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  • 1.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    The Right to the Citi(zen): Urban Spaces in Commercial Media Environments2016In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 478-489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the publication of Henri Lefebvre’s book Le Droit à la ville (1968), a debate has emerged regarding the neoliberal takeover of urban spaces and activism. Nonetheless, in the past 10 years, we have seen the continuous expansion of public space via social networking media and, today, most public institutions in Western states use social networking sites to communicate with their “citizens.” Although there are many serious problems associated with this takeover, little has been said about them so far. In this article, I address the contribution of The right to the city to this debate by analyzing a public institution which tried to establish communication with its “citizens” in an urban space in a virtual world. My analysis concludes that the users of this new media platform did not regard themselves as citizens when they were dwelling in this urban space online, but instead saw themselves as the consumers they were addressed as in this environment.

  • 2.
    Broth, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Getting Ready to Move as a Couple: Accomplishing Mobile Formations in a Dance Class2014In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 107-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article focuses on how students in a Lindy Hop dance class move into a complex mobile formation as a sequentially relevant response to a directive embedded in the teachers verbal and embodied instructions of the next task for practice. This sequence of actions accomplishes a transition from a stationary constellation of observing students to a mobile circle of practicing dance couples. The article describes in detail how instruction is turned into practice in an emergent way, in and through the simultaneous accountable production and reception of qualitative instruction, practice proposals, structuring instructions, and count-ins. The analysis shows how student behavior is oriented to the couple as a relevant mobile formation and how couples gradually become more synchronized with each other.

  • 3.
    Haas, Tigran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Olsson, Krister
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Transmutation and reinvention of public spaces through ideals of urban planning and design2014In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 59-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our cities are undergoing a rapid transformation of public spaces due to different factors, such as economic and cultural globalization, demographic transformations, marketing strategies, urban planning and design approaches, medialization reinterpretations, social networks, and others. The urban realm itself is the collection of public spaces and places - buildings, squares, streets, landscapes, and ecosystems, as well as processes, mindscapes, and people that make up and shape any environment. In that respect, urban planning and design is really characterized by two distinct processes that transubstantiate space and place: static and dynamic. This qualitative, reflective article discusses these issues, taking a standpoint from the notion of public space as a common good. This notion is discussed in relation to the factors that transform our cities and is analyzed in relation to the concept of public good. We reflect this discussion vis-à-vis the views of the leading paradigms in urban planning and design, and their intake on and outlook on these complex issues.

  • 4.
    Holmberg, Tora
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Trans-species urban politics: Stories from a beach2013In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 28-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article investigates the emergence and continuation of a spatial conflict, concerning a "dog beach" in Santa Cruz, California, that led to the creation of local interest organizations and came to involve city and state authorities and regulations, local news and social media, and not least, park visitors (both humans and dogs). Through the debate, positions for and against dogs being off leash were consolidated—however, not necessarily positions for and against dogs. Several themes emerge through the analysis: safety/risk, disturbance, excrements, and "dogginess," meaning the perceived nature of dogs. The case study is used as an example of not only how urban politics affects the bodies, practices, and movement of people and dogs but also, similarly, how this politics is constantly under the threat of civil disobedience and subversive acts of counterpolitics. It illustrates the dialectics of everyday lives—of the bodies, practices, and movement of people and dogs—and space: the liminal case of the beach. Furthermore, the collective movement of dogs and people is conceptualized as a trans-species urban crowd, threatening a certain ideal public order.

    Keywords

    dog, animal studies, urban crowd, urban sociology, liminality, politics of place

  • 5.
    Jansson, André
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    The Hegemony of the Urban/Rural Divide: Cultural Transformations and Mediatized Moral Geographies in Sweden2013In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 88-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The urban/rural divide constitutes a socially pervasive lived space, corresponding to what Cresswell calls a moral geography. In modern society, the symbolic association of urbanism, globalism, and mediatization defines the dominant metaphysics of flow, which can be distinguished from the more sedentarist metaphysics of fixity, largely representing rural values and life conditions. This article provides an empirically based account (survey data and qualitative interviews) of how these metaphysics are linked to popular understandings of “the city” and “the countryside” in contemporary Sweden, and how such moral geographies are affected by mediatization processes. The findings suggest that although “the city” occupies a culturally dominant position as the mediated center (Couldry), this position evolves through the mutual interplay between the two metaphysics. Ultimately, it is argued that the mediatized reproduction of an urban/rural divide holds a hegemonic function in contemporary society, annihilating conditions that are neither “urban” nor “rural.”

  • 6.
    Kärrholm, Mattias
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    The Materiality of Territorial Production, a Conceptual Discussion of Territoriality, Materiality and the Everyday Life of Public Space2007In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article brings together research on territoriality and actor-network theory to develop new ways of investigating the role of materiality and material design in the territorial power relations of urban public places. Using the public square as a main example, the author suggests new ways of conceptualizing the production and stabilization of territories in the everyday urban environment. Setting out from a brief outline of the history of territoriality research, the traditional approaches are reappropriated from the viewpoint of actants rather than persons or institutions, suggesting a distinction between four different forms of territorial production. Some material ways of stabilizing the effects of these territorial productions are then conceptualized. The author argues that public space can be seen as constituted by a territorial complexity, thus pointing to the relationship between materiality and public space, via territorial stabilization and production.

