Change search
Refine search result
1 - 22 of 22
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Aho, Nikolas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Proczkowska Björklund, Marie
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Peritraumatic reactions in relation to trauma exposure and symptoms of posttraumatic stress in high school students2017In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 1380998Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Exposure to traumatic events is clearly associated with a diversity of subsequent mental health problems, with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as the most prevalent disorder. Epidemiologically, trauma exposure rates are more prevalent than PTSD, indicating that most trauma victims do not develop PTSD. More knowledge is needed to understand the development of the different posttraumatic pathways including the significance of pretraumatic, peritraumatic and posttraumatic risk factors. Objective: To study peritraumatic reactions in relation to trauma exposure and symptoms of posttraumatic stress and to enhance our understanding of peritraumatic reactions as mediators between trauma and later symptomatology. Method: The study was composed of a representative community sample of 5332 second year high school students (mean age 17.3 years) who completed the Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (SAQ/JVQ), Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children (TSCC) and answered questions about peritraumatic reactions. Mediation effects of peritraumatic reactions on the trauma exposure relationship to symptoms was tested using the PROCESS macro for SPSS. Results: Traumatic events are common (84.1%) and are accompanied in three-quarters of the students with at least one form of peritraumatic reaction. Peritraumatic reactions, especially peritraumatic dissociative reactions, mediate the relationship between trauma exposure and symptoms, and gender moderates the effect of peritraumatic dissociation. This moderating effect was found to be larger for boys than for girls, indicating gender differences in response to trauma. Conclusions: The results indicate the need to screen for peritraumatic reactions as early as possible after a traumatic event in order to identify those at risk for PTSD.

  • 2.
    Almqvist, Kjerstin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Psychology. Karlstad Univ, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Support for Children Who Have Experienced Violence Against Their Mother: Preliminary Results from a National Evaluation Study in Sweden2011In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Arnberg, Filip K.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Bondjers, Kristina
    Uppsala universitet.
    Sveen, Josefin
    Uppsala universitet.
    Panel discussion: early interventions after traumatic events2015In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 6, article id 28636Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Arnberg, Filip K.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Bondjers, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Sveen, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Panel discussion: early interventions after traumatic events2015In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 6, article id 28636Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Hultman, Christina M
    Institutionen för medicinsk epidemiologi och biostatistik, Karolinska Institutet.
    Michel, Per-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Lundin, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Fifteen years after a ferry disaster: Clinical interviews and survivors’ self-assessment of their experience2013In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 4, p. 20650-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Disasters yield increased rates of psychological disorders decades later. Other consequences, however, have received little attention in the past.

    Objective:

    We aimed to examine diagnostic status and survivors’ views on disaster-related consequences and social support.

    Methods:

    A mixed-methods approach was used with 22 survivors (of 49 eligible) 15 years after a ferry disaster. Data collection included audiotaped interviews with open-ended questions and diagnostic assessment of Axis-I disorders.

    Results:

    The post-disaster incidence was 54% (12/22) for Axis-I disorders, and 45% (10/22) for full or subsyndromal posttraumatic stress disorder. Thematic analysis revealed that survivor perception of the longterm consequences included positive (character change) and negative aspects (being ascribed a survivor identity). Participants’ sought social support for several years, yet many felt hindered by experiential dissimilarity and distress of significant others.

    Conclusions:

    Axis-I disorders were prevalent, but not salient to survivors’ perceptions in the long-term. Postdisaster interventions need to attend to common barriers to support.

  • 6.
    Bondjers, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Hyland, Philip
    Department of Psychology, Maynooth University, Kildare, Ireland.
    Roberts, Neil P.
    Cardiff & Vale University Health Board, Cardiff, United Kingdom; UK School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Bisson, Jonathan I.
    UK School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Arnberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Validation of a clinician-administered diagnostic measure of ICD-11 PTSD and Complex PTSD: the International Trauma Interview in a Swedish sample2019In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 1665617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The recently published ICD-11 includes substantial changes to the diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and introduces the diagnosis of Complex PTSD (CPTSD). The International Trauma Interview (ITI) has been developed for clinicians to assess these new diagnoses but has not yet been evaluated.

    Objectives: To evaluate the psychometric properties of the Swedish translation of the ITI by examining the interrater agreement, latent structure, internal consistency, and convergent and discriminant validity.

    Methods: In a prospective study, 186 adults who had experienced a potentially traumatic event were assessed with the ITI and answered questionnaires for symptoms of posttraumatic stress, other psychiatric disorders, functional disability, and quality of life (QoL).

    Results: The diagnostic rate was 16% for PTSD and 6% for CPTSD. Interrater agreement was satisfactory (α = .76), and confirmatory factor analysis indicated that a two-factor second-20 order model consistent with the ICD-11 model of CPTSD provided acceptable fit to the data. Composite reliability analysis demonstrated that the ITI possessed acceptable internal reliability, and associations with measures of other psychiatric disorders, insomnia, functional disability, and QoL supported the concurrent validity of the ITI.

    Conclusion: Swedish ITI shows promise as a clinician-administered instrument to assess and diagnose ICD-11 PTSD and CPTSD.

  • 7.
    Bondjers, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Arnberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Similarity in symptom patterns of posttraumatic stress among disaster-survivors: a three-step latent profile analysis2018In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 1546083Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Individuals express symptoms of posttraumatic stress in various ways, noted for example in the many symptom combinations in the diagnostic manuals. Studies aiming to examine differences of symptom presentations by extracting latent classes or profiles indicate both the presence of subtypes with differing symptomatology and subtypes distinguished by severity levels. Few studies have examined subtype associations with long-term outcomes. Objective: The current study aimed to apply latent profile analysis on posttraumatic stress (PTS) in a highly homogenous sample of Swedish tourists exposed to the 2004 Southeast Asia tsunami and to examine if classes differed in their long-term outcome. Methods: An latent profile analysis was conducted using self-report data collected one year after the disaster from 1638 highly exposed survivors that endorsed 1 symptom of PTS. Associations were examined between the classes and predictors of PTS (loss of a relative or friend, subjective life threat) and levels of PTS at a three-year follow up. Results: The latent profile analysis indicated four classes: minimal, low, moderate, and severe symptoms. The classes were distinguished mainly by their levels of PTS. Loss of a relative or friend and subjective life threat were associated with a higher likelihood of belonging to any other class than the minimal class. The severity level of the classes at one year were predictive of PTS severity at the three-year follow-up. Conclusions: Homogeneous profiles of posttraumatic stress differing mainly in symptom severity were found in this sample of disaster survivors. Profile diversity may be related to sample variation and unmeasured confounders rather than reflect qualitatively different disorders.

  • 8.
    Cernvall, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Sveen, Josefin
    Uppsala universitet.
    Bergh Johannesson, Kerstin
    Uppsala universitet.
    Arnberg, Filip
    Uppsala universitet.
    A pilot study of user satisfaction and perceived helpfulness of the Swedish version of the mobile app PTSD Coach.2018In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 9, no Suppl 1, article id 1472990Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is a need for accessible interventions in the aftermath of traumatic events with documented efficacy for preventing or reducing negative mental health consequences. The PTSD Coach is a mobile app that has shown to be effective in reducing symptoms of posttraumatic stress (PTSS).

    Objective: The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the user satisfaction, perceived helpfulness and potential reductions of PTSS and symptoms of depression among participants using the Swedish version of the PTSD Coach.

    Method: This was an uncontrolled pre-test post-test open trial including participants recruited from the community via advertisement and from an ongoing observational study who had experienced a potentially traumatic event in the last five years. Participants had access to the Swedish PTSD Coach app for four weeks.

