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  • 1.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schröder, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Effectiveness of implementing a best practice primary healthcare model for low back pain (BetterBack) compared with current routine care in the Swedish context: an internal pilot study informed protocol for an effectiveness-implementation hybrid type 2 trial2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 4, article id e019906Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Low back pain (LBP) is a major health problem commonly requiring healthcare. In Sweden, there is a call from healthcare practitioners (HCPs) for the development, implementation and evaluation of a best practice primary healthcare model for LBP.

    Aims (1) To improve and understand the mechanisms underlying changes in HCP confidence, attitudes and beliefs for providing best practice coherent primary healthcare for patients with LBP; (2) to improve and understand the mechanisms underlying illness beliefs, self-care enablement, pain, disability and quality of life in patients with LBP; and (3) to evaluate a multifaceted and sustained implementation strategy and the cost-effectiveness of the BetterBack☺ model of care (MOC) for LBP from the perspective of the Swedish primary healthcare context.

    Methods This study is an effectiveness-implementation hybrid type 2 trial testing the hypothesised superiority of the BetterBack☺ MOC compared with current routine care. The trial involves simultaneous testing of MOC effects at the HCP, patient and implementation process levels. This involves a prospective cohort study investigating implementation at the HCP level and a patient-blinded, pragmatic, cluster, randomised controlled trial with longitudinal follow-up at 3, 6 and 12 months post baseline for effectiveness at the patient level. A parallel process and economic analysis from a healthcare sector perspective will also be performed. Patients will be allocated to routine care (control group) or the BetterBack☺ MOC (intervention group) according to a stepped cluster dogleg structure with two assessments in routine care. Experimental conditions will be compared and causal mediation analysis investigated. Qualitative HCP and patient experiences of the BetterBack☺ MOC will also be investigated.

    Dissemination The findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at national and international conferences. Further national dissemination and implementation in Sweden and associated national quality register data collection are potential future developments of the project.

  • 2.
    Addelyan Rasi, Hamideh
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Kent
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Moula, Alireza
    Department of Social and Psychological Studies, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Can a psychosocial intervention programme teaching coping strategies improve the quality of life of Iranian women?: A non-randomised quasi-experimental study2013In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 3, no 3, article id e002407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To assess whether a psychosocial intervention teaching coping strategies to women can improve quality of life (QOL) in groups of Iranian women exposed to social pressures. Design: Quasi-experimental non-randomised group design involving two categories of Iranian women, each category represented by non-equivalent intervention and comparison groups. Setting: A large urban area in Iran. Participants: 44 women; 25 single mothers and 19 newly married women. Interventions: Seventh-month psychosocial intervention aimed at providing coping strategies. Primary outcome measures: Effect sizes in four specific health-related domains and two overall perceptions of QOL and health measured by the WHOQOL-BREF instrument. Results: Large effect sizes were observed among the women exposed to the intervention in the WHOQOLBREF subdomains measuring physical health (r=0.68; p<0.001), psychological health (r=0.72; p<0.001), social relationships (r=0.52; p<0.01), environmental health (r=0.55; p<0.01) and in the overall perception of QOL (r=0.72; p<0.001); the effect size regarding overall perception of health was between small and medium (r=0.20; not significant). Small and not statistically significant effect sizes were observed in the women provided with traditional social welfare services. Conclusions: Teaching coping strategies can improve the QOL of women in societies where gender discrimination is prevalent. The findings require reproduction in studies with a more rigorous design before the intervention model can be recommended for widespread distribution.

  • 3.
    Addelyan Rasi, Hamideh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindqvist, Kent
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Moula, Alireza
    Department of Sociology & Social Work, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Can a psychosocial intervention programme teaching coping strategies improve the quality of life of Iranian women? A non-randomised quasi-experimental study2013In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 2407-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To assess whether a psychosocial intervention teaching coping strategies to women can improve quality of life (QOL) in groups of Iranian women exposed to social pressures.

    Design: Quasi-experimental nonrandomized group design involving two categories of Iranian women, each category represented by nonequivalent intervention and comparison groups.

    Setting: A large urban area in Iran.

    Participants: 44 women; 25 single mothers and 19 newly married women.

    Interventions: Seventh-month psychosocial intervention aimed at providing coping strategies.

    Primary outcome measures: Effect sizes in four specific health-related domains and two overall perceptions of QOL and health measured by the WHOQOL-BREF instrument.

    Results: Large effect sizes were observed among the women exposed to the intervention in the WHOQOL-BREF subdomains measuring physical health (r=0.68; p<0.001), psychological health (r=0.72; p<0.001), social relationships (r=0.52; p<0.01), environmental health (r=0.55; p<0.01), and in the overall perception of QOL (r=0.72; p<0.001); the effect size regarding overall perception of health was between small and medium (r=0.20; not significant). Small and not statistically significant effect sizes were observed in the women provided with traditional social welfare services.

    Conclusions: Teaching coping strategies can improve the QOL of women in societies where gender discrimination is prevalent. The findings require reproduction in studies with a more rigorous design before the intervention model can be recommended for widespread distribution.

  • 4.
    Alaie, Iman
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Philipson, Anna
    Orebro Univ, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Fac Med & Hlth, Orebro, Sweden.
    Ssegonja, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Hagberg, Lars
    Orebro Univ, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Fac Med & Hlth, Orebro, Sweden.
    Feldman, Inna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Sampaio, Filipa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Moller, Margareta
    Orebro Univ, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Fac Med & Hlth, Orebro, Sweden.
    Arinell, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Ramklint, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Päären, Aivar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Olsson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Bohman, Hannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Inst KIND, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Ctr Neurodev Disorders,Pediat Neuropsychiat Unit, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Cty Council, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uppsala Longitudinal Adolescent Depression Study (ULADS)2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 3, article id e024939Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To present the Uppsala Longitudinal Adolescent Depression Study, initiated in Uppsala, Sweden, in the early 1990s. The initial aim of this epidemiological investigation was to study the prevalence, characteristics and correlates of adolescent depression, and has subsequently expanded to include a broad range of social, economic and health-related long-term outcomes and cost-of-illness analyses.

    Participants: The source population was first-year students (aged 16-17) in upper-secondary schools in Uppsala during 1991-1992, of which 2300 (93%) were screened for depression. Adolescents with positive screening and sex/age-matched peers were invited to a comprehensive assessment. A total of 631 adolescents (78% females) completed this assessment, and 409 subsequently completed a 15year follow-up assessment. At both occasions, extensive information was collected on mental disorders, personality and psychosocial situation. Detailed social, economic and health-related data from 1993 onwards have recently been obtained from the Swedish national registries for 576 of the original participants and an age-matched reference population (N=200 000).

    Findings to date: The adolescent lifetime prevalence of a major depressive episode was estimated to be 11.4%. Recurrence in young adulthood was reported by the majority, with a particularly poor prognosis for those with a persistent depressive disorder or multiple somatic symptoms. Adolescent depression was also associated with an increased risk of other adversities in adulthood, including additional mental health conditions, low educational attainment and problems related to intimate relationships.

    Future plans: Longitudinal studies of adolescent depression are rare and must be responsibly managed and utilised. We therefore intend to follow the cohort continuously by means of registries. Currently, the participants are approaching mid-adulthood. At this stage, we are focusing on the overall long-term burden of adolescent depression. For this purpose, the research group has incorporated expertise in health economics. We would also welcome extended collaboration with researchers managing similar datasets.

  • 5.
    Alaie, Iman
    et al.
    Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Philipsson, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. University Health Care Research Centre.
    Ssegonja, Richard
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Child Health and Parenting (CHAP), Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hagberg, Lars
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. University Health Care Research Centre.
    Feldman, Inna
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Child Health and Parenting (CHAP), Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sampaio, Filipa
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Child Health and Parenting (CHAP), Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Möller, Margareta
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. University Health Care Research Centre.
    Arinell, Hans
    Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ramklint, Mia
    Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Päären, Aivar
    Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Olsson, Gunilla
    Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bohman, Hannes
    Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders at Karolinska Institutet (KIND), Pediatric Neuropsychiatry Unit, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Centre for Psychiatry Research, Stockholm Health Care Services, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uppsala Longitudinal Adolescent Depression Study (ULADS)2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 3, article id e024939Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To present the Uppsala Longitudinal Adolescent Depression Study, initiated in Uppsala, Sweden, in the early 1990s. The initial aim of this epidemiological investigation was to study the prevalence, characteristics and correlates of adolescent depression, and has subsequently expanded to include a broad range of social, economic and health-related long-term outcomes and cost-of-illness analyses.

    Participants: The source population was first-year students (aged 16-17) in upper-secondary schools in Uppsala during 1991-1992, of which 2300 (93%) were screened for depression. Adolescents with positive screening and sex/age-matched peers were invited to a comprehensive assessment. A total of 631 adolescents (78% females) completed this assessment, and 409 subsequently completed a 15year follow-up assessment. At both occasions, extensive information was collected on mental disorders, personality and psychosocial situation. Detailed social, economic and health-related data from 1993 onwards have recently been obtained from the Swedish national registries for 576 of the original participants and an age-matched reference population (N=200 000).

    Findings to date: The adolescent lifetime prevalence of a major depressive episode was estimated to be 11.4%. Recurrence in young adulthood was reported by the majority, with a particularly poor prognosis for those with a persistent depressive disorder or multiple somatic symptoms. Adolescent depression was also associated with an increased risk of other adversities in adulthood, including additional mental health conditions, low educational attainment and problems related to intimate relationships.

    Future plans: Longitudinal studies of adolescent depression are rare and must be responsibly managed and utilised. We therefore intend to follow the cohort continuously by means of registries. Currently, the participants are approaching mid-adulthood. At this stage, we are focusing on the overall long-term burden of adolescent depression. For this purpose, the research group has incorporated expertise in health economics. We would also welcome extended collaboration with researchers managing similar datasets.

  • 6.
    Alassaad, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Bertilsson, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Gillespie, Ulrika
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    A tool for prediction of risk of rehospitalisation and mortality in the hospitalised elderly: secondary analysis of clinical trial data2015In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 5, no 2, article id e007259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To construct and internally validate a risk score, the '80+ score', for revisits to hospital and mortality for older patients, incorporating aspects of pharmacotherapy. Our secondary aim was to compare the discriminatory ability of the score with that of three validated tools for measuring inappropriate prescribing: Screening Tool of Older Person's Prescriptions (STOPP), Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right Treatment (START) and Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI). Setting: Two acute internal medicine wards at Uppsala University hospital. Patient data were used from a randomised controlled trial investigating the effects of a comprehensive clinical pharmacist intervention. Participants: Data from 368 patients, aged 80 years and older, admitted to one of the study wards. Primary outcome measure: Time to rehospitalisation or death during the year after discharge from hospital. Candidate variables were selected among a large number of clinical and drug-specific variables. After a selection process, a score for risk estimation was constructed. The 80+ score was internally validated, and the discriminatory ability of the score and of STOPP, START and MAI was assessed using C-statistics. Results: Seven variables were selected. Impaired renal function, pulmonary disease, malignant disease, living in a nursing home, being prescribed an opioid or being prescribed a drug for peptic ulcer or gastroesophageal reflux disease were associated with an increased risk, while being prescribed an antidepressant drug (tricyclic antidepressants not included) was linked to a lower risk of the outcome. These variables made up the components of the 80+ score. The C-statistics were 0.71 (80+), 0.57 (STOPP), 0.54 (START) and 0.63 (MAI). Conclusions: We developed and internally validated a score for prediction of risk of rehospitalisation and mortality in hospitalised older people. The score discriminated risk better than available tools for inappropriate prescribing. Pending external validation, this score can aid in clinical identification of high-risk patients and targeting of interventions.

