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  • 1. Dobiński, Wojciech
    Geophysical characteristics of permafrost in the Abisko area, northern Sweden2010In: Polish Polar Research, ISSN 0138-0338, E-ISSN 2081-8262, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 141-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on permafrost in the Abisko area of northern Sweden date from the 1950s. A mean annual air temperature of -3 °C in the Abisko mountains (i.e. 1000 m a.s.l.) and -1 °C beyond the mountain area at an altitude of around 400 m suggests that both mountain and arctic permafrost occur there. Several geophysical surveys were performed by means of resistivity tomography (ERT) and electromagnetic mapping (EM). Wherever possible the geophysical survey results were calibrated by digging tests pits. The results show that permafrost occurs extensively in the mountain areas, especially those above 900 m a.s.l. and also sporadically at lower altitudes. At 400 m a.s.l. permafrost may be up to 30 m thick. Its thickness and extent are determined largely by the very variable local rock and soil conditions. Fossil permafrost is also likely to occur in this area.

  • 2. Khodami, Sahar
    et al.
    Martinez Arbizu, Pedro
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Laakman, Silke
    Molecular species delimitation of Icelandic brittle stars (Ophiuroidea)2014In: Polish Polar Research, ISSN 0138-0338, E-ISSN 2081-8262, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 243-260Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Mörs, Thomas
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Hagström, Jonas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Kaim, Andrzej
    HRYNIEWICZ, Krzysztof
    First shark record (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii) from the Paleogene of Spitsbergen, Svalbard2019In: Polish Polar Research, ISSN 0138-0338, E-ISSN 2081-8262Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Sulej, Tomasz
    et al.
    Wolniewicz, Andrzej
    Bonde, Niels
    Błażejowski, Blazej
    Niedźwiedzki, Grzegorz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Tałanda, Mateusz
    New perspectives on the Late Triassic vertebrates of East Greenland: preliminary results of a Polish−Danish palaeontological expedition2014In: Polish Polar Research, ISSN 0138-0338, E-ISSN 2081-8262, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 541-552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Fleming Fjord Formation (Jameson Land, East Greenland) documents a diverse assemblage of terrestrial vertebrates of Late Triassic age. Expeditions from the turn of the 21st century have discovered many important fossils that form the basis of our current knowledge of Late Triassic Greenlandic faunas. However, due to the scarcity and incompleteness of the fossils and their insufficient study, our understanding of the taxonomic diversity of the Fleming Fjord Formation is hindered. Here, we report the preliminary findings of a Polish−Danish expedition to the Fleming Fjord Formation that took place in 2014. Three areas were visited – the fairly well known MacKnight Bjerg and Wood Bjerg and the virtually unexplored Liasryggen. MacKnigth Bjerg and Liasryggen yielded fossils which promise to significantly broaden our knowledge of vertebrate evolution in the Late Triassic. Stem−mammal remains were discovered at Liasryggen. Other fossils found at both sites include remains of actinopterygians, sarcopterygians, temnospondyl amphibians and various archosaurs (including early dinosaurs). Numerous vertebrate trace fossils, including coprolites, pseudosuchian footprints, theropod and sauropodomorph dinosaur tracks, were also discovered. Newly discovered skeletal remains as well as abundant trace fossils indicate higher tetrapod diversity in the Late Triassic of Greenland than previously thought. Trace fossils also allow inferences of early theropod and sauropodomorph dinosaur behaviour.

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