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  • 1.
    Andersson, Morgan
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Svennerlind, Christer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences. Chalmers University of Technology.
    Malmqvist, Inga
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Anckarsäter, Henrik
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg.
    New Swedish forensic psychiatric facilities: visions and outcomes2013In: Facilities, ISSN 0263-2772, E-ISSN 1758-7131, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 24-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to map significant features of the physical design of nine recently planned facilities for forensic psychiatric care in Sweden. The present paper is focused on differences in the physical design, static security adaptations, visions and goals for the projects, economy and steering processes.

    Design/methodology/approach – In June 2008, records concerning major forensic psychiatric construction projects, planned or carried out between 1970 and 2008, were requested from all 21 regions in Sweden. The documents were collected, organized, critically examined, and analyzed in their contexts. Extensive data have also been retrieved from the internet.

    Findings – In spite of the common national legislation governing forensic psychiatric care, the projects show great diversity in the physical design and, after 2006, increasing emphasis on static security. The collected material indicates different visions and goals and little coordination between them. It also suggests that the decisions rarely have been preceded by scientific studies or, as it appears, systematic needs assessments. There were also considerable variations in the interpretation of the legislation stipulating public access to official documentation and the time-frame allowed for such requests.

    Research limitations/implications – Limitations of the project especially relate to the incompleteness of the documents received. Originality/value – This mainly descriptive paper provides an overview of contemporary Swedish forensic psychiatric construction projects, planned for or realized after 2000. This paper points out structural and physical differences between these projects. The systematised documents are made available for research purposes within different disciplines.

  • 2.
    Eriksson, Per-Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Cooperation and partnering in facilities construction: empirical application of prisoner's dilemma2007In: Facilities, ISSN 0263-2772, E-ISSN 1758-7131, Vol. 25, no 1/2, p. 7-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - To investigate if game theoretic reasoning may be used to explain a lack of cooperation in buyer-supplier relationships within construction and facilities management. In order to make an empirical application of the Prisoner's dilemma game possible important variables are operationalized and empirically measured Methodology/approach - Empirical data concerning pay-offs and the variables in the discount parameter formula (created in this paper) have been obtained through interviews with clients and contractors in the Swedish construction sector. Findings - This paper suggests a way to operationalize pay-offs and the discount parameter, making empirical measurements possible. Due to differences in pay-offs and the discount parameter, different forms of contracts will affect cooperation. Cumulative values of cooperation are much higher in lasting relationships than in occasional transactions. Thus, the best way to facilitate cooperation between rational players is long-term contracts.Research limitations/implications - Since the values used are based on empirical data collected from a few respondents, they should be viewed as illustrative empirical examples, rather than statistical generalizations.Practical implications - From a game theoretic perspective the practice of project partnering may not solve problems regarding lack of cooperation. To increase the incentives for cooperation the actors should work together in long-term relationships instead of focusing on single projects. Long-term strategic partnering is therefore beneficial for the construction and management of facilities.Originality/value - This paper makes empirical application of the Prisoner's Dilemma game possible by operationalizing and empirically measuring game theoretic variables that previously have been given values set by the researcher rather than by the players in the game.

  • 3.
    Eriksson, Per-Erik
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Dickinson, Michael
    SCRI Research Centre, University of Salford, Manchester.
    Khalfan, Malik M.A.
    SCRI Research Centre, University of Salford, Manchester.
    The influence of partnering and procurement on subcontractor involvement and innovation2007In: Facilities, ISSN 0263-2772, E-ISSN 1758-7131, Vol. 25, no 5/6, p. 203-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The aim of this paper is to investigate how a client's cooperative procurement procedures influence subcontractor involvement, value creation, and innovation in the construction of complex facilities. Design/methodology/approach - Empirical data were collected through interviews, surveys and participation in workshops during a longitudinal action research case study. The case project was located in Sweden and concerned the construction of plant facilities for manufacturing of pharmaceutical products. Findings - The case study findings reveal that the client's procurement procedures affect the level of subcontractor involvement and integration, but that this does not necessarily result in increased subcontractor value creation and innovation in the construction process. Research limitations/implications - Since the empirical results are based on data collected from only one case project, the possibilities for generalisations are limited. Practical implications - Clients' procurement procedures heavily affect subcontractor involvement, but in order to increase subcontractor contributions to innovation and value creation the actors should adopt a long-term perspective and actively work to establish an innovation-friendly climate. Originality/value - This paper focuses on the often-neglected importance of subcontractors and their contributions to innovation and value creation.