  • 7. Alemu, Yihun Mulugeta
    et al.
    Awoke, Worku
    Wilder-Smith, Annalies
    Institute of Public Health, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany; Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore.
    Determinants for tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults in Northwest Ethiopia: a multicentre case-control study2016In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, no 4, article id e009058Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to identify determinants for tuberculosis (TB) among HIV-infected adults in Northwest Ethiopia.

    DESIGN: Case-control study.

    SETTING: Three hospitals and 10 health centres in Northwest Ethiopia.

    PARTICIPANTS: A total of 446 individuals consented to participate in the study (150 cases and 296 controls). Cases were HIV-infected adults diagnosed with active TB, and controls were HIV-infected adults without active TB.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The link between TB and determinants was assessed using logistic regression. Determinants were categorised as sociodemographic, host-related, clinical and environmental.

    RESULTS: Smoking (adjusted OR (AOR) 5.47; 95% CI 2.26 to 13.22), presence of a TB patient in the family (AOR 2.66; 95% CI 1.25 to 5.66), alcohol consumption (AOR 2.49; 95% CI 1.29 to 4.80) and chewing khat (AOR 2.22; 95% CI 1.11 to 4.41) were independent determinants for increased occurrence of TB. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) (AOR 0.25; 95% CI 0.13 to 0.51), isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) (AOR 0.22; 95% CI 0.11 to 0.41) and cotrimoxazole preventive therapy (AOR 0.32; 95% CI 0.19 to 0.55) had a protective effect against TB.

    CONCLUSIONS: HIV-infected adults with substance abuse (tobacco smoking, khat chewing and alcohol) should be prioritised for TB screening. This study reaffirmed that HAART and IPT are some of the best strategies for reducing TB occurrence in HIV-infected adults. These findings provide impetus to intensify tracing of TB household contacts.

  • 8.
    Alinaghizadeh, Hassan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Wålinder, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Vingård, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Tondel, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Total cancer incidence in relation to 137Cs fallout in the most contaminated counties in Sweden after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident: a register-based study2016In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, no 12, article id e011924Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the total cancer incidence in relation to a 5-year exposure to caesium-137 ((137)Cs) from the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

    METHODS: A closed cohort was defined as all individuals living in the three most contaminated counties in mid-Sweden in 1986. Fallout of (137)Cs was retrieved as a digital map from the Geological Survey of Sweden, demographic data from Statistics Sweden, and cancer diagnosis from the National Board of Health and Welfare. Individuals were assigned an annual (137)Cs exposure based on their place of residence (1986-1990), from which 5-year cumulative (137)Cs exposures were calculated, accounting for the physical decay of (137)Cs and changing residencies. HRs were adjusted for age, sex, rural/non-rural residence and pre-Chernobyl total cancer incidence.

    RESULTS: The 734 537 people identified were categorised by exposure: the first quartile was low exposure (0.0-45.4 kBq/m(2)), the second and third quartiles were intermediate exposure (45.41-118.8 kBq/m(2)), and the fourth quartile was the highest exposure (118.81-564.71 kBq/m(2)). Between 1991 and 2010, 82 495 cancer cases were registered in the 3 counties. Adjusted HRs (95% CI) were 1.03 (1.01 to 1.05) for intermediate exposure and 1.05 (1.03 to 1.07) for the highest exposure compared to the reference exposure.

    CONCLUSIONS: We found a small overall exposure-response pattern of the total cancer incidence related to (137)Cs after adjustment for age, sex, rural residence and pre-Chernobyl cancer incidence.

  • 9.
    Almkvist, Ove
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Bosnes, Ole
    Bosnes, Ingunn
    Stordal, Eystein
    Selective impact of disease on short-term and long-term components of self-reported memory: a population-based HUNT study2017In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 5, article id e013586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Subjective memory is commonly considered to be a unidimensional measure. However, theories of performance-based memory suggest that subjective memory could be divided into more than one dimension. Objective: To divide subjective memory into theoretically related components of memory and explore the relationship to disease. Methods: In this study, various aspects of self-reported memory were studied with respect to demographics and diseases in the third wave of the HUNT epidemiological study in middle Norway. The study included all individuals 55 years of age or older, who responded to a nine-item questionnaire on subjective memory and questionnaires on health (n=18 633). Results: A principle component analysis of the memory items resulted in two memory components; the criterion used was an eigenvalue above 1, which accounted for 54% of the total variance. The components were interpreted as long-term memory (LTM; the first component; 43% of the total variance) and short-term memory (STM; the second component; 11% of the total variance). Memory impairment was significantly related to all diseases (except Bechterew's disease), most strongly to brain infarction, heart failure, diabetes, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and whiplash. For most diseases, the STM component was more affected than the LTM component; however, in cancer, the opposite pattern was seen. Conclusions: Subjective memory impairment as measured in HUNT contained two components, which were differentially associated with diseases.

  • 10.
    Altman, Maria
    et al.
    Dept of Medicine Solna, Clinical Epidemiological Unit, T2 Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Edstedt Bonamy, Anna-Karin
    Dept of Medicine Solna, Clinical Epidemiological Unit, T2 Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Cnattingius, Sven
    Dept of Medicine Solna, Clinical Epidemiological Unit, T2 Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cause-specific infant mortality in a population-based Swedish study of term and post-term births: the contribution of gestational age and birth weight2012In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 2, no 4, article id e001152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To investigate infant mortality and causes of infant death in relation to gestational age (GA) and birth weight for GA in non-malformed term and post-term infants.

    DESIGN:

    Observational, retrospective nationwide cohort study.

    SETTING:

    Sweden 1983-2006.

    PARTICIPANTS:

    2 152 738 singleton non-malformed infants born at 37 gestational weeks or later.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

    Infant, neonatal and postneonatal mortality and causes of infant death.

    RESULTS:

    Infant mortality rate was 0.12% (n=2687). Compared with infants born at 40 weeks, risk of infant mortality was increased among early term infants (37 weeks, adjusted OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.43 to 2.02). Compared with infants with normal birth weight for GA, very small for gestational age (SGA; <3rd percentile) infants faced a doubled risk of infant mortality (adjusted OR 2.13, 95% CI 1.80 to 2.53), and corresponding risk was also increased among moderately SGA infants (3rd to <10th percentile; adjusted OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.26 to 1.68). Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) was the most common cause of death, accounting for 39% of all infant mortality. Compared with birth at 40 weeks, birth at 37 weeks was associated with increased risks of death by infections, cardiovascular disorders, SIDS and malignant neoplasms. Very and moderately SGA were associated with increased risks of death by neonatal respiratory disorders, infections, cardiovascular disorders, SIDS and neuromuscular disorders. High birth weight for GA was associated with increased risks of death by asphyxia and malignant neoplasms.

    CONCLUSION:

    Early term birth and very to moderately low birth weight for GA are independent risk factors for infant mortality among non-malformed term infants.

  • 11. Aman, Malin
    et al.
    Forssblad, Magnus
    Henriksson-Larsén, Karin
    Insurance claims data: a possible solution for a national sports injury surveillance system? An evaluation of data information against ASIDD and consensus statements on sports injury surveillance2014In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 4, no 6, article id e005056Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Before preventive actions can be suggested for sports injuries at the national level, a solid surveillance system is required in order to study their epidemiology, risk factors and mechanisms. There are guidelines for sports injury data collection and classifications in the literature for that purpose. In Sweden, 90% of all athletes (57/70 sports federations) are insured with the same insurance company and data from their database could be a foundation for studies on acute sports injuries at the national level.

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the usefulness of sports injury insurance claims data in sports injury surveillance at the national level.

    METHOD: A database with 27 947 injuries was exported to an Excel file. Access to the corresponding text files was also obtained. Data were reviewed on available information, missing information and dropouts. Comparison with ASIDD (Australian Sports Injury Data Dictionary) and existing consensus statements in the literature (football (soccer), rugby union, tennis, cricket and thoroughbred horse racing) was performed in a structured manner.

    RESULT: Comparison with ASIDD showed that 93% of the suggested data items were present in the database to at least some extent. Compliance with the consensus statements was generally high (13/18). Almost all claims (83%) contained text information concerning the injury.

    CONCLUSIONS: Relatively high-quality sports injury data can be obtained from a specific insurance company at the national level in Sweden. The database has the potential to be a solid base for research on acute sports injuries in different sports at the national level.

  • 12. Amsberg, Susanne
    et al.
    Wijk, Ingrid
    Livheim, Fredrik
    Toft, Eva
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Anderbro, Therese
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for adult type 1 diabetes management: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 11, article id e022234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Integrating diabetes self-management into daily life involves a range of complex challenges for affected individuals. Environmental, social, behavioural and emotional psychological factors influence the lives of those with diabetes. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of a stress management group intervention based on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) among adults living with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes.

    Methods and analysis This study will use a randomised controlled trial design evaluating treatment as usual (TAU) and ACT versus TAU. The stress management group intervention will be based on ACT and comprises a programme divided into seven 2-hour sessions conducted over 14 weeks. A total of 70 patients who meet inclusion criteria will be recruited over a 2-year period with follow-up after 1, 2 and 5 years. The primary outcome measure will be HbA1c. The secondary outcome measures will be the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales, the Swedish version of the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey, the Swedish version of the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale, The Summary of Self-Care Activities, Acceptance Action Diabetes Questionnaire, Swedish Acceptance and Action Questionnaire and the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life. The questionnaires will be administered via the internet at baseline, after sessions 4 (study week 7) and 7 (study week 14), and 6, 12 and 24 months later, then finally after 5 years. HbA1c will be measured at the same time points. Assessment of intervention effect will be performed through the analysis of covariance. An intention-to-treat approach will be used. Mixed-model repeated measures will be applied to explore effect of intervention across all time points.

    Ethics and dissemination The study has received ethical approval (Dnr: 2016/14-31/1). The study findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications, conferences and reports to key stakeholders.

    Trial registration number NCT02914496; Pre-results.

  • 13.
    Amsberg, Susanne
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Wijk, Ingrid
    Sophiahemmet högskola.
    Livheim, Fredrik
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Toft, Eva
    Karolinska Institutet, Ersta sjukhus.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet högskola, Södersjukhuset.
    Anderbro, Therese
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholms universitet.
    Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for adult type 1 diabetes management: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 11, p. 1-8, article id e022234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Integrating diabetes self-management into daily life involves a range of complex challenges for affected individuals. Environmental, social, behavioural and emotional psychological factors influence the lives of those with diabetes. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of a stress management group intervention based on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) among adults living with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes.

    METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This study will use a randomised controlled trial design evaluating treatment as usual (TAU) and ACT versus TAU. The stress management group intervention will be based on ACT and comprises a programme divided into seven 2-hour sessions conducted over 14 weeks. A total of 70 patients who meet inclusion criteria will be recruited over a 2-year period with follow-up after 1, 2 and 5 years.The primary outcome measure will be HbA1c. The secondary outcome measures will be the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales, the Swedish version of the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey, the Swedish version of the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale, The Summary of Self-Care Activities, Acceptance Action Diabetes Questionnaire, Swedish Acceptance and Action Questionnaire and the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life. The questionnaires will be administered via the internet at baseline, after sessions 4 (study week 7) and 7 (study week 14), and 6, 12 and 24 months later, then finally after 5 years. HbA1c will be measured at the same time points.Assessment of intervention effect will be performed through the analysis of covariance. An intention-to-treat approach will be used. Mixed-model repeated measures will be applied to explore effect of intervention across all time points.

    ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study has received ethical approval (Dnr: 2016/14-31/1). The study findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications, conferences and reports to key stakeholders.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02914496; Pre-results.