    Results: Eleven participants (mean age = 38.6, female = 8) completed the study. Nine of the participants met criteria for full or partial PTSD. Results from the PTSD Coach Survey indicated that participants found the app slightly to moderately helpful and were slightly to moderately satisfied with the app. Nominal but not statistically significant reductions of medium effect sizes in PTSS (PCL-5) and depression (PHQ-9) from pre- to post-assessment were found. In interviews, participants indicated that they found elements such as learning about PTSD, breathing exercises and monitoring symptoms helpful in managing symptoms. However, several participants indicated that they had not used the app as much as they had intended to. Participants also had suggestions for improvements such as enhanced app structure and better guidance regarding how to use the app.

    Conclusions: The perceived helpfulness and user satisfaction were slightly lower compared to research on the original version of the app. Experiences from the study are discussed and a future controlled study of the Swedish version of the PTSD Coach is suggested.

  • 9.
    Cernvall, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Sveen, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Bergh Johannesson, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Arnberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    A pilot study of user satisfaction and perceived helpfulness of the Swedish version of the mobile app PTSD Coach2018In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 9, no Suppl 1, article id 1472990Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is a need for accessible interventions in the aftermath of traumatic events with documented efficacy for preventing or reducing negative mental health consequences. The PTSD Coach is a mobile app that has shown to be effective in reducing symptoms of posttraumatic stress (PTSS). Objective: The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the user satisfaction, perceived helpfulness and potential reductions of PTSS and symptoms of depression among participants using the Swedish version of the PTSD Coach. Method: This was an uncontrolled pre-test post-test open trial including participants recruited from the community via advertisement and from an ongoing observational study who had experienced a potentially traumatic event in the last five years. Participants had access to the Swedish PTSD Coach app for four weeks. Results: Eleven participants (mean age = 38.6, female = 8) completed the study. Nine of the participants met criteria for full or partial PTSD. Results from the PTSD Coach Survey indicated that participants found the app slightly to moderately helpful and were slightly to moderately satisfied with the app. Nominal but not statistically significant reductions of medium effect sizes in PTSS (PCL-5) and depression (PHQ-9) from pre- to post-assessment were found. In interviews, participants indicated that they found elements such as learning about PTSD, breathing exercises and monitoring symptoms helpful in managing symptoms. However, several participants indicated that they had not used the app as much as they had intended to. Participants also had suggestions for improvements such as enhanced app structure and better guidance regarding how to use the app. Conclusions: The perceived helpfulness and user satisfaction were slightly lower compared to research on the original version of the app. Experiences from the study are discussed and a future controlled study of the Swedish version of the PTSD Coach is suggested.

  • 10.
    Hensler, Ida
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Sveen, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Cernvall, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Arnberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    PTSD Coach Sweden: A Self-Management App for Trauma-Related Symptoms: A RCT study protocol evaluating a self-help app for posttraumatic stress in a Swedish community sample2019In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 10, no S1, article id 4–010Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Resources to administer evidence-based care for PTSD and trauma-related complications are scarce, especially in particular geographical areas, during mass casualty situations and for individuals with subclinical symptoms as clinics prioritize more severe cases. Effective interventions for PTSD through technical platforms could disseminate information and self-management strategies to decrease individual suffering and societal costs. Assessment at multiple time points can elucidate which aspects of an intervention that are effective, in addition to the evolution of intervention use and well-being over time. 

    Objective: Evaluate an app-administered self-help intervention (PTSD Coach Sweden) aiming to reduce and manage PTSD symptoms and other related complications. 

    Method: In this trial, 200 participants from Sweden who have experienced a traumatic event in the past two years and who report posttraumatic stress symptoms will be randomized to three months use of the app or waitlist. The primary endpoint is self-rated PTSD symptom severity at three months, with follow-up at six and nine months. Secondary outcomes include depressive symptoms, physical symptoms, functional impairment and health care use. Ecological momentary assessment of health status and use of strategies corresponding to app content is used for 21 days during the first three months.

    Results: Lessons learned and recommendations from the preparations of app-based intervention trials are presented. Available data from the primary endpoint are presented. 

    Conclusions: App-based interventions hold promise to increase outreach, but further trials are needed. Several challenges introduced when preparing an app-based intervention are discussed.

