Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Gonzalez Garcia, Manuel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Australian eHealth Research Centre, CSIRO, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; Heart Centre, University Hospital of Umeå.
    Fatehi, Farhad
    Bashi, Nazli
    Varnfield, Marlien
    Iyngkaran, Pupalan
    Driscoll, Andrea
    Neil, Christopher
    Hare, David L.
    Oldenburg, Brian
    A Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Utilizing Telemedicine for Improving Heart Failure Readmission: Can a Realist Approach Bridge the Translational Divide?2019In: Clinical Medicine Insights: Cardiology, ISSN 1179-5468, E-ISSN 1179-5468, Vol. 13Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Telemedicine and digital health technologies hold great promise for improving clinical care of heart failure. However, inconsistent and contradictory findings from randomized controlled trials have so far discouraged widespread adoption of digital health in routine clinical practice. We undertook this review study to summarize the study outcomes of the use of exploring the evidence for telemedicine in the clinical care of patients with heart failure and readmissions.

    Methods: We inspected the references of guidelines and searched PubMed for randomized controlled trials published over the past 10 years on the use of telemedicine for reducing readmission in heart failure. We utilized a modified realist review approach to identify the underlying contextual mechanisms for the intervention(s) in each randomized controlled trial, evaluating outcomes of the intervention and understanding how and under what conditions they worked. To provide uniformity, all extracted data were synthesized using adapted domains from the taxonomy for disease management created by the Disease Management Taxonomy Writing Group.

    Results: A total of 12 papers were eligible, 6 of them supporting and 6 others undermining the use of telemedicine for improving heart failure readmission. In general terms, those studies not supporting the use of telemedicine were multicentre, publicly funded, with large amount of participants, and long duration. The patients had also better rates of treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin II receptor blocker and beta-blockers, and telemonitoring and automatic transmission of vital signs were less utilized, in comparison with the studies in which telemedicine use was supported. The analysis of the environment, intensity, content of interventions, method of communication, quality of the underlying model of care and the ability, capability, and interest from health workers can help us to envisage probabilities of success of telemedicine use.

    Conclusions: A realist lens may aid to understand whom and in which circumstances the use of telemedicine can add any substantial value to traditional models of care. Wider outcome criteria beyond major adverse cardiovascular events, for example, cost efficacy, should also be considered as appropriate for effecting guidelines on care delivery when robust prognostic therapeutics already exist.

  • 2.
    Rönnqvist, Josefine
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hallberg, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala Univ, Uppsala Univ Hosp, Uppsala, Sweden;Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Clin Pharmacol & Sci Life Lab, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Yue, Qun-Ying
    Swedish Med Prod Agcy, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wadelius, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fusidic Acid: A Neglected Risk Factor for Statin-Associated Myopathy2018In: Clinical Medicine Insights: Cardiology, ISSN 1179-5468, E-ISSN 1179-5468, Vol. 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Statins are widely used lipid-lowering drugs used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Statins are known to cause myopathy, an adverse drug reaction with various clinical features rhabdomyolysis.

    Objective: To describe clinical characteristics of statin-treated individuals who experienced myopathy and identify risk factors of statin-associated myopathy.

    Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on cases of statin-associated myopathy reported to the Swedish Medical Products Agency. Clinical factors were compared between cases and statin-treated controls not diagnosed with myopathy. Statistical methods were univariate and multivariate logistic regression and results were presented as odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). To correct for multiple comparisons, the cutoff for statistical significance was set to P < .0017.

    Results: In total, 47 cases of statin-associated myopathy were compared with 3871 treated controls. Rhabdomyolysis was diagnosed in 51% of the cases. Markers for cardiovascular disease were more common in cases than controls. Statistical analysis revealed the following independent risk factors for myopathy: high statin dose (OR = 1.54, calculated using the standard deviation 19.82, 95% CI = 1.32-1.80, P < .0001), and concomitant treatment with fusidic acid (OR = 1002, 95% CI = 54.55-18 410, P < .0001), cyclosporine (OR = 34.10, 95% CI = 4.43-262.45, P = .0007), and gemfibrozil (OR = 12.35, 95% CI = 2.38-64.10, P = .0028).

  • 3.
    Sörelius, Karl
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    di Summa, Pietro G.
    CHU Vaudois, Dept Plast Reconstruct & Hand Surg, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    On the Diagnosis of Mycotic Aortic Aneurysms2018In: Clinical Medicine Insights: Cardiology, ISSN 1179-5468, E-ISSN 1179-5468, Vol. 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: There is striking paucity in consensus on the terminology, definition, and diagnostic criteria of mycotic aortic aneurysms. This literature study aims to elucidate this scientific omission, discuss its consequences, and present a proposition for reporting items on this disease.

    METHODS: A systematic literature review on PubMed and Medline using mycotic and infected aortic aneurysms between 1850 and 2017 was performed. Articles were assessed according to a protocol regarding terminology, definition, and diagnostic criteria. Case series with less than 5 patients were excluded.

    RESULTS: A total of 49 articles were included. The most prevalent term was mycotic aortic aneurysm but there was no widely accepted definition. Most modern publications used a diagnostic workup based on a combination on clinical presentation, laboratory results, imaging findings, and intraoperative findings. How these protean variables should be balanced was unclear. A proposition of reporting items was framed and consisted of definition of disease used, basis of diagnostic workup, exclusion criteria, patient characteristics, laboratory and imaging findings, aneurysm anatomy, details on treatment, pre/postoperative antibiotic treatment, and details on follow-up.

    CONCLUSIONS: This article emphasizes the need to standardize definition, terminology, and diagnostic criteria for mycotic aortic aneurysms and proposes reporting items enhancing comparability between studies.

  • 4.
    Toukhsati, S. R.
    et al.
    Federat Univ Australia, Australia; Univ Melbourne, Australia; Austin Hlth, Australia.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Australian Catholic Univ, Australia.
    Babu, A. S.
    Univ Melbourne, Australia; Austin Hlth, Australia; Manipal Acad Higher Educ, India.
    Driscoll, A.
    Austin Hlth, Australia; Deakin Univ, Australia.
    Hare, D. L.
    Univ Melbourne, Australia; Austin Hlth, Australia.
    Self-Care Interventions That Reduce Hospital Readmissions in Patients With Heart Failure; Towards the Identification of Change Agents2019In: Clinical Medicine Insights: Cardiology, ISSN 1179-5468, E-ISSN 1179-5468, Vol. 13Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unplanned hospital readmissions are the most important, preventable cost in heart failure (HF) health economics. Current professional guidelines recommend that patient self-care is an important means by which to reduce this burden. Patients with HF should be engaged in their care such as by detecting. monitoring, and managing their symptoms. A variety of educational and behavioural interventions have been designed and implemented by health care providers to encourage and support patient self-care. Meta-analyses support the use of self-care interventions to improve patient self-care and reduce hospital readmissions; however, efficacy is variable. The aim of this review was to explore methods to achieve greater clarity and consistency in the development and reporting of self-care interventions to enable change agents to be identified. We conclude that advancement in this field requires more explicit integration and reporting on the behaviour change theories that inform the design of self-care interventions and the selection of behaviour change techniques. The systematic application of validated checklists, such as the Theory Coding Scheme and the CALO-RE taxonomy, will improve the systematic testing and refinement of interventions to enable change agent/s to be identified and optimised.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf