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  • 1.
    Abbasian, Saeid
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskap.
    Hellgren, Carina
    International Programme Office, Stockholm.
    Working Conditions for Female and Immigrant Cleaners in Stockholm County: An Intersectional Approach2012In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 161-181Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Abbasian, Saeid
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Hellgren, Carina
    International Programme Office.
    Working Conditions for Female and Immigrant Cleaners in Stockholm County: An Intersectional Approach2012In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 161-181Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 3.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Gender and The Modern Organization, Ten Years After2014In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 109-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This empirical article presents a gender analysis of long-term impacts of some of the many organizational change projects in Swedish industrial work organizations during the 1990s. Based on the results of return visits to three industrial companies and their change projects (implementation of Lean Production or other modern organizational models) that I studied more than a decade earlier, I discuss how the work organizations eventually had changed and specifically how and whether organizational internal gender patterns had changed. The initial study showed gender-based restoring responses to strategic organizational changes, especially in the gender-segregated and gender-homogeneous work organizations. These responses conserved gender patterns as well as the organizations’ culture in general, resulting in less productive work as well as a problematic work environment. The follow-up study showed that the organizations slowly changed according to the modern organizational models (e.g., Lean Production), but at the same time, in some cases, keeping the same gender segregation and stereotypical gender markings of skills and work tasks or with new variants of unequal gender order. In addition, the follow-up study showed other and more positive results with emerging pattern of gender equality, at least in the form of reduced gender segregation and less stereotypical ideas concerning gender. The material indicates that the studied companies, in some aspects, developed into less gendered production organizations while taking some steps toward a modern organization and this was done without gender equality interventions. Therefore, the material indicated that, at least in part, gender equality could be seen as a prerequisite or perhaps even a side effect of modern organizational concepts. This article contributes to the emerging literature on an organizational theory of undoing gender as well as to the research of conditions and consequences of the modern organizational models.

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  • 4.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Johansson, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    One Hundred Years of Inertia: An Exposé of the Concept of the Psychosocial Work Environment in Swedish Policy and Research2013In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 5-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to describe a broader concept of the psychosocial work environment, a concept that not only is limited to the individual and her immediate environment but also takes into account a broader context that includes production technology as well as work organization and learning. Based on examples from Sweden, we discuss concepts and approaches to psychosocial work environment and how these have changed over time (e.g., how knowledge about the psychosocial work environment is used to understand and discuss health, management, and development—for individuals, groups, and organizations). The knowledge presented is not new; it has been around a long time. The title of the article—One Hundred Years of Inertia—shows some impatience on the part of its authors given that the pace of change in the work environment has not always been great.

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  • 5.
    Allvin, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Mellner, Christin
    Stockholms universitet.
    Movitz, Fredrik
    Stockholms universitet.
    Aronsson, Gunnar
    Stockholms universitet.
    The Diffusion of Flexibility: Estimating the Incidence of Low-Regulated Working Conditions2013In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 99-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to determine the actual occurrences of flexible working conditions and to demonstrate an instrument for their assessment. Flexibility is discussed as a concept and defined in terms of deregulation of work, and a corresponding increase in self-government and ambiguity. Using empirical data from a national survey of the Swedish labor force, the results show that almost half (47%) of the jobs on the Swedish labor market can be characterized as low, or even unregulated. This means that almost half of the Swedish work force is subjected to working conditions involving a nonnegligible requirement for self-government.

  • 6. Allvin, Michael
    et al.
    Mellner, Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Movitz, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Aronsson, Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The Diffusion of Flexibility: Estimating the Incidence of Low-Regulated Working Conditions2013In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 99-116Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to determine the actual occurrences of flexible working conditions and to demonstrate an instrument for their assessment. Flexibility is discussed as a concept and defined in terms of deregulation of work, and a corresponding increase in self-government and ambiguity. Using empirical data from a national survey of the Swedish labor force, the results show that almost half (47%) of the jobs on the Swedish labor market can be characterized as low, or even unregulated. This means that almost half of the Swedish work force is subjected to working conditions involving a nonnegligible requirement for self-government.

  • 7.
    Alvehus, Johan
    et al.
    Lund University, Department of Service Management and Service Studies, Sweden.
    Andersson, Thomas
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    A New Professional Landscape: Entangled Institutional Logics in Two Swedish Welfare Professions2018In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 91-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has made three parallel but incompatible observations on the contemporary development of welfare professions: loss of professional autonomy, hybridization, and maintained autonomy.  Yet,  research  providing  contextual  understanding  of  the  simultaneous  occurrence  of  these three observations is lacking. The aim of this theoretical paper is to identify and explain seemingly  contradictory  coexisting  features  of  modern  welfare  professions  through  a  compre-hensive reading of current literature on the health care and teaching professions in Sweden. The literature  has  demonstrated  entangled  institutional  logics,  in  which  simultaneous  but  differing  effects occur, thereby developing a new professional landscape.

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  • 8.
    Andersson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies.
    Gunnarsson, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hedlund, Ann
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies.
    Rosén, Gunnar
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies.
    Young People’s Attitudes to Attractive Work, During and After Upper Secondary School2017In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 55-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Attractive work has been defined as a job position which an individual wants, where the employee experiences job stability and where employee identification and dedication are fostered. The present study is aimed at increasing knowledge about attitude changes to work during young people’s transition from school to work-life. A closed cohort, consisting of 225 pupils from graduating classes in 10 upper secondary schools in Sweden, was studied. The most significant result was found in the pupils’ expectations regarding work attractiveness while they were still attending school and in the subsequent year, after they had finished school. During school attendance, there were no differences between the groups, while those who did not find employment after school greatly reduced their demands regarding attractive work.Those who managed to get a job maintained the same level of expectation as during their school years, in terms of requirements for an attractive job. 