  • 11. Luik, Annemarie I
    et al.
    Iyadurai, Lalitha
    Gebhardt, Isabel
    Holmes, Emily A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska Institutet.
    Sleep disturbance and intrusive memories after presenting to the emergency department following a traumatic motor vehicle accident: an exploratory analysis.2019In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 1556550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sleep disturbances are common after traumatic events and have been hypothesized to be a risk factor in the development of psychopathology such as that associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Objective: To assess the association between intrusive memories, a core clinical feature of PTSD, and self-reported sleep disturbance shortly after experiencing or witnessing a motor vehicle accident, and whether a brief behavioural intervention (trauma reminder cue and Tetris gameplay) reduced sleep disturbance post-trauma. Method: The exploratory analyses included 71 participants (mean age 39.66, standard deviation 16.32; 37 women, 52.1%) enrolled in a previously published proof-of-concept randomized controlled trial. Participants were recruited from the emergency department after experiencing or witnessing a traumatic motor vehicle accident. Intrusive memories were assessed with a daily paper-and-pen diary for one week post-trauma, and sleep disturbances with three questions from the Impact of Event Scale-Revised assessing problems initiating sleep, problems maintaining sleep and dreams about the event at one week and one month post-trauma. Missing data were imputed 15 times. Results: The total number of intrusive memories during the first week post-trauma suggested weak to moderate pooled intercorrelations with problems initiating and maintaining sleep. An ordinal regression using imputed data suggested that the intervention had no effect on sleep disturbances, while completers only analyses suggested an improvement in problems maintaining sleep at one week. Conclusions: This exploratory study suggested that experiencing early intrusive memories is related to sleep disturbances. Sleep disturbance might be a particularly important construct to assess in studies involving intrusive memories post-trauma.

  • 12.
    Nilsson, Doris
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Per E.
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine, Umeå University.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The psychometric properties of the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Young Children in a sample of Swedish children2012In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 3, article id 18505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of Trauma Symptom Checklist for Young Children (TSCYC).

    Method: The study was composed of a total of 629 children - 296 girls and 333 boys - aged 311, from a nonclinical population who were rated by their caretakers (26 of whom performed a re-test after 2 weeks) in addition to 59 children from a clinical population with known experience of sexual and/or physical abuse. The caretakers from the normal population completed the TSCYC and Lifetime Incidence of Traumatic Events Scale-parent scale (LITE-P) and the clinical-sample caretakers completed TSCYC. The psychometric properties of the TSCYC were examined, including reliability and validity.

    Results: The reliability (Cronbach’s alpha) of the TSCYC, total scale, was α=0.93 (normative group) and α=0.96 (clinical group). For the clinical scales, this ranged between α=0.550.88 and 0.770.93, respectively. Test-retest for the total scale was r0.77. Regarding criterion-related validity, the clinical groups scored significantly higher than the normative group, and within the normative group significant relationships were found between exposure to traumatic events and TSCYC scores. Confirmatory factor analysis testing of the construction of the TSCYC indicated significant loadings on the original scales.

    Conclusion: The Swedish version of TSCYC appears to be a screening instrument with satisfactory psychometric qualities for identifying symptoms after trauma in young children. The instrument can also be recommended to clinicians for screening purposes in a European context.

  • 13. Nilsson, Doris
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Per E
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Svedin, Carl-Göran
    The psychometric properties of the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Young Children in a sample of Swedish children2012In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 3, article id 18505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of Trauma Symptom Checklist for Young Children (TSCYC).

    Method: The study was composed of a total of 629 children—296 girls and 333 boys—aged 3–11, from a non-clinical population who were rated by their caretakers (26 of whom performed a re-test after 2 weeks) in addition to 59 children from a clinical population with known experience of sexual and/or physical abuse. The caretakers from the normal population completed the TSCYC and Lifetime Incidence of Traumatic Events Scale-parent scale (LITE-P) and the clinical-sample caretakers completed TSCYC. The psychometric properties of the TSCYC were examined, including reliability and validity.