  • 14. Amsberg, Susanne
    et al.
    Wijk, Ingrid
    Livheim, Fredrik
    Toft, Eva
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Anderbro, Therese
    Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for adult type 1 diabetes management: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 11, article id e022234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Integrating diabetes self-management into daily life involves a range of complex challenges for affected individuals. Environmental, social, behavioural and emotional psychological factors influence the lives of those with diabetes. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of a stress management group intervention based on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) among adults living with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes.

    METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This study will use a randomised controlled trial design evaluating treatment as usual (TAU) and ACT versus TAU. The stress management group intervention will be based on ACT and comprises a programme divided into seven 2-hour sessions conducted over 14 weeks. A total of 70 patients who meet inclusion criteria will be recruited over a 2-year period with follow-up after 1, 2 and 5 years.The primary outcome measure will be HbA1c. The secondary outcome measures will be the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales, the Swedish version of the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey, the Swedish version of the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale, The Summary of Self-Care Activities, Acceptance Action Diabetes Questionnaire, Swedish Acceptance and Action Questionnaire and the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life. The questionnaires will be administered via the internet at baseline, after sessions 4 (study week 7) and 7 (study week 14), and 6, 12 and 24 months later, then finally after 5 years. HbA1c will be measured at the same time points.Assessment of intervention effect will be performed through the analysis of covariance. An intention-to-treat approach will be used. Mixed-model repeated measures will be applied to explore effect of intervention across all time points.

    ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study has received ethical approval (Dnr: 2016/14-31/1). The study findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications, conferences and reports to key stakeholders.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02914496; Pre-results.

  • 15.
    Ander, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Wikman, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Ljótsson, Brjánn
    Karolinska Inst, Div Psychol, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grönqvist, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Ljungman, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Woodford, Joanne
    Univ Exeter, Coll Life & Environm Sci, CEDAR, Psychol, Exeter, Devon, England.
    Lindahl Norberg, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    von Essen, Louise
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Guided Internet-Administered Self-Help to Reduce Symptoms Of Anxiety and Depression Among Adolescents and Young Adults Diagnosed With Cancer During Adolescence (U-CARE: YoungCan): study protocol for a feasibility trial2017In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 1, article id e013906Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction A subgroup of adolescents and young adults diagnosed with cancer during adolescence reports elevated levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms and unmet needs for psychological support. Evidence-based psychological treatments tailored for this population are lacking. This protocol describes a feasibility study of a guided-internet-administered self-help programme (YoungCan) primarily targeting symptoms of anxiety and depression among young persons diagnosed with cancer during adolescence and of the planned study procedures for a future controlled trial. Methods/analysis The study is an uncontrolled feasibility trial with a pre-post and 3-month follow-up design. Potential participants aged 15-25years, diagnosed with cancer during adolescence, will be identified via the Swedish Childhood Cancer Registry. 30 participants will be included. Participants will receive YoungCan, a 12-week therapist-guided, internet-administered self-help programme consisting primarily of cognitive-behavioural therapy organised into individually assigned modules targeting depressive symptoms, worry and anxiety, body dissatisfaction and post-traumatic stress. Interactive peer support and psychoeducative functions are also available. Feasibility outcomes include: recruitment and eligibility criteria; data collection; attrition; resources needed to complete the study and programme; safety procedures; participants' and therapists' adherence to the programme; and participants' acceptability of the programme and study methodology. Additionally, mechanisms of impact will be explored and data regarding symptoms of anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress, body dissatisfaction, reactions to social interactions, quality of life, axis I diagnoses according to the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview and healthcare service use will be collected. Exploratory analyses of changes in targeted outcomes will be conducted. Ethics/dissemination This feasibility protocol was approved by the Regional Ethical Review Board in Uppsala, Sweden (ref: 2016/210). Findings will be disseminated to relevant research, clinical, health service and patient communities through publications in peer-reviewed and popular science journals and presentations at scientific and clinical conferences.

  • 16. Andersson, Ola
    et al.
    Hellstrom-Westas, Lena
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Elective caesarean: does delay in cord clamping for 30 s ensure sufficient iron stores at 4 months of age? A historical cohort control study2016In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, no 11, article id e012995Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare iron stores in infants born after elective caesarean section (CS) and a 30 s delay of umbilical cord clamping with those born vaginally after early (<= 10 s) or delayed (>= 180 s) cord clamping. Design: Prospective observational study with historical control. Setting: Swedish county hospital. Population: 64 infants born after elective CS were compared with a historical control of 166 early clamped and 168 delayed clamped after vaginal birth. Methods: Blood and iron status were measured in blood samples collected at birth, 48-96 hours after birth, 4 and 12 months of age. Primary and secondary outcome measures: Ferritin at 4 months of age was the primary outcome, second outcome measures were other indicators of iron status, and haemoglobin, at 4 and 12 months of age, as well as respiratory distress at 1 and 6 hours after birth. Results: At 4 months infants born by elective CS had better iron status than those born vaginally subjected to early cord clamping, shown by higher adjusted mean difference of ferritin concentration (39 mu g/L (95% CI 10 to 60)) and mean cell volume (1.8 fL (95% CI 0.6 to 3.0)); and lower levels of transferrin receptors (-0.39 mg/L (95% CI -0.69 to -0.08)). No differences were seen between infants born after elective CS and delayed clamped vaginally born infants at 4 months. No differences were found between groups at 12 months of age. Conclusions: Waiting to clamp the umbilical cord for 30 s after elective CS results in higher iron stores at 4 months of age compared with early cord clamping after vaginal birth, and seems to ensure iron status comparable with those achieved after 180 s delayed cord clamping after vaginal birth.

  • 17.
    Andersson, Ola
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Department of Research and Development, Region Halland, Sweden.
    Hellström-Westas, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Elective caesarean: does delay in cord clamping for 30 s ensure sufficient iron stores at 4 months of age? A historical cohort control study2016In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, no 11, article id e012995Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To compare iron stores in infants born after elective caesarean section (CS) and a 30 s delay of umbilical cord clamping with those born vaginally after early (≤10 s) or delayed (≥180 s) cord clamping.

    DESIGN: Prospective observational study with historical control.

    SETTING: Swedish county hospital.

    POPULATION: 64 infants born after elective CS were compared with a historical control of 166 early clamped and 168 delayed clamped after vaginal birth.

    METHODS: Blood and iron status were measured in blood samples collected at birth, 48-96 hours after birth, 4 and 12 months of age.

    PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Ferritin at 4 months of age was the primary outcome, second outcome measures were other indicators of iron status, and haemoglobin, at 4 and 12 months of age, as well as respiratory distress at 1 and 6 hours after birth.

    RESULTS: At 4 months infants born by elective CS had better iron status than those born vaginally subjected to early cord clamping, shown by higher adjusted mean difference of ferritin concentration (39 µg/L (95% CI 10 to 60)) and mean cell volume (1.8 fL (95% CI 0.6 to 3.0)); and lower levels of transferrin receptors (-0.39 mg/L (95% CI -0.69 to -0.08)). No differences were seen between infants born after elective CS and delayed clamped vaginally born infants at 4 months. No differences were found between groups at 12 months of age.

    CONCLUSIONS: Waiting to clamp the umbilical cord for 30 s after elective CS results in higher iron stores at 4 months of age compared with early cord clamping after vaginal birth, and seems to ensure iron status comparable with those achieved after 180 s delayed cord clamping after vaginal birth.

  • 18.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Div Nursing Sci, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Norrkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Paediat, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Blomqvist, Ylva Thernström
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Helmer, Charlotte Sahlen
    Linkoping Univ, Div Nursing Sci, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Norrkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Paediat, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Olsson, Emma
    Orebro Univ, Dept Pediat, Orebro, Sweden;Orebro Univ, Ctr Hlth Care Sci, Orebro, Sweden.
    Shorey, Shefaly
    Natl Univ Singapore, Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Yong Loo Lin Sch Med, Alice Lee Ctr Nursing Studies, Singapore, Singapore.
    Frostell, Anneli
    Linkoping Univ, Div Psychol, Dept Behav Sci & Learning, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linkoping Univ, Div Nursing Sci, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Norrkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Effect of skin-to-skin contact on parents' sleep quality, mood, parent-infant interaction and cortisol concentrations in neonatal care units: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 7, article id e021606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Separation after preterm birth is a major stressor for infants and parents. Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) is a method of care suitable to use in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to minimise separation between parents and infants. Less separation leads to increased possibilities for parent-infant interaction, provided that the parents' sleep quality is satisfactory. We aimed to evaluate the effect of continuous SSC on sleep quality and mood in parents of preterm infants born <33 weeks of gestation as well as the quality of parent-infant interaction and salivary cortisol concentrations at the time of discharge.

    Methods and analysis: A randomised intervention study with two arms-intervention versus standard care. Data will be collected from 50 families. Eligible families will be randomly allocated to intervention or standard care when transferred from the intensive care room to the family-room in the NICU. The intervention consists of continuous SSC for four consecutive days and nights in the family-room. Data will be collected every day during the intervention and again at the time of discharge from the hospital. Outcome measures comprise activity tracker (Actigraph); validated self-rated questionnaires concerning sleep, mood and bonding; observed scorings of parental sensitivity and emotional availability and salivary cortisol. Data will be analysed with pairwise, repeated measures, Mann Whitney U-test will be used to compare groups and analysis of variance will be used to adjust for different hospitals and parents' gender.

    Ethics and dissemination: The study is approved by the Regional Research Ethics Board at an appropriate university (2016/89-31). The results will be published in scientific journals. We will also use conferences and social media to disseminate our findings.

  • 19.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Department of Paediatrics, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Blomqvist, Ylva Thernström
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Helmer, Charlotte Sahlén
    Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Department of Paediatrics, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Olsson, Emma
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Pediatrics.
    Shorey, Shefaly
    Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore.
    Frostell, Anneli
    Division of Psychology, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Morelius, Evalotte
    Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Effect of skin-to-skin contact on parents' sleep quality, mood, parent-infant interaction and cortisol concentrations in neonatal care units: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 7, article id e021606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Separation after preterm birth is a major stressor for infants and parents. Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) is a method of care suitable to use in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to minimise separation between parents and infants. Less separation leads to increased possibilities for parent-infant interaction, provided that the parents' sleep quality is satisfactory. We aimed to evaluate the effect of continuous SSC on sleep quality and mood in parents of preterm infants born <33 weeks of gestation as well as the quality of parent-infant interaction and salivary cortisol concentrations at the time of discharge.

    Methods and analysis: A randomised intervention study with two arms-intervention versus standard care. Data will be collected from 50 families. Eligible families will be randomly allocated to intervention or standard care when transferred from the intensive care room to the family-room in the NICU. The intervention consists of continuous SSC for four consecutive days and nights in the family-room. Data will be collected every day during the intervention and again at the time of discharge from the hospital. Outcome measures comprise activity tracker (Actigraph); validated self-rated questionnaires concerning sleep, mood and bonding; observed scorings of parental sensitivity and emotional availability and salivary cortisol. Data will be analysed with pairwise, repeated measures, Mann Whitney U-test will be used to compare groups and analysis of variance will be used to adjust for different hospitals and parents' gender.

    Ethics and dissemination: The study is approved by the Regional Research Ethics Board at an appropriate university (2016/89-31). The results will be published in scientific journals. We will also use conferences and social media to disseminate our findings.