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  • 9.
    Andersson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Occupational science.
    Gunnarsson, Kristina
    Uppsala universitet, Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine .
    Hedlund, Ann
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Occupational science.
    Rosén, Gunnar
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Occupational science.
    Young people’s attitudes to attractive work, during and after upper secondary school2017In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 55-68Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 10.
    Andreasson, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Ljungar, Erik
    Ahlstrom, Linda
    Hermansson, Jonas
    Dellve, Lotta
    Professional Bureaucracy and Health Care Managers’Planned Change Strategies: Governance in SwedishHealth Care2018In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 23-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To increase efficiency and quality, process development has been implemented in many Swedish

    hospitals. These hospitals are usually organized as professional bureaucracies in which

    health care managers have limited decision control. The new governance principles has been

    implemented without removing bureaucratic elements. This study analyzes how managers implement

    planned change in these professional bureaucracies, considering if managers coaching

    style, organizational preconditions, implementation strategy, appraisal of change and clinic autonomy,

    is associated with health care process quality (HPQ). The study is based on interviews

    with health care managers and longitudinal assessments of HPQ. The results revealed significant

    differences between coaching style, organizational preconditions, and HPQ over time. The

    conclusion is that leadership and preconditions is of importance for the health care manager’s

    ability to work with planned change, as that the health care managers understand how management

    methods, governance principles, and professional bureaucracies work in practice.

  • 11.
    Andreasson, Jörgen
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ljungar, Erik
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Linda, Ahlstrom
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Jonas, Hermansson
    Angered Hospital.
    Dellve, Lotta
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Professional Bureaucracy and Health Care Managers’ Planned Change Strategies: Governance in Swedish Health Care2018In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 23-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To increase efficiency and quality, process development has been implemented in many Swedish hospitals. These hospitals are usually organized as professional bureaucracies in which health care managers have limited decision control. The new governance principles has been implemented without removing bureaucratic elements. This study analyzes how managers implement planned change in these professional bureaucracies, considering if managers coaching style, organizational preconditions, implementation strategy, appraisal of change and clinic autonomy, is associated with health care process quality (HPQ). The study is based on interviews with health care managers and longitudinal assessments of HPQ. The results revealed significant differences between coaching style, organizational preconditions, and HPQ over time. The conclusion is that leadership and preconditions is of importance for the health care manager’s ability to work with planned change, as that the health care managers understand how management methods, governance principles, and professional bureaucracies work in practice.

  • 12.
    Annell, Stefan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Lindfors, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Kecklund, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Sustainable Recruitment: Individual Characteristics and Psychosocial Working Conditions Among Swedish Police Officers2018In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 3-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Selection research has typically focused on how to identify suitable candidates, while less is known regarding the long-term effects of various selection factors once the suitable candidates have start-ed working. The overall aim of this study was to examine the relative importance of selection fac-tors (measured during recruitment), and psychosocial working conditions (once candidates started working) for four outcomes, namely (1) job satisfaction, (2) organizational citizenship behavior, (3) occupational retention, and (4) health. Data came from a longitudinal study of newly hired police officers in Sweden (N = 508), including recruitment data and a follow-up after 3.5 years. Results of hierarchical multiple regression analyses showed that psychosocial working conditions were more important than selection factors in predicting the four outcomes. The findings suggest that employers, to ensure sustainability, need to focus on activities that facilitate newcomers’ enter-ing in the organization and their professions by providing a sound work climate.

  • 13.
    Antonsson, Ann-Beth
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Schmidt, Lisa
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Sjöström, John
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Understanding the Challenges Facing Occupational2017In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 85-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to Swedish Work Environmental Act, all organizations are required to implement Occupational Health and Safety Management (OHSM). In support of this and when competence within the employer’s own organization is insufficient, regulations state that the employers are required to employ external resources such as an Occupational Health Service (OHS) provider.

    The aim of this study was to explore how public sector organizations utilized services and support from their OHS provider in preventive OHSM. Eleven public sector organizations were studied, 100 of respondents (politicians, managers, HR, safety representatives, and OHS professionals) interviewed, and the data collected qualitatively and thematically analyzed.

    The results showed that the OHS providers do not support the public-sector organizations with preventive OHSM according to the intentions of the legislation. A significant conclusion is that the HR department has an important role in the collaboration and for the utilization of preventive services in OHSM.

  • 14.
    Aronsson, Gunnar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Taloyan, Marina
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Östergren, Per-Olof
    Associations Between Being 'locked-In' and Health - An Epidemiological Study2019In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 71-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate associations between an individual's level of perceived control over labor market position (locked-in and not locked-in) and self-rated health and psychological well-being. Methods. A representative sample (n = 11,675) of the working population in southern Sweden responded to a questionnaire. Results. Sixty-seven percent of the respondents worked in their preferred workplace and occupation. Nineteen percent reported being in a nonpreferred workplace and nonpreferred occupation (double locked-in). Twenty-three percent reported suboptimal health compared with 31% among the double locked-in. The risk of suboptimal health was elevated in all locked-in groups also after adjustment for background variables and job strain. In the double locked-in group, the fully adjusted odds ratio for suboptimal health was 1.72 (95% confidence interval 1.49-1.99) and for suboptimal psychological well-being 2.17 (95% confidence interval 1.84-2.56). Odds ratio for the other locked-in groups was lower but still statistically significant. Conclusions. Being at a nonpreferred work-place or occupation was associated with impaired health.