  • 7.
    Lagerkvist, Amanda
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Media and Communication Studies.
    The Future Is Here: Media, Memory, and Futurity in Shanghai2010In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 220-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thriving on its long-term collective memory of possessing futurity, Shanghai resurges with large-scale ambitions of becoming the world center of trade and finance as well as the information and communication hub of the Asia-Pacific region with an Infoport advancing beyond the era of the Internet. This article ponders the relationship between memory and futurity in Shanghai, and suggests that in celebrating temporal coexistence, Shanghai offers the contours an alternate social ordering of retromodernity. In this media city, media forms constitute a backbone of the Shanghai imaginary, and the enthusiasm for new communication technologies in Shanghai today is reminiscent of the role that media forms played in modernizing Shanghai in the past. Probing how memories of media futures past may trigger digitalization, the author argues that temporal anchoring in Shanghai does not represent a refusal to partake in the fast-paced world; instead, it pursues a memory of modernity and anchors in a “Bergsonian terrain” where mobility is, in effect, its “natural tradition.”

  • 8.
    Lagerkvist, Amanda
    Södertörns högskola, Medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    The Future Is Here: Media, Memory, and Futurity in Shanghai2010In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 220-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thriving on its long-term collective memory of possessing futurity, Shanghai resurges with large-scale ambitions of becoming the world center of trade and finance as well as the information and communication hub of the Asia-Pacific region with an Infoport advancing beyond the era of the Internet. This article ponders the relationship between memory and futurity in Shanghai, and suggests that in celebrating temporal coexistence, Shanghai offers the contours an alternate social ordering of retromodernity. In this media city, media forms constitute a backbone of the Shanghai imaginary, and the enthusiasm for new communication technologies in Shanghai today is reminiscent of the role that media forms played in modernizing Shanghai in the past. Probing how memories of media futures past may trigger digitalization, the author argues that temporal anchoring in Shanghai does not represent a refusal to partake in the fast-paced world; instead, it pursues a memory of modernity and anchors in a “Bergsonian terrain” where mobility is, in effect, its “natural tradition.”

  • 9.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Communication as spatial production: Expanding the research agenda of communication geography2016In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 56-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The founders of the interdisciplinary field of communication geography argue that the field carries the potential to provide a processual view of communication as spatial production. This article sets out to delineate this underexplored aspect of communication geography. The aim is to expand the research agenda of communication geography by acknowledging the role of everyday social interaction on the one hand, and media environments on the other, in producing and maintaining peoples' taken-for-granted senses of space. This focus is guided by combining central insights of social phenomenology and medium theory. In synthesizing these positions, a research agenda emerges that emphasizes the capacity of media to mold the scope and character of communication that in turn maintain the scope and character of taken-for-granted space in everyday reality.

  • 10.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Communication as spatial production: Expanding the research agenda of communication geography2016In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 56-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The founders of the interdisciplinary field of communication geography argue that the field carries the potential to provide a processual view of communication as spatial production. This article sets out to delineate this underexplored aspect of communication geography. The aim is to expand the research agenda of communication geography by acknowledging the role of everyday social interaction on the one hand, and media environments on the other, in producing and maintaining peoples' taken-for-granted senses of space. This focus is guided by combining central insights of social phenomenology and medium theory. In synthesizing these positions, a research agenda emerges that emphasizes the capacity of media to mold the scope and character of communication that in turn maintain the scope and character of taken-for-granted space in everyday reality.

  • 11.
    Linnell, Mikael
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    The Haptic Space of Disaster2019In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this article is to contribute to discussions on the spatialization of future eventsand, in particular, on enactment as the primary contemporary response to uncertain futures.Realistically simulated disasters is an emerging feature in contemporary public preparednessexercises. The purpose of such simulations is to foster public vigilance and initiative by way ofimmersive experiences of future disasters. This new mode of experiential learning calls for newanalytical concepts that take into account the dynamic relationship between the materialityof experience and the experiencing subject. Therefore, in this article, I propose an analyticalvocabulary derived from recent interjections in visual and cultural studies, human geography,and sociology. More specifically I make use of, and extend, the notions of “haptic space” and“haptic sense” as elaborated by Bruno (2014), Fisher (2012), and Marks (2015). I apply theseconcepts to make sense of my empirical encounter with public simulation centers in Japan andTurkey. Finally, I discuss some implications of the haptic perspective in this context.