  • 20.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thernström Blomqvist, Ylva
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sahlén Helmer, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Olsson, Emma
    Department of Pediatrics and Centre for Health Care Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Shorey, Shefaly
    Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore.
    Frostell, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Effect of skin-to-skin contact on parents sleep quality, mood, parent-infant interaction and cortisol concentrations in neonatal care units: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 7, article id e021606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Separation after preterm birth is a major stressor for infants and parents. Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) is a method of care suitable to use in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to minimise separation between parents and infants. Less separation leads to increased possibilities for parent-infant interaction, provided that the parents’ sleep quality is satisfactory. We aimed to evaluate the effect of continuous SSC on sleep quality and mood in parents of preterm infants born <33 weeks of gestation as well as the quality of parent-infant interaction and salivary cortisol concentrations at the time of discharge.

    Methods and analysis A randomised intervention study with two arms—intervention versus standard care. Data will be collected from 50 families. Eligible families will be randomly allocated to intervention or standard care when transferred from the intensive care room to the family-room in the NICU. The intervention consists of continuous SSC for four consecutive days and nights in the family-room. Data will be collected every day during the intervention and again at the time of discharge from the hospital. Outcome measures comprise activity tracker (Actigraph); validated self-rated questionnaires concerning sleep, mood and bonding; observed scorings of parental sensitivity and emotional availability and salivary cortisol. Data will be analysed with pairwise, repeated measures, Mann Whitney U-test will be used to compare groups and analysis of variance will be used to adjust for different hospitals and parents’ gender.

    Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the Regional Research Ethics Board at an appropriate university (2016/89–31). The results will be published in scientific journals. We will also use conferences and social media to disseminate our findings.

  • 21. Arkema, Elizabeth V
    et al.
    Jönsen, Andreas
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Simard, Julia F
    Case definitions in Swedish register data to identify systemic lupus erythematosus2016In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, no 1, article id e007769Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To develop and investigate the utility of several different case definitions for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) using national register data in Sweden.

    METHODS: The reference standard consisted of clinically confirmed SLE cases pooled from four major clinical centres in Sweden (n=929), and a sample of non-SLE comparators randomly selected from the National Population Register (n=24 267). Demographics, comorbidities, prescriptions and autoimmune disease family history were obtained from multiple registers and linked to the reference standard. We first used previously published SLE definitions to create algorithms for SLE. We also used modern data mining techniques (penalised least absolute shrinkage and selection operator logistic regression, elastic net regression and classification trees) to objectively create data-driven case definitions. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for the case definitions identified.

    RESULTS: Defining SLE by using only hospitalisation data resulted in the lowest sensitivity (0.79). When SLE codes from the outpatient register were included, sensitivity and PPV increased (PPV between 0.97 and 0.98, sensitivity between 0.97 and 0.99). Addition of medication information did not greatly improve the algorithm's performance. The application of data mining methods did not yield different case definitions.

    CONCLUSIONS: The use of SLE International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes in outpatient clinics increased the accuracy for identifying individuals with SLE using Swedish registry data. This study implies that it is possible to use ICD codes from national registers to create a cohort of individuals with SLE.

  • 22.
    Arkema, Elizabeth V
    et al.
    1Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
    Jönsen, Andreas
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Department of Medical Sciences, Science for Life Laboratories, Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Simard, Julia F
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
    Case definitions in Swedish register data to identify systemic lupus erythematosus2016In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To develop and investigate the utility of several different case definitions for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) using national register data in Sweden.

    METHODS: The reference standard consisted of clinically confirmed SLE cases pooled from four major clinical centres in Sweden (n=929), and a sample of non-SLE comparators randomly selected from the National Population Register (n=24 267). Demographics, comorbidities, prescriptions and autoimmune disease family history were obtained from multiple registers and linked to the reference standard. We first used previously published SLE definitions to create algorithms for SLE. We also used modern data mining techniques (penalised least absolute shrinkage and selection operator logistic regression, elastic net regression and classification trees) to objectively create data-driven case definitions. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for the case definitions identified.

    RESULTS: Defining SLE by using only hospitalisation data resulted in the lowest sensitivity (0.79). When SLE codes from the outpatient register were included, sensitivity and PPV increased (PPV between 0.97 and 0.98, sensitivity between 0.97 and 0.99). Addition of medication information did not greatly improve the algorithm's performance. The application of data mining methods did not yield different case definitions.

    CONCLUSIONS: The use of SLE International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes in outpatient clinics increased the accuracy for identifying individuals with SLE using Swedish registry data. This study implies that it is possible to use ICD codes from national registers to create a cohort of individuals with SLE.

  • 23. Arnardottir, Erna Sif
    et al.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Bjornsdottir, Erla
    Benediktsdottir, Bryndis
    Juliusson, Sigurdur
    Kuna, Samuel T.
    Pack, Allan I.
    Gislason, Thorarinn
    Nocturnal sweating - a common symptom of obstructive sleep apnoea: the Icelandic sleep apnoea cohort2013In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 3, no 5, p. e002795-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To estimate the prevalence and characteristics of frequent nocturnal sweating in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) patients compared with the general population and evaluate the possible changes with positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment. Nocturnal sweating can be very bothersome to the patient and bed partner. Design: Case-control and longitudinal cohort study. Setting: Landspitali-The National University Hospital, Iceland. Participants: The Icelandic Sleep Apnea Cohort consisted of 822 untreated patients with OSA, referred for treatment with PAP. Of these, 700 patients were also assessed at a 2-year follow-up. The control group consisted of 703 randomly selected subjects from the general population. Intervention: PAP therapy in the OSA cohort. Main outcome measures: Subjective reporting of nocturnal sweating on a frequency scale of 1-5: (1) never or very seldom, (2) less than once a week, (3) once to twice a week, (4) 3-5 times a week and (5) every night or almost every night. Full PAP treatment was defined objectively as the use for = 4 h/day and = 5 days/week. Results: Frequent nocturnal sweating (= 3x a week) was reported by 30.6% of male and 33.3% of female OSA patients compared with 9.3% of men and 12.4% of women in the general population (p<0.001). This difference remained significant after adjustment for demographic factors. Nocturnal sweating was related to younger age, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, sleepiness and insomnia symptoms. The prevalence of frequent nocturnal sweating decreased with full PAP treatment (from 33.2% to 11.5%, p<0.003 compared with the change in non-users). Conclusions: The prevalence of frequent nocturnal sweating was threefold higher in untreated OSA patients than in the general population and decreased to general population levels with successful PAP therapy. Practitioners should consider the possibility of OSA in their patients who complain of nocturnal sweating.

  • 24.
    Arnetz, Bengt B.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Michigan State Univ, E Lansing, USA; Umea Univ, Umea, Sweden.
    Lewalski, Philip
    Wayne State Univ, Sch Med, Dept Emergency Med, Detroit, MI USA..
    Arnetz, Judy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Michigan State Univ, E Lansing, USA; Umea Univ, Umea, Sweden.
    Breejen, Karen
    Michigan State Univ, Coll Human Med, Dept Family Med, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA..
    Przyklenk, Karin
    Wayne State Univ, Sch Med, Dept Emergency Med, Detroit, MI USA.;Wayne State Univ, Sch Med, Cardiovasc Res Inst, Detroit, MI USA.;Wayne State Univ, Sch Med, Dept Physiol, Detroit, MI 48201 USA..
    Examining self-reported and biological stress and near misses among Emergency Medicine residents: a single-centre cross-sectional assessment in the USA2017In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 8, article id e016479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To examine the relationship between perceived and biological stress and near misses among Emergency Medicine residents. Design Self-rated stress and stress biomarkers were assessed in residents in Emergency Medicine before and after a day shift. The supervising physicians and residents reported numbers of near misses. Setting The study took place in the Emergency Department of a large trauma 1 centre, located in Detroit, USA. Participants Residents in Emergency Medicine volunteered to participate. The sample consisted of 32 residents, with complete data on 28 subjects. Residents' supervising physicians assessed the clinical performance of each resident. Primary and secondary outcome measures Participants' preshift and postshift stress, biological stress (salivary cortisol, plasma interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein), residents' and supervisors' reports of near misses, number of critically ill and patients with trauma seen during the shift. Results Residents' self-reported stress increased from an average preshift level of 2.79 of 10 (SD 1.81) to a postshift level of 5.82 (2.13) (p<0.001). Residents cared for an average of 2.32 (1.52) critically ill patients and 0.68 (1.06) patients with trauma. Residents reported a total of 7 near misses, compared with 11 reported by the supervising physicians. After controlling for baseline work-related exhaustion, residents that cared for more patients with trauma and had higher levels of TNF-a reported a higher frequency of near misses (R-2=0.72; p=0.001). Residents' preshift ratings of how stressful they expected the shift to be were related to the supervising physicians' ratings of residents' near misses during the shift. Conclusion Residents' own ratings of near misses were associated with residents' TNF-alpha, a biomarker of systemic inflammation and the number of patients with trauma seen during the shift. In contrast, supervisor reports on residents' near misses were related only to the residents' preshift expectations of how stressful the shift would be.

  • 25.
    Arnetz, Bengt B.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine. Department of Family Medicine, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, Michigan, USA; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lewalski, Philip
    Arnetz, Judy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine. Department of Family Medicine, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, Michigan, USA; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Breejen, Karen
    Przyklenk, Karin
    Examining self-reported and biological stress and near misses among Emergency Medicine residents: a single-centre cross-sectional assessment in the USA2017In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 8, article id e016479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To examine the relationship between perceived and biological stress and near misses among Emergency Medicine residents.

    Design: Self-rated stress and stress biomarkers were assessed in residents in Emergency Medicine before and after a day shift. The supervising physicians and residents reported numbers of near misses.

    Setting: The study took place in the Emergency Department of a large trauma 1 centre, located in Detroit, USA. Participants Residents in Emergency Medicine volunteered to participate. The sample consisted of 32 residents, with complete data on 28 subjects. Residents' supervising physicians assessed the clinical performance of each resident.

    Primary and secondary outcome measures: Participants' preshift and postshift stress, biological stress (salivary cortisol, plasma interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein), residents' and supervisors' reports of near misses, number of critically ill and patients with trauma seen during the shift.

    Results: Residents' self-reported stress increased from an average preshift level of 2.79 of 10 (SD 1.81) to a postshift level of 5.82 (2.13) (p<0.001). Residents cared for an average of 2.32 (1.52) critically ill patients and 0.68 (1.06) patients with trauma. Residents reported a total of 7 near misses, compared with 11 reported by the supervising physicians. After controlling for baseline work-related exhaustion, residents that cared for more patients with trauma and had higher levels of TNF-a reported a higher frequency of near misses (R-2=0.72; p=0.001). Residents' preshift ratings of how stressful they expected the shift to be were related to the supervising physicians' ratings of residents' near misses during the shift.

    Conclusion: Residents' own ratings of near misses were associated with residents' TNF-alpha, a biomarker of systemic inflammation and the number of patients with trauma seen during the shift. In contrast, supervisor reports on residents' near misses were related only to the residents' preshift expectations of how stressful the shift would be.

  • 26.
    Arnold, Samuel R. C.
    et al.
    Department of Developmental Disability Neuropsychiatry (3DN), UNSW Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
    Foley, Kitty-Rose
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Hwang, Ye In (Jane)
    Department of Developmental Disability Neuropsychiatry (3DN), UNSW Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
    Richdale, Amanda L.
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Uljarevic, Mirko
    Stanford Autism Center, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Stanford University.
    Lawson, Lauren P.
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Cai, Ru Ying
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Lennox, Nick
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Urbanowicz, Anna
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Trollor, Julian N.
    Department of Developmental Disability Neuropsychiatry (3DN), UNSW Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
    Cohort profile: The Australian Longitudinal Study of Adults with Autism2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Arumugam, Ashokan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Strong, Andrew
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Tengman, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Röijezon, Ulrik
    Häger, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Psychometric properties of knee proprioception tests targeting healthy individuals and those with anterior cruciate ligament injury managed with or without reconstruction: a systematic review protocol2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 4, article id e027241Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury affects knee proprioception and sensorimotor control and might contribute to an increased risk of a second ACL injury and secondary knee osteoarthritis. Therefore, there is a growing need for valid, reliable and responsive knee proprioception tests. No previous study has comprehensively reviewed all the relevant psychometric properties (PMPs) of these tests together. The aim of this review protocol is to narrate the steps involved in synthesising the evidence for the PMPs of specific knee proprioception tests among individuals with an ACL injury and knee-healthy controls.