    Results: The reliability (Cronbach's alpha) of the TSCYC, total scale, was α=0.93 (normative group) and α=0.96 (clinical group). For the clinical scales, this ranged between α=0.55–0.88 and 0.77–0.93, respectively. Test-retest for the total scale was r=0.77. Regarding criterion-related validity, the clinical groups scored significantly higher than the normative group, and within the normative group significant relationships were found between exposure to traumatic events and TSCYC scores. Confirmatory factor analysis testing of the construction of the TSCYC indicated significant loadings on the original scales.

    Conclusion: The Swedish version of TSCYC appears to be a screening instrument with satisfactory psychometric qualities for identifying symptoms after trauma in young children. The instrument can also be recommended to clinicians for screening purposes in a European context.

  • 14.
    Nilsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Röda Korsets Högskola.
    Saboonchi, Fredrik
    Röda Korsets Högskola.
    Gustavsson, Catharina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Malm, Andreas
    Röda Korsets Högskola.
    Gottvall, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Trauma-afflicted refugees’ experiences of participating in physical activity and exercise treatment: a qualitative study based on focus group discussions2019In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 1699327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Refugees with prolonged and repeated experiences of trauma, often in combination with post-migration living difficulties, are subjected to severe levels of stress and stress-related ill health, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Physical activity (PA) is well-established as an effective stress reliever. However, the effect of PA and exercise has received scarce attention in the context of PTSD, and particularly in the field of refugees’ health.

    Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the experience of participation in PA and exercise as part of the treatment for trauma-afflicted refugees.

    Method: An explorative qualitative research design was used. Six focus group discussions were conducted with 33 female and male participants that had experience of group-based PA and exercise treatment. The gathered data was analysed by qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The analysis resulted in one over-arching theme reflecting the participants overall experience of PA and exercise as a process of building resilience. Participants experienced improvements in both physical and mental health domains. Increased self-awareness and self-confidence were seen as additional important benefits, and the interruption of daily stressors provided a sense of relief and recovery. The treatment group settings were experienced as becoming a vehicle for overcoming social fear and isolation, which also carried an empowering and strength-building impact over to participants’ family life and social relationships. Treatment characteristics were experienced as highly supportive and often referred to as the basis of other positive experiences and perceived health benefits.

    Conclusions: The result of this study outlines a detailed account of trauma-afflicted refugees’ experiences and preferences of PA and exercise-based treatment from a broad range of perspectives. These findings provide a starting point for future research in this field and indicate a particular need for both research and intervention development to include the real-life impact of participating in such treatments.

  • 15.
    Nilsson, Henrik
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet / Swedish Red Cross Treatment Center for Persons Affected by War and Torture.
    Saboonchi, Fredrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Gustavsson, Catharina
    The Swedish Red Cross University College. Uppsala University.
    Malm, Andreas
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet / Swedish Red Cross Treatment Center for Persons Affected by War and Torture.
    Gottvall, Maria
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Uppsala University.
    Trauma-afflicted refugees' experiences of participating in physical activity and exercise treatment: a qualitative study based on focus group discussions2019In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 1699327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Refugees with prolonged and repeated experiences of trauma, often in combination with post-migration living difficulties, are subjected to severe levels of stress and stress-related ill health, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Physical activity (PA) is well-established as an effective stress reliever. However, the effect of PA and exercise has received scarce attention in the context of PTSD, and particularly in the field of refugees' health.

    Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the experience of participation in PA and exercise as part of the treatment for trauma-afflicted refugees.

    Method: An explorative qualitative research design was used. Six focus group discussions were conducted with 33 female and male participants that had experience of group-based PA and exercise treatment. The gathered data was analysed by qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The analysis resulted in one over-arching theme reflecting the participants overall experience of PA and exercise as a process of building resilience. Participants experienced improvements in both physical and mental health domains. Increased self-awareness and self-confidence were seen as additional important benefits, and the interruption of daily stressors provided a sense of relief and recovery. The treatment group settings were experienced as becoming a vehicle for overcoming social fear and isolation, which also carried an empowering and strength-building impact over to participants' family life and social relationships. Treatment characteristics were experienced as highly supportive and often referred to as the basis of other positive experiences and perceived health benefits.

