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  • 1.
    Aarsand, Pål
    et al.
    Department of Education and Life Long Learning, Norwegian University of Technology and Science.
    Melander, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Appropriation through guided participation: Media literacy activities in children's everyday lives2016In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 12, p. 20-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores media literacy practices in children’s everyday lives and some of the ways in which young children appropriate basic media literacy skills through guided participation in situated activities. Building on an ethnomethodological perspective, the analyses are based on video recordings documenting the activities in which four target children, aged 6-7 years old, participated at home and in school. Through the detailed analysis of two mundane media literacy activities – online calling and word processing – similarities and differences in media usage within and out-of-school are examined. It is shown how children’s media literacy activities encompass verbal, embodied and social competencies that are made relevant, and thus accessible for learning, in interaction between the adults and children in the form of norms and guidelines for what constitutes knowledgeable participation in media literacy activities, and that are appropriated and reactualized by the children in interaction with their peers. The findings show how the participants coordinate their actions on and in front of the screen and where spatiality and temporality are oriented to as crucial aspects of the organization of the activities. Moreover, it is demonstrated how old and new technologies are linked together in culturally and historically embedded conceptualizations of literacy. 

  • 2.
    Andersson, Helen
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för nordiska språk, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nature, nationalism and neoliberalism on food packaging: The case of Sweden2019In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars have shown that representations of nature are common on food packaging, often to sell products that are far from natural. They have also shown that brands can add value to products using nationalist messages. However, much less research has gone into how these representations take form in specific national settings. In this article, using multimodal critical discourse analysis, I investigate a sample of Swedish food packaging, and show how the nature represented evokes associations established systematically by governments building up nationalist imagery associated with social democracy, openness, freedom, responsibility, equality and fairness. I argue that at a time when Sweden is moving to the right politically, becoming a model neoliberal society, such representations, used for marketing purposes, help communicate a banal sense that Sweden is very much as it always has been.

  • 3.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    The role of swearing in creating an online persona: The case of YouTuber PewDiePie2017In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 18, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is an investigation of the use of English-language swear words by Swedish, non-native speaker PewDiePie in the context of self-recorded, Let’s Play horror videos uploaded to the video-sharing website, YouTube. Situating PewDiePie within the greater media landscape to establish both his success and notoriety, this article addresses the local interpretation of the globalization of English and the use of English swear words in Swedish media. The practice of swearing in the gaming context is discussed, and swearing instances in a selection of three of PewDiePie’s horror game videos are analyzed. The article puts forth the argument that the use of English swear words contributes to the performance of PewDiePie as a specific, online persona, one that is both in line with the context of video gaming and conducive to a para-social relationship, allowing PewDiePie to achieve the overall goals of communicating with his viewers as peers and reducing the social distance between them. The article concludes that PewDiePie’s practice of social swearing not only simulates casual conversation between friends, but actively reduces social distance, creates the illusion of intimacy, and contributes to his unprecedented success on YouTube.

  • 4.
    Blomberg, Helena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Nurses' blogs as part of a political process - Professional identity as a rhetorical resource for negotiating responsibility and blame2016In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 13, p. 82-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The working conditions of nurses in the Swedish healthcare system are often debated in the news media, where the various stakeholders' (nurses, union, politicians and healthcare managers) versions of events are laid out. By using social media, nurses can participate in the debate and in a political process by drawing on narrative elements as responses to politicians' and healthcare managers' neglect of the nurses' situations. This article reports on a study of 50 topic driven blogs written by nurses from 2013 to 2015 and published on the website of a union magazine for healthcare professionals. Departing from a discursive narrative approach, the aim of the study is to analyse how the nurses narrate their working conditions and what they convey. The study shows that the bloggers create a we-ness by constructing and displaying their professional identity, illustrating unfair working conditions, conveying criticism and negotiating responsibility and blame. Addressing other nurses, the bloggers presume that others in the profession experience similar things in their workplaces and thereby encourage them to take action and make the injustices known. In order to gain credibility for the reported events and the relations, rhetorical resources such as factual accounts, categories, pronouns and a media discourse are used. The media discourse that is (re)produced in the blogs and elsewhere may result in nurses being trapped in their way of talking about their working situation, normalising it and having difficulty finding solutions.

  • 5.
    Camauër, Leonor
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Denigrating and being denigrated for a higher end: Constructing ordinary expertise through supportive and belligerent talk2016In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 13, no Part A, p. 4-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the construction of ordinary expertise as a joint venture between experts and advisees in a Swedish makeover television show aired since 2006, Lyxfällan (Eng. The Luxury Trap). This show is also an exponent of belligerent broadcasting (Higgins et al., 2011) and circulates a discourse of consumption which promotes an individualistic consumer ideal.

    Drawing on methodological approaches from studies of broadcast talk as talk-in-interaction and multimodal discourse analysis, the article examines the ways in which performances by advisers, advisees and an unseen narrator are made to work together to construct ordinary expertise. The analysis reveals that Lyxfällan’s construction of ordinary expertise heavily relies upon advisers and advisees both following and breaking the general norms of ordinary conversations and the sociability of broadcast talk (Scannell, 1996), as well as the more specific conventions of the participation framework (Thornborrow, 2015) of exchanges between advisers and advisees.

  • 6.
    Eriksson, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The ‘ordinary-ization’ of televised cooking expertise: A historical study of cooking instruction programmes on Swedish television2016In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 13, p. 29-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Taking a historical perspective (1982–2005) and using a multimodal discourse analysis, this paper explores the performance of ordinary expertise in Swedish cookery programmes. In particular it explores the changing forms of audience address in one particular format, called the novice format, which is crucial to understanding the history of Swedish cookery programmes. Typically this format involves two participants: a presenter who plays the role of a novice cook, posing questions about the ongoing preparation of dishes; and a chef who carries out the cooking, providing expert advice by responding to the questions asked. The analysis shows that over time the performance of expertise goes from taking the form of conversational coaching, to being enacted through small talk, to finally arising through the simulation of an interactional give-and-take between the expert and the viewers. When it comes to the ordinariness of ordinary expertise, this development is paradoxical. In the later series of programmes, when the chef appears more like an ordinary guy, the distance between the expert chef and the viewers is reduced. But at the same time the cooking is decoupled from routines associated with work and domestic chores, and in this sense is becoming less tied to everyday life and more escapist in character.

  • 7.
    Eriksson, Göran
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Thornborrow, Joanna
    Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, France.
    Editorial: Mediated forms of ordinary expertise2016In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 13, no Part A, p. 1-3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Idevall Hagren, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    “She has promised never to use the N-word again”: Discourses of racism in a Swedish media debate2019In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 31, article id 100322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, as in most European countries, antiracist discourses co-exist with new racism and right-wing populism. Self-images as antiracist are maintained through the strategy to deny racism and accusations of racism. This article addresses discourses of racism in a Swedish media debate that started with a YouTuber being accused of using the N-word. Through a categorization analysis of newspaper articles, that report on and debate the incident, the management of accusations and denials, as well as language ideologies and different perspectives on racism, are examined. The analysis shows how the YouTuber, and journalists, deny racism by claiming that the racist expression was an unintentional “gaffe”, thus categorizing the YouTuber as a non-racist. This understanding of racism, as an individual and intentional phenomenon, dominates the debate. However, some debaters advocate a structural discourse of racism, focusing on racist activities rather than racist individuals. Nevertheless, the findings suggest that the media context does not provide room for a nuanced discussion about structural racism and racist language. Instead, the category work indicates that the maintenance of social relations and an antiracist self-image is the core activity of the interaction.

  • 9.
    Jonsson, Carla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Muhonen, Anu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.
    Multilingual repertoires and the relocalization of manga in digital media2014In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 4-5, p. 87-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to analyze multilingual repertoires of young adolescents and the relocalization of manga on Facebook. The focal points of our analysis are: how young adolescents relocalize manga in digital media, the multilingual repertoires these adolescents use in the relocalization of manga, and the manner in which the relocalization of manga and the multilingual repertoires in digital media contribute to indexing the identity of these adolescents.

    The results show that digital media opens up for and encourages dialogue through which the identity performances of young adolescents are invigorated. Through their repertoires, the adolescents perform local, global and glocal identities that reflect superdiverse conditions. The participants׳ choice of, e.g., Japanese screen names highlights their indexing of identities in which local and global aspects are blended and where Japanese aspects are highlighted, whereas other heritage cultures are backgrounded. From the adolescents׳ engagement in a global and transnational manga culture, we learn that, in superdiverse conditions, global transcultural flows can affect the lives of adolescents to the extent that these become a central part of their identity performance.

    In the article, we propose a sociolinguistic online ethnography approach in which we combine (socio)linguistic ethnography with online ethnography. The study shows how the ethnographic data supports, deepens and nuances the analysis. Sociolinguistic online ethnography thus offers a lens through which we as researchers can access not only multilingual repertoires per se but also the participants׳ voices and interpretations.

  • 10.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Mauranen, Anna
    Digital academic discourse: Texts and contexts2018In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 24, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This Special Issue focuses on how digital media – blogs, tweets, and other digital platforms – are used by researchers, and how these new modes of academic communication have impacted writing practices and language uses in the academy. It brings together research in two related areas of scholarship: academic discourse analysis and literacies research. In this introductory article, we first outline the concept of digital academic discourse as we perceive it in the context of our Special Issue and show how it is related to, and at the same time different from, its “analogue” predecessor. We then continue to discuss the practices surrounding the production of academic texts with the support of digital media, followed by an outline of how both digital academic discourse and related writing practices are tied to the networks, communities and spaces in which they take place. Next, methodological issues in the study of digital academic discourse are considered, and the articles in this special issue are presented in connection to the themes outlined above. We conclude by contextualising the studies reported here within current trends in discourse analytical and sociolinguistic research and identify venues for future studies.

  • 11.
    Landqvist, Mats
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Swedish Language.
    Sense and sensibility - Online forums as epistemic arenas2016In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 13, no Part B, p. 98-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From a discourse analytic framework, this article analyses an online forum in which users give each other support in relation to a medical problem. The article relates sequences of dialogue between active users in this health forum from the perspective of digital literacy, informational support giving and rapport building. Taking into account previous studies on communication via medical forums, support giving and identity construction, this study develops and proposes some key strategies of explication of how knowledge plays a key role and is assigned to establishing contact as well as adapting themselves to other users of the forum. The role of epistemic parts in the forums is displayed through (1) encouraging further interaction, (2) bonding, and (3) attracting eligible dialogue partners. Skilful users are shown to share knowledge with each other in an informal, yet specific and substantial way. Posters are authored in flexible ways through a balance between knowledge input and emotional support giving. Knowledge is thus framed by the effects of the entanglement of epistemic and affective stances - not only by information exchanges.

  • 12.
    Ledin, Per
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Swedish Language.
    Machin, David
    Örebro University.
    Replacing actual political activism with ethical shopping: The case of Oatly2019In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been an increase of food products marketed through buzzwords like organic, ‘local’, ‘recyclable’, ‘Fair-trade’. These have been described as part of a newer kind of ethical or emotional capitalism,where consumers can align with political issues through acts of shopping. The problem is that such actsreplace or shape what we know about, and how we act towards, actual socio-political matters. In thispaper, we look at one example of such a product: Oatly, a milk alternative, which brands itself as sustainableand anti-corporate. Taking a Multimodal Critical Discourse Analytical approach, we want to learnmore about how such brands do not actually state details of the socio-political issue alongside which theyalign (its causes, process, solutions) yet successfully communicate a compelling sense that buying theproduct is a form of social activism in a way which cleverly implicates consumers to internalize its valuesand give them a powerful sense of being part of a political moral order. And this is a form of activismwhich is fun, chic and rather easy.

  • 13.
    Ledin, Per
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Swedish Language.
    Machin, David
    Örebro universitet.
    The evolution of performance management discourse in corporate strategy diagrams for public institutions2016In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 13, no B, p. 122-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A specific kind of performance management model called ‘Balanced Scorecard’ has come to dominate the way institutions are run around the world, oriented to increasing outputs and to ‘quality assurance’. Strategic diagrams emerged out of this model, claiming to break down all institutional parts and processes into a flow-chart forming a sort of road map of the role played by all parts of an organization in reaching targets. Drawing on Fairclough׳s (1992) notion of the ‘technologization’ of discourse and Van Leeuwen׳s (2008) notion of ‘the new writing’ this paper applies multimodal critical discourse analysis to a sample of diagrams from a wider corpus showing how they have changed over time, becoming more abstracted and symbolic, as the performance management discourse itself has become naturalized.

  • 14.
    Ledin, Per
    et al.
    Department of Culture and Communication, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Machin, David
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The evolution of performance management discourse in corporate strategy diagrams for public institutions2016In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 13, no B, p. 122-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A specific kind of performance management model called ‘Balanced Scorecard’ has come to dominate the way institutions are run around the world, oriented to increasing outputs and to ‘quality assurance’. Strategic diagrams emerged out of this model, claiming to break down all institutional parts and processes into a flow-chart forming a sort of road map of the role played by all parts of an organization in reaching targets. Drawing on Fairclough׳s (1992) notion of the ‘technologization’ of discourse and Van Leeuwen׳s (2008) notion of ‘the new writing’ this paper applies multimodal critical discourse analysis to a sample of diagrams from a wider corpus showing how they have changed over time, becoming more abstracted and symbolic, as the performance management discourse itself has become naturalized.