    Methods and analysis: The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses will be followed to report the review. A combination of four conceptual groups of terms-(1) construct (knee proprioception), (2) target population (healthy individuals and those with an ACL injury managed conservatively or with a surgical reconstruction), (3) measurement instrument (specific knee proprioception tests) and (4) PMPs (reliability, validity and responsiveness)-will be used for electronic databases search. PubMed, AMED, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, Web of Science, Scopus, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and ProQuest will be searched from their inception to November 2018. Two reviewers will independently screen titles, abstracts and full text articles, extract data and perform risk of bias assessment using the updated COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments risk of bias checklist for the eligible studies. A narrative synthesis of the findings and a meta-analysis will be attempted as appropriate. Each PMP of knee proprioception tests will be classified as 'sufficient', 'indeterminate' or 'insufficient'. The overall level of evidence will be ascertained using an established set of criteria.

    Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval or patient consent is not required for a systematic review. The review findings will be submitted as a series of manuscripts for peer-review and publication in scientific journals.

  • 28.
    Arumugam, Ashokan
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation – Physiotherapy Section, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Strong, Andrew
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation – Physiotherapy Section, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Tengman, Eva
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation – Physiotherapy Section, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Röijezon, Ulrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Häger, Charlotte K
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation – Physiotherapy Section, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Psychometric properties of knee proprioception tests targeting healthy individuals and those with anterior cruciate ligament injury managed with or without reconstruction: a systematic review protocol2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 4, article id e02741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury affects knee proprioception and sensorimotor control and might contribute to an increased risk of a second ACL injury and secondary knee osteoarthritis. Therefore, there is a growing need for valid, reliable and responsive knee proprioception tests. No previous study has comprehensively reviewed all the relevant psychometric properties (PMPs) of these tests together. The aim of this review protocol is to narrate the steps involved in synthesising the evidence for the PMPs of specific knee proprioception tests among individuals with an ACL injury and knee-healthy controls.

  • 29.
    Askelöf, Ulrica
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Div Obstet & Gynecol, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Swedish Natl Umbil Cord Blood Bank, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Andersson, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Umea Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Unit Pediat, Umea, Sweden..
    Fasth, Anders
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Swedish Natl Umbil Cord Blood Bank, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Pediat, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Hallberg, Boubou
    Karolinska Inst, CLINTEC, Dept Neonatol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hellström-Westas, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Pettersson, Karin
    Karolinska Inst, Div Obstet & Gynecol, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Swedish Natl Umbil Cord Blood Bank, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Westgren, Magnus
    Karolinska Inst, Div Obstet & Gynecol, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Swedish Natl Umbil Cord Blood Bank, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Wiklund, Ingela E.
    Danderyd Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gotherstrom, Cecilia
    Karolinska Inst, Div Obstet & Gynecol, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Swedish Natl Umbil Cord Blood Bank, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Hematol & Regenerat Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wait a minute?: An observational cohort study comparing iron stores in healthy Swedish infants at 4 months of age after 10-, 60-and 180-second umbilical cord clamping2017In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 12, article id e017215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objective: Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a valuable stem cell source used for transplantation. Immediate umbilical cord (UC) clamping is widely practised, but delayed UC clamping is increasingly advocated to reduce possible infant anaemia. The aim of this study was to investigate an intermediate UC clamping time point and to evaluate iron status at the age of 4 months in infants who had the UC clamped after 60 s and compare the results with immediate and late UC clamping.

    Design: Prospective observational study with two historical controls.

    Setting: A university hospital in Stockholm, Sweden, and a county hospital in Halland, Sweden.

    Methods: Iron status was assessed at 4 months in 200 prospectively recruited term infants whose UC was clamped 60 s after birth. The newborn baby was held below the uterine level for the first 30 s before placing the infant on the mother’s abdomen for additional 30 s. The results were compared with data from a previously conducted randomised controlled trial including infants subjected to UC clamping at ≤10 s (n=200) or ≥180 s (n=200) after delivery.

    Results: After adjustment for age differences at the time of follow-up, serum ferritin concentrations were 77, 103 and 114 µg/L in the 10, 60 and 180 s groups, respectively. The adjusted ferritin concentration was significantly higher in the 60 s group compared with the 10 s group (P=0.002), while the difference between the 60 and 180 s groups was not significant (P=0.29).

    Conclusion: In this study of healthy term infants, 60 s UC clamping with 30 s lowering of the baby below the uterine level resulted in higher serum ferritin concentrations at 4 months compared with 10 s UC clamping. The results suggest that delaying the UC clamping for 60 s reduces the risk for iron deficiency.

  • 30. Askelöf, Ulrica
    et al.
    Andersson, Ola
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Fasth, Anders
    Hallberg, Boubou
    Hellström-Westas, Lena
    Pettersson, Karin
    Westgren, Magnus
    Wiklund, Ingela E.
    Götherström, Cecilia
    Wait a minute?: An observational cohort study comparing iron stores in healthy Swedish infants at 4 months of age after 10-, 60-and 180-second umbilical cord clamping2017In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 12, article id e017215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objective: Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a valuable stem cell source used for transplantation. Immediate umbilical cord (UC) clamping is widely practised, but delayed UC clamping is increasingly advocated to reduce possible infant anaemia. The aim of this study was to investigate an intermediate UC clamping time point and to evaluate iron status at the age of 4 months in infants who had the UC clamped after 60 s and compare the results with immediate and late UC clamping.

    Design: Prospective observational study with two historical controls.

    Setting: A university hospital in Stockholm, Sweden, and a county hospital in Halland, Sweden.

    Methods: Iron status was assessed at 4 months in 200 prospectively recruited term infants whose UC was clamped 60 s after birth. The newborn baby was held below the uterine level for the first 30 s before placing the infant on the mother's abdomen for additional 30 s. The results were compared with data from a previously conducted randomised controlled trial including infants subjected to UC clamping at <= 10 s (n= 200) or >= 180 s (n= 200) after delivery.

    Results: After adjustment for age differences at the time of follow- up, serum ferritin concentrations were 77, 103 and 114 mu g/L in the 10, 60 and 180 s groups, respectively. The adjusted ferritin concentration was significantly higher in the 60 s group compared with the 10 s group (P=0.002), while the difference between the 60 and 180 s groups was not significant (P=0.29).

    Conclusion: In this study of healthy term infants, 60 s UC clamping with 30 s lowering of the baby below the uterine level resulted in higher serum ferritin concentrations at 4 months compared with 10 s UC clamping. The results suggest that delaying the UC clamping for 60 s reduces the risk for iron deficiency.

  • 31. Astrom, Christofer
    et al.
    Orru, Hans
    Rocklov, Joacim
    Strandberg, Gustav
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Ebi, Kristie L.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Heat-related respiratory hospital admissions in Europe in a changing climate: a health impact assessment2013In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 3, no 1, article id e001842Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Respiratory diseases are ranked second in Europe in terms of mortality, prevalence and costs. Studies have shown that extreme heat has a large impact on mortality and morbidity, with a large relative increase for respiratory diseases. Expected increases in mean temperature and the number of extreme heat events over the coming decades due to climate change raise questions about the possible health impacts. We assess the number of heat-related respiratory hospital admissions in a future with a different climate. Design: A Europe-wide health impact assessment. Setting: An assessment for each of the EU27 countries. Methods: Heat-related hospital admissions under a changing climate are projected using multicity epidemiological exposure-response relationships applied to gridded population data and country-specific baseline respiratory hospital admission rates. Times-series of temperatures are simulated with a regional climate model based on four global climate models, under two greenhouse gas emission scenarios. Results: Between a reference period (1981-2010) and a future period (2021-2050), the total number of respiratory hospital admissions attributed to heat is projected to be larger in southern Europe, with three times more heat attributed respiratory hospital admissions in the future period. The smallest change was estimated in Eastern Europe with about a twofold increase. For all of Europe, the number of heat-related respiratory hospital admissions is projected to be 26 000 annually in the future period compared with 11 000 in the reference period. Conclusions: The results suggest that the projected effects of climate change on temperature and the number of extreme heat events could substantially influence respiratory morbidity across Europe.

  • 32.
    Atroshi, Isam
    et al.
    Hässleholm Hospital, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden .
    Strandberg, Emelie
    Hässleholm Hospital, Sweden.
    Lauritzson, Anna
    Hässleholm Hospital, Sweden.
    Ahlgren, Eva
    Hässleholm Hospital, Sweden.
    Waldén, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Hässleholm Hospital, Sweden.
    Costs for collagenase injections compared with fasciectomy in the treatment of Dupuytren's contracture: a retrospective cohort study2014In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 4, no 1, p. e004166-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    To compare collagenase injections and surgery (fasciectomy) for Dupuytren's contracture (DC) regarding actual total direct treatment costs and short-term outcomes.

    DESIGN:

    Retrospective cohort study.

    SETTING:

    Orthopaedic department of a regional hospital in Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS:

    Patients aged 65 years or older with previously untreated DC of 30° or greater in the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and/or proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints of the small, ring or middle finger. The collagenase group comprised 16 consecutive patients treated during the first 6 months following the introduction of collagenase as treatment for DC at the study centre. The controls were 16 patients randomly selected among those operated on with fasciectomy at the same centre during the preceding 3 years.

    INTERVENTIONS:

    Treatment with collagenase was given during two standard outpatient clinic visits (injection of 0.9 mg, distributed at multiple sites in a palpable cord, and next-day finger extension under local anaesthesia) followed by night-time splinting. Fasciectomy was carried out in the operating room (day surgery) under general or regional anaesthesia using standard technique, followed by therapy and splinting.

    PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES:

    Actual total direct costs (salaries of all medical personnel involved in care, medications, materials and other relevant costs), and total MCP and PIP extension deficit (degrees) measured by hand therapists at 6-12 weeks after the treatment.

    RESULTS:

    Collagenase injection required fewer hospital outpatient visits to a therapist and nurse than fasciectomy. Total treatment cost for collagenase injection was US$1418.04 and for fasciectomy US$2102.56. The post-treatment median (IQR) total extension deficit was 10 (0-30) for the collagenase group and 10 (0-34) for the fasciectomy group.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Treatment of DC with one collagenase injection costs 33% less than fasciectomy with equivalent efficacy at 6 weeks regarding reduction in contracture.

  • 33. Atzendorf, Josefine
    et al.
    Apfelbacher, Christian
    Gomes de Matos, Elena
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. IFT Institut für Therapieforschung, Germany; Eötvös-Loránd-Universität, Hungary.
    Piontek, Daniela
    Patterns of multiple lifestyle risk factors and their link to mental health in the German adult population: a cross-sectional study2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 12, article id e022184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Lifestyle risk factors, such as drinking or unhealthy diet, can expotentiate detrimental health effects. Therefore, it is important to investigate multiple lifestyle risk factors instead of single ones. The study aims at: (1) identifying patterns of lifestyle risk factors within the adult general population in Germany and (2) examining associations between the extracted patterns and external factors.

    Design Cross-sectional study.

    Setting General German adult population (aged 18–64 years).

    Participants Participants of the 2015 Epidemiological Survey of Substance Abuse (n=9204).

    Primary outcome measures Lifestyle risk factors (daily smoking, at-risk alcohol consumption, unhealthy diet, low physical activity, weekly use of pharmaceuticals, as well as consumption of cannabis and other illicit drugs).

    Results A latent class analysis was applied to identify patterns of lifestyle risk factors, and a multinomial logistic regression was carried out to examine associations between the extracted classes and external factors. A total of four classes were extracted which can be described as healthy lifestyle (58.5%), drinking lifestyle (24.4%), smoking lifestyle (15.4%) and a cumulate risk factors lifestyle (1.7%). Individuals who were male, at younger age and single as well as individuals with various mental health problems were more likely to show multiple lifestyle risk factors.

    Conclusions Healthcare professionals should be aware of correlations between different lifestyle risk factors as well as between lifestyle risk groups and mental health. Health promotion strategies should further focus especially on younger and single men.

    This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

  • 34. Barman, Malin
    et al.
    Murray, Fiona
    Bernardi, Angelina I.
    Broberg, Karin
    Bölte, Sven
    Hesselmar, Bill
    Jacobsson, Bo
    Jonsson, Karin
    Kippler, Maria
    Rabe, Hardis
    Ross, Alastair B.
    Sjöberg, Fei
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Vahter, Marie
    Wold, Agnes E.
    Sandberg, Ann-Sofie
    Sandin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics. Sunderby Research Unit, Region Norrbotten, Luleå, Sweden.
    Nutritional impact on Immunological maturation during Childhood in relation to the Environment (NICE): a prospective birth cohort in northern Sweden2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 10, article id e022013Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Prenatal and neonatal environmental factors, such as nutrition, microbes and toxicants, may affect health throughout life. Many diseases, such as allergy and impaired child development, may be programmed already in utero or during early infancy. Birth cohorts are important tools to study associations between early life exposure and disease risk. Here, we describe the study protocol of the prospective birth cohort, 'Nutritional impact on Immunological maturation during Childhood in relation to the Environment' (NICE). The primary aim of the NICE cohort is to clarify the effect of key environmental exposures-diet, microbes and environmental toxicants-during pregnancy and early childhood, on the maturation of the infant's immune system, including initiation of sensitisation and allergy as well as some secondary outcomes: infant growth, obesity, neurological development and oral health. Methods and analysis The NICE cohort will recruit about 650 families during mid-pregnancy. The principal inclusion criterion will be planned birth at the Sunderby Hospital in the north of Sweden, during 2015-2018. Questionnaires data and biological samples will be collected at 10 time-points, from pregnancy until the children reach 4 years of age. Samples will be collected primarily from mothers and children, and from fathers. Biological samples include blood, urine, placenta, breast milk, meconium, faeces, saliva and hair. Information regarding allergic heredity, diet, socioeconomic status, lifestyle including smoking, siblings, pet ownership, etc will be collected using questionnaires. Sensitisation to common allergens will be assessed by skin prick testing and allergic disease will be diagnosed by a paediatrician at 1 and 4 years of age. At 4 years of age, the children will also be examined regarding growth, neurobehavioural and neurophysiological status and oral health. Ethics and dissemination The NICE cohort has been approved by the Regional Ethical Review Board in Umea, Sweden (2013/18-31M). Results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals and communicated on scientific conferences.

  • 35. Bell, Katy J. L.
    et al.
    Beller, Elaine
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    McGeechan, Kevin
    Hayen, Andrew
    Irwig, Les
    Neal, Bruce
    Glasziou, Paul
    Ambulatory blood pressure adds little to Framingham Risk Score for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in older men: secondary analysis of observational study data2014In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 4, no 9, p. e006044-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To determine the incremental value of ambulatory blood pressure (BP) in predicting cardiovascular risk when the Framingham Risk Score (FRS) is known. Methods: We included 780 men without cardiovascular disease from the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men, all aged approximately 70 years at baseline. We first screened ambulatory systolic BP (ASBP) parameters for their incremental value by adding them to a model with 10-year FRS. For the best ASBP parameter we estimated HRs and changes in discrimination, calibration and reclassification. We also estimated the difference in the number of men started on treatment and in the number of men protected against a cardiovascular event. Results: Mean daytime ASBP had the highest incremental value; adding other parameters did not yield further improvements. While ASBP was an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, addition to FRS led to only small increases to the overall model fit, discrimination (a 1% increase in the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve), calibration and reclassification. We estimated that for every 10 000 men screened with ASBP, 141 fewer would start a new BP-lowering treatment (95% CI 62 to 220 less treated), but this would result in 7 fewer cardiovascular events prevented over the subsequent 10 years (95% CI 21 fewer events prevented to 7 more events prevented). Conclusions: In addition to a standard cardiovascular risk assessment it is not clear that ambulatory BP measurement provides further incremental value. The clinical role of ambulatory BP requires ongoing careful consideration.

  • 36.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lopez-Pelayo, Hugo
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Palacio-Vieira, Jorge
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Colom, Joan
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Gual, Antoni
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Wallace, Paul
    UCL, England.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Anderson, Peter
    Newcastle University, England; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Implementing referral to an electronic alcohol brief advice website in primary healthcare: results from the ODHIN implementation trial2016In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, no 6, article id e010271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The objective of the present study was to explore whether the possibility of offering facilitated access to an alcohol electronic brief intervention (eBI) instead of delivering brief face-to-face advice increased the proportion of consulting adults who were screened and given brief advice. Design The study was a 12-week implementation study. Sixty primary healthcare units (PHCUs) in 5 jurisdictions (Catalonia, England, the Netherlands, Poland and Sweden) were asked to screen adults who attended the PHCU for risky drinking. Setting A total of 120 primary healthcare centres from 5 jurisdictions in Europe. Participants 746 individual providers (general practitioners, nurses or other professionals) participated in the study. Primary outcome Change in the proportion of patients screened and referred to eBI comparing a baseline 4-week preimplementation period with a 12-week implementation period. Results The possibility of referring patients to the eBI was not found to be associated with any increase in the proportion of patients screened. However, it was associated with an increase in the proportion of screen-positive patients receiving brief advice from 70% to 80% for the screen-positive sample as a whole (pamp;lt;0.05), mainly driven by a significant increase in brief intervention rates in England from 87% to 96% (pamp;lt;0.01). The study indicated that staff displayed a low level of engagement in this new technology. Staff continued to offer face-to-face advice to a larger proportion of patients (54%) than referral to eBI (38%). In addition, low engagement was seen among the referred patients; on average, 18% of the patients logged on to the website with a mean log-on rate across the different countries between 0.58% and 36.95%. Conclusions Referral to eBI takes nearly as much time as brief oral advice and might require more introduction and training before staff are comfortable with referring to eBI.

  • 37. Bengtsson, Linus
    et al.
    Lu, Xin
    Liljeros, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. The Institute for Futures Studies, Sweden.
    Thanh, Hoang Huy
    Thorson, Anna
    Strong propensity for HIV transmission among men who have sex with men in Vietnam: behavioural data and sexual network modelling2014In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 4, no 1, article id e003526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Survey data from men who have sex with men (MSM) in Asian cities indicate ongoing and drastic increases in HIV prevalence. It is unknown which behavioural factors are most important in driving these epidemics. We aimed to analyse detailed sexual behaviour data among MSM in Vietnam and to model HIV transmission using improved assumptions on sexual network structure. Setting Vietnam. Participants Internet-using men who had ever had sex (any type) with a man, aged 18years and living in Vietnam. The study was cross-sectional, population-based and performed in 2012, using online respondent-driven sampling. The Internet-based survey instrument was completed by 982 participants, of which 857 were eligible. Questions included sociodemography and retrospective sexual behaviour, including number of unprotected anal sex (UAS) acts per partner. Primary and secondary outcome measures Estimated basic reproductive number over 3months as a function of transmission risk per UAS act; frequency distributions of number of UAS partners and UAS acts during last 3months. Results 36% (CI 32% to 42%) reported UAS at least once during the last 3months. 36% (CI 32% to 41%) had ever taken an HIV test and received the result. UAS partner numbers and number of UAS acts were both highly skewed and positively correlated. Using a weighted configuration model, taking into account partner numbers, frequency of UAS and their correlations, we estimated the basic reproductive number (R0) over 3months. The results indicated rapid transmission over a wide range of values of per-act transmissibility. Conclusions Men with multiple partners had unexpectedly high UAS frequency per partner, paired with low HIV testing rates. The study highlights the importance of collecting data on frequency of UAS acts and indicates the need to rapidly scale-up HIV prevention services and testing opportunities for MSM in Vietnam.

  • 38.
    Bergendahl, Sandra
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ankarcrona, Victoria
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Leijonhufvud, Asa
    Lund Univ, Clin Sci Helsingborg, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Hesselman, Susanne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Karlstrom, Sofie
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kallner, Helena Kopp
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wendel, Sophia Brismar
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lateral episiotomy versus no episiotomy to reduce obstetric anal sphincter injury in vacuum-assisted delivery in nulliparous women: study protocol on a randomised controlled trial2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 3, article id e025050Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASIS) occurs in 5%-7% of normal deliveries and increases with vacuum extraction (VE) to 12%-14% in nulliparous women in Sweden. Lateral/mediolateral episiotomy may reduce the prevalence of OASIS at VE in nulliparous women. The current use of episiotomy is restrictive. The protective effect and consequences are uncertain. This trial will investigate if lateral episiotomy can reduce the prevalence of OASIS and assess short-term and long-term effects. Methods and analysis This is a multicentre randomised controlled trial of lateral episiotomy versus no episiotomy in nulliparous women with a singleton, live fetus, after gestational week 34+0 with indication for VE. A lateral episiotomy of 4 cm is cut at crowning, 1-3 cm from the midline, at a 60 degrees angle. The primary outcome is OASIS by clinical diagnosis analysed according to intention to treat. To demonstrate a 50% reduction in OASIS prevalence (from 12.4% to 6.2%), 710 women will be randomised at a 1:1 ratio. Secondary outcomes are pain, blood loss, other perineal injuries, perineal complications, Apgar score, cord pH and neonatal complications. Web-based questionnaires at baseline, 2 months, 1 and 5 years will be used to assess pain, incontinence, prolapse, sexual function, quality of life and childbirth experience. A subset of women will receive follow-up by pelvic floor sonography and pelvic examination. Mode of delivery and recurrence of OASIS/episiotomy in subsequent pregnancies will be assessed at 5 and 10 years using register data. Ethics and dissemination The trial is open for enrolment. The trial has received ethical approval from the Regional Ethical Review Board of Stockholm and full funding from the Swedish Research Council. Women are interested in participation. The predominant restrictive view on episiotomy may limit recruitment. Results are of global interest and will be disseminated in peer-reviewed journals and at international congresses.

  • 39.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Lambe, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lüchtenborg, Margreet
    Linklater, Karen
    Peake, Michael D
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Møller, Henrik
    Social differences in lung cancer management and survival in South East England: a cohort study2012In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 2, no 3, p. e001048-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To examine possible social variations in lung cancer survival and assess if any such gradients can be attributed to social differences in comorbidity, stage at diagnosis or treatment.

    DESIGN:

    Population-based cohort identified in the Thames Cancer Registry.

    SETTING:

    South East England.

    PARTICIPANTS:

    15 582 lung cancer patients diagnosed between 2006 and 2008.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

    Stage at diagnosis, surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and survival.