  • 4.
    Forslund, Helena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    The size of a logistics performance measurement system2011In: Facilities, ISSN 0263-2772, E-ISSN 1758-7131, Vol. 29, no 3/4, p. 133-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – One practical challenge in managing logistics performance concerns the size, or thenumber of actors involved, in a performance measurement (PM) system. The first objective of thispaper is to describe and compare the advantages and disadvantages of four logistics performancemeasurement system sizes. The second objective is to develop a model of the factors affecting logisticsPM system size.

    Design/methodology/approach – This is a conceptual paper based on a literature review.

    Findings – Internal PM systems were related to advantages connected with convenience and theavoidance of implementation problems. Disadvantages of an applied system were severe, especially ina supply chain context. Supply chain PM systems contained attractive advantages that can be reachedwith an applied system. However, a number of disadvantages in the shape of implementationproblems must be handled. A model of the factors affecting the decision on logistics PM system sizeswas developed. Power, purpose and implementation were found to be important factors. Fivepropositions were formulated.

    Research limitations/implications – The contribution of this paper is mainly theoretical; theresults remain unverified until empirical studies are conducted.Practical implications – The paper can be seen as a first step towards new knowledge on howlogistics PM system size is decided.

    Originality/value – As little research exists in the area, this paper highlights the theoretical aspectsof a practical challenge

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  • 5.
    Holmén, Magnus
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Broechner, Jan
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Mokhlesian, Shahin
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Integrating contractor and property developer for product system innovations2017In: Facilities, ISSN 0263-2772, E-ISSN 1758-7131, Vol. 35, no 9/10, p. 511-524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The aim of this paper is to explain why construction groups facing opportunities for product system innovations, such as green buildings, may choose to integrate construction and property development, taking on facilities management (FM) for a limited period.

    Design/methodology/approach - Conceptual analysis based on prior literature and illustrated by a single case of integration.

    Findings - For product system innovations, an in-house developer should be more able to reduce uncertainty than independent developers, due to unobservable long-term technological quality for customers, because the property becomes associated with lower risk after having been owned and operated. Alternatives such as building certification systems support incremental innovations, warranties suffer from double moral hazard in the long run and risk allocation in public- private partnership projects often fails to encourage system innovations. Integration allows the contractor to work continuously with innovative projects, developing new capabilities, which allow the firm to signal proficiency to the market, employees and the investment community.

    Research limitations/implications - The phenomenon is new, and further empirical surveys are needed to confirm the hypothetical conclusions drawn here.

    Practical implications - The value of close collaboration between those who develop innovative green building technologies and facilities managers is outlined.

    Originality/value - The relation between the scope of corporate activities in construction groups, technological innovations and FM has not been studied before.

  • 6.
    Kallio, Tomi J.
    et al.
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Kallio, Kirsi-Mari
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Blomberg, Annika Johanna
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Physical space, culture and organisational creativity: a longitudinal study2015In: Facilities, ISSN 0263-2772, E-ISSN 1758-7131, Vol. 33, no 5-6, p. 389-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this study is to explore the potential positive effects of the design of a physical organisational environment on the emergence of an organisational culture conducive to organisational creativity. Design/methodology/approach - The study is based on an in-depth, longitudinal case study, the aim being to enhance understanding of how a change in physical space, including location, spatial organisation and architectonic details, supports cultural change. Findings - It is suggested that physical space plays an implicit yet significant role in the emergence of a culture conducive to organisational creativity. It appears from the case analysis that there are three aspects of culture in particular, equality, openness and collectivity, that may be positively affected by the design of an organisation’s physical environment. Practical implications - The careful choice, planning and design of an organisation’s physical location, layout and style can advance the appearance of an organisational culture conducive to creativity. Originality/value - The paper describes a longitudinal study comparing a case organisation before and after a change in its physical environment. The longitudinal data illustrates how a change in the spatial environment contributes to the emergence of a culture conducive to organisational creativity.