  • 12.
    McIlvenny, Paul
    et al.
    Aalborg University, Denmark .
    Broth, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Haddington, Pentti
    University of Oulu, Finland .
    Moving Together: Mobile Formations in Interaction2014In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 104-106Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Polanska Vergara, Dominika
    Södertörns högskola, Sociologi.
    Gated Communities and the Construction of Social Class Markers in Postsocialist Societies: The Case of Poland2010In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 421-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to analyze how social class markers are constructed in the discourse on gated communities in a postsocialist urban context. The case of Poland is used as an example of apost-Communist country where the number of gated communities is increasing rapidly in urban areas. The material of study consists of 50 articles published in the largest national newspaper.

    This article argues that the discourse on gated communities is constituted by and constitutes class divisions and social class markers prevalent in the country since the fall of Communism. The “new” capitalistic system with its inherent social divisions is described as creating demands for “new” forms of housing where gates function as separators, protectors, and class identifiers. Residential differentiation is a reality in Polish society, and private space has become a symbol of exclusivity and spread throughout the country along with the popularity of gated forms of housing.

  • 14.
    Polanska Vergara, Dominika
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Gated Communities and the Construction of Social Class Markers in Postsocialist Societies: The Case of Poland2010In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 421-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to analyze how social class markers are constructed in the discourse on gated communities in a postsocialist urban context. The case of Poland is used as an example of apost-Communist country where the number of gated communities is increasing rapidly in urban areas. The material of study consists of 50 articles published in the largest national newspaper.

    This article argues that the discourse on gated communities is constituted by and constitutes class divisions and social class markers prevalent in the country since the fall of Communism. The “new” capitalistic system with its inherent social divisions is described as creating demands for “new” forms of housing where gates function as separators, protectors, and class identifiers. Residential differentiation is a reality in Polish society, and private space has become a symbol of exclusivity and spread throughout the country along with the popularity of gated forms of housing.

  • 15.
    Polanska Vergara, Dominika
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper.
    Gated Communities and the Construction of Social Class Markers in Postsocialist Societies: The Case of Poland2010In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 421-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to analyze how social class markers are constructed in the discourse on gated communities in a postsocialist urban context. The case of Poland is used as an example of a post-Communist country where the number of gated communities is increasing rapidly in urban areas. The material of study consists of 50 articles published in the largest national newspaper. This article argues that the discourse on gated communities is constituted by and constitutes class divisions and social class markers prevalent in the country since the fall of Communism. The "new" capitalistic system with its inherent social divisions is described as creating demands for "new" forms of housing where gates function as separators, protectors, and class identifiers. Residential differentiation is a reality in Polish society, and private space has become a symbol of exclusivity and spread throughout the country along with the popularity of gated forms of housing.

  • 16. Weilenmann, Alexandra
    et al.
    Normark, Daniel
    Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden .
    Laurier, Eric
    Managing Walking Together: The Challenge of Revolving Doors2014In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 122-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are a number of mundane technologies which shape pedestrian mobility such as pavements,corridors and stairs. In this paper we focus on the practical implications revolving doors as atechnology have for the social organisation of people walking together. Drawing upon videorecordings we analyse the observable intersubjective resources produced and used by membersof the setting when walking through doors, and the interaction between formations of peopleas they do this. Revolving doors are turn-taking technologies that challenge mobile formationsbecause the formations need to disassemble in order to pass through the doors, and thenre-assemble again on the other side. Using an ethnomethodologically guided approach we shedlight on some of the accomplishment of walking together in mobile formations.

  • 17.
    Westin, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    The Life and Form of the City: An Interview with Bill Hillier2011In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 227-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What are the relations between urban form and social and economic processes in the city? Or more importantly: How can we come to terms with these relations? These questions — fundamental not only for social scientists across the disciplines, but indeed also for architectural theorists — make up the underlying themes of this interview with Bill Hillier, professor of Architectural and Urban Morphology, Bartlett School, University College London. The interview was conducted at his office in the spring of 2008 and the purpose was to discuss Professor Hillier’s ideas on space, urbanity and the theory of space syntax put forward in his well-known book Space is the Machine from 1996. The conversation also provides interesting insights into Professor Hillier’s thoughts on the relation between the human mind and her material surroundings.

  • 18.
    Yakhlef, Ali
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    We Have Always Been Virtual: Writing, Institutions, and Technology2009In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 76-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accounts of virtual organization have been couched in terms of concepts and metaphors that do not inherit from the features of a coherent theory of virtuality. Arguing that virtuality is inherent in modernity, this article focuses on three major drivers behind the current wave of virtualization of organizational work practices to explore the interplay of the virtual and the concrete. Using three vignettes as an illustration, the article discusses how organizations, through writing, make the presence of humans contingent; through technology, displace human action into artifacts, machines, or electronic devices; and through institutions, virtualize (conflicting and sometimes collaborative) human relations and proximal encounters. However, the process of virtualization does not only deterritorialize existing skills and relations, but it also generates new skills, which in their turn impose a reterritorialization process.

  • 19.
    Yaklef, Ali
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Global Brands as Embodied Generic Spaces2004In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 237-248Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 19 of 19
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