    RESULTS:

    The likelihood of being diagnosed as having early-stage disease did not vary by socioeconomic quintiles (p=0.58). In early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer, the likelihood of undergoing surgery was lowest in the most deprived group. There were no socioeconomic differences in the likelihood of receiving radiotherapy in stage III disease, while in advanced disease and in small-cell lung cancer, receipt of chemotherapy differed over socioeconomic quintiles (p<0.01). In early-stage disease and following adjustment for confounders, the HR between the most deprived and the most affluent group was 1.24 (95% CI 0.98 to 1.56). Corresponding estimates in stage III and advanced disease or small-cell lung cancer were 1.16 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.34) and 1.12 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.20), respectively. In early-stage disease, the crude HR between the most deprived and the most affluent group was approximately 1.4 and constant through follow-up, while in patients with advanced disease or small-cell lung cancer, no difference was detectable after 3 months.

    CONCLUSION:

    We observed socioeconomic variations in management and survival in patients diagnosed as having lung cancer in South East England between 2006 and 2008, differences which could not fully be explained by social differences in stage at diagnosis, co-morbidity and treatment. The survival observed in the most affluent group should set the target for what is achievable for all lung cancer patients, managed in the same healthcare system.

  • 40.
    Bergström, Aileen
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Borell, Lena
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Evaluation of an intervention addressing a reablement programme for older, community-dwelling persons in Sweden (ASSIST 1.0): a protocol for a feasibility study2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 7, article id e025870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Older persons with functional limitations often need assistance from home care staff to thrive and continue to live in their home environments. Reablement, a proactive, preventative approach administered by home care staff, stimulating active engagement of the older person, is often recommended. Even though reablement has a potential to become a new rehabilitation model and has been implemented in different countries in various degrees, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the process of establishing reablement, the theoretical underpinnings and the conditionality and outcomes in different contexts. This knowledge is needed before fullscale recommendations can be made for implementation in specific contexts. Aim This study protocol aims to present a feasibility study of the intervention, ASSIST 1.0, a theory-based reablement programme, which includes coaching of home care staff and digitally based smart products, in a Swedish context. Methods and analysis This feasibility study will evaluate the perceived value and acceptability of ASSIST 1.0 intervention programme regarding fidelity, reach and dose, and potential outcomes by using a pretest and post-test design involving an intervention group and a control group (n=30) of older persons living at home, needing home care services. Qualitative interviews with home care staff delivering ASSIST and the older adults receiving the intervention as well as their significant others will be conducted to explore aspects affecting the intervention. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the regional ethics board. The results of the feasibility study will form the base for refinement of the ASSIST programme and for the subsequent planning of a full-scale randomised controlled trial investigating the effect of the programme on a larger scale. Dissemination will include peer-reviewed publications and presentations at national and international conferences as well as information to involved stakeholders.

  • 41.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    et al.
    Anglia Ruskin University, England.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Allen, Peter M.
    Anglia Ruskin University, England; Anglia Ruskin University, England.
    Baguley, David M.
    Anglia Ruskin University, England; Cambridge University Hospital NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for adults with tinnitus in the UK: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial2015In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 5, no 9, p. e008241-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Tinnitus is one of the most distressing hearing-related symptoms. Innovative ways of managing tinnitus distress and the related healthcare burden of treating tinnitus are required. An internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) intervention has been developed in Sweden to improve access to evidence-based tinnitus treatments. This study aims to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of iCBT in reducing the impact associated with tinnitus, in the UK. It, furthermore, aims to establish whether there are subgroups of tinnitus sufferers for whom this iCBT intervention may be more suitable. Methods and analysis: A two-armed randomised control trial-with a 1-year follow-up design-will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of iCBT on tinnitus distress. A delayed treatment design using a weekly check-in control group will be used. 70 participants will be randomly assigned to each group by an independent researcher by using a computer-generated randomisation schedule, and after being prestratified for age and tinnitus severity. They will undergo the iCBT e-health intervention online together with audiological therapeutic support. The main outcome measure is the Tinnitus Functional Index. Process evaluation of the intervention will also be conducted. Data analysis will be in accordance with Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials guidelines. Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval has been granted. If this intervention proves effective, it may be possible that at least some tinnitus sufferers can be managed though an iCBT e-learning treatment programme. This would be cost effective and potentially will free up services for those with more severe problems that need face-to-face treatment.

  • 42.
    Biswas, Animesh
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Centre for Injury Prevention and Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Rahman, Fazlur
    Centre for Injury Prevention and Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Eriksson, Charli
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Halim, Abdul
    Centre for Injury Prevention and Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Dalal, Koustuv
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Social Autopsy of maternal, neonatal deaths and stillbirths in rural Bangladesh: qualitative exploration of its effect and community acceptance2016In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, no 8, article id e010490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Social Autopsy (SA) is an innovative strategy where a trained facilitator leads community groups through a structured, standardised analysis of the physical, environmental, cultural and social factors contributing to a serious, non-fatal health event or death. The discussion stimulated by the formal process of SA determines the causes and suggests preventative measures that are appropriate and achievable in the community. Here we explored individual experiences of SA, including acceptance and participant learning, and its effect on rural communities in Bangladesh. The present study had explored the experiences gained while undertaking SA of maternal and neonatal deaths and stillbirths in rural Bangladesh.

    Design: Qualitative assessment of documents, observations, focus group discussions, group discussions and in-depth interviews by content and thematic analyses.

    Results: Each community's maternal and neonatal death was a unique, sad story. SA undertaken by government field-level health workers were well accepted by rural communities. SA had the capability to explore the social reasons behind the medical cause of the death without apportioning blame to any individual or group. SA was a useful instrument to raise awareness and encourage community responses to errors within the society that contributed to the death. People participating in SA showed commitment to future preventative measures and devised their own solutions for the future prevention of maternal and neonatal deaths.

    Conclusions: SA highlights societal errors and promotes discussion around maternal or newborn death. SA is an effective means to deliver important preventative messages and to sensitise the community to death issues. Importantly, the community itself is enabled to devise future strategies to avert future maternal and neonatal deaths in Bangladesh.

  • 43.
    Bjerre, Lise M.
    et al.
    Univ Ottawa, Dept Family Med, Ottawa, ON, Canada.;Bruyere Res Inst, Ottawa, ON, Canada.;ICES uOttawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada.;Univ Ottawa, Sch Epidemiol Publ Hlth & Prevent Med, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Ramsay, Timothy
    Univ Ottawa, Sch Epidemiol Publ Hlth & Prevent Med, Ottawa, ON, Canada.;Ottawa Hosp, Res Inst, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Cahir, Catriona
    Univ Dublin Trinity Coll, Econ & Social Res Inst, Dublin 2, Ireland..
    Ryan, Cristin
    Royal Coll Surgeons Ireland, Sch Pharm, Dublin 2, Ireland..
    Halil, Roland
    Univ Ottawa, Dept Family Med, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Farrell, Barbara
    Univ Ottawa, Dept Family Med, Ottawa, ON, Canada.;Bruyere Res Inst, Ottawa, ON, Canada.;Univ Waterloo, Sch Pharm, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada..
    Thavorn, Kednapa
    ICES uOttawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada.;Univ Ottawa, Sch Epidemiol Publ Hlth & Prevent Med, Ottawa, ON, Canada.;Ottawa Hosp, Res Inst, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Catley, Christina
    ICES uOttawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Hawken, Steven
    ICES uOttawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada.;Univ Ottawa, Sch Epidemiol Publ Hlth & Prevent Med, Ottawa, ON, Canada.;Ottawa Hosp, Res Inst, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Gillespie, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy.
    Manuel, Douglas G.
    Univ Ottawa, Dept Family Med, Ottawa, ON, Canada.;Bruyere Res Inst, Ottawa, ON, Canada.;ICES uOttawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada.;Univ Ottawa, Sch Epidemiol Publ Hlth & Prevent Med, Ottawa, ON, Canada.;Ottawa Hosp, Res Inst, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Assessing potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) and predicting patient outcomes in Ontario's older population: a population-based cohort study applying subsets of the STOPP/START and Beers' criteria in large health administrative databases2015In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 5, no 11, article id e010146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Adverse drug events (ADEs) are common in older people and contribute significantly to emergency department (ED) visits, unplanned hospitalisations, healthcare costs, morbidity and mortality. Many ADEs are avoidable if attention is directed towards identifying and preventing inappropriate drug use and undesirable drug combinations. Tools exist to identify potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) in clinical settings, but they are underused. Applying PIP assessment tools to population-wide health administrative data could provide an opportunity to assess the impact of PIP on individual patients as well as on the healthcare system. This would open new possibilities for interventions to monitor and optimise medication management on a broader, population-level scale. Methods and analysis: The aim of this study is to describe the occurrence of PIP in Ontario's older population (aged 65 years and older), and to assess the health outcomes and health system costs associated with PIP-more specifically, the association between PIP and the occurrence of ED visits, hospitalisations and death, and their related costs. This will be done within the framework of a population-based retrospective cohort study using Ontario's large health administrative and population databases. Eligible patients aged 66 years and older who were issued at least 1 prescription between 1 April 2003 and 31 March 2014 (approximately 2 million patients) will be included. Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval was obtained from the Ottawa Health Services Network Ethical Review Board and from the Bruyere Research Institute Ethics Review Board. Dissemination will occur via publication, presentation at national and international conferences, and ongoing exchanges with regional, provincial and national stakeholders, including the Ontario Drug Policy Research Network and the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care.

  • 44. Björk, Tabita
    et al.
    Brus, Ole
    Osika, Walter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Montgomery, Scott
    Laterality, hand control and scholastic performance: a British birth cohort study2012In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 2, no 2, p. e000314-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To use simple measures of laterality and hand control that can identify a greater risk of poorer scholastic ability, potentially signalling suboptimal hemispheric lateralisation.

    Design: Analysis of material from a birth cohort study.

    Setting: Members of the National Child Development Study, a British birth cohort study following people born in 1958.

    Participants: 10 612 children who undertook tests at age 11 years.

    Primary outcome measures: Teacher-administered tests of non-verbal general ability, verbal general ability, reading comprehension and mathematics. 

    Results Linear regression produced associations (and 95% CIs) with tests of verbal general ability, non-verbal general ability, reading comprehension and mathematics scores for the lowest third (compared with highest) of a left-hand control test involving picking up matches of −1.21 (−1.73 to −0.68; p<0.001), −0.72 (−1.14 to −0.29; p=0.001), −0.70 (−1.06 to −0.35; p<0.001) and −1.32 (−1.90 to −0.73; p<0.001). Among those in the lowest third of the right-hand control test score, mixed-handedness compared with right-handedness was associated with poorer scholastic performance, with regression coefficients (and 95% CIs; p values) of 1.90 (−3.01 to −0.80; p=0.001), −1.25 (−2.15 to −0.35; p=0.007), −1.28 (2.04 to −0.53; p=0.001) and −1.33 (−2.53 to −0.13; p=0.030). The estimates are for a point change in the scholastic test scores, after adjustment for sex, left-hand motor function and social class. Statistically significant associations with mixed-handedness were only observed for the lowest third of right-hand motor function.

    Conclusions Measures involving poorer left-hand motor function may represent useful markers of reduced cognitive function possibly reflecting suboptimal hemispheric lateralisation. Crude measures of laterality such as reported non-right-handedness may be more useful for research when combined with measures of motor function.                        

  • 45.
    Björk, Tabita
    et al.
    Psychiatric Research Centre, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brus, Ole
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Osika, Walter
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Montgomery, Scott M.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Primary Care and Public Health, Charing Cross Hospital, Imperial College, London, UK.
    Laterality, hand control and scholastic performance: a British birth cohort study2012In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 2, no 2, article id e000314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To use simple measures of laterality and hand control that can identify a greater risk of poorer scholastic ability, potentially signalling suboptimal hemispheric lateralisation.