  • 15.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    To spray or not to spray: the discursive construction of contested environmental issues in the news media2013In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 123-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the role of the news media in the (re)definition of contested environmental issues. It analyzes how the media, by means of various discursive strategies, legitimize or de-legitimize different claims about how to handle environmental issues. Guided by critical discourse analysis, the paper analyzes the news reporting on two cases of insect outbreaks in Sweden: one which resulted in spraying and one which did not. The analysis concludes that the production of hegemonic meaning on contested environmental issues – i.e.  the process by which certain definitions of how to understand and manage them emerge victorious from the discursive struggle between stakeholders – is closely linked to journalistic routines, as well as to media logic in general and to the media’s difficulties in handling scientific uncertainty in particular.

  • 16. Lidskog, Rolf
    et al.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    To spray or not to spray: the discursive construction of contested environmental issues in the news media2013In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 123-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the role of the news media in the (re)definition of contested environmental issues. It analyzes how the media, by means of various discursive strategies, legitimize or de-legitimize different claims about how to handle environmental issues. Guided by critical discourse analysis, the paper analyzes the news reporting on two cases of insect outbreaks in Sweden: one which resulted in spraying and one which did not. The analysis concludes that the production of hegemonic meaning on contested environmental issues – i.e.  the process by which certain definitions of how to understand and manage them emerge victorious from the discursive struggle between stakeholders – is closely linked to journalistic routines, as well as to media logic in general and to the media’s difficulties in handling scientific uncertainty in particular.

  • 17.
    Lundström, Ragnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Spaces for support: Discursive negotiations of supporter positions in online forum discussions about suicide2018In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 25, p. 98-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates self-organized peer-to-peer support in online forum discussions about suicide. It analyzes how the discursive strategies through which participants introduce themselves as supporters relate to the support they provide. The analysis shows that the strategies employed to construct supporter identities commonly draw on what has been described as 'somatic individuality' - by which the management of biological 'risks' are framed as individual responsibilities - and by negotiating tensions between different perspectives on suicide. These are; (a) a discourse focusing on psychiatric knowledge and psychopharmaceuticals (b) a discourse focusing on social context and personal relationships, and (c) a critical stance towards the established care system. Negotiations between these condition, and are also conditioned by, power relations in the forum. These dynamics regulate the ways in which participants can use an online forum in order to move away from crisis points by discursively attempting to enter a supporter position. 

  • 18.
    Tseronis, Assimakis
    University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Multimodal argumentation in news magazine covers: A case study of front covers putting Greece on the spot of the European economic crisis2015In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 7, p. 18-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, front covers of news magazines are studied as a distinct multimodal genre that invites readers to buy the magazine not only by attracting their attention but also by assuming a position with respect to the particular cover story. In order to account for the argument that a front cover may convey in support of that position, an argumentative reconstruction is required that also needs to take seriously into account the way in which the verbal and the visual modes interact to create meaning. The study proposes a multimodal argumentation perspective on the systematic reconstruction of the arguments that front covers of news magazines put forward. As a case in point, six covers by two German weekly news magazines are analysed, featuring the role of Greece in the eurozone crisis in the period 2010-2012. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 19.
    Wikström, Peter
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    When I need/want to: Normativity, identity, and form in user construals of 'talk-like' tweeting2016In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 14, p. 54-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this study is on how Twitter users construe talk-like tweeting in metalinguistic utterances. In a material of tweets containing or responding to explicit comparisons of tweeting to talking (N=520), a broad range of construals are identified, showing Twitter users associating talk-likeness with, e.g., notions of the textual representation of voice, of grammatical (in-)correctness, of accurately reflecting one׳s ‘real-life’ identity, and of regional or social variation in language use. These associations frequently serve normative functions, enforcing or contesting linguistic and discursive norms in both serious and playful ways. The findings offer a novel perspective on the oft-debated orality of computer-mediated discourse, providing a window on how a process of enregisterment (Agha, 2007) is instantiated and how language norms are actively negotiated by participants in everyday online language use on Twitter.

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