  • 15. Aslan, Pinar
    et al.
    Ahmadi, Nader
    Wikström, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Sjöberg, Stefan
    Agency and Adaptation: Strategies of Immigrants' Descendants on the Swedish Labor Market2020In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 43-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how descendants of immigrants in Sweden understand labor market conditions, and how such understandings influence their occupational strategies. We interviewed 21 Sweden-born individuals with non-Western immigrant parents, and identified three strategies based on our analysis of the data: 'choosing' the right job, adapting the habitus, and using cultural capital in flexible ways. The first strategy covers interviewees working in jobs with labor shortages and/or high demand for employees with immigrant background. The second covers interviewees who could learn through failing, with substantial resilience and persistence. The third deals with interviewees who searched for jobs in branches that valued their particular skill set, entailing the importance of being flexible on the labor market.

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  • 16.
    Aslan, Pinar
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Ahmadi, Nader
    Myndigheten för arbetsmiljökunskap.
    Wikström, Eva
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för socialt arbete.
    Sjöberg, Stefan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Agency and adaptation: strategies of immigrants’ descendants on the Swedish labor market2020In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 43-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how descendants of immigrants in Sweden understand labor market conditions, and how such understandings influence their occupational strategies. We interviewed twenty-one Sweden-born individuals with non-Western immigrant parents, and identified three strategies based on our analysis of the data: ‘choosing’ the right job, adapting the habitus, and using cultural capital in flexible ways. The first strategy covers interviewees working in jobs with labor shortages and/or high demand for employees with immigrant background. The second covers interviewees who could learn through failing, with substantial resilience and persistence. The third deals with interviewees who searched for jobs in branches that valued their particular skill set, entailing the importance of being flexible on the labor market.

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  • 17.
    Barth, Henrik
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Zalkat, Ghazal
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Harder Than You Think – Immigrant Labor Market Integration in Agricultural Sector2023In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 27-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent forced migration to Europe has created more challenges for the labor market integration. However, the Swedish government encourages unemployed immigrants to seek employment in the farming, gardening, and forestry industries. Thus, this article focuses on the matching process in the Swedish agricultural sector by using an exploratory, qualitative, in-depth interview with representatives involved in the matching process. Immigrants experience challenges of Swedish language proficiency, lacking a driving license and adapting to new cultures in the workplace, while employers attribute challenges of effective hiring process and the absence of evidence of immigrants’ work experience. Furthermore, the employment service offices struggle with scant knowledge of agricultural employment that needs to be combined with limited contact with employers and the bureaucratic delays caused by requirements of qualifications validation. The paper concludes with a Labour Market Matching Model, which focuses on critical aspects before, during, and after the matching process.

  • 18.
    Bengtsson, Mattias
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Flisbäck, Marita
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Existential Driving Forces to Work after Retirement: The Example of Physicians’ Mentoring2021In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article addresses physicians who work as group supervisors or mentors in a training program after having formally retired. The driving forces to continue to work are analyzed in terms of the development of existential meaning of work at a particular stage of the life cycle. We argue that a deeper understanding of the existential driving forces, that both cause physicians to accept post-retirement mentoring tasks and that is awakened and developed in this specific work, would contribute to a deeper understanding of why individuals continue working into old age. However, in political discussions of an extended working life, similar aspects tend to be disregarded. Understanding the existential driving forces that cause an individual to continue working after retirement may be crucial to comprehending how we can take advantage of the resources of the older workforce and, thus, realize human potential at a later stage of the life cycle.

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  • 19. Bergholm, Tapio
    et al.
    Gonäs, Lena
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Juul, Ida
    Gender and Working Life: Introduction to special issue2011In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 1, no 2Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Berglund, Tomas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Håkansson, Kristina
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Isidorsson, Tommy
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Alfonsson, Johan
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Temporary Employment and the Future Labor Market Status2017In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 27-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to describe and explain the development of temporary employment in Sweden between 1992 and 2010, and to investigate the effect of temporary employment for individuals' futurecareer on the labor market. The article analyzes temporary employees' status transitions on the labor market using Swedish Labour Force Survey (LFS) data for the period 1992-2010. Each cohort consists of 2-year panels and focuses on changes between the first and last measuring points. The findings indicate that the specific type of temporary employment is crucial as regards whether or not it constitutes a stepping-stone toward permanent employment. The chances are greater in the case of, for example, substitutes, but are considerably less in the case of on-call employment. Certain types of temporary employment thus seem to be used by the employer to screen the employability of the employee, while others are used for achieving flexibility.

  • 21.
    Bergman, Ann
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Back to the Future: Not looking into the future but at futures2015In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 3-8Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 22.
    Bergman, Ann
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School.
    Gillberg, Gunnar
    Göteborgs universitet.
    The Cabin Crew Blues: Middle-aged Cabin Attendants and Their Working Conditions2015In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 23-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how an airline company uses the labor of a group of middle-aged cabin attendants in an industry increasingly characterized by deregulation and competiveness. The study was based on in-depth interviews with seven women, all with between 24 and 30 years of work experience as cabin attendants. The article focuses on the women's working conditions and well-being and the analysis reveals three key aspects-intensification of work, vulnerability, and aging-that affect the cabin attendants' experiences and emotions in relation to the work. It is at the intersection of these three aspects that the cabin attendants' concerns must be understood. The study's findings indicated that positive emotions such as job satisfaction and commitment have diminished because of exploitative and otherwise poor working conditions. Taking the cabin attendants' concerns as its point of departure, the article shows that there is a need to move away from a discussion about emotional labor toward a discussion of working conditions.