  • 7.
    Lindahl, Göran
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Ryd, Nina
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Clients' goals and the construction project management process2007In: Facilities, ISSN 0263-2772, E-ISSN 1758-7131, Vol. 25, no 3/4, p. 147-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The paper seeks to suggest methods that will enable innovative and effective communication and collaboration between clients and construction project management professionals. Design/methodology/approach – The methodology involves workshops with construction clients documented in working documents circulated to participants. Findings – Workshops revealed trends that urge a re-evaluation of the briefing process. The need for better briefing with the focus on end-users is increasing. The findings also pointed to difficulties for construction projects to deliver what the user-clients need. There was considered to be a lack of systems and methods to keep track of user client demands sufficiently and in a satisfactory way. Goals need to be iterated and validated on a regular and coherent basis throughout projects. An increased interest for process-oriented and strategic briefing was indicated. Research limitations/implications – Further studies are required to develop a client/user driven construction process that is more than just new statements. Research needs to address not only issues in the business as such, but also what requirements should be put on the education and training of stakeholders who are active in the construction sector. Practical implications – The paper presents a challenge to the traditional role of several actors; there is a need to communicate core business needs to construction prerequisites in a reciprocal way. There is a need of choosing logic – however, this does not diminish the need for methodologies for capturing, processing and verifying requirements in the process of provision of facilities to a user. Originality/value – The paper proposes the idea that different logics govern actions by construction industry stakeholders, an issue the construction sector needs to address.

  • 8.
    Mahzouni, Arian
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment. Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Swiss Fed Inst Technol Lausanne, Inst Technol & Publ Policy, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    The institutional challenges of scaling-up housing retrofit: the Swiss cities of Basel and Sion2019In: Facilities, ISSN 0263-2772, E-ISSN 1758-7131, Vol. 37, no 11/12, p. 780-798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose This paper aims to discuss the nexus between two societal (sub) systems of housing and energy supply to shed new light on the key institutional barriers to socio-technical energy transition in the built environment. The key research question is to explore if and how key patterns of institutional elements associated with energy retrofit and energy supply are combined, co-evolved and played out in the housing system, leading to an alternative energy transition pathway in the built environment. Design/methodology/approach A comparative case study of residential buildings in the Swiss cities of Basel and Sion is conducted to map retrofitting policies and practices in a wide range of buildings (e.g. multi-family and single family) that each requires a particular constellation of institutions, actors and artefacts. Findings The key finding is that the regulative institutions support energy transition in each urban form/housing type. However, the co-evolution with normative and cultural-cognitive institutions does not play out very clearly in the housing system. One reason is that the norms and cultures are deeply rooted in the practices exercised by business community and households and therefore they need a longer time frame to adapt to a new regulation. Research limitations/implications -The policies and actions to increase the rate of housing retrofit are discussed in the specific socio-political context of Switzerland. Therefore, the results of this study might not be applied in other contexts with different conditions, limiting the possibility for analytical generalization. The case study can generate only context-specific knowledge, which might be valuable only to cities with similar conditions. This paper addresses theoretical, methodological and policy challenges in scaling-up retrofit projects by taking a holistic and integrated approach to the systems of housing and energy supply. Practical implications -It would have been necessary to find out how the introduction and enforcement of new energy policies and regulations (regulative institutions) have changed the norms and building practices (normative institutions) used by actors from housing industry and the attitudes and energy consumption behaviour of the households (cultural-cognitive institutions). Nevertheless, information about normative and cultural-cognitive institutions require more primary data in the form of interviews with organizations and households, respectively, which goes beyond the scope and resources of this study. Originality/value Insights from different strands of literature (institutions and sustainability transition) are combined to understand if and how retrofitting practices go along with other elements of urban sustainability including architectural, technical, socio-cultural and economic factors.