    Design: Analysis of material from a birth cohort study.

    Setting: Members of the National Child Development Study, a British birth cohort study following people born in 1958.

    Participants: 10 612 children who undertook tests at age 11 years.

    Primary outcome measures: Teacher-administered tests of non-verbal general ability, verbal general ability, reading comprehension and mathematics.

    Results: Linear regression produced associations (and 95% CIs) with tests of verbal general ability, non-verbal general ability, reading comprehension and mathematics scores for the lowest third (compared with highest) of a left-hand control test involving picking up matches of -1.21 (-1.73 to -0.68; p<0.001), -0.72 (-1.14 to -0.29; p=0.001), -0.70 (-1.06 to -0.35; p<0.001) and -1.32 (-1.90 to -0.73; p<0.001). Among those in the lowest third of the right-hand control test score, mixed-handedness compared with right-handedness was associated with poorer scholastic performance, with regression coefficients (and 95% CIs; p values) of 1.90 (-3.01 to -0.80; p=0.001), -1.25 (-2.15 to -0.35; p=0.007), -1.28 (2.04 to -0.53; p=0.001) and -1.33 (-2.53 to -0.13; p=0.030). The estimates are for a point change in the scholastic test scores, after adjustment for sex, left-hand motor function and social class. Statistically significant associations with mixed-handedness were only observed for the lowest third of right-hand motor function.

    Conclusions: Measures involving poorer left-hand motor function may represent useful markers of reduced cognitive function possibly reflecting suboptimal hemispheric lateralisation. Crude measures of laterality such as reported non-right-handedness may be more useful for research when combined with measures of motor function.

  • 46. Björkenstam, Charlotte
    et al.
    Orellana, Cecilia
    László, Krisztina D
    Svedberg, Pia
    Voss, Margaretha
    Lidwall, Ulrik
    Lindfors, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Sickness absence and disability pension before and after first childbirth and in nulliparous women: longitudinal analyses of three cohorts in Sweden2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 9, article id e031593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Childbirth is suggested to be associated with elevated levels of sickness absence (SA) and disability pension (DP). However, detailed knowledge about SA/DP patterns around childbirth is lacking. We aimed to compare SA/DP across different time periods among women according to their childbirth status.

    Design Register-based longitudinal cohort study.

    Setting Sweden.

    Participants Three population-based cohorts of nulliparous women aged 18–39 years, living in Sweden 31 December 1994, 1999 or 2004 (nearly 500 000/cohort).

    Primary and secondary outcome measures Sum of SA >14 and DP net days/year.

    Methods We compared crude and standardised mean SA and DP days/year during the 3 years preceding and the 3 years after first childbirth date (Y−3 to Y+3), among women having (1) their first and only birth during the subsequent 3 years (B1), (2) their first birth and at least another delivery (B1+), and (3) no childbirths during follow-up (B0).

    Results Despite an increase in SA in the year preceding the first childbirth, women in the B1 group, and especially in B1+, tended to have fewer SA/DP days throughout the years than women in the B0 group. For cohort 2005, the mean SA/DP days/year (95% CIs) in the B0, B1 and B1+ groups were for Y−3: 25.3 (24.9–25.7), 14.5 (13.6–15.5) and 8.5 (7.9–9.2); Y−2: 27.5 (27.1–27.9), 16.6 (15.5–17.6) and 9.6 (8.9–10.4); Y−1: 29.2 (28.8–29.6), 31.4 (30.2–32.6) and 22.0 (21.2–22.9); Y+1: 30.2 (29.8–30.7), 11.2 (10.4–12.1) and 5.5 (5.0–6.1); Y+2: 31.7 (31.3–32.1), 15.3 (14.2–16.3) and 10.9 (10.3–11.6); Y+3: 32.3 (31.9–32.7), 18.1 (17.0–19.3) and 12.4 (11.7–13.0), respectively. These patterns were the same in all three cohorts.

    Conclusions Women with more than one childbirth had fewer SA/DP days/year compared with women with one childbirth or with no births. Women who did not give birth had markedly more DP days than those giving birth, suggesting a health selection into childbirth.

  • 47. Björkenstam, Emma
    et al.
    Ljung, Rickard
    Burström, Bo
    Mittendorfer-Rutz, Ellenor
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Weitoft, Gunilla Ringbäck
    Quality of medical care and excess mortality in psychiatric patients: a nationwide register-based study in Sweden2012In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 2, no 1, p. e000778-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To assess overall and cause-specific mortality and the quality of somatic care among psychiatric patients.

    DESIGN: A register-based cohort study.

    SETTING: All individuals aged 20-79 years in Sweden in 2005.

    PARTICIPANTS: In total 6 294 339 individuals.

    PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURE: The individuals were followed for mortality in 2006 and 2007, generating 72 187 deaths. Psychiatric patients were grouped according to their diagnosis in the National Patient Register. Mortality risk of psychiatric patients was compared with that of non-psychiatric patients. Estimates of RR of mortality were calculated as incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% CIs using Poisson regression analysis. Psychiatric patients were compared with non-psychiatric patients for three healthcare quality indicators: the proportion of avoidable hospitalisations, case death rate after myocardial infarction and statin use among diabetic patients.

    RESULTS: Compared with individuals with no episodes of treatment for mental disorder, psychiatric patients had a substantially increased risk of all studied causes of death as well as death from conditions considered amenable to intervention by the health service, that is, avoidable mortality. The highest mortality was found among those with another mental disorder, predominantly substance abuse (for women, an IRR of 4.7 (95% CI 4.3 to 5.0) and for men, an IRR of 4.8 (95% CI 4.6 to 5.0)). The analysis of quality of somatic care revealed lower levels of healthcare quality for psychiatric patients, signalling failures in public health and medical care.

    CONCLUSION: This study shows a marked increase in excess mortality, suggesting a lower quality of somatic healthcare in psychiatric patients.

  • 48.
    Blom, Mathias Carl
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ashfaq, Awais
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research. Halland Hospital, Region Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Pinheiro Sant'Anna, Anita
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Anderson, Philip D.
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA & Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
    Lingman, Markus
    Halland Hospital, Region Halland, Sweden & Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine/Cardiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Training machine learning models to predict 30-day mortality in patients discharged from the emergency department: a retrospective, population based registry study2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 8, article id e028015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Aggressive treatment at end-of-life (EOL) can be traumatic to patients and may not add clinical benefit. Absent an accurate prognosis of death, individual level biases may prevent timely discussions about the scope of EOL care and patients are at risk of being subject to care against their desire. The aim of this work is to develop predictive algorithms for identifying patients at EOL, with clinically meaningful discriminatory power.

    Methods: Retrospective, population-based study of patients utilizing emergency departments (EDs) in Sweden, Europe. Electronic health records (EHRs) were used to train supervised learning algorithms to predict all-cause mortality within 30 days following ED discharge. Algorithm performance was validated out of sample on EHRs from a separate hospital, to which the algorithms were previously unexposed.

    Results: Of 65,776 visits in the development set, 136 (0.21%) experienced the outcome. The algorithm with highest discrimination attained ROC-AUC 0.945 (95% CI 0.933 - 0.956), with sensitivity 0.869 (95% CI 0.802, 0.931) and specificity 0.858 (0.855, 0.860) on the validation set.

    Conclusions: Multiple algorithms displayed excellent discrimination and outperformed available indexes for short-term mortality prediction. The practical utility of the algorithms increases as the required data were captured electronically and did not require de novo data collection.

    Trial registration number: Not applicable.

  • 49.
    Blomberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Birch Tyrberg, Rasmus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Impact of maternal age on obstetric and neonatal outcome with emphasis on primiparous adolescents and older women: a Swedish Medical Birth Register Study2014In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 4, no 11, p. e005840-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To evaluate the associations between maternal age and obstetric and neonatal outcomes in primiparous women with emphasis on teenagers and older women. Design: A population-based cohort study. Setting: The Swedish Medical Birth Register. Participants: Primiparous women with singleton births from 1992 through 2010 (N=798 674) were divided into seven age groups: less than17 years, 17-19 years and an additional five 5-year classes. The reference group consisted of the women aged 25-29 years. Primary outcome: Obstetric and neonatal outcome. Results: The teenager groups had significantly more vaginal births (adjusted OR (aOR) 2.04 (1.79 to 2.32) and 1.95 (1.88 to 2.02) for age less than17 years and 1719 years, respectively); fewer caesarean sections (aOR 0.57 (0.48 to 0.67) and 0.55 (0.53 to 0.58)), and instrumental vaginal births (aOR 0.43 (0.36 to 0.52) and 0.50 (0.48 to 0.53)) compared with the reference group. The opposite was found among older women reaching a fourfold increased OR for caesarean section. The teenagers showed no increased risk of adverse neonatal outcome but presented an increased risk of prematurity less than32 weeks (aOR 1.66 (1.10 to 2.51) and 1.20 (1.04 to 1.38)). Women with advancing age (greater than= 30 years) revealed significantly increased risk of prematurity, perineal lacerations, preeclampsia, abruption, placenta previa, postpartum haemorrhage and unfavourable neonatal outcomes compared with the reference group. Conclusions: For clinicians counselling young women it is of importance to highlight the obstetrically positive consequences that fewer maternal complications and favourable neonatal outcomes are expected. The results imply that there is a need for individualising antenatal surveillance programmes and obstetric care based on age grouping in order to attempt to improve the outcomes in the age groups with less favourable obstetric and neonatal outcomes. Such changes in surveillance programmes and obstetric interventions need to be evaluated in further studies.

  • 50.
    Blomstedt, Yulia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Norberg, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Nyström, Lennarth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lönnberg, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Impact of a combined community and primary care prevention strategy on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality: a cohort analysis based on 1 million person-years of follow-up in Västerbotten County, Sweden, during 1990-20062015In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 5, no 12, article id e009651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of the Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) by comparing all eligible individuals (target group impact) according to the intention-to-treat principle and VIP participants with the general Swedish population.

    DESIGN: Dynamic cohort study.

    SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: All individuals aged 40, 50 or 60 years, residing in Västerbotten County, Sweden, between 1990 and 2006 (N=101 918) were followed from their first opportunity to participate in the VIP until age 75, study end point or prior death.

    INTERVENTION: The VIP is a systematic, long-term, county-wide cardiovascular disease (CVD) intervention that is performed within the primary healthcare setting and combines individual and population approaches. The core component is a health dialogue based on a physical examination and a comprehensive questionnaire at the ages of 40, 50 and 60 years.

    PRIMARY OUTCOMES: All-cause and CVD mortality.

    RESULTS: For the target group, there were 5646 deaths observed over 1 054 607 person-years. Compared to Sweden at large, the standardised all-cause mortality ratio was 90.6% (95% CI 88.2% to 93.0%): for women 87.9% (95% CI 84.1% to 91.7%) and for men 92.2% (95% CI 89.2% to 95.3%). For CVD, the ratio was 95.0% (95% CI 90.7% to 99.4%): for women 90.4% (95% CI 82.6% to 98.7%) and for men 96.8% (95% CI 91.7 to 102.0). For participants, subject to further impact as well as selection, when compared to Sweden at large, the standardised all-cause mortality ratio was 66.3% (95% CI 63.7% to 69.0%), whereas the CVD ratio was 68.9% (95% CI 64.2% to 73.9%). For the target group as well as for the participants, standardised mortality ratios for all-cause mortality were reduced within all educational strata.

    CONCLUSIONS: The study suggests that the VIP model of CVD prevention is able to impact on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality when evaluated according to the intention-to-treat principle.

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