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  • 23.
    Bergqvist, Tuula
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Eriksson, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Passion and Exploitation Among Young Adults with Different Labor Market Status in Europe2015In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 17-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to describe and analyze the relationship between attitudes to work, wellbeing, and labor market status among young adults in Europe and to discuss the extent to which the relationship can be understood in terms of passion or exploitation. This aim is made concrete in the following research questions:  To what extent do young adults in Europe have a passionate attitude to work? Are there differences between groups with various labor market status and nationalities?  Are there differences in levels of well-being between the groups of young adults with different labor market status, and differences between the countries?  The results are based on an individual survey conducted with three categories of young people (18–34 years old): long-term unemployed, those in precarious employments, and those regularly employed. The study had a cross-national comparative design and the countries included were France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Sweden, and Switzerland.

  • 24.
    Björkenfeldt, Oscar
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science. Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Addressing Online Harassment in Swedish Journalism: An Institutional Perspective on Management2023In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 89-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study scrutinizes Swedish news organizations’ strategies to navigate the psychosocial implications of online harassment toward journalists, drawing from interviews with 14 media managers across local and national media outlets. Employing institutional theory, the findings highlight managerial prioritization of physical safety, while concurrently undervaluing the mental strain induced by subtle online harassment, viewed as an occupational hazard intrinsic to the profession. Consequently, their comprehension of work environment responsibilities is shaped through their cognitive assimilation, influenced by their sociocultural environment and industry affiliation, which precludes them from recognizing online harassment as an organizational challenge. This, in turn, hinders a systematic and reflexive approach toward managing the multifaceted manifestations of online harassment. The significance of the study transcends merely identifying barriers, offering insights into the underlying institutional structures and practices that perpetuate them. These insights are pivotal for devising strategies that mitigate the detrimental impacts of online harassment in journalism. © (2023), (Roskilde University). All Rights Reserved.

  • 25.
    Blomqvist, Martha
    et al.
    Centre for Gender Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Peterson, Helen
    Department of Sociology and Work Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dhar-Bhattacharjee, Sunrita
    Lord Ashcroft International Business School, Anglia Ruskin University, UK.
    “You Feel The Threat From Asia”: Onshore Experiences of IT Offshoring To India2015In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 41-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the experiences of employees and managers in Swedish companies that offshore IT services to India, focusing on how implementation of offshoring is changing the work organization and working conditions for software developers onsite. Our analysis highlights the fact that the working conditions have been significantly redesigned in several different ways because of offshoring, most obviously due to the need for knowledge transfer between the onshore and the offshore working sites. The study illustrates how employees and managers onsite utilized different strategies for knowledge transfer and how these strategies were more or less successful, sometimes due to resistance from employees. The article concludes that, although offshoring contributed to a separation of conception from execution in these companies, there were few signs of routinization of daily work tasks for onsite employees. Instead, it was the routinized and noncore tasks that were offshored while project management tasks were taken over by onsite staff, which meant that they ended up in a superior position vis-à-vis their Indian colleagues as new global hierarchies were created. Power relations at work, both within firms and between firms, are thus brought to light.

  • 26.
    Blomqvist, Martha
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Peterson, Helen
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Sociol & Work Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dhar-Bhattacharjee, Sunrita
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, Lord Ashcroft Int Business Sch, Cambridge, England.
    "You feel the threat from Asia": Onshore experiences of IT offshoring to India2015In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 41-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the experiences of employees and managers in Swedish companies that offshore IT services to India, focusing on how implementation of offshoring is changing the work organization and working conditions for software developers onsite. Our analysis highlights the fact that the working conditions have been significantly redesigned in several different ways because of offshoring, most obviously due to the need for knowledge transfer between the onshore and the offshore working sites. The study illustrates how employees and managers onsite utilized different strategies for knowledge transfer and how these strategies were more or less successful, sometimes due to resistance from employees. The article concludes that, although offshoring contributed to a separation of conception from execution in these companies, there were few signs of routinization of daily work tasks for onsite employees. Instead, it was the routinized and noncore tasks that were offshored while project management tasks were taken over by onsite staff, which meant that they ended up in a superior position vis-à-vis their Indian colleagues as new global hierarchies were created. Power relations at work, both within firms and between firms, are thus brought to light.

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  • 27.
    Bolin, Malin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Olofsdotter, Gunilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Bringing Organizations Back in: Going from Healthy Work to Healthy Workplaces2019In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 3-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to discuss how the concept of inequality regimes can contribute to theoretical and methodological advances in occupational health research. We posit the mutual advantages of bringing together feminist intersectional analysis of inequality in working life with studies of working conditions and health. The job demands and control model (JDC) is used as a starting point for the discussion. Reintegration of organizational analysis into studies of working conditions and health is warranted, as organizations influence how working conditions are distributed and individuals are stratified in the labor market. We refer to that development as going from healthy work to healthy workplaces. We discuss how the concept of inequality regimes is open for mixed method analysis and how it can be used as a theoretical framework for unraveling the ways in which inequalities in working conditions and health are (re)created in different types of organizations.

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  • 28.
    Boréus, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Mörekenstam, Ulf
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Polit Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Patterned Inequalities and the Inequality Regime of a Swedish Housing Company2015In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 105-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the authors analyze inequalities between different groups of employees at a housing company in a larger Swedish city. The concept of inequality regime is taken as a point of departure. The purposes of the article are three: first, to add to knowledge of how inequality is generated at an organizational level at specific workplaces; second, to contribute to the understanding of how different practices, processes, and meanings of inequality regimes may interact to create and reinforce inequalities between natives and immigrants; and, third, to contribute to the empirical usefulness of the concept of inequality regime by demonstrating how it can be operationalized and combined with other concepts in the analysis. The study shows how the practices, processes, and meanings at the given workplace generated and reproduced different kinds of inequalities: unequal wages, an ethnic division of labor, unequal influence and job security, and unequal opportunities to capitalize on useful skills (i.e., language competence). Important conclusions are that different kinds of inequalities may reinforce each other by creating vicious circles, and subtler forms of inequality may partly explain explicit wage inequalities.

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  • 29.
    Boréus, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Mörkenstam, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Patterned Inequalities and the Inequality Regime of a Swedish Housing Company2015In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 105-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the authors analyze inequalities between different groups of employees at a housing company in a larger Swedish city. The concept of inequality regime is taken as a point of departure. The purposes of the article are three: first, to add to knowledge of how inequality is generated at an organizational level at specific workplaces; second, to contribute to the understanding of how different practices, processes, and meanings of inequality regimes may interact to create and reinforce inequalities between natives and immigrants; and, third, to contribute to the empirical usefulness of the concept of inequality regime by demonstrating how it can be operationalized and combined with other concepts in the analysis. The study shows how the practices, processes, and meanings at the given workplace generated and reproduced different kinds of inequalities: unequal wages, an ethnic division of labor, unequal influence and job security, and unequal opportunities to capitalize on useful skills (i.e., language competence). Important conclusions are that different kinds of inequalities may reinforce each other by creating vicious circles, and subtler forms of inequality may partly explain explicit wage inequalities.

  • 30.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Changing Occupational Roles in Audit Society: The Case of Swedish Student Aid Officials2015In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 31-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is about occupational change concerning a non-professional group of Street Level Bureaucrats—student aid officials at the Swedish Board for Study Support (SBSS). The aim is to describe and analyze changes in their occupational role—their discretional space and working conditions under the impact of changed ways to manage public service organizations and new information and communication technology. The SBSS is the sole administrator of student financial aid in Sweden. Its officials investigate and take decisions about students’ applications and repayment of loans. This work includes interacting with clients via telephone and computer. These officials have to have a certain amount of discretion to interpret and apply rules and regulations on specific circumstances in individual cases. How are their working conditions affected by organizational and policy changes in the authority? How is their ability to exercise influence and control over their own work performance affected? The analysis highlights how officials suffer from decreased discretion and an increasing routinization in their work. This is a result of a regulatory framework continuously growing in detail together with increasing management control based on new information and communication technology. What remains of discretion is a kind of ‘task’ discretion, the ability to do minor technical manipulations of rules in individual cases. Even today’s top management seems critical of this development. Besides further automatization and reduction of staff an ongoing process of organizational change is therefore also aiming to develop officials’ competence and working conditions toward what may be seen as organizational professionalism,a development of specific occupational skills and a discretion adjusted and subordinated to managerial means and ends. The analysis rests on data from a research project (2011 to 2014) about Institutional Talk. Data sources are qualitative interviews, audio-taped speech sequences, observational field notes, and official documents. 

  • 31.
    Bäcklander, Gisela
    KTH.
    To see or not to see: Importance of sensemaking in employee self-direction2019In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 25-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Being self-directed is one of the most sought-after employee attributes. The present study examines managers’ approaches to and conceptualization of employee self-directedness through semi-structured interviews with 13 managers from five companies in the Stockholm area. Analysis suggests two different emphases in trying to increase self-direction, with differing underlying assumptions: an evaluation emphasis where self-direction is conceptualized as an inherent property of the individual, and a cultivation emphasis suggesting a more interactionist perspective of self-direction as an emergent behavior based on the interaction of individual and situational characteristics. Further, a “seeing work”-skill emerged in all interviews, implicating situational judgment and attention as core to what is ultimately seen as successful self-direction. Managers with a cultivation emphasis mentioned as viable tactics those focused on supporting sensemaking and thus enriching the working situation to enable better discretionary situational judgements.

  • 32.
    Bäcklander, Gisela
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    To see or not to see: Importance of sensemaking in employee self-direction2019In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 25-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Being self-directed is one of the most sought-after employee attributes. The present study examines managers’ approaches to and conceptualization of employee self-directedness through semi-structured interviews with 13 managers from five companies in the Stockholm area. Analysis suggests two different emphases in trying to increase self-direction, with differing underlying assumptions: an evaluation emphasis where self-direction is conceptualized as an inherent property of the individual, and a cultivation emphasis suggesting a more interactionist perspective of self-direction as an emergent behavior based on the interaction of individual and situational characteristics. Further, a “seeing work”-skill emerged in all interviews, implicating situational judgment and attention as core to what is ultimately seen as successful self-direction. Managers with a cultivation emphasis mentioned as viable tactics those focused on supporting sensemaking and thus enriching the working situation to enable better discretionary situational judgements.

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    Bäcklander 2019 To see or not to see_postprint
  • 33.
    Ede, Lena
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Rantakeisu, Ulla
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Managing Organized Insecurity: The Consequences for Care Workers of Deregulated Working Conditions in Elderly Care2015In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 55-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Part-time work is more than twice as common among women than men in Sweden. New ways of organizing working hours to allow for more full-time jobs have been introduced for care workers in elderly care, which means unscheduled working hours based on the needs of the workplace. The aim of the study is to analyze how the organization of the unscheduled working hours affect employees' daily lives and their possibility to provide care. The Classic Grounded Theory method was used in a secondary analysis of interviews with employees and managers in Swedish municipal elderly care. The implementation of unscheduled working hours plunged employees into a situation of managing organized insecurity. This main concern for the care workers involved a cyclic process of first having to be available for work because of economic and social obligations to the employer and the co-workers, despite sacrifices in the private sphere. Then, they had to be adaptable in relation to unknown clients and co-workers and to the employer, which means reduced possibilities to provide good care. Full-time jobs were thus created through requiring permanent staff to be flexible, which in effect meant eroded working conditions with high demands on employee adaptability. Solving the part-time problem in elderly care by introducing unscheduled working hours may in effect be counter-productive.