    Conclusions: The result of this study outlines a detailed account of trauma-afflicted refugees' experiences and preferences of PA and exercise-based treatment from a broad range of perspectives. These findings provide a starting point for future research in this field and indicate a particular need for both research and intervention development to include the real-life impact of participating in such treatments.

  • 16. Olff, Miranda
    et al.
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Intimate partner violence and mental health-remarks from two Chief Editors on a joint publishing venture2014In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 5, article id 25679Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Ranjbar, Vania
    et al.
    Angered Hospital ; University of Gothenburg.
    Näslund, Monika S.
    Stockholm County Council.
    Vingare, Emme-Li
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Swedish Psychotrauma Society.
    Hagelthorn, Christina
    Swedish Psychotrauma Society.
    Englund, Liselotte
    Karlstad University.
    Karlsson, Ingvar
    Swedish Psychotrauma Society ; University of Gothenburg.
    The Swedish Psychotrauma Society: joining forces for a national psychotrauma platform from a multidisciplinary and holistic approach2015In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 6, no Supplement 3, article id 28546Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Ranjbar, Vanja
    et al.
    Angered Hospital; SwedenDepartment of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Näslund, Monica S
    Crisis and Disaster Psychology Unit, Academic Primary Health Care Centre, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm.
    Vingare, Emme-Li
    Department of Social Work, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Hagelthorn, Christina
    Swedish Psychotrauma Society, Sweden.
    Englund, Liselotte
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013).
    Karlsson, Ingvar
    Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The Swedish Psychotrauma Society: Joining forces for a national psychotrauma platform from a multidisciplinary and holistic approach2015In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 28546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Events such as the discotheque fire in Gothenburg, Sweden, in 1998 and the 2004 tsunami in Thailand, in which many Swedish citizens’ lives were lost, exemplify events of traumatic character with implications for different professions in Sweden (Arnberg, Hultman, Michel, & Lundin, 2013; Wahlström, Michélsen, Schulman, Backheden, & Keskinen-Rosenqvist, 2013). Such events highlight the need for Swedish research on psychotraumatology to meet needs arising in connection with such traumas. Also events in Sweden's immediate vicinity, such as the terrorist attacks in Oslo and in Utøya in 2011, can be considered to have impact on Swedish society and its emergency preparedness. The Swedish Psychotrauma Society was formed in 2013. Its objectives are to increase and disseminate knowledge on psychotraumatology by creating a network of professionals and individuals who are active and/or interested in the subject, promote research and training in the field, and collaborate nationally and internationally on issues relating to psychotraumatology. The society is open to researchers, students, practitioners, and others alike with an interest in psychotraumatology, thereby encouraging multidisciplinary and holistic work and collaboration as well as being one of its kind in Sweden within this field. Not least, the society strives to be a link between research and practice. To this effect, the society organised its first scientific conference in May 2015, with a grant from The Swedish Foundation for Humanities and Social Science. The conference aimed to offer internationally renowned psychotrauma researchers as keynote speakers (Litz, 2015; Newman & Drevo, 2015; Olff, Van Zuiden, & Bakker, 2015) and gather a nationwide audience consisting of professionals and researchers from various disciplines. By establishing a Swedish psychotrauma society and inspire and strengthen the field of psychotraumatology in Sweden, it is hoped that the Swedish Psychotrauma Society during the coming year can become affiliated to the ESTSS and commence collaborations with its European counterparts.

