here was collected in an ethnographic study lasting eighteen months, using participant observation, qualitative interviews and collection of key texts as the main tools.

  • 7.
    Norrthon, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Framing in theater rehearsals: A longitudinal study following one line from page to stage2020In: Journal of Applied Linguistics and Professional Practice, ISSN 2040-3658, E-ISSN 2040-3666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This video-ethnographic workplace study follows a theater rehearsal process, which to date is an under-researched professional setting. More specifically, the study investigates the process of  framing (Goffman 1974) contexts that together build up the theatrical framework (cf. MacLachlan and Reid 1994: 17). Applying a conversation analytic method, the analysis follows actors and a director longitudinally as they are framing a performance with respect to a single line in a script. The aim is to uncover how the participants develop the performance by framing various theatrical contexts in situated interactions and over time. The results show that the performance develops in a nonlinear manner, whereby social and psychological contexts are foregrounded first. These contexts are later backgrounded when the participants develop physical actions in the performance. Framing is a process of grounding (Clark 1996), in which the participants collaboratively and interactionally add content to the script, and arrive at a mutual understanding by recycling and developing previously established framings. Negotiations of framings are joint and explicit, challenging a view of theater work that actors should not be overly conscious of their actions on the stage.

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