  • 34.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Holden, Richard J.
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    A Case Study of Three Swedish Hospitals' Strategies for Implementing Lean Production2016In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 105-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many hospitals have recently implemented the management concept lean production. The aim of this study was to learn how and why three Swedish hospitals selected and developed their hospital-wide lean production strategies. Although previous research shows that the concept is implemented in various ways, there is limited research on how and why different hospitals choose different implementation strategies and if the chosen strategies contribute to sustainable participation in organizational development. A case study of three different Swedish hospitals implementing lean production was thus performed. We studied the content of the hospitals' selected implementation strategies, conditions and rationales behind their strategy selection, and how different organizational actors participated in the implementation. Qualitative interviews with 54 key actors at the studied hospitals were performed. In addition, a self-administered survey questionnaire to employees was answered at T1 (2012, n = 557), T2 (2013, n = 554), and T3 (2014, n = 366). The three studied hospitals chose different strategies for implementing lean production due to different contextual conditions and for different reasons. The hospital-wide implementation strategies were related to employees' interest and participation in lean production. The results show that many different actors at different organizational levels need to participate in lean production in order to sustain and diffuse change processes. Furthermore, broad motives including quality of care seem to be needed for engaging different professional groups.

  • 35.
    Falkenberg, Helena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. University of Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Lindfors, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Working in the Same Sector, in the Same Organization and in the Same Occupation: Similarities and Differences Between Women and Men Physicians’ Work Climate and Health Complaints2015In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 67-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the segregated labor market, gender differences in health are often confounded by factors such as sector or occupation.This study explored similarities and differences in work climate and health complaints among women and men working in the same sector, in the same organization, and in the same occupation. First, work climate and health complaints were compared between women and men. Second, relations between the work climate and health complaints were investigated in both genders. Questionnaire data were collected from 95 women and 105 men physicians who worked in the same acute care hospital in Sweden.The results showed no gender differences in the job, role, leadership, or organizational characteristics. However, women physicians reported less workgroup cohesiveness and cooperation and more mental and physical health complaints than men physicians.Workgroup cohesiveness and cooperation were related to less health complaints only for men physicians.This explorative study indicates similarities between women and men when the work situation is similar, but suggests that some of the differences that appear in the large structures of the gender-segregated labor market also seem to be present for women and men who work in the same sector, in the same organization, and in the same occupation.

  • 36.
    Gensby, Ulrik
    et al.
    Team Arbejdsliv.
    Limborg, Hans Jørgen
    Team Arbejdsliv.
    Mahood, Quenby
    Institute for Work and Health.
    Ståhl, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Albertsen, Karin
    Team Arbejdsliv.
    Employer Strategies for Preventing Mental HealthRelated Work Disability: A Scoping Review2019In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 57-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined Nordic research on psychosocial work environment and disability manage- ment, specifically employer strategies for preventing work disability in common mental disorders (CMDs).A scoping review was performed to identify strategies across several research databases, alongside contact with content experts, hand-searching of non-indexed journals, and internet searches. Identification and selection of relevant studies, charting of data, and collating and sum- marizing of results was done using a six-step framework for conducting scoping reviews. Several key elements and knowledge gaps were identified in current prevention approaches and work- place initiatives across the included studies.We propose a program theory for workplace preven- tion of CMD-related work disability.The program theory may help specify employer strategies, and bridge activities with stakeholders outside the workplace.

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  • 37.
    Gherardi, Silvia
    Univ Trento, Trento, Italy.;Aalto Univ, Espoo, Finland..
    How the Turn to Practice may contribute to Working Life Studies2015In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 5, no 3A, p. 13-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Working life studies and practice-based studies have a common interest for work, and how work is accomplished in situated working conditions. The turn to practice may contribute to renew the study of work. The main concern of a practice-based approach to working practices is to understand the logic of the situation and the performance of action as practical knowledge, which connects working with organizing and knowing with practicing. The article will first illustrate the basic assumptions of an approach to working practices based on a post-humanist practice theory and second it will focus on a specific contribution from it. I shall argue that a practice approach to innovation as a continuous process contributes to a better understanding of how working practices change or persist. In fact, the study of work in situation is not only descriptive in its purpose, but it is also intended to yield practical outcomes for empowering practitioners in their attachment to practicing.

  • 38.
    Gonäs, Lena
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School.
    Tyrkkö, Arja
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies.
    Changing Structures and Women’s Role as Labor Force2015In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 89-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to analyze changes in the development of women's role as labor force over a 40-year period. This is done by presenting research results that concern the restructur-ing of the labor market over different time periods. The empirical material is from the 1960s, the heyday of the Swedish model; from the 1980s, the period that economic historians label the third industrial revolution; and from the 1990s, a period labeled the new working life that is covering the reorganization of the public sector.For the first period results from restructuring in the shipyard industry are presented as well as employment outcomes for single individuals. This industry was male dominated with very few women employed, but regional policy measures were implemented to reach a latent female labor force. The second period is covered by a study of closures and cutbacks in different industries in Sweden during 1982–1983. The proportion of women employed in the industries studied was around one third and employment outcomes had a specific gendered pattern. Women did to a lower extent than men get new permanent jobs. Permanent temporariness was introduced as a concept to describe their labor market situation.The recession that one decade later hit both female- and male-dominated sectors is il-lustrated by a study of the relations between labor market attachment, working life, and family conditions. The material comes from a regional research program based on a questionnaire and on register data on incomes from 1990 to 1999. The paper analyzes several areas related to work and outside of work that indicate a gendered pattern of multidimensional subordination and an increased polarization in terms of both gender and class. In conclusion, the 40 years has been a period of dramatic change in women's situation as labor force. In times of restructuring they often entered into precarious job situations or unemploy-ment. Women's double burden proved remarkably resilient when explaining gender differences in employment and working conditions.

  • 39.
    Granberg, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Manufacturing dissent: Labor conflict, care work, and the politicization of caring2014In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 139-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article analyzes the phenomenon of "politicization of caring," observed in studies of nurselabor conflict, in the context of a small-scale episode of conflict at a Swedish hospital ward. Usinganalytical concepts drawn from work on the role of images of gendered ideal workers in managementcultivation of consent, and the method of positioning analysis, it tries to identify the littleresearched discursive practices involved in the politicization of caring. Analysis of interviews withregistered nurses, who took part in a conflict where some of them threatened to resign unlesswages were raised and working conditions improved, shows a range of such strategies: includingproblematizing identities in nursing, expanding the context of caring work, using a discourse of professionalism,and redefining the interpellated image of nursing. Findings indicate that politicizationthus has important effects on the gendering of nursing and the viability of neoliberal restructuringof healthcare work.

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  • 40.
    Granberg, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Shop floor power: Opportunity and collectivism in nurses' collective resignations2017In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 109-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This historical and comparative study attends to the phenomenon of collective resignation by registered nurses in the Swedish health services, with the aim of exploring the existence and utilization of shop floor power. The study uses two kinds of data: incidences of collective resignation since the 1980s are explored using newspaper data; second, two cases of collective resignation are comparatively explored using interview data. First is analyzed how contemporary opportunities to take this form of worker action arose. Then is analyzed how differences between the two cases shed further light on opportunity structures in different contexts of nursing, and on nurses' ability to organize the resignation threat as a collective act. The study clarifies the existence of nurses' shop floor power as it relates to opportunity structures, while also pointing to the significance of the extent of collectivism when nurses challenge employers by threatening this kind of industrial action.

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  • 41.
    Grönlund, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    On different tracks? Gender, professional strategies and early career wage gaps2017In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 9-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A longstanding notion in labor market theory is that women accommodate family responsibilities in their occupational and job choices. Utilizing a survey of newly graduated highly educated men and women in five occupations in Sweden (n≈2400), the article explores whether men and women differ in their professional strategies and if such differences produce early career wage gaps. Findings based on OLS regressions show that women express dual commitment to work and family; compared with men, they value ‘family-friendly’ work-conditions higher but do not value wages and career lower. Parenthood is not related to lower levels of career focus, but neutralizes occupational differences in family focus for women. Despite the select sample, women have lower wages than men, but the wage gap is not explained by different prioritization of family/career. The findings suggest that assumptions about gendered skill investments must be empirically scrutinized and theories further developed.

  • 42.
    Grönlund, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Nordlund, Madelene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    A maternal wall for refugees? Gender and labor market establishment in Sweden2022In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 3-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using longitudinal register data, we examined gender patterns in the long-term labor market establishment of refugees (n≈11 700) and Swedish-born individuals (n≈109 000). The main question was whether refugee women face greater difficulties than men and if gender differences can be attributed to care responsibilities. With multinomial logistic regression, cox regressions, and individual fixed effects models, refugees were observed at age 29-30 in 1997, then followed to age 50. Results show that both among refugees and Swedish-born, establishment was a protracted and insecure process for women. Over time, women caught up with men but in terms of stable employment, gender gaps prevailed throughout the fertile period and parenthood was negatively related to long-term establishment prospects. Future research should move beyond the focus on labor market entry to capture the mechanisms behind long term insecurities. The timing of parenthood and the importance of adult education are of particular interest.

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  • 43.
    Grönlund, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Öun, Ida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Beyond the Mummy Track?: Part-time Rights, Gender, and Career-Family Dilemmas2018In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 177-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Statutory rights to part-time work are increasingly discussed and institutionalized, but have been little empirically investigated. On the basis of a survey of Swedish parents (n = 1900), the article explores the usage and usefulness of the right to work hour reductions in relation to career-family dilemmas. The results show that the gender composition of the workplace affects both mothers’ and fathers’ likelihood of reducing work hours. Mothers who reduce work hours experience lower work-family conflict but stronger fears of negative career repercussions. For fathers, the implications of work hour reductions vary with the gender composition of the workplace. Meanwhile, the division of housework is related both to the likelihood of reducing work hours and to its implications. The analysis suggests that even when a statutory right to part-time is provided, workplace norms and men’s participation in housework are crucial for changing gender patterns.

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  • 44.
    Haake, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lindberg, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Rantatalo, Oscar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Grimm, Frida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Siljebo, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Bäck, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Leadership in swedish public organizations: a research review in education and care2023In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 63-85Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is a review of recent Swedish leadership research in two large public-sector areas: education and care. By comparing and contrasting research in these areas, we unveil the specifics and commonalities of research in public-sector leadership. We reviewed research articles from 2018 to 2020 and analyzed theories used, data-gathering methods employed, and topics researched. The results show some fundamental differences between the two areas. Compared to research on education, research on care is to a larger extent non-theoretical and is often focused on change management, quality assurance, and leaders’ roles in employee health. Conversely, studies on education are theory driven and mostly focused on leaders’ roles in learning and shared leadership. We discuss the state of Swedish public leadership research and make suggestions for mutual learning and moving forward in this research field.

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  • 45.
    Hagsten, Kenneth
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Learning Inforamt Management & Ethics LIME, Solna, Sweden..
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Palm, Kristina
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Learning Inforamt Management & Ethics LIME, Solna, Sweden..
    Self-propelled Employees - Co-workership in Swedish Community Pharmacies2024In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 14, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, work in Swedish pharmacies is examined. With the Nordic concept of co-workership as a frame, the aim is to examine how employees in pharmacies view and handle their work situations and the reasons behind them. Data were mainly collected with 20 qualitative semistructured interviews in five different pharmacies. The data were organized and analyzed by using the content analysis process. In the studied pharmacies, it can be summarized as work was carried out in a self-propelled way. Employees take an overall responsibility for the workplace, have ambition to help others and to be a part of a good team, while most of the work is carried out individually and independently.

  • 46.
    Hagsten, Kenneth
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Palm, Kristina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Self-propelled Employees – Co-workership in Swedish Community Pharmacies2024In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 47-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, work in Swedish pharmacies is examined.With the Nordic concept of co-workership as a frame, the aim is to examine how employees in pharmacies view and handle their work situations and the reasons behind them. Data were mainly collected with 20 qualitative semi-structured interviews in five different pharmacies. The data were organized and analyzed by using the content analysis process. In the studied pharmacies, it can be summarized as work was carengried out in a self-propelled way. Employees take an overall responsibility for the workplace, have ambition to help others and to be a part of a good team, while most of the work is carried out individually and independently.

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  • 47.
    Haugen, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Westin, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    'Not a Problem Until it Becomes a Problem': A Qualitative Study of Values and Risks of In-house Family Ties in Swedish Workplaces2016In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 67-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In-house family ties at workplaces occur in most contexts, and are associated with both advantages and disadvantages. On the basis of 40 interviews with human resource managers at Swedish workplaces, the values and risks of in-house family ties and their importance within the workplace are analyzed jointly, thus allowing for a holistic perspective. The interviews reveal values and risks on a strategic level, for day-to-day operations, for the social work environment, and on the level of individuals. Crucially, even when in-house family ties are perceived as uncomplicated, there is a latent risk that problems might arise. The interpretation of the role of in-house family ties is also strongly related to whether they are paired with asymmetrical (vertical) power relations. It also depends heavily on the chosen perspective-that of the organization, the social work environment, the individual, or the broader society-and the perceived advantages tend to come with corresponding inverted disadvantages.

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  • 48.
    Hobbins, Jennifer
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum.
    Young long-term unemployed and the individualization of responsibilities2016In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 43-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, as in most Western societies, a common belief is that unemployment is somehow linked to the individual, her lack of work ethic, or other personal shortcomings rather than to structural causes. This is not only manifested in public arenas such as the media or political debates but also in our social surroundings. In recent years, these views have gained mportance, indicating a shift in the location of responsibilities from the welfare state to the ndividual. This shift entails high demands and expectations on unemployed people and is omething they have to deal with and relate to. One of the most exposed groups is young ong-term unemployed.

    The aim of this article is to highlight how the discourse of individualized responsibility is reflected in unemployed peoples’ stories, and to shed light on the ways in which young long-term unemployed adults relate to and position themselves toward this discourse. Based on 18 qualitative interviews with young Swedish long-term unemployed people, the findings how three approaches to the discourse: conformity, distancing, and resistance.

  • 49.
    Hobbins, Jennifer
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013). Swedish Defence University; Swedish National Defence College.
    Young long-term unemployed and the individualization of responsibilities2016In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 43-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, as in most Western societies, a common belief is that unemployment is somehow linked to the individual, her lack of work ethic, or other personal shortcomings rather than to structural causes. This is not only manifested in public arenas such as the media or political debates but also in our social surroundings. In recent years, these views have gained mportance, indicating a shift in the location of responsibilities from the welfare state to the ndividual. This shift entails high demands and expectations on unemployed people and is omething they have to deal with and relate to. One of the most exposed groups is young ong-term unemployed. The aim of this article is to highlight how the discourse of individualized responsibility is reflected in unemployed peoples’ stories, and to shed light on the ways in which young long-term unemployed adults relate to and position themselves toward this discourse. Based on 18 qualitative interviews with young Swedish long-term unemployed people, the findings how three approaches to the discourse: conformity, distancing, and resistance.

  • 50.
    Härkönen, Juho
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Räsänen, Pekka
    Näsi, Matti
    Obesity, Unemployment, and Earnings2011In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 23-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article analyses the effects of obesity—a clear signal of weight abnormality—on unemployment and earnings among Finnish men and women. Our empirical data consist of the last four waves (waves 4 to 8) of the Finnish section of the European Community Household Panel (ECHP) data collected between 1998 and 2001. According to our results, obese women have a significantly higher risk of unemployment (even after controlling for age, level of education and other related factors), than women who are not obese. Furthermore, the generally weaker occupational positions of obese women tend to translate to lower earnings. Overall, obese women are more likely to have weaker labour market attachment  and hold socio-economically weaker positions. Similar results were not found among men. Thus, our results indicate the presence of gender discrimination in the Finnish labour market. In the conclusions we further discuss weight related impacts on succeeding in the labour market, but also its role as a possible risk factor in drifting away from employment. We reflect on this issue as a form of inequality that can have an increasing significance in the future.

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