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  • 1.
    Jonasson, Lise-Lotte
    et al.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Sandman, Lars
    University of Borås, Sweden;Linköping university, Sweden.
    Bremer, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Managers’ experiences of ethical problems in municipal elderly care: a qualitative study of written reflections as part of leadership training2019In: Journal of Healthcare Leadership, ISSN 1179-3201, E-ISSN 1179-3201, Vol. 11, p. 63-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Managers in elderly care have a complex ethical responsibility to address the needs and preferences of older persons while balancing the conflicting interests and requirements of relatives’ demands and nursing staff’s work environment. In addition, managers must consider laws, guidelines, and organizational conditions that can cause ethical problems and dilemmas that need to be resolved. However, few studies have focused on the role of health care managers in the context of how they relate to and deal with ethical conflicts. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe ethical problems experienced by managers in elderly care. Methods: We used a descriptive, interpretative design to analyze textual data from two examinations in leadership courses for managers in elderly care. A simple random selection of 100 out of 345 written exams was made to obtain a manageable amount of data. The data consisted of approximately 300 pages of single-spaced written text. Thematic analysis was used to evaluate the data. Results: The results show that managers perceive the central ethical conflicts relate to the older persons’ autonomy and values versus their needs and the values of the staff. Additionally, ethical dilemmas arise in relation to the relatives’ perspective of their loved one’s needs and preferences. Legislations, guidelines, and a lack of resources create difficulties when managers perceive these factors as conflicting with the care needs of older persons. Conclusion: Managers in elderly care experience ethical conflicts that arise as unavoidable and perennial values conflicts, poorly substantiated values, and problematic organizational conditions. Structured approaches for identifying, reflecting on, and assessing ethical problems in the organization should therefore be implemented.

  • 2.
    Jonasson, Lise-Lotte
    et al.
    Univ Boras, Sweden.
    Sandman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Boras, Sweden.
    Bremer, Anders
    Univ Boras, Sweden; Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Managers experiences of ethical problems in municipal elderly care: a qualitative study of written reflections as part of leadership training2019In: Journal of Healthcare Leadership, ISSN 1179-3201, E-ISSN 1179-3201, Vol. 11, p. 63-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Managers in elderly care have a complex ethical responsibility to address the needs and preferences of older persons while balancing the conflicting interests and requirements of relatives demands and nursing staffs work environment. In addition, managers must consider laws, guidelines, and organizational conditions that can cause ethical problems and dilemmas that need to be resolved. However, few studies have focused on the role of health care managers in the context of how they relate to and deal with ethical conflicts. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe ethical problems experienced by managers in elderly care. Methods: We used a descriptive, interpretative design to analyze textual data from two examinations in leadership courses for managers in elderly care. A simple random selection of 100 out of 345 written exams was made to obtain a manageable amount of data. The data consisted of approximately 300 pages of single-spaced written text. Thematic analysis was used to evaluate the data. Results: The results show that managers perceive the central ethical conflicts relate to the older persons autonomy and values versus their needs and the values of the staff. Additionally, ethical dilemmas arise in relation to the relatives perspective of their loved ones needs and preferences. Legislations, guidelines, and a lack of resources create difficulties when managers perceive these factors as conflicting with the care needs of older persons. Conclusion: Managers in elderly care experience ethical conflicts that arise as unavoidable and perennial values conflicts, poorly substantiated values, and problematic organizational conditions. Structured approaches for identifying, reflecting on, and assessing ethical problems in the organization should therefore be implemented.

  • 3.
    Winge, Monica
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Lindh-Waterworth, Eva
    Scenario for a patient at home in health and social care2014In: Journal of Healthcare Leadership, ISSN 1179-3201, E-ISSN 1179-3201, no 6, p. 51-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes and discusses the situation for a typical patient with multiple illnesses and how his case would benefit from improved coordination, communication, and collaboration among all involved care providers. The paper is built around a patient case presented in a current scenario. The authors identified that for a single patient with several problems and diagnoses and the involvement of several care actors, the common issues concern lack of collaboration, lack of coordination, and awareness of what others have done to assess, plan, perform, and evaluate care. This presumably leads to a lack of care quality and a lack of effective use of care resources. The scenario and the findings are based on a patient-oriented perspective, on an analysis expressed in focus groups, and on interviews with key actors in health and social care. The paper also discusses the fact that an increasing number of patients are treated in their homes by a variety of organizations, and how this fact raises new and more intense demands on the various stakeholders forming the care staff to collaborate and coordinate care. We point to the need for managers in and between organizations to agree on the ways of collaborating at the operational level. Most importantly, by taking a basic set of issues as the starting point for reasoning, we derived a set of related problems and suggest solutions to deal with these. The literature currently lacks scenario descriptions that put the patient's situation into focus with respect to collaboration between health and social care. Finally, the paper presents a future case for collaboration including support by new e-services.

  • 4.
    Winge, Monica
    et al.
    Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Waterworth, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Scenario for a patient at home in health and social care2014In: Journal of Healthcare Leadership, ISSN 1179-3201, E-ISSN 1179-3201, no 6, p. 51-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes and discusses the situation for a typical patient with multiple illnesses and how his case would benefit from improved coordination, communication, and collaboration among all involved care providers. The paper is built around a patient case presented in a current scenario. The authors identified that for a single patient with several problems and diagnoses and the involvement of several care actors, the common issues concern lack of collaboration, lack of coordination, and awareness of what others have done to assess, plan, perform, and evaluate care. This presumably leads to a lack of care quality and a lack of effective use of care resources. The scenario and the findings are based on a patient-oriented perspective, on an analysis expressed in focus groups, and on interviews with key actors in health and social care. The paper also discusses the fact that an increasing number of patients are treated in their homes by a variety of organizations, and how this fact raises new and more intense demands on the various stakeholders forming the care staff to collaborate and coordinate care. We point to the need for managers in and between organizations to agree on the ways of collaborating at the operational level. Most importantly, by taking a basic set of issues as the starting point for reasoning, we derived a set of related problems and suggest solutions to deal with these. The literature currently lacks scenario descriptions that put the patient's situation into focus with respect to collaboration between health and social care. Finally, the paper presents a future case for collaboration including support by new e-services.

1 - 4 of 4
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