  • 19.
    Schaefer, Ingo
    et al.
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Dept Psychiat & Psychotherapy, Hamburg, Germany.
    Hopchet, Manoelle
    Belgian Inst Psychotraumatol, Brussels, Belgium.
    Vandamme, Naomi
    Belgian Inst Psychotraumatol, Trauma Ctr Limburg, Hasselt, Belgium.
    Ajdukovic, Dean
    Univ Zagreb, Dept Psychol, Fac Humanities & Social Sci, Zagreb, Croatia.
    El-Hage, Wissam
    Univ Tours, CHRU Tours, INSERM, iBrain,UMR 1253, Tours, France.
    Egreteau, Laurine
    Clin Psychiat Univ, CHRU Tours, Laurine Egreteau, Tours, France.
    Javakhishvili, Jana Darejan
    ILia State Univ, Fac Arts & Sci, Inst Addict Studies, Tbilisi, Rep of Georgia.
    Makhashvili, Nino
    ILia State Univ, Business Sch, Tbilisi, Rep of Georgia.
    Lampe, Astrid
    Univ Med Hosp Innsbruck, Dept Med Psychol & Psychotherapy, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Ardino, Vittoria
    Urbino Univ, Dipartimento Sci Uomo, Urbino, Italy.
    Kazlauskas, Evaldas
    Vilnius Univ, Inst Psychol, Ctr Psychotraumatol, Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Mouthaan, Joanne
    Leiden Univ, Inst Psychol, Dept Clin Psychol, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Sijbrandij, Marit
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Fac Behav & Movement Sci, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Dragan, Malgorzata
    Univ Warsaw, Fac Psychol, Warsaw, Poland.
    Lis-Turlejska, Maja
    SWPS Univ Social Sci & Humanities, Fac Psychol, Warsaw, Poland.
    Figueiredo-Braga, Margarida
    Univ Porto, Fac Med, Porto, Portugal;Univ Coimbra, Ctr Social Studies CES, Coimbra, Portugal.
    Sales, Luisa
    Univ Coimbra, Ctr Trauma CES, Mil Hosp Coimbra, Dept Psychiat, Coimbra, Portugal.
    Arnberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Nazarenko, Tetiana
    USOCTE, Nongovt Org, Kiev, Ukraine.
    Nalyvaiko, Natalia
    USOCTE, Nongovt Org, Int Inst Depth Psychol, Kiev, Ukraine.
    Armour, Cherie
    Ulster Univ, Fac Life & Hlth Sci, Inst Mental Hlth Sci, Sch Psychol, Coleraine, Londonderry, North Ireland.
    Murphy, Dominic
    Combat Stress, Res Dept, Leatherhead, Surrey, England;Kings Coll London, Dept Psychol Med, Kings Ctr Mil Hlth Res, London, England.
    Trauma and trauma care in Europe2018In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 1556553Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European countries have a long history of exposure to large-scale trauma. In the early 1990s the increasing awareness of the consequences of trauma within the mental health community led to the foundation of local societies for psychotraumatology across Europe and the European Society of Traumatic Stress Studies (ESTSS), which celebrated its 25th anniversary in 2018. The focus of this article is to describe the current state of care for survivors of trauma in the 15 European countries where ESTSS member societies have been established. Brief descriptions on the historical burden of trauma in each country are followed by an overview of the care system for trauma survivors in the countries, the state-of-the-art of interventions, current challenges in caring for survivors and the topics that need to be most urgently addressed in the future. The reports from the different countries demonstrate how important steps towards a better provision of care for survivors of trauma have been made in Europe. Given the cultural and economic diversity of the continent, there are also differences between the European countries, for instance with regard to the use of evidence-based treatments. Strategies to overcome these differences, like the new ESTSS training curricula for care-providers across Europe, are briefly discussed.

  • 20. Sinai, Cave
    et al.
    Hirvikoski, Tatja
    Nordström, Anna-Lena
    Nordström, Peter
    Nilsonne, Asa
    Wilczek, Alexander
    Asberg, Marie
    Jokinen, Jussi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci Psychiat, SE-17176 Solna, Sweden.
    Hypothalamic pituitary thyroid axis and exposure to interpersonal violence in childhood among women with borderline personality disorder2014In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 5, p. 23911-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A relationship between exposure to sexual violence and thyroid hormone alterations has been observed among women with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Women with borderline personality disorder (BPD) report a high estimate of childhood trauma.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to assess relationships between thyroid hormone measures and exposure to violence in childhood in women with BPD.