  • 9.
    Palm, Peter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Information for Decision-making in In-house and Outsourced Real Estate Management Organisations2016In: Facilities, ISSN 0263-2772, E-ISSN 1758-7131, Vol. 34, no 13/14, p. 891-905Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Purpose – The aim is to examine how the real estate owner (decisionmaker) ensures being able to make informed decisions and how they differs according to organisational form. Design/methodology/approach – This research is based on an interview study of nineteen firm representatives, six decisionmakers and thirteen management representatives, all from Swedish commercial real estate sector. Findings – The study conclude that, regardless of organisational setting, the industry have a plan regarding handling information. The decisionmakers have all secured themselves access to required/desired information. How this is done and what kind of information it is however differ if the real estate management is in-house or outsourced. Furthermore a clear focus on financial and contractual information is evident in both organisational settings. Research limitations/implications – The research in this paper is limited to Swedish commercial real estate sector Practical implications – The insight the paper provides regarding required information can shed light on how information systems are built and how to improve your information sharing. Originality/value – It provides an insight regarding how the industry, depending on organisation setting, prioritise different information and how the decisionmaker secures access to it. Keywords – Real Estate Management, Information, Decision making, Commercial Real Estate,

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  • 10.
    Palm, Peter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Real estate management: incentives for effort2017In: Facilities, ISSN 0263-2772, E-ISSN 1758-7131, Vol. 35, no 9/10, p. 573-587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to examine how the real estate owner (decision maker) can ensure that the preferred tasks are prioritised. In particular, the incentives to ensure motivation to perform to accomplish the strategic goals of the decision maker are investigated. Design/methodology/approach: This research is based on an interview study of 19 firm representatives, 6 decision makers and 13 management representatives, all from the Swedish commercial real estate sector. Findings: The study concludes that the real estate management organisation in the outsourced management setting is governed by the contract, in detail constituting work tasks, and in the in-house management setting, there is freedom with responsibilities instead of regulations. Research limitations/implications: The research in this paper is limited to Swedish commercial real estate sector. Practical implications: The insight in the paper regarding how decision makers create incentives for the real estate management organisation in the different organisational settings can provide inspiration to design incentives for effort. Originality/value: It provides an insight regarding how the industry, depending on organisation setting, prioritise different work tasks and how incentives are created to enable effort.

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  • 11.
    Palm, Peter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Who should clean the university?: The in-house outsourcing decision from a student perspective2021In: Facilities, ISSN 0263-2772, E-ISSN 1758-7131, Vol. 39, no 9/10, p. 635-651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose This paper aims to investigate how the students perceive the cleaning of the university, from an in-house and outsourced perspective. Design/methodology/approach This research is based on a survey conducted in the different university buildings with a total of 240 students. The survey was then analysed through an ordinal regression. Findings The ordinal regression indicates a statistically significant result were student are more satisfied with the cleaning performed by the outsourced service provider. Research limitations/implications The research in this paper is limited to one Swedish university. But, the overall strategies for how to organise the cleaning service at the university do address all universities. However, the research is limited and more research has to be performed. Practical implications The insight the paper provides regarding how the students perceive the cleaning service at the university gives direct implications to university in relation to how to consider the cleaning service as an important factor. Originality/value It provides the first study from a student perspective on the question of cleaning of the university, when previous studies have indicated cleaning as an important function not least to student's performance and academic results.

  • 12.
    Pemsel, Sofia
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Widén, Kristian
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hansson, Bengt
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Managing the needs of end-users in the design and delivery of construction projects2010In: Facilities, ISSN 0263-2772, E-ISSN 1758-7131, Vol. 28, no 1/2, p. 17-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The two-fold purpose of this paper is identifying areas of difficulty in managing the needs of end-users in the course of the design and delivery of construction projects and suggesting possible solutions. Design/methodology/approach: The focus of the paper is the interaction between three principal parties: end-users, project leader (a selected end-user) and facility planner (a facilities professional). The context is two projects in the public sector: a university and a hospital. The end-users of both are known from the start and participate in the whole process. The paper is based on a case study comprising 12 interviews - seven end-users and five professionals. Findings: The research shows that during the project's design and delivery, communication and attitudinal problems have to be managed alongside the inherent difficulty of understanding end-users' real needs. To help in managing these issues, facility planners relied heavily on pedagogical and behavioural skills, rather than formalised methods as found in the literature. Practical implications: The findings highlight areas of difficulty for managers and planners and how these areas were handled in practice. Suggestions on how to resolve some of the areas are presented and discussed. Originality/value: Much of the research related to managing end-users focuses on how to extract value from the construction process, for instance providing greater flexibility and improved air quality. This paper concentrates on relations between parties who are central to the briefing, design and delivery process © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 13.
    Ryd, Nina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Fristedt, Sven
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Transforming strategic briefing into project briefs: A case study about client and contractor collaboration2007In: Facilities, ISSN 0263-2772, E-ISSN 1758-7131, Vol. 25, no 5/6, p. 185-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The aim of this paper is to describe the process of the client's operationally determined requirements as they are translated into a strategic brief and how this is then transformed into a number of general briefs (outline briefs – four in total) adapted to various project categories so as to eventually be implemented in approximately 500 projects (through project briefs) distributed throughout Sweden. In addition, there is a description of the procurement procedure, which was directly based on briefs and the collaboration between the construction project's various players during the design phase, with the aim of clarifying how the development business's requirements were tested, developed and gradually implemented in the form of physical solutions.Design/methodology/approach – Two research methods have been applied: a broad (comprehensive) case study based on a workshop, interviews and studies of project documentation; and literature studies with the aim of generalising and analysing the client's brief work on the basis of the case studied. Findings – A number of factors (11 in total) of importance to implementation of the dynamic briefing are described and discussed in relation to the theoretical discussion in the field (theoretical framework). The case study supports the picture of briefing taking place as part of a dynamic process during which all players are responsible for adopting the development operation's overall goals, developing them and realising them in the best possible way in the individual project.Practical implications – The case study describes how business requirements are translated and developed during a collaborative process involving client and contractor – the brief's importance as procurement data. Experience from this case study may also be of benefit to other client organisations that are to implement national/international projects. Originality/value – The case study describes new knowledge of how national change processes are realised as well as collaboration between client and contractor. The paper offers insights for the academic community, professionals in the construction industry and clients involved in large-scale facilities and change processes.

  • 14.
    Steen, Jesper
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Blombergsson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Wiklander, Johanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Useful Buildings for Office activities2005In: Facilities, ISSN 0263-2772, E-ISSN 1758-7131, Vol. 23, no 3/4, p. 176-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – There is lack of knowledge about how movements and interaction within offices are related to the work activities and the premises. This paper aims to develop such knowledge and to develop analytic methods for differentiating office buildings regarding their usefulness to different kind of office activities and sectors.

    Design/methodology/approach – The empirical data were collected from several comparative case studies. The spatial configuration of each office is analysed with Space syntax-methods. The organisation and work activities of each office and the use of the spatial system are surveyed by means of interviews, observations and private logbooks and questionnaires.

    Findings – The spatial configuration influences the relation between movements and actual interaction, and, as most interaction occurs at one's workstation, which people will be interacting with whom. The building's spatial influence is largest on intra-group movement. The spatial behaviour – the pattern of occupation and movement of the office workers – is on an average level quite the same for different organisations.

    Research limitations/implications – The project is so far concentrated on the main work category in many large organisations, the handling officer, a clerk handling tasks individually more or less routinely. The sample of office concepts, or spatial forms, is also restricted so far.

    Practical implications – The findings are of great interest for architects in designing offices in order to be both well functioning for a specific organisation and robust in permitting changes of different kind. For the real estate owners the knowledge will facilitate defining the market and for the users this will strengthen the potential to express the demands.

    Originality/value – This research project is focused on spatial configuration and interaction, unlike the most of the studies about the individual workstations.

  • 15.
    Toivanen, Susanna
    et al.
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Division of Sociology, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Berthelsen, Hanne
    Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA). Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Muhonen, Tuija
    Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA). Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of School Development and Leadership (SOL).
    Consequences of implementing activity-based flexible offices in academia: a follow-up study of perceived changes in the physical and psychosocial work environment after relocation2023In: Facilities, ISSN 0263-2772, E-ISSN 1758-7131, Vol. 41, no 15/16, p. 129-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate university staff relocation from multiple separate buildings to a new building with activity-based flexible offices (AFOs) at a University in Sweden. The aim was to assess staff perceptions of the physical and psychosocial work environment and whether there were any changes in these perceptions before and after the move.

    Design/methodology/approach: A mixed-methods design was used, analyzing closed-ended survey data at two time points (T1, n = 169 and T2, n = 160) and open-ended responses (n = 180) at T2.

    Findings: The main findings revealed that employees started working more from home and that there were significant decreases in perceptions of the physical and psychosocial work environment, as well as job satisfaction, after the move to the new premises.

    Practical implications: A comprehensive analysis of existing work processes, tasks and collaborations is crucial when planning new university premises. The planning process needs to be done in close collaboration with different stakeholders with multiple perspectives.

    Originality/value: Introduction of AFOs in an academic setting can lead to negative consequences for occupational health and efficiency.

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  • 16.
    Toivanen, Susanna
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Berthelsen, Hanne
    Faculty of Odontology/Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Muhonen, Tuija
    Department of School Development and Leadership/Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Consequences of implementing activity-based flexible offices in academia: a follow-up study of perceived changes in the physical and psychosocial work environment after relocation2023In: Facilities, ISSN 0263-2772, E-ISSN 1758-7131, Vol. 41, no 15/16, p. 129-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to investigate university staff relocation from multiple separate buildings to a new building with activity-based flexible offices (AFOs) at a University in Sweden. The aim was to assess staff perceptions of the physical and psychosocial work environment and whether there were any changes in these perceptions before and after the move. Design/methodology/approachA mixed-methods design was used, analyzing closed-ended survey data at two time points (T1, n = 169 and T2, n = 160) and open-ended responses (n = 180) at T2.FindingsThe main findings revealed that employees started working more from home and that there were significant decreases in perceptions of the physical and psychosocial work environment, as well as job satisfaction, after the move to the new premises. Practical implicationsA comprehensive analysis of existing work processes, tasks and collaborations is crucial when planning new university premises. The planning process needs to be done in close collaboration with different stakeholders with multiple perspectives. Originality/valueIntroduction of AFOs in an academic setting can lead to negative consequences for occupational health and efficiency.

  • 17.
    Vigren, Olli
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Construction and Facilities Management.
    Kadefors, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Eriksson, Kent
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Business and Financial Systems.
    Digitalization, innovation capabilities and absorptive capacity in the Swedish real estate ecosystem2022In: Facilities, ISSN 0263-2772, E-ISSN 1758-7131, Vol. 40, no 15-16, p. 89-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to increase the knowledge of real estate firms’ capabilities to innovate and, consequently, their capacity to absorb new innovations and benefit from digital technologies in an ecosystem context. Design/methodology/approach: The results are based on 32 interviews with representatives of Swedish real estate owners, real estate owner industry associations and suppliers of digital technology to real estate owners. The data are interpreted using theories on absorptive capacity (i.e. the capacity to absorb new innovations), innovation capabilities and innovation ecosystems. Findings: The real estate owners, technology suppliers and real estate owner industry associations have expanded their innovation capabilities and reshaped their innovation ecosystem by initiating a number of different digitalization activities; for example, the development of new IT systems, digital platforms, services and business models. The absorptive capacity has been improved as the organizations have changed routines and structures related to innovation, and they have taken on new roles related to digitalization and innovation, making them better able to absorb new innovations. Also, this paper identifies several drivers and obstacles to digitalization in the real estate sector. Research limitations/implications: The increased capabilities related to digitalization can lead to better absorptive capacity on an individual firm level, which can contribute to the overall development of these firms in a longer-term. Also, new capabilities may lead to better absorptive capacity in the real estate sector at large, as firms may benefit from each other’s capabilities through collaboration. The limitations are that this study does not interview tenants or facility management firms and that the findings represent the context of the Swedish real estate market. Originality/value: This paper investigates innovation capabilities, absorptive capacity and innovation ecosystems of real estate owners, their technology suppliers and real estate owner industry associations on the organizational level and on the sector level, into which there is little previous research. Also, this paper highlights the novelty of digitalization as a phenomenon in the sector.

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  • 18.
    Zalejska-Jonsson, Agnieszka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Business and Financial Systems.
    Does facility management affect perception of building quality?: A study of cooperative residential buildings in Sweden2020In: Facilities, ISSN 0263-2772, E-ISSN 1758-7131, Vol. 38, no 7-8, p. 559-576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This paper aims to examine the strategy, selection and perception of facility management (FM) services and the effect it may have on perceived building quality. Design/methodology/approach - Data was collected through a survey distributed to board members of cooperatives for newly constructed buildings in Sweden. Responses from 394 cooperative boards were included in the data set and analysed. The difference in cooperative choice of FM strategy and satisfaction with FM services was examined with non-parametrical Kruskal-Wallis tests and the effect of FM strategy and satisfaction with FM services on perceived building quality was examined with a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Findings - The results suggest information asymmetry and indicate urgent need for an objective accreditation system for FM services, which will inform and assist housing owners in the FM selection process. The study validates the hypothesis that facilities management strategies applied by housing cooperatives have a significant effect on perception of building quality. Practical implications - The findings will assist developers, facility and property managers to understand the needs and services valued by the housing cooperative. The findings highlight the information asymmetry, restricted techniques and weak signalling methods among FM services, and advocates promoting an objective accreditation system for FM services. Originality/value - The study contributes to the discussion on the concept of building quality and the results presented provide a better understanding of facilities management strategy on perception of building quality.

  • 19.
    Zalejska-Jonsson, Agnieszka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Business and Financial Systems.
    Parameters contributing to occupants’ satisfaction: green and conventional residential buildings2014In: Facilities, ISSN 0263-2772, E-ISSN 1758-7131, Vol. 32, no 7/8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The aim of this paper is to investigate the overall satisfaction of occupants of green and conventional residential buildings and their perception of indoor environment quality (IEQ) and to study factors that may cause occupants’ dissatisfaction.

    Design/methodology/approach - Data was collected through a survey sent to occupants of comparable green and conventional multi-family buildings. The difference in responses between occupants of green and conventional buildings was analysed using a Mann-Whitney (rank sum) test. The ordered logistic models were applied to the data to test whether the overall satisfaction changes depending on the level of acceptance of indoor environment quality and whether the building environmental profile and the apartment tenure affect occupant satisfaction.

    Findings - The results show that both categories of occupants are very satisfied with their apartments and that there is no statistically significant difference between the stated overall satisfaction of occupants living in green and conventional buildings, although a difference was found in acceptance level for thermal and sound quality. The research highlights the importance of occupant feedback, user-friendly technical installations and the ability to control indoor environment. This knowledge is important for designers, engineers and developers alike in enabling them to improve dwelling quality and minimize post-occupancy problems.

    Research limitations/implications - It was not possible to include physical measurements of IEQ parameters; the analysis is based only on occupants’ responses, which may carry a certain subjectivity.

    Originality/value - The paper contributes to the understanding of IEQ from occupant perspective and to knowledge on green building performance.

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