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  • 1.
    Björnfot, Anders
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Torjussen, Liv
    Gjövik University College.
    Extent and effect of horizontal supply chain collaboration among construction SME2012In: Journal of Engineering, Project, and Production Management, ISSN 2221-6529, E-ISSN 2223-8379, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 47-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The majority of companies involved in value delivery in the Swedish housing industry are Small- and Medium-sized Enterprises (SME). An SME is often managed in an informal way with focus on sales and production. Many SME are also financially vulnerable as they are strongly dependent on a few key customers and key products. As variation will always exist, SME should learn to deal with variation instead of try eliminating it. This paper hypothesises that structural flexibility in SME supply chains through horizontal collaboration leads to a regional environment of economical growth from which all active SME will benefit. The hypothesis is examined through two case studies; a Swedish supplier network that has worked together six years and a four year old Norwegian supplier network. A benefit of collaboration is knowledge sharing that lessens the economical strain of keeping up with the “latest”. Other examples of collaboration are shared production resources in case of low capacity. Collaboration within supplier tier networks is considered to mark the emergence of a “collective strength” that improves individual suppliers bargaining position towards their customers. This evolution is considered an indication of the emergence of a “Lean Enterprise” within the house building sector.

  • 2.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Björnfot, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Production resource management in the industrialised house-building supply chain2012In: Journal of Engineering, Project, and Production Management, ISSN 2221-6529, E-ISSN 2223-8379, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 78-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrialised house-building suppliers must learn to see how the lack of resource management disrupt the synchronisation of their production processes both upstream (e.g. capability to forecast material consumption) and downstream (e.g. order delivery Just-in-Time). In contrast to focus on workflow as is more common in construction, Systematic Production Analysis (SPA) is a tool capable of providing a more robust production process in terms of better resource characterisation and predictability. A roadmap model, composed of six steps, has been developed for simple introduction of SPA. The model is a straightforward way of classifying the production system in terms of impacting resource and parameters attributing to production loss (scrap or downtime). The applicability of SPA is analysed through a pilot case study at a patio door manufacturer. Two main response parameters emerged related to scrap; surface and dimension errors of the work piece material (wood). An objective function was formulated to reduce the scrap without increasing the total cost of the work piece material. It was suggested that the case company evaluates Engineering Wood Products (EWP) leading to a more robust production process (less scrap), but in turn increasing the initial cost of the work piece material. Other potential measures are purchasing new processing tools, investing in new machinery or educating workers which all, directly or indirectly, lead to reduced scrap. Consequently, proper management of production resources will improve their predictability and in turn improve production control.

  • 3.
    Salloum, Mohammed
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Explaining the evolution of performance measures – A dual case-study approach2013In: Journal of Engineering, Project, and Production Management, ISSN 2221-6529, E-ISSN 2223-8379Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Few empirical studies have examined how performance measures change in practice and the driving forces behind this change. The existing body of literature has taken a prescriptive approach to how managers and organisations ought to manage change in performance measures without any concern for studying the phenomenon itself and thus a theoretical gap exists. With this gap in mind, the purpose of this paper is to outline how and why the performance measures have changed at two case companies over the time period 2008-2011. In order to fulfil the purpose of this paper two case studies at two different case companies have been conducted. The choice of data collection method is justified by the ambition to attain an in-depth and holistic understanding of the phenomenon. For each case, the data collection was based on four components: an interview study, analysis of archived data, documentation and direct observations. In total, 28 interviews were conducted, 14 at each case company. The empirical findings exhibit that the performance measures are exposed to continuous and considerable change from several perspectives. The measurement scopes at both case companies are steadily expanding, the individual performance measures are constantly replaced and their characteristics are continuously altered. An array of change triggers has been identified in the empirical findings. In contrast to what is advocated in literature, the findings illustrate that the most frequent reason for change is the will to improve the performance measures, the measurement process and the overall performance rather than changing internal and external environments. There are several challenges that need to be addressed in the future research agenda.

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