    METHOD: A total of 92 clinically euthyroid women with BPD (53% with comorbid PTSD) diagnosis and at least two prior suicide attempts were assessed with the Karolinska Interpersonal Violence Scales (KIVS). The KIVS contains four subscales with concrete examples of exposure to violence and expressed violent behavior in childhood (aged 6-14 years) and during adult life (15 years or older). Baseline thyroid function was evaluated by measuring plasma free and bound triiodothyronine (FT3 and T3), thyroxine (FT4 and T4), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) with immunoassays. The FT3/FT4 ratio was used to estimate peripheral deiodination. Plasma cortisol was also assessed.

    RESULTS: Sixty-seven percent of patients reported medium high or high level of exposure to interpersonal violence as a child. The FT3/FT4 ratio showed a significant negative correlation with exposure to violence as a child. Patients with PTSD had significantly higher plasma cortisol levels. An ad hoc analysis revealed that the correlation between KIVS exposure to interpersonal violence as a child and FT3/FT4 ratio was significant only in patients with comorbid PTSD. Altered thyroid activity, especially FT3/FT4, levels was associated with exposure to violence in childhood in women with BPD.

    CONCLUSION: Severe childhood trauma-related stress may promote lasting altered thyroid levels and/or contribute to the development of psychopathology associated with BPD traits or PTSD.

  • 21.
    Sveen, Josefin
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Bondjers, Kristina
    Uppsala universitet.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala universitet.
    Psychometric properties of the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5: a pilot study2016In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 7, article id 30165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To date there is a lack of studies assessing the psychometric properties of the recently revised PTSD Checklist (PCL), the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5). The aim of this pilot study was to examine the psychometric properties of the PCL-5 in parents of children with burns.

    Methods: The participating parents (N = 62, mean age = 38) completed self-report questionnaires, 0.8-5.6 years after their child's burn. Measures were the PCL-5, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), and the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Burn severity of the child and sociodemographic variables was obtained.

    Results: The parents' average PCL-5 scores were low to moderate. The internal consistency of the PCL-5 was satisfactory, with Cronbach's alpha ranging from 0.56 to 0.77 and mean inter-item correlations ranging from 0.22 to 0.73 for the four PCL-5 subscales and the PCL-5 total. The PCL-5 subscales were moderately to highly correlated with the corresponding IES-R subscales as well as MADRS and PSS (p < 0.05), whereas associations with sociodemographics and burn severity were low to moderate.

    Conclusions: This study provides preliminary support for the use of PCL-5. The results indicate satisfactory psychometric properties of the PCL-5 as measured with internal consistency, test retest reliability, and aspects of convergent validity.

  • 22.
    Sveen, Josefin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Bondjers, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Psychometric properties of the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5: a pilot study2016In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 7, article id 30165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To date there is a lack of studies assessing the psychometric properties of the recently revised PTSD Checklist (PCL), the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5). The aim of this pilot study was to examine the psychometric properties of the PCL-5 in parents of children with burns.

    Methods: The participating parents (N = 62, mean age = 38) completed self-report questionnaires, 0.8-5.6 years after their child's burn. Measures were the PCL-5, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), and the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Burn severity of the child and sociodemographic variables was obtained.

    Results: The parents' average PCL-5 scores were low to moderate. The internal consistency of the PCL-5 was satisfactory, with Cronbach's alpha ranging from 0.56 to 0.77 and mean inter-item correlations ranging from 0.22 to 0.73 for the four PCL-5 subscales and the PCL-5 total. The PCL-5 subscales were moderately to highly correlated with the corresponding IES-R subscales as well as MADRS and PSS (p < 0.05), whereas associations with sociodemographics and burn severity were low to moderate.

    Conclusions: This study provides preliminary support for the use of PCL-5. The results indicate satisfactory psychometric properties of the PCL-5 as measured with internal consistency, test retest reliability, and aspects of convergent validity.

1 - 22 